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  • 1.
    Carlquist, Jonas
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Arts, Department of language studies.
    Langum, VirginiaUmeå University, Faculty of Arts, Department of language studies.
    Words and Matter: The Virgin Mary in Late Medieval and Early Modern Parish Life2015Collection (editor) (Refereed)
  • 2.
    Dermineur, Elise
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Arts, Department of historical, philosophical and religious studies.
    Langum, Virginia
    Umeå University, Faculty of Arts, Department of language studies.
    Umeå Group for Premodern Studies Annual Report 20122013Report (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
  • 3.
    Dermineur, Elise M.
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Arts, Department of historical, philosophical and religious studies.
    Karlsson Sjögren, Åsa
    Umeå University, Faculty of Arts, Department of historical, philosophical and religious studies.
    Langum, Virginia
    Umeå University, Faculty of Arts, Department of language studies.
    Introduction2018In: Revisiting gender in European history, 1400-1800 / [ed] Elise M. Dermineur, Åsa Karlsson Sjögren, Virginia Langum, New York and Oxon: Routledge, 2018, p. 1-9Chapter in book (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The scholarly notion of gender has only recently been framed. In the aftermath of World War II, a series of social demands and protests emerged which shook the Western world. These movements placed social and political inequality at the core of their struggle. In particular, feminist movements, collectively called the second wave, blossomed throughout the Western world in the late 1960s and throughout the 1970s. Their powerful socio-political dimension and dynamism quickly attracted worldwide attention. This chapter also presents an overview of this book. The book covers various regions in Europe in different time periods at all levels of society. It covers a wide socio-professional spectrum, from elite women to female artisans, domestics and peasant women. The book redresses a lack of scholarship on gender and 'the dark or unofficial side of the preindustrial economy'. It examines the illness experience articulated by two late medieval mystical writers through the possibilities afforded by medicine and religious culture.

  • 4.
    Dermineur, Elise M.
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Arts, Department of historical, philosophical and religious studies.
    Karlsson Sjögren, ÅsaUmeå University, Faculty of Arts, Department of historical, philosophical and religious studies.Langum, VirginiaUmeå University, Faculty of Arts, Department of language studies.
    Revisiting gender in European history, 1400-18002018Collection (editor) (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Do women have a history? Did women have a renaissance? These were provocative questions when they were raised in the heyday of women's studies in the 1970s. But how relevant does gender remain to premodern history in the twenty-first century? This book considers this question in eight new case studies that span the European continent from 1400 to 1800. An introductory essay examines the category of gender in historiography and specifically within premodern historiography, as well as the issue of source material for historians of the period. The eight individual essays seek to examine gender in relation to emerging fields and theoretical considerations, as well as how premodern history contributes to traditional concepts and theories within women's and gender studies, such as patriarchy.

  • 5. Jørgensen, Dolly
    et al.
    Langum, Virginia
    Umeå University, Faculty of Arts, Department of language studies.
    Envisioning North from a premodern perspective2018In: Visions of North in premodern Europe / [ed] Dolly Jørgensen and Virginia Langum, Brepols, 2018, p. 1-11Chapter in book (Refereed)
  • 6. Jørgensen, Dolly
    et al.
    Langum, VirginiaUmeå University, Faculty of Arts, Department of language studies.
    Visions of North in premodern Europe2018Collection (editor) (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The North has long attracted attention, not simply as a circumpolar geographical location, but also as an ideological space, a place that is 'made' through the understanding, imagination, and interactions of both insiders and outsiders. The envisioning of the North brings it into being, and it is from this starting point that this volume explores how the North was perceived from ancient times up to the early modern period, questioning who, where, and what was defined as North over the course of two millennia.

    Covering historical periods as diverse as Ancient Greece to eighteenth-century France, and drawing on a variety of disciplines including cultural history, literary studies, art history, environmental history, and the history of science, the contributions gathered here combine to shed light on one key question: how was the North constructed as a place and a people? Material such as sagas, the ethnographic work of Olaus Magnus, religious writing, maps, medical texts, and illustrations are drawn on throughout the volume, offering important insights into how these key sources continued to be used over time. Selected texts have been compiled into a useful appendix that will be of considerable value to scholars.

  • 7.
    Langum, V.E.
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Arts, Department of language studies.
    Langam, Virginia
    Umeå University, Faculty of Arts, Department of language studies.
    Sins of Tongues, Pain of Members: Speech and Sacrament in Late Medieval Exempla2006In: Marginalia, Vol. 6, p. 1-12Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 8.
    Langum, Virginia
    Umeå University, Faculty of Arts, Department of language studies.
    Anne Thompson, The Northern Homily Cycle2009In: Journal of the Early Book Society, ISSN 1525-6790, Vol. 12, p. 316-Article, book review (Refereed)
  • 9.
    Langum, Virginia
    Umeå University, Faculty of Arts, Department of language studies.
    Arderne, John2019In: The Chaucer Encyclopedia / [ed] Gillespie, V., Newhauser, R., Rosenfeld, J. & Walter, K., Wiley-Blackwell, 2019Chapter in book (Refereed)
  • 10.
    Langum, Virginia
    Umeå University, Faculty of Arts, Department of language studies.
    'As a Kinde Modur Schulde': Mary and Natural Maternity in the Middle Ages2015In: Words and Matter: the Virgin Mary in Late Medieval and Early Modern Parish Life / [ed] Jonas Carlquist and Virginia Langum, Stockholm: Sällskapet Runica et mediaevalia , 2015, p. 133-148Chapter in book (Refereed)
  • 11.
    Langum, Virginia
    Umeå University, Faculty of Arts, Department of language studies.
    Att klandra kroppen2016In: Curie: en tidning från VetenskapsrådetArticle in journal (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
  • 12.
    Langum, Virginia
    Umeå University, Faculty of Arts, Department of language studies.
    Blaming the Body2016Other (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
  • 13.
    Langum, Virginia
    Umeå University, Faculty of Arts, Department of language studies.
    Cold characters: northern temperament in the premodern imaginaryManuscript (preprint) (Other academic)
  • 14.
    Langum, Virginia
    Umeå University, Faculty of Arts, Department of language studies.
    Cold characters: Northern temperament in the premodern imaginary2018In: Visions of North in premodern Europe / [ed] Dolly Jørgensen and Virginia Langum, Brepols, 2018, p. 123-144Chapter in book (Refereed)
  • 15.
    Langum, Virginia
    Umeå University, Faculty of Arts, Department of language studies.
    Det kulturella värdet av en fis2016In: Curie: en tidning från VetenskapsrådetArticle in journal (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
  • 16.
    Langum, Virginia
    Umeå University, Faculty of Arts, Department of language studies.
    Discerning skin: complexion, surgery and language in medieval confession2013In: Reading skin in medieval literature and culture / [ed] Katie L. Walter, Basingstoke: Palgrave Macmillan, 2013, p. 141-160Chapter in book (Refereed)
  • 17.
    Langum, Virginia
    Umeå University, Faculty of Arts, Department of language studies.
    Edwin D. Craun, Hands of the Tongue: Essays on Deviant Speech2009In: Marginalia, Vol. 8Article, book review (Refereed)
  • 18.
    Langum, Virginia
    Umeå University, Faculty of Arts, Department of language studies.
    Foreword2014In: Cases on Professional Distance Education Degree Programs and Practices: Successes, Challenges, and Issues / [ed] Kirk P H Sullivan, Peter E Czigler and Jenny M Sullivan Hellgren, Hershey, PA USA: IGI Global, 2014, p. XV-XVIChapter in book (Other academic)
  • 19.
    Langum, Virginia
    Umeå University, Faculty of Arts, Department of language studies.
    Galyen, Galien (Galen)2019In: The Chaucer Encyclopedia / [ed] Gillespie, V., Newhauser, R., Rosenfeld, J. & Walter, K., Wiley-Blackwell, 2019Chapter in book (Refereed)
  • 20.
    Langum, Virginia
    Umeå University, Faculty of Arts, Department of language studies.
    Hur jag slutade ängslas och lärde mig älska skivstången2016In: Curie: en tidning från VetenskapsrådetArticle in journal (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
  • 21.
    Langum, Virginia
    Umeå University, Faculty of Arts, Department of language studies.
    Langland's diseased vision2009In: AVISTA Forum Journal, p. 42-45Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 22.
    Langum, Virginia
    Umeå University, Faculty of Arts, Department of language studies.
    Mary: the return2015In: Words and matter: the Virgin Mary in late medieval and early modern parish life / [ed] Jonas Carlquist and Virginia Langum, Stockholm: Sällskapet Runica et mediaevalia , 2015, p. 222-225Chapter in book (Other academic)
  • 23.
    Langum, Virginia
    Umeå University, Faculty of Arts, Department of language studies.
    Medicine and the seven deadly sins in late medieval literature and culture2016Book (Refereed)
  • 24.
    Langum, Virginia
    Umeå University, Faculty of Arts, Department of language studies.
    Medicine, female mystics and illness experience2018In: Revisiting gender in European history, 1400-1800 / [ed] Elise M. Dermineur, Åsa Karlsson Sjögren and Virginia Langum, Routledge, 2018, p. 100-120Chapter in book (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The relationship of the physical, gendered body to mental health is a common theme in literary studies, which have sought to understand historical and contemporary narratives by female authors. Medieval mystics, in particular, have invited psychological and medical intrigue, both in their own period and much later. While both male and female mystics often write in highly embodied imagery, female mystics often write in immediate relation to their own bodies. Mystics sought personal experience, or what is called mystical union with the divine, through certain practices, which ranged from contemplation to extreme fleshly mortification. In the later Middle Ages, between the thirteenth and fifteenth centuries, women took a particular role in shaping mystical practices and texts through their works in various languages. Not only their own contemporaries but also far more recent readers have offered various biomedical and psychosomatic diagnoses for these medieval female mystics. This chapter outlines these attempts, while arguing for a new interpretation of the texts using the women's own use and understanding of medicine. From the outset, the range of diagnoses from various readers from the fifteenth century to the twenty-first century seems vast and incompatible—from medieval accounts of demonic possession and humoral balance, to late nineteenth-century and early twentieth-century notions of hysteria, to more current diagnoses of temporal lobe epilepsy and botulism. However, I argue that they have a common clinical core. They assume that these women are bodies and minds to be diagnosed by various authoritative standards, whether religious or biomedical. This chapter considers contemporary and anachronistic diagnostic tools for mystical experience through the works of two mystical women of late medieval England: Margery Kempe (ca. 1373–ca. 1438) and Julian of Norwich (ca. 1342–ca. 1416). Despite the wealth of criticism on these women, which refers to their contemporary and later authoritative discourses of religion and medicine, the women's own medical knowledge and the way they negotiate it in terms of their own experience has not yet been considered. I argue that these texts stand witness to two women attuned to medical knowledge and capable of diagnosing themselves. Rather than clinical narratives, these texts represent illness experiences, and as such the interplay of their own contemporary biomedical knowledge and their own lived embodied experience. They are at once doctors and patients.

  • 25.
    Langum, Virginia
    Umeå University, Faculty of Arts, Department of language studies.
    Medicine, passion and sin in Gower2013In: Medieval and early modern literature, science and medicine / [ed] Rachel Falconer and Denis Reveney, Gunter Narr Verlag, 2013, Vol. 28, p. 117-130Chapter in book (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This article discusses the presentation of wrath and envy, primarily in the Middle English poem the Confessio Amantis, but with some references to the French Mirror of Man, as a means of exploring the fourteenth-century English poet John Gower’s understanding of the body, medicine and sin. Wrath and envy present interesting case studies as Gower claims that they are the most unnatural of the seven sins. Yet wrath and envy are richly embodied in both his poetry, as well as contemporary medical and pastoral literature as will be shown. The essay argues for the hitherto unnoticed importance of medicine in understanding Gower’s poetry. I would specifically like to address the question of whether wrath, envy and other passions cause or are metaphors for, sin, in Gower's representations of these passions. By attending to human physiology, Gower invites the reader to recognize their shared human weakness, particularly in reference to the passions (emotions) and the predisposition to sin: his text thus fosters co-passion or compassion in his reader, as I will argue.

  • 26.
    Langum, Virginia
    Umeå University, Faculty of Arts, Department of language studies.
    Medieval 'Waste Studies'2009In: Marginalia, ISSN 1750-4953, Vol. 10Article, book review (Refereed)
  • 27.
    Langum, Virginia
    Umeå University, Faculty of Arts, Department of language studies.
    Metaphor as Medicine in Medieval Surgical Manuals2014Report (Other academic)
  • 28.
    Langum, Virginia
    Umeå University, Faculty of Arts, Department of language studies.
    Metaphor as Medicine in Medieval Surgical Manuals2014Manuscript (preprint) (Other academic)
  • 29.
    Langum, Virginia
    Umeå University, Faculty of Arts, Department of language studies.
    Mystical bodybuilding2013Report (Other academic)
  • 30.
    Langum, Virginia
    Umeå University, Faculty of Arts, Department of language studies.
    Mystical bodybuilding2013Report (Other academic)
  • 31.
    Langum, Virginia
    Umeå University, Faculty of Arts, Department of language studies.
    Om akademiska synder2016In: Curie: en tidning från VetenskapsrådetArticle in journal (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
  • 32.
    Langum, Virginia
    University of Cambridge.
    Peggy A. Knapp, Chaucerian Aesthetics2009In: Marginalia, ISSN 1750-4953, Vol. 9Article, book review (Refereed)
  • 33.
    Langum, Virginia
    Umeå University, Faculty of Arts, Department of language studies.
    Radix malorum est cupiditas: Greed in the Literature of Late Medieval England2019In: Greed in Literature / [ed] Robert Evans, Salem Press, 2019Chapter in book (Other academic)
  • 34.
    Langum, Virginia
    Umeå University, Faculty of Arts, Department of language studies.
    Reading and Health2018In: Thule: Kungl. Skytteanska samfundets årsbok 2018 / [ed] Roger Jacobsson, Umeå: Kungl. Skytteanska samfundet , 2018, p. 97-107Chapter in book (Other academic)
  • 35.
    Langum, Virginia
    Umeå University, Faculty of Arts, Department of language studies.
    Roman Catholicism in Fantastic Film: Essays on Belief, Spectacle, Ritual and Imagery2013In: Journal of Religion and Popular Culture, ISSN 1703-289X, E-ISSN 1703-289X, Vol. 25, no 2, p. 306-307Article, book review (Refereed)
  • 36.
    Langum, Virginia
    Umeå University, Faculty of Arts, Department of language studies.
    Sacred and secular wrath in Medieval English sources2016In: The sacred and the secular in medieval healing: sites, objects, and text / [ed] Barbara S. Bowers and Linda Migl Keyser, Abingdon: Routledge, 2016, p. 13-25Chapter in book (Refereed)
  • 37.
    Langum, Virginia
    Umeå University, Faculty of Arts, Department of language studies.
    Seeing in Sermons: Word, Light and Aesthetic Experience2014In: On Light / [ed] K. P. Clarke and S. Baccianti, Oxford: Society for the Study of Medieval Languages and Literature , 2014, p. 121-136Chapter in book (Refereed)
  • 38.
    Langum, Virginia
    Umeå University, Faculty of Arts, Department of language studies.
    Sins of Tongues, Pain of Members2007In: MarginaliaArticle in journal (Refereed)
  • 39.
    Langum, Virginia
    Umeå University, Faculty of Arts, Department of language studies.
    The Discourse of Hysteria: The Topoi of Humility, Physicality, and Authority in Women's Rhetoric2012In: Medieval Feminist Forum, ISSN 1536-8742, E-ISSN 2151-6073, p. 134-136Article, book review (Refereed)
  • 40.
    Langum, Virginia
    Umeå University, Faculty of Arts, Department of language studies.
    The physiology of reading pleasure and the pleasure of reading physiology in the Middle Ages2016Manuscript (preprint) (Other academic)
  • 41.
    Langum, Virginia
    Umeå University, Faculty of Arts, Department of language studies.
    The wounded surgeon: devotion, compassion and metaphor in medieval England2015In: Wounds and wound repair in medieval culture / [ed] Larissa Tracy and Kelly DeVries, Leiden: Brill Academic Publishers, 2015, p. 269-290Chapter in book (Refereed)
  • 42.
    Langum, Virginia
    Umeå University, Faculty of Arts, Department of language studies.
    Thom Mertens, Maria Sherwood-Smith, Michael Mecklenburg and Hans-Jochen Schiewer, eds., The Last Judgement in Medieval Preaching2014In: Medieval Sermon Studies, ISSN 1366-0691, E-ISSN 1749-6276, Vol. 58, p. 88-89Article, book review (Other academic)
  • 43.
    Langum, Virginia
    Umeå University, Faculty of Arts, Department of language studies.
    Vin, kvinnor och deras sånger2016In: Curie: an tidning från VetenskapsrådetArticle in journal (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
  • 44.
    Langum, Virginia
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Arts, Department of language studies.
    Dermineur, Elise
    Umeå University, Faculty of Arts, Department of historical, philosophical and religious studies.
    Umeå Group for Premodern Studies Annual Report 20132014Report (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
  • 45.
    Langum, Virginia
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Arts, Department of language studies.
    Lindberg, Staffan
    Bort med tassarna – politisera inte forskningen2016In: Göteborgs-postenArticle in journal (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
  • 46.
    Langum, Virginia
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Arts, Department of language studies.
    Lindberg, Staffan
    Möjlighet till karriär krävs för att säkra kvalitet2016In: Svenska dagbladetArticle in journal (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
  • 47.
    Langum, Virginia
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Arts, Department of language studies.
    Sullivan, Kirk
    Umeå University, Faculty of Arts, Department of language studies.
    Writing academic english as a doctoral student in Sweden: narrative perspectives2017In: Journal of second language writing, ISSN 1060-3743, E-ISSN 1873-1422, Vol. 35, p. 20-25Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The expectation that doctoral students publish during their studies has increased in recent years. The standard of having international academic publications before entering the job market has long been perceived to pose an even greater challenge to doctoral students in non-English speaking countries who are often expected to publish in English, rather than their national language. This deficient perspective has, however, recently been questioned. We undertook a narrative inquiry at a Swedish university in order to better understand the experience, self-perception, and needs of doctoral students writing academic English. From these narratives, two themes relating to the doctoral students' journeys towards academic writing emerged: deficit and commonality. After reviewing the data, we argue that it is important to support doctoral students in their journey into bi-literate academic writers, rather than focus on the notion of the privileged position of the native speaker.

  • 48.
    Sullivan, Kirk P H
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Arts, Department of language studies.
    Langum, VirginiaUmeå University, Faculty of Arts, Department of language studies.
    Proceedings of the second Faculty of Arts Doctoral College Conference2014Conference proceedings (editor) (Other academic)
  • 49.
    Sullivan, Kirk P.H.
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Arts, Department of language studies.
    Langum, Virginia
    Umeå University, Faculty of Arts, Department of language studies.
    Cocq, Coppélie
    Education is not sufficient: exploring ways to support and research indigenous writing and literacies2019In: Perspectives on indigenous writing and literacies / [ed] Coppélie Cocq and Kirk P.H. Sullivan, Leiden: Brill Academic Publishers, 2019, p. 215-219Chapter in book (Refereed)
  • 50.
    Westum, Asbjörg
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Arts, Department of language studies.
    Langum, Virginia
    Umeå University, Faculty of Arts, Department of language studies.
    I människan själv, eller utanför?: Föreställningar om pestens orsaker i lärda skrifter och folktro2015In: Kulturella perspektiv - Svensk etnologisk tidskrift, ISSN 1102-7908, Vol. 24, no 1, p. 11-19Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The article examines how the causes of Black death were conceived and discussed in two distinct contexts; learned sources from late medieval England and oral Swedish legends that were collected and recorded many centuries aftr the outbreak. While focused on discussions of a particular disease - plague or what is known as the bacterium yersinia pestis - the geographical, chronological and material range enables a greater perspective upon the continuities and transitions of how theories of causality are framed.

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