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  • 1.
    Almbjär, Martin
    Umeå University, Faculty of Arts, Department of historical, philosophical and religious studies.
    ‘Arja Rantanen, Pennförare i periferin: Österbottniska sockenskrivare 1721–1868’2017In: Scandia, ISSN 0036-5483, Vol. 83, no 1Article, book review (Other academic)
  • 2.
    Almbjär, Martin
    Umeå University, Faculty of Arts, Department of historical, philosophical and religious studies.
    Brandenburg-Prussia, 1466-1806: Karin Friedrich2013In: Scandia, ISSN 0036-5483, Vol. 79, no 2, p. 171-172Article, book review (Other academic)
  • 3.
    Almbjär, Martin
    Umeå University, Faculty of Arts, Department of historical, philosophical and religious studies.
    ‘Emma Rotschild, The inner life of empires: An eighteenth-century history’2013In: Personhistorisk Tidskrift, ISSN 0031-5699, Vol. 109, no 2Article, book review (Other academic)
  • 4.
    Almbjär, Martin
    Umeå University, Faculty of Arts, Department of historical, philosophical and religious studies.
    En klättrande adelsman på 1600-talet: Johan Ekeblads karriär speglad i hans brev2008In: Personhistorisk Tidskrift, ISSN 0031-5699, Vol. 104, no 1, p. 63-82Article in journal (Other academic)
  • 5.
    Almbjär, Martin
    Umeå University, Faculty of Arts, Department of historical, philosophical and religious studies.
    Makt och människor. Europeisk statsbildning från medeltiden till franska revolutionen: Harald Gustafsson2012In: Scandia, ISSN 0036-5483, Vol. 78, no 2, p. 140-141Article, book review (Other academic)
  • 6. Almbjär, Martin
    Mauritz Stålhandskes behov av att klaga2010In: Personhistorisk Tidskrift, ISSN 0031-5699, Vol. 106, no 1, p. 59-74Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [sv]

    en studie av åtta suppliker inlämnade till 1755–56 års Riksdag.

  • 7.
    Almbjär, Martin
    Umeå University, Faculty of Arts, Department of historical, philosophical and religious studies.
    ‘Merry E Weisner-Hanks, The marvellous hairy girls: The Gonzales sisters and their worlds’,2012In: Personhistorisk Tidskrift, ISSN 0031-5699, Vol. 108, no 2Article, book review (Other academic)
  • 8.
    Almbjär, Martin
    Umeå University, Faculty of Arts, Department of historical, philosophical and religious studies.
    Sweden's Participation in the Seven Years War in the Mirror of the Day Register of Loitz City 1757-17592017In: Historisk Tidskrift (S), ISSN 0345-469X, Vol. 137, no 1, p. 151-153Article, book review (Other academic)
  • 9.
    Almbjär, Martin
    Umeå University, Faculty of Arts, Department of historical, philosophical and religious studies.
    The voice of the people?: Supplications submitted to the Swedish Diet in the Age of Liberty, 1719–17722016Doctoral thesis, monograph (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    This dissertation is devoted to the study of who used the formal channels of interaction in the early modern era and why. It examines the full range of the political conversation in early modern Sweden, as seen in the supplications to the Diet in the Age of Liberty (1719–1772), and more specifically the supplications submitted to the parliamentary committee tasked with handling them, the Screening Deputation. The literature yields few systematic studies of this official channel, and supplications have long been terra incognita in the early modern political landscape. Their exact importance is uncertain, to say the least.

    Using a database built on three samples from the beginning, middle, and end of the Age of Liberty, the Diet's supplication channel is shown to have been used by two groups: supplicants from state-affiliated households primarily tried to use it to pursue their claims on the state, to settle various issues related to employment, or to receive some sort of support through hard times; and, increasingly, commoners, especially delegates in the Estate of the Burghers, used the channel for their gravamina concerning commerce, taxation, and the like, and state support for public amenities, a group for whom the Screening Deputation offered an alternative route to getting their grievances heard by the Diet. Both groups increasingly used the Diet's supplication channel was appeal the verdicts of the King in Council (Kungl. Maj:t). Although most were not appeals against the Judicial Audit, the results reveal an active use of appeals, and thus a de facto erosion of Kungl. Maj:t's supremacy. The results also show that as many as three-fifths of all supplicants had their supplications accepted by the Screening Deputation for further examination by the Diet. Although the acceptance rate was definitely lower in the 1730s and 1740s, the committee seems to have been fairly benevolent in its interpretation of the rules on petitioning.

    The results, lastly, show that although the Diet's supplication channel allowed excluded groups direct access to the Diet - including women of all classes, commoners of rank, and unrepresented groups - it mainly catered to men with the social status or wealth that put them in the middle and upper strata of society. Although this supplication channel stood open to anyone, its egalitarian potential was seemingly never realized. The use of March and Olsen's institutional theory about the logic of appropriateness, has revealed that certain institutional templates and norms that would have enabled these groups more access to the channel succumbed and made room for other institutional foundations.

    Supplications were part of the medieval and early modern centralization of legal and political power, the formation of the state, the protection of the privileges of Swedish subjects, and, during the Age of Liberty, the power struggle between the Diet and the kings. Each supplication viewed by itself might seem trivial, but nonetheless played a part in each and every one of these major processes. An ordinary Swede could have an impact on early modern politics when acting in concert with other supplicants, like rain eating away at rock.

  • 10.
    Almbjär, Martin
    Umeå University, Faculty of Arts, Department of historical, philosophical and religious studies.
    ‘Thomas Wallnig, Johannes Frimmel & Werner Telesko, eds., Eighteenth century studies in Austria 1945–2010’,2015In: Nordic yearbook for eighteenth-century studies, ISSN 1652-4772, Vol. 12Article, book review (Other academic)
  • 11.
    Almbjär, Martin
    Umeå University, Faculty of Arts, Department of historical, philosophical and religious studies.
    Tidigmodern statsformering2013In: Scandia, ISSN 0036-5483, Vol. 79, no 2, p. 145-146Article in journal (Other academic)
  • 12.
    Almbjär, Martin
    Umeå University, Faculty of Arts, Department of historical, philosophical and religious studies.
    War, Money and the English State, 1688-1783: John Brewer2013In: Scandia, ISSN 0036-5483, Vol. 79, no 2, p. 150-151Article, book review (Other academic)
  • 13.
    Liliequist, Jonas
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Arts, Department of historical, philosophical and religious studies.
    Almbjär, Martin
    Umeå University, Faculty of Arts, Department of historical, philosophical and religious studies.
    Early modern court records and petitions in Sweden (c.1400-1809): overview and research trends2012In: Frühneuzeit-Info, ISSN 0940-4007, Vol. 23, no 1+2, p. 7-23Article in journal (Other academic)
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