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  • 1.
    Andersson, Jonas
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine, Medicine.
    Inflammation and lifestyle in cardiovascular medicine2010Doctoral thesis, comprehensive summary (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Despite major advances in the treatment and prevention of atherosclerosis the last several decades, cardiovascular disease still accounts for the majority of deaths in Sweden. With the population getting older, more obese and with rising numbers of diabetics, the cardiovascular disease burden may increase further in the future.

    The focus in cardiovascular disease has shifted with time from calcification and narrowing of arteries to the biological processes within the atherosclerotic plaque. C-reactive protein (CRP) has emerged as one of many proteins that reflect a low grade systemic inflammation and is suitable for analysis as it is more stable and easily measured than most other inflammatory markers. Several large prospective studies have shown that CRP is not only an inflammatory marker, but even a predictive marker for cardiovascular disease. C-reactive protein is associated with several other risk factors for cardiovascular disease including obesity and the metabolic syndrome.

    Our study of twenty healthy men during a two week endurance cross country skiing tour demonstrated a decline in already low baseline CRP levels immediately after the tour and six weeks later.

    In a study of 200 obese individuals with impaired glucose tolerance randomised to a counselling session at their health care centre or a one month stay at a wellness centre, we found decreased levels of CRP in subjects admitted to the wellness centre. The effect remained at one, but not after three years of follow-up.

    In a prospective, nested, case-referent study with 308 ischemic strokes, 61 intracerebral haemorrhages and 735 matched referents, CRP was associated with ischemic stroke in both uni- and multivariate analyses. No association was found with intracerebral haemorrhages. When classifying ischemic stroke according to TOAST criteria, CRP was associated with small vessel disease. The CRP 1444 (CC/CT vs. TT) polymorphism was associated with plasma levels of CRP, but neither with ischemic stroke nor with intracerebral haemorrhage.

    A study on 129 patients with atrial fibrillation was used to evaluate whether inflammation sensitive fibrinolytic variables adjusted for CRP could predict recurrence of atrial fibrillation after electrical cardioversion. In multivariate iv models, lower PAI-1 mass was associated with sinus rhythm even after adjusting for CRP and markers of the metabolic syndrome.

    In conclusion, lifestyle intervention can be used to reduce CRP levels, but it remains a challenge to maintain this effect. CRP is a marker of ischemic stroke, but there are no significant associations between the CRP1444 polymorphism and any stroke subtype, suggesting that the CRP relationship with ischemic stroke is not causal. The fibrinolytic variable, PAI-1, is associated with the risk of recurrence of atrial fibrillation after electrical cardioversion after adjustment for CRP. Our findings suggest a pathophysiological link between atrial fibrillation and PAI-1, but the relation to inflammation remains unclear.

  • 2.
    Andersson, Jonas
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine, Medicine.
    Almroth, Henrik
    Höglund, Niklas
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine, Cardiology.
    Jensen, Steen
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine, Cardiology.
    Tornvall, Per
    Englund, Anders
    Rosenqvist, Mårten
    Boman, Kurt
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine, Medicine.
    Markers of fibrinolysis as predictors for maintenance of sinus rhythm after electrical cardioversion2011In: Thrombosis Research, ISSN 0049-3848, E-ISSN 1879-2472, Vol. 127, no 3, p. 189-192Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    No fibrinolytic component alone was found to be a predictor of recurrence of atrial fibrillation. In multivariate models lower PAI-1 mass was associated with sinus rhythm even after adjusting for CRP, markers of the metabolic syndrome and treatment with atorvastatin. Our findings suggest a patophysiological link between AF and PAI-1 mass but the relation to inflammation remains unclear.

  • 3.
    Andersson, Jonas
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine, Medicine.
    Boman, Kurt
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine, Medicine.
    Jansson, Jan-Håkan
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine, Medicine.
    Nilsson, Torbjørn K
    Lindahl, Bernt
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine, Occupational and Environmental Medicine.
    Effect of intensive lifestyle intervention on C-reactive protein in subjects with impaired glucose tolerance and obesity: results from a randomized controlled trial with 5-year follow-up2008In: Biomarkers: biochemical indicators of exposure, response, and susceptibility to chemicals, ISSN 1366-5804, Vol. 13, no 7, p. 671-679Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    C-reactive protein (CRP) is a marker of metabolic and cardiovascular disease. To study the effects of lifestyle on CRP in a high-risk population we conducted a randomized controlled trial on 200 obese subjects (BMI > 27 kg m(-2)) with impaired glucose tolerance recruited from primary care settings. They were randomized to either a 1-month stay at a wellness centre focusing on diet, exercise and stress management (intervention group) or 30-60 min of oral and written information on lifestyle intervention (control group). A significant reduction of CRP was observed after 1 month and 1 year in the intervention group. They reduced their CRP levels more than the control group 1 year after intervention (p=0.004). In conclusion lifestyle intervention can decrease CRP in obese individuals with impaired glucose tolerance for up to 1 year. Further research is needed to evaluate whether the CRP level reduction translates into a decreased risk for cardiovascular morbidity.

  • 4.
    Andersson, Jonas
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine, Medicine.
    Jansson, Jan-Håkan
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine, Medicine.
    Hellsten, Gideon
    Nilsson, Torbjörn K
    Hallmans, Göran
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine, Nutritional Research.
    Boman, Kurt
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine, Medicine.
    Effects of heavy endurance physical exercise on inflammatory markers in non-athletes2010In: Atherosclerosis, ISSN 0021-9150, E-ISSN 1879-1484, Vol. 209, no 2, p. 601-605Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    OBJECTIVES: Physical activity has beneficial effects on cardiovascular disease but the mechanisms are still somewhat unclear. One possible pathway may be through the anti-inflammatory effects attributed to regular physical activity. Our primary aim was to study the effects of endurance physical exercise on C-reactive protein (CRP), Interleukin-6 (IL-6), Tumor Necrosis Factor-alpha (TNFalpha) during the acute and recovery phases. Secondarily, we studied the impact of diet on these inflammatory markers.

    METHODS: Twenty men, aged 18-55 years, participated in a 14 days cross-country skiing tour. They traveled 12-30km per day corresponding to about 10h of heavy physical activity. The participants were randomized to a diet with either 30 or 40% of energy derived from fat. Inflammatory variables were analysed at week 0, after 1 and 2 weeks and during the recovery phase at week 6 and 8.

    RESULTS: CRP and TNFalpha increased significantly during the two weeks of exercise (1.4-5.0mg/l, p=0.00 and 6.8-8.4pg/ml, p=0.00). CRP levels were significantly lower during recovery (median 0.7mg/l) compared to baseline (median 1.4mg/l) and did not correlate to metabolic variables. There were no significant changes in IL-6 levels during the study period. For dietary groups significant CRP changes were observed only in the high fat group during recovery.

    CONCLUSIONS: CRP and TNFalpha increased significantly but reacted differently during heavy physical activity while there seemed to be no significant changes in IL-6. No significant differences regarding inflammatory variables were found between the dietary groups.

  • 5.
    Andersson, Jonas
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine, Medicine.
    Johansson, Lars
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine, Medicine.
    Ladenvall, Per
    Wiklund, Per-Gunnar
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine, Medicine.
    Stegmayr, Birgitta
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine, Medicine.
    Jern, Christina
    Boman, Kurt
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine, Medicine.
    C-reactive protein is a determinant of first-ever stroke: prospective nested case-referent study2009In: Cerebrovascular Diseases, ISSN 1015-9770, E-ISSN 1421-9786, Vol. 27, no 6, p. 544-551Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    BACKGROUND AND PURPOSE: C-reactive protein (CRP) is a determinant of stroke, but there are no prospective studies on CRP and first ischemic stroke divided into etiologic subtypes. Our primary aim was to study CRP as a determinant of ischemic stroke, classified according to Trial of ORG 10172 in Acute Stroke Treatment (TOAST) criteria, and intracerebral hemorrhage (ICH) in a prospective study. A secondary aim was to study the relationship between the 1444C>T polymorphism, plasma levels of CRP and stroke.

    METHODS: The study was a prospective population-based case-referent study nested within the Northern Sweden Cohorts. We defined 308 cases of ischemic stroke and 61 ICH. Two controls for each case were defined from the same cohort.

    RESULTS: The OR for the highest (>3 mg/l) versus lowest group (<1 mg/l) of CRP was 2.58 (95% CI 1.74-3.84) for ischemic stroke and 1.63 (95% CI 0.67-3.93) for ICH. In a multivariate model including traditional risk factors, CRP remained associated with ischemic stroke (OR 2.06; 95% CI 1.29-3.29). Small-vessel disease was associated with CRP in the multivariate model (OR 3.88; 95% CI 1.10-13.7). The CRP 1444 (CC/CT vs. TT) polymorphism was associated with plasma levels of CRP but neither with ischemic stroke nor with ICH.

    CONCLUSIONS: This prospective population-based study shows that CRP is significantly associated with the risk of having a first ischemic stroke, especially for small-vessel disease. No significant associations were found between the CRP 1444C>T polymorphism and any stroke subtype.

  • 6.
    Andersson, Jonas
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine, Medicine.
    Rosenqvist, Mårten
    Tornvall, Per
    Boman, Kurt
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine, Medicine.
    NT-proBNP predicts maintenance of sinus rhythm after electrical cardioversion.2015In: Thrombosis Research, ISSN 0049-3848, E-ISSN 1879-2472, Vol. 135, no 2, p. 289-291Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    BACKGROUND: Atrial fibrillation (AF) is the most common arrhythmia. NT-proBNP is a fragment of the prohormone brain natriuretic peptide. Previous studies indicate that increased levels of NT-proBNP are associated with higher recurrence rates of AF after electrical cardioversion. Our null hypothesis was that NT-proBNP does not predict recurrence of AF after restoration of sinus rhythm.

    METHODS: We performed a hypothesis generating study within a double-blinded, placebo-controlled, randomized, prospective multicentre study of the effects of atorvastatin on recurrence of AF after electrical cardioversion. 199 patients with persistent AF and an indication for cardioversion were included in the present substudy. NT-proBNP was assessed prior to cardioversion. Cardioversion was performed according to local standard clinical practice on an elective outpatient basis. Patients were followed-up one month after cardioversion.

    RESULTS: 181 patients had a successful cardioversion and 91 of the study group remained in sinus rhythm at day 30. Recurrence of AF was observed in 108 patients at day 30. An optimal cutpoint for NT-proBNP at 500 ng/L predicted recurrence of AF after cardioversion (OR 2.94; 95% CI 1.30-6.63). In multivariate analysis adjusting for age, sex, hypertension, and treatment group strengthened the results (OR 3,56; 95% CI 1,44-8,81). When analysing the ROC curve of NT-proBNP in baseline and atrial fibrillation at day 30 the result was 0.57.

    CONCLUSION: NT-proBNP levels are a predictor of recurrence of AF 30 days after cardioversion. ROC curves indicates that the practical value of NT-proBNP for the individual patient is limited.

  • 7.
    Andersson, Jonas
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine, Medicine.
    Wennberg, Patrik
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine, Family Medicine.
    Lundblad, Dan
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine, Medicine.
    Escher, Stefan A
    Jansson, Jan-Håkan
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine, Medicine.
    Diabetes mellitus, high BMI and low education level predict sudden cardiac death within 24 hours of incident myocardial infarction2016In: European Journal of Preventive Cardiology, ISSN 2047-4873, E-ISSN 2047-4881, Vol. 23, no 17, p. 1814-1820Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    BACKGROUND: More than half of cardiovascular mortality occurs outside the hospital, mainly due to consistently low survival rates from out-of-hospital cardiac arrest.

    METHODS: This is a prospective, nested, case-control study derived from the Västerbotten Intervention Programme and the World Health Organization's Multinational Monitoring of Trends and Determinants in Cardiovascular Disease study in northern Sweden (1986-2006). To determine predictors for sudden cardiac death risk factors for cardiovascular disease were compared between incident myocardial infarction with sudden cardiac death (n = 363) and survivors of incident myocardial infarction (n = 1998) using multivariate logistic regression analysis.

    RESULTS: Diabetes had the strongest association with sudden cardiac death out of all evaluated risk factors (odds ratio (OR) 1.83, 95% confidence interval (CI) 1.30-2.59), followed by low education (OR 1.55, 95% CI 1.19-2.01), high body mass index (OR 1.05, 95% CI 1.02-1.08) and male sex (OR 1.42, 95% CI 1.001-2.01).

    CONCLUSIONS: The pattern of risk factors for incident myocardial infarction is different among survivors and those who die within 24 hours. The risk factors that contribute the most to death within 24 hours are diabetes mellitus, high body mass index and low education level, and can be addressed at both the public health level and by general practitioners.

  • 8.
    Bodén, Stina
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Radiation Sciences, Oncology.
    Wennberg, Maria
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine, Nutritional Research.
    Van Guelpen, Bethany
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Radiation Sciences, Oncology.
    Johansson, Ingegerd
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine, Nutritional Research.
    Lindahl, Bernt
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine, Occupational and Environmental Medicine.
    Andersson, Jonas
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine, Medicine.
    Shivappa, Nitin
    Hebert, James R
    Nilsson, Lena Maria
    Umeå University, Arctic Research Centre at Umeå University. Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine, Nutritional Research.
    Dietary inflammatory index and risk of first myocardial infarction: a prospective population-based study2017In: Nutrition Journal, ISSN 1475-2891, E-ISSN 1475-2891, Vol. 16, article id 21Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    BACKGROUND: Chronic, low-grade inflammation is an established risk factor for cardiovascular disease. The inflammatory impact of diet can be reflected by concentrations of inflammatory markers in the bloodstream and the inflammatory potential of diet can be estimated by the dietary inflammatory index (DII(TM)), which has been associated with cardiovascular disease risk in some previous studies. We aimed to examine the association between the DII and the risk of first myocardial infarction (MI) in a population-based study with long follow-up.

    METHOD: We conducted a prospective case-control study of 1389 verified cases of first MI and 5555 matched controls nested within the population-based cohorts of the Northern Sweden Health and Disease Study (NSHDS), of which the largest is the ongoing Västerbotten Intervention Programme (VIP) with nearly 100 000 participants during the study period. Median follow-up from recruitment to MI diagnosis was 6.4 years (6.2 for men and 7.2 for women). DII scores were derived from a validated food frequency questionnaire (FFQ) administered in 1986-2006. Multivariable conditional logistic regression models were used to estimate odds ratios (OR) and 95% confidence intervals (CI), using quartile 1 (most anti-inflammatory diet) as the reference category. For validation, general linear models were used to estimate the association between the DII scores and two inflammatory markers, high-sensitivity C-reactive protein (hsCRP) and interleukin 6 (IL-6) in a subset (n = 605) of the study population.

    RESULTS: Male participants with the most pro-inflammatory DII scores had an increased risk of MI [ORQ4vsQ1 = 1.57 (95% CI 1.21-2.02) P trend = 0.02], which was essentially unchanged after adjustment for potential confounders, including cardiovascular risk factors [ORQ4vsQ1 = 1.50 (95% CI 1.14-1.99), P trend = 0.10]. No association was found between DII and MI in women. An increase of one DII score unit was associated with 9% higher hsCRP (95% CI 0.03-0.14) and 6% higher IL-6 (95% CI 0.02-0.11) in 605 controls with biomarker data available.

    CONCLUSION: A pro-inflammatory diet was associated with an elevated risk of first myocardial infarction in men; whereas for women the relationship was null. Consideration of the inflammatory impact of diet could improve prevention of cardiovascular disease.

  • 9.
    Boman, Kurt
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine, Medicine.
    Boman, Jenny Hernestål
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine, Medicine.
    Andersson, Jonas
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine, Medicine.
    Olofsson, Mona
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine, Medicine.
    Dahlöf, Björn
    Effects of atenolol or losartan on fibrinolysis and von Willebrand factor in hypertensive patients with left ventricular hypertrophy.2010In: Clinical and applied thrombosis/hemostasis, ISSN 1076-0296, E-ISSN 1938-2723, Vol. 16, no 2, p. 146-152Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    OBJECTIVES: To compare the effects of the beta-blocker atenolol with the angiotensin receptor blocker (ARB) losartan on plasma tissue-type plasminogen activator (tPA) activity and mass concentration, plasminogen activator inhibitor-1 (PAI-1) activity, tPA/PAI-1 complex, and von Willebrand factor (VWF). DESIGN: A prespecified, explorative substudy in 22 patients with hypertension and left ventricular hypertrophy (LVH) performed within randomized multicenter, double-blind prospective study. RESULTS: After a median of 36 weeks of treatment, there were significant differences between the treatment groups, atenolol versus losartan, in plasma median levels of tPA mass (11.9 vs 7.3 ng/mL, P = .019), PAI-1 activity (20.7 vs 4.8 IU/mL, P = .030), and tPA/PAI-1 complex (7.1 vs 2.5 ng/mL, P = .015). In patients treated with atenolol, median levels of tPA mass (8.9-11.9 ng/mL, P = .021) and VWF (113.5%-134.3%, P = .021) increased significantly, indicating a change toward a more prothrombotic state. No significant changes occurred in the losartan group. CONCLUSION: Losartan treatment was associated with preserved fibrinolytic balance compared to a more prothrombotic fibrinolytic and hemostatic state in the atenolol group. These findings suggest different fibrinolytic and hemostatic responses to treatment in hypertensive patients with LVH.

  • 10.
    Höglund, Niklas
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine, Cardiology.
    Andersson, Jonas
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine, Cardiology.
    Almroth, Henrik
    Tornvall, Per
    Englund, Anders
    Rosenqvist, Marten
    Jensen, Steen M.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine, Cardiology.
    Boman, Kurt
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine, Medicine.
    The predictive value of C-reactive protein on recurrence of atrial fibrillation after cardioversion with or without treatment with atorvastatin2013In: International Journal of Cardiology, ISSN 0167-5273, E-ISSN 1874-1754, Vol. 167, no 5, p. 2088-2091Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: The aim of this study was to investigate whether high-sensitivity C-reactive protein (hsCRP) levels prior to cardioversion (CV) predict recurrence of atrial fibrillation (AF) in patients randomized to treatment with either atorvastatin or placebo 30 and 180 days after CV. Methods: This was a prespecified substudy of 128 patients with persistent AF randomized to treatment with atorvastatin 80 mg/day or placebo, initiated 14 days before CV, and continued 30 days after CV. HsCRP levels were measured at randomization, at the time of CV, and 2 days and 30 days after CV. Results: In univariate analysis of those who were in sinus rhythm 2 h after CV, hsCRP did not significantly (odds ratio [OR] 1.11, 95% confidence interval [CI] 0.99-1.25) predict recurrence of AF at 30 days. However, after adjusting for treatment with atorvastatin, hsCRP predicted the recurrence of AF (OR 1.14, 95% CI 1.01-1.27). In a multivariate logistic regression analysis with gender, age, body mass index (BMI), smoking, cholesterol, and treatment with atorvastatin as covariates, the association was still significant (OR 1.14, 95% CI 1.01-1.29). Six months after CV, hsCRP at randomization predicted recurrence of AF in both univariate analysis (OR 1.30, 95% CI 1.06-1.60) and in multivariate logistic regression analysis (OR 1.33, 95% CI 1.06-1.67). Conclusion: HsCRP was associated with AF recurrence one and six months after successful CV of persistent AF. However, the association at one month was significant only after adjusting for atorvastatin treatment.

  • 11.
    Johansson, Cecilia
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine, Section of Medicine.
    Dahlqvist, Erik
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine, Section of Medicine.
    Andersson, Jonas
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine, Section of Medicine.
    Jansson, Jan-Håkan
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine, Section of Medicine.
    Johansson, Lars
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine, Section of Medicine.
    Incidence, type of atrial fibrillation and risk factors for stroke: a population-based cohort study2017In: Clinical Epidemiology, ISSN 1179-1349, E-ISSN 1179-1349, Vol. 9, p. 53-62Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Purpose: The aims of this study were to estimate the incidence of atrial fibrillation and atrial flutter (AF), to assess the presence of provoking factors and risk factors for stroke and systemic embolism, and to determine the type of AF in patients with first-diagnosed AF. Patients and methods: This cohort study was performed in northern Sweden between January 1, 2011 and December 31, 2012. Diagnosis registries were searched for the International Classification of Diseases-10 code for AF (I48) to identify cases of incident AF. All AF diagnoses were electrocardiogram-verified. Data pertaining to provoking factors, type of AF and presence of risk factors for stroke and systemic embolism according to the CHA(2)DS(2)-VASc score were obtained from medical records. Results: The incidence of AF in the entire population was 4.0 per 1,000 person-years. The incidence was 27.5 per 1,000 person-years in patients aged >= 80 years. A total of 21% of all patients had a provoking factor in association with the first-diagnosed episode of AF. The CHA(2)DS(2)-VASc score was 2 or higher in 81% of the patients. Permanent AF was the most common type of AF (29%). Conclusion: There was a considerable increase in the incidence of AF with age, and a provoking factor was found in one-fifth. The most common type of AF was permanent AF. Four in five patients had a CHA(2)DS(2)-VASc score of 2 or more.

  • 12. Key, Timothy J.
    et al.
    Appleby, Paul N.
    Bradbury, Kathryn E.
    Sweeting, Michael
    Wood, Angela
    Johansson, Ingegerd
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Odontology.
    Kühn, Tilman
    Steur, Marinka
    Weiderpass, Elisabete
    Wennberg, Maria
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine, Nutritional Research.
    Würtz, Anne Mette Lund
    Agudo, Antonio
    Andersson, Jonas
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine, Section of Medicine.
    Arriola, Larraitz
    Boeing, Heiner
    Boer, Jolanda M. A.
    Bonnet, Fabrice
    Boutron-Ruault, Marie-Christine
    Cross, Amanda J.
    Ericson, Ulrika
    Fagherazzi, Guy
    Ferrari, Pietro
    Gunter, Marc
    Huerta, José María
    Katzke, Verena
    Khaw, Kay-Tee
    Krogh, Vittorio
    La Vecchia, Carlo
    Matullo, Giuseppe
    Moreno-Iribas, Conchi
    Naska, Androniki
    Nilsson, Lena Maria
    Umeå University, Arctic Research Centre at Umeå University.
    Olsen, Anja
    Overvad, Kim
    Palli, Domenico
    Panico, Salvatore
    Molina-Portillo, Elena
    Quirós, J. Ramón
    Skeie, Guri
    Sluijs, Ivonne
    Sonestedt, Emily
    Stepien, Magdalena
    Tjønneland, Anne
    Trichopoulou, Antonia
    Tumino, Rosario
    Tzoulaki, Ioanna
    van der Schouw, Yvonne T.
    Verschuren, W. M. Monique
    Di Angelantonio, Emanuele
    Langenberg, Claudia
    Forouhi, Nita
    Wareham, Nick
    Butterworth, Adam
    Riboli, Elio
    Danesh, John
    Consumption of Meat, Fish, Dairy Products, Eggs and Risk of Ischemic Heart Disease: A Prospective Study of 7198 Incident Cases Among 409,885 Participants in the Pan-European EPIC Cohort2019In: Circulation, ISSN 0009-7322, E-ISSN 1524-4539, Vol. 139, no 25, p. 2835-2845Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    BACKGROUND: There is uncertainty about the relevance of animal foods to the etiology of ischemic heart disease (IHD). We examined meat, fish, dairy products and eggs and risk for IHD in the pan-European EPIC cohort.

    METHODS: A prospective study of 409,885 men and women in nine European countries. Diet was assessed using validated questionnaires, calibrated using 24-hour recalls. Lipids and blood pressure were measured in a subsample. During 12.6 years mean follow up, 7198 participants had a myocardial infarction or died from IHD. The relationships of animal foods with risk were examined using Cox regression with adjustment for other animal foods and relevant covariates.

    RESULTS: The hazard ratio (HR) for IHD was 1.19 (95% CI 1.06-1.33) for a 100 g/d increment in intake of red and processed meat, and this remained significant after excluding the first 4 years of follow-up (HR 1.25 [1.09-1.42]). Risk was inversely associated with intakes of yogurt (HR 0.93 [0.89-0.98] per 100 g/d increment), cheese (HR 0.92 [0.86-0.98] per 30 g/d increment) and eggs (HR 0.93 [0.88-0.99] per 20 g/d increment); the associations with yogurt and eggs were attenuated and non-significant after excluding the first 4 years of follow-up. Risk was not significantly associated with intakes of poultry, fish or milk. In analyses modelling dietary substitutions, replacement of 100 kcal/d from red and processed meat with 100 kcal/d from fatty fish, yogurt, cheese or eggs was associated with approximately 20% lower risk of IHD. Consumption of red and processed meat was positively associated with serum non-HDL cholesterol concentration and systolic blood pressure, and consumption of cheese was inversely associated with serum non-HDL cholesterol.

    CONCLUSIONS: Risk for IHD was positively associated with consumption of red and processed meat, and inversely associated with consumption of yogurt, cheese and eggs, although the associations with yogurt and eggs may be influenced by reverse causation bias. It is not clear whether the associations with red and processed meat and cheese reflect causality, but they were consistent with the associations of these foods with plasma non-HDL cholesterol, and for red and processed meat with systolic blood pressure, which could mediate such effects.

  • 13. Willeit, Peter
    et al.
    Kaptoge, Stephen
    Welsh, Paul
    Butterworth, Adam S.
    Chowdhury, Rajiv
    Spackman, Sarah A.
    Pennells, Lisa
    Gao, Pei
    Burgess, Stephen
    Freitag, Daniel F.
    Sweeting, Michael
    Wood, Angela M.
    Cook, Nancy R.
    Judd, Suzanne
    Trompet, Stella
    Nambi, Vijay
    Olsen, Michael Hecht
    Everett, Brendan M.
    Kee, Frank
    Arnlov, Johan
    Salomaa, Veikko
    Levy, Daniel
    Kauhanen, Jussi
    Laukkanen, Jari A.
    Kavousi, Maryam
    Ninomiya, Toshiharu
    Casas, Juan-Pablo
    Daniels, Lori B.
    Lind, Lars
    Kistorp, Caroline N.
    Rosenberg, Jens
    Mueller, Thomas
    Rubattu, Speranza
    Panagiotakos, Demosthenes B.
    Franco, Oscar H.
    de Lemos, James A.
    Luchner, Andreas
    Kizer, Jorge R.
    Kiechl, Stefan
    Salonen, Jukka T.
    Wannamethee, S. Goya
    de Boer, Rudolf A.
    Nordestgaard, Borge G.
    Andersson, Jonas
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine, Medicine.
    Jorgensen, Torben
    Melander, Olle
    Ballantyne, Christie M.
    DeFilippi, Christopher
    Ridker, Paul M.
    Cushman, Mary
    Rosamond, Wayne D.
    Thompson, Simon G.
    Gudnason, Vilmundur
    Sattar, Naveed
    Danesh, John
    Di Angelantonio, Emanuele
    Natriuretic peptides and integrated risk assessment for cardiovascular disease: an individual-participant-data meta-analysis2016In: The Lancet Diabetes and Endocrinology, ISSN 2213-8587, E-ISSN 2213-8595, Vol. 4, no 10, p. 840-849Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: Guidelines for primary prevention of cardiovascular diseases focus on prediction of coronary heart disease and stroke. We assessed whether or not measurement of N-terminal-pro-B-type natriuretic peptide (NT-proBNP) concentration could enable a more integrated approach than at present by predicting heart failure and enhancing coronary heart disease and stroke risk assessment. Methods: In this individual-participant-data meta-analysis, we generated and harmonised individual-participant data from relevant prospective studies via both de-novo NT-proBNP concentration measurement of stored samples and collection of data from studies identified through a systematic search of the literature (PubMed, Scientific Citation Index Expanded, and Embase) for articles published up to Sept 4, 2014, using search terms related to natriuretic peptide family members and the primary outcomes, with no language restrictions. We calculated risk ratios and measures of risk discrimination and reclassification across predicted 10 year risk categories (ie, <5%, 5% to <7.5%, and >= 7.5%), adding assessment of NT-proBNP concentration to that of conventional risk factors (ie, age, sex, smoking status, systolic blood pressure, history of diabetes, and total and HDL cholesterol concentrations). Primary outcomes were the combination of coronary heart disease and stroke, and the combination of coronary heart disease, stroke, and heart failure. Findings: We recorded 5500 coronary heart disease, 4002 stroke, and 2212 heart failure outcomes among 95617 participants without a history of cardiovascular disease in 40 prospective studies. Risk ratios (for a comparison of the top third vs bottom third of NT-proBNP concentrations, adjusted for conventional risk factors) were 1.76 (95% CI 1.56-1.98) for the combination of coronary heart disease and stroke and 2.00 (1.77-2.26) for the combination of coronary heart disease, stroke, and heart failure. Addition of information about NT-proBNP concentration to a model containing conventional risk factors was associated with a C-index increase of 0.012 (0.010-0.014) and a net reclassification improvement of 0.027 (0.019-0.036) for the combination of coronary heart disease and stroke and a C-index increase of 0.019 (0.016-0.022) and a net reclassification improvement of 0.028 (0.019-0.038) for the combination of coronary heart disease, stroke, and heart failure. Interpretation: In people without baseline cardiovascular disease, NT-proBNP concentration assessment strongly predicted first-onset heart failure and augmented coronary heart disease and stroke prediction, suggesting that NT-proBNP concentration assessment could be used to integrate heart failure into cardiovascular disease primary prevention.

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