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  • 1. Akpinar, Murat
    et al.
    Vincze, Zsuzsanna
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Umeå School of Business and Economics (USBE), Business Administration.
    The dynamics of coopetition: A stakeholder view of the German automotive industry2016In: Industrial Marketing Management, ISSN 0019-8501, E-ISSN 1873-2062, Vol. 57, p. 53-63Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In response to calls for better understanding the dynamics of coopetition, this study aims to develop a framework that explains why the levels of competition and cooperation change over time. The framework adopts the two-continua approach to coopetition and the theoretical concepts of power and stake from the stakeholder literature. Integrating concepts from the coopetition and stakeholder literatures is a promising attempt, which is justified by the fact that stakeholders are in coopetition with the firm. According to our framework the power difference affects the level of competition, and vice versa, whereas common stakes affect the level of cooperation, and vice versa. This was subject to a test with insights from the in-depth analysis of the changing coopetition between the Volkswagen Group and Porsche AG during the period 2001–2012. Our findings explain why an environmental threat on one of the firms shifted the power difference and changed the coopetition first from cooperation-dominant to balanced-strong and then ended it through a full acquisition.

  • 2.
    Hakala, Ulla
    et al.
    Department of Marketing and International Business, Turku School of Economics at University of Turku, Turku, Finland.
    Svensson, Johan
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Umeå School of Business and Economics (USBE), Statistics.
    Vincze, Zsuzsanna
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Umeå School of Business and Economics (USBE).
    Consumer-based brand equity and top-of-mind awareness: a cross-country analysis2012In: Journal of Product & Brand Management, ISSN 1061-0421, Vol. 21, no 6, p. 439-451Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Purpose The study focused on dimensions of consumer-based brand equity, and especially the recall level of brand awareness. The purpose was to identify any statistically significant differences in brand recall in various product categories and different national contexts.

    Design/methodology/approach This observation study explored relations between consumers’ awareness of brands, attitudes related to brand equity, and changes in cultural context. Questionnaire data was collected from university students in four countries: the USA, Finland, France and Sweden. The respondents were asked about the brands of beverages, computers and cell-phones that first came into their minds, and their attitudes in relation to brand equity.

    Findings It seems that the four dimensions of brand equity co-vary depending on the cultural context. The results also revealed a relationship between TOMA and the national context that was generalizable in the three product categories.

    Research limitations/implications Culture as a contextual factor of consumer brand equity should be studied further. The findings should be replicated with non-student samples in other product categories and cultural contexts. SEM could be used to establish the causality and direction of the relationships between the various dimensions of culture and brand equity.

    Practical implications The findings on the effect of the cultural context on brand equity are of practical relevance to marketing managers: they should tailor their branding strategies accordingly.

    Originality/value The results gave valid and reliable evidence of a relationship between the TOMA dimension of brand equity and the national cultural context.

  • 3.
    Hakala, Ulla
    et al.
    Department of Marketing and International Business, Turku School of Economics at University of Turku, Turku, Finland.
    Svensson, Johan
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Umeå School of Business and Economics (USBE), Statistics.
    Vincze, Zsuzsanna
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Umeå School of Business and Economics (USBE).
    Consumer-based brand equity and top-of-mind awareness: A cross-country analysis2012In: Journal of Product & Brand Management, ISSN 1061-0421, Vol. 21, no 6, p. 439-451Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Purpose – The study focused on dimensions of consumer-based brand equity, and especially the recall level of brand awareness. The purpose was to identify any statistically significant differences in brand recall in various product categories and different national contexts. Design/methodology/approach – This observation study explored relations between consumers' awareness of brands, attitudes related to brand equity, and changes in cultural context. Questionnaire data was collected from university students in four countries: the USA, Finland, France and Sweden. The respondents were asked about the brands of beverages, computers and cell-phones that first came into their minds, and their attitudes in relation to brand equity. Findings – It seems that the four dimensions of brand equity co-vary depending on the cultural context. The results also revealed a relationship between TOMA and the national context that was generalizable in the three product categories. Research limitations/implications – Culture as a contextual factor of consumer brand equity should be studied further. The findings should be replicated with non-student samples in other product categories and cultural contexts. SEM could be used to establish the causality and direction of the relationships between the various dimensions of culture and brand equity. Practical implications – The findings on the effect of the cultural context on brand equity are of practical relevance to marketing managers: they should tailor their branding strategies accordingly. Originality/value – The results gave valid and reliable evidence of a relationship between the TOMA dimension of brand equity and the national cultural context.

  • 4. Lindman, Martti
    et al.
    Pennanen, Kyösti
    Rothenstein, Jens
    Scozzi, Barbara
    Vincze, Zsuzsanna
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Umeå School of Business and Economics (USBE).
    The practice of customer value creation and market effectiveness among low-tech SMEs2012In: Journal of global business and technology, ISSN 1553-5495, Vol. 8, no 1, p. 1-15Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Low-tech firms by definition can rarely establish their competitive advantage on new technological knowledge which is why such firms and low-tech SMEs in particular has to find other means to compete. As value creation is increasingly considered the core of staying competitive independent of the firm size and industry characteristics, the practice of customer value creation and resulting market effectiveness becomes topical in terms of competition management. Acknowledging the complexity of a contemporary phenomenon of this type, an attempt is made to understand the customer value creation in its real-life context through an international case study approach. Emerging qualitative research findings indicate that high performing firms apply high design and high quality related activities more often than the less successful firms in addition to which corresponding high end products are expressed representatively.

    Low performance firms in turn more frequently base their value creation on lower price characteristics and product and company information only. The subsequent statistical analysis confirms the significance of representative presentation and indicates further that interaction which is made possible to customers with designers has the biggest antecedent influence to market effectiveness. However, so far no statistically significant value creation strategy could be identified which would have been capable of differentiating case firms by their market effectiveness. In exploring empirically the practice of SME value creation the study offers some firsthand evidence and managerial guidance as to SME value creation and corresponding market effectiveness.

  • 5. Lindman, Martti
    et al.
    Pennanen, Kyösti
    Rothenstein, Jens
    Scozzi, Barbara
    Vincze, Zsuzsanna
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Umeå School of Business and Economics (USBE), Business Administration.
    The value space: how firms facilitate value creation2016In: Business Process Management Journal, ISSN 1463-7154, E-ISSN 1758-4116, Vol. 22, no 4, p. 736-762Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Purpose– The purpose of this paper is to investigate the firm’s role in the value creation process. In particular, after categorizing the activities that firms carry out to facilitate the creation of value, the “value space,” an actionable framework within which different dimensions of value creation are integrated, is developed and discussed.

    Design/methodology/approach– The framework is built up on process theory, an in-depth review of the literature and a multiple case study carried out on 65 European firms in the furniture industry.

    Findings– The value space is both a practical and theoretically based framework which contributes to the development of a more holistic and “actionable” view on the role of firm in the value creation process; also it provides managers with a tool to support the analysis, management and innovation of the value creation process.

    Originality/value– The systematic categorization of firms’ activities and their subsequent integration into a value creation framework are a missing piece in terms of understanding the value creation process carried out by firms. Also, by facilitating the analysis and innovation of the value creation process, the framework can be used to support both exploitative and explorative business process management.

  • 6.
    Tesar, George
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Umeå School of Business and Economics (USBE), Business Administration. University of Wisconsin-Whitewater.
    Vincze, ZsuzsannaUmeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Umeå School of Business and Economics (USBE), Business Administration.
    Motivating SMEs to cooperate and internationalize: a dynamic perspective2017Collection (editor) (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Motivating cooperation among and internationalization of small and medium-sized enterprises (SMEs) in Northern Europe is a challenging task. SMEs in Northern Europe are typically located in small remote towns or villages, over large geographic areas, with limited resources. Although in theory, they create employment opportunities, stabilize local socio-economic conditions, and contribute to tax revenue they often require significant managerial knowhow and assistance. Their typical local orientation often prevents them looking beyond their perceived boundaries. In order to extend their inherent capabilities, they need to be entrepreneurial, innovative, and international in their managerial abilities.

    Most Northern European countries offer assistance to SMEs in numerous forms on local, regional, and national levels. Government assistance is generally directed to the overall operations of SMEs and is seldom directed to improving management to their skills and knowhow. Entrepreneurial, innovative, and even international initiatives are personal. Individual managers are sources of ideas, products, programs, and cross border ventures. Northern European SMEs depend on strong managers—managers who understand local strategic dynamics and seize their advantages.

    Northern European SMEs do not operate in a vacuum. They frequently cooperate strategically and operationally with other SMEs in their regions. They form industrial clusters with integrated supply chains, internal research and engineering services to develop competitive products and services, and share marketing and sales organizations among other activities. Their futures often depend on exports and on international ventures in some cases.

    One of the unique characteristics of SMEs in Northern Europe, is their willingness to cooperate with regional universities and other educational institutions. SMEs managers help academics learn about their managerial styles, they respond to academic research, and open their operations to case research studies. Academics learn from direct contact with SMEs managers. And, this is not a one-way street. Managers also learn from the academics.

    Academics help managers be entrepreneurial, make better decisions, and think strategically. Transfer of knowledge from academics to SMEs managers represents an important way of growing SMEs. This publication is dedicated to Professor Håkan Boter of Umeå School of Business and Economics at Umeå University. He is one academic who has been extensively involved with the transfer of knowledge from academia to SMEs in Northern Europe.

    During his career, Professor Boter initiated and participated in projects designed to foster cooperation and internationalization among SMEs in Northern Europe and facilitate their growth. These projects include the establishment of the Center of Inter-Organizational Innovation Research (CiiR) and the Center for Entrepreneurship, Innovation and Business Development (CEIB) among other initiatives. Professor Boter reached across the borders of academia to SMEs and often served as an advisor, coordinator, facilitator, mediator, and information source. His commitment to developing management expertise in eastern Africa under the auspices of the Swedish International Development Agency has been extraordinary as is his participation in a coalition of major European and North American international universities to promote management education among African universities. Professor Boter has authored and coauthored many widely recognized papers and monographs on managerial aspects of SMEs, their cooperation, and internationalization. His contributions provided an impetus for this project. We thank you, Håkan!

    George Tesar, Madison, Wisconsin

    Zsuzsanna Vincze, Umeå, Sweden

  • 7.
    Vincze, Zsuzsanna
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Umeå School of Business.
    Grounded theory2010In: Encyclopaedia of Case Study Research / [ed] Albert J. Mills, Gabrielle Durepos, Elden Wiebe, SAGE Publications , 2010Chapter in book (Other academic)
  • 8.
    Vincze, Zsuzsanna
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Umeå School of Business and Economics (USBE).
    In search of generative mechanism: the grounded theory approach to process theory building2013In: Handbook of longitudinal research methods in organiation and business studies / [ed] Melanie E. Hassett and Eriikka Paavilainen-Mäntymäki, Cheltenham: Edward Elgar Publishing, 2013, p. 163-184Chapter in book (Refereed)
  • 9.
    Vincze, Zsuzsanna
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Umeå School of Business and Economics (USBE).
    Boter, Håkan
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Umeå School of Business and Economics (USBE), Business Administration.
    Closing the distance Between Two Furniture Clusters, Möbelriket in Lammhult and Tibro Interiör in Tibro2012In: Marketing Management in Geographically Remote Industrial Clusters: Implications for Business-to-Consumer Marketing / [ed] Tesar, George, Bodin, Jan, Singapore: World Scientific, 2012, p. 151-166Chapter in book (Refereed)
  • 10.
    Vincze, Zsuzsanna
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Umeå School of Business and Economics (USBE).
    Svensson, Johan
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Umeå School of Business and Economics (USBE), Statistics.
    Boter, Håkan
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Umeå School of Business and Economics (USBE), Business Administration.
    The effect of geographical location on export-import intensity and overall performance: A study of SMEs in the Swedish furniture sector2012Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 11.
    Vincze, Zsuzsanna
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Umeå School of Business and Economics (USBE), Business Administration.
    Teräs, Jukka
    Mechanisms of innovation-based cluster transformation2016In: Innovation drivers and regional innovation strategies / [ed] Mario Davide Parrilli, Rune Dahl-Fitjar, and Andrés Rodríguez-Pose, New York: Routledge, 2016, p. 85-104Chapter in book (Refereed)
  • 12.
    Vincze, Zsuzsanna
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Umeå School of Business and Economics (USBE), Business Administration.
    Vanyushyn, Vladimir
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Umeå School of Business and Economics (USBE), Business Administration.
    Boter, Håkan
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Umeå School of Business and Economics (USBE).
    Uncover the Hidden Innovation: Analysis of Innovation Behaviour of Swedish Firms2014Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 13.
    Vincze, Zsuzsanna
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Umeå School of Business and Economics (USBE), Business Administration.
    Vanyushyn, Vladmir
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Umeå School of Business and Economics (USBE), Business Administration.
    Boter, Håkan
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Umeå School of Business and Economics (USBE), Business Administration.
    Innovation behaviour of Swedish Firms2014Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 14.
    Vincze, Zsuzsanna
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Umeå School of Business and Economics (USBE).
    Zettinig, Peter
    Turku School of Economics, University of Turku.
    Cluster dynamics and the MNEs role in cluster developmen2012Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 15.
    Vincze, Zsuzsanna
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Umeå School of Business and Economics (USBE).
    Zettinig, Peter
    Turku School of Economics, University of Turku.
    Constellationof cluster firms and effects on cluster development: The influence of managerial and entrepreneurial mindset and behavior2012Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 16.
    Vincze, Zsuzsanna
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Umeå School of Business.
    Zettinig, Peter
    School of Marketing and International Business at Victoria University of Wellington, New Zealand.
    Guest Editorial: Futures of teaching and learning international business2008In: Journal of Teaching in International Business, ISSN 0897-5930, E-ISSN 1528-6991, Vol. 19, no 2, p. 101-103Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 17.
    Vincze, Zsuzsanna
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Umeå School of Business and Economics (USBE), Business Administration. University of Turku.
    Zettinig, Peter
    University of Turku.
    SME-MNE cooperation in a regional cluster2017In: Motivating SMEs to cooperate and internationalize: a dynamic perspective / [ed] George Tesar and Zsuzsanna Vincze, New York: Routledge, 2017, p. 152-168Chapter in book (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The paper sets out to explain how and why industrial clusters evolve to new economically viable development paths. We focus on the interplay between MNEs global strategies and their local SMEs creating important dynamics leading to cluster change. Although various mechanisms are at play simultaneously, we consider that the understanding of the dynamics and interactions between MNE and SMEs' entrepreneurial behaviours are crucial. We define the boundary conditions to put the balance of exploitation and exploration into a more applicable framework. This allows us to present propositions of mindset and behaviour in regard to (a) the perceptions and preferences for environmental uncertainty; (b) the focus on exploration and exploitation processes; and (c) the means to derive at balancing these processes. Drawing on longitudinal data from a Swedish biorefinery cluster (Örnsköldsvik) we identify archetypical firms and document their interactions between the lead MNE and local/regional entrepreneurial SMEs; we conclude on dynamic changes that drive local firms' success in such a cluster.

  • 18.
    Vinze, Zsuzsanna
    et al.
    Turku School of Economics, Turku, Finland.
    Zettinig, Peter
    School of Marketing and International Business at Victoria University of Wellington, New Zealand.
    Developing the international business curriculum: Results and implication of a Delphi study on the futures of teaching and learning in international business2008In: Journal of Teaching in International Business, ISSN 0897-5930, E-ISSN 1528-6991, Vol. 19, no 2, p. 109-141Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This article presents the results of a Delphi study concerning the futures of teaching and learning in International Business (IB), a topic that has been receiving a lot of discussion during recent years. Based on our findings we identify two dimensions which may be at the core and instrumental for developing the value proposition of IB. The first dimension is the product of intensified interactions of phenomena on many levels of analysis and the second dimension is a result of the increased need for integration of discipline-based theories. These two dimensions are the basis of a framework that illustrates the high degree of complexity IB is tackling and provides possible pathways for future-oriented programme design.

  • 19.
    Vlasov, Maxim
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Umeå School of Business and Economics (USBE), Business Administration. Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Umeå School of Business and Economics (USBE), Statistics.
    Bonnedahl, Karl Johan
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Umeå School of Business and Economics (USBE), Business Administration. Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Umeå School of Business and Economics (USBE), Statistics.
    Vincze, Zsuzsanna
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Umeå School of Business and Economics (USBE), Business Administration. Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Umeå School of Business and Economics (USBE), Statistics.
    Entrepreneurship for resilience: embeddedness in place and in trans-local grassroots networks2018In: Journal of Enterprising Communities: People and Places in the Global Economy, ISSN 1750-6204, E-ISSN 1750-6212, Vol. 12, no 3, p. 374-394Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Purpose

    This paper aims to contribute to the emerging entrepreneurship research that deals with resilience by examining how embeddedness in place and in trans-local grassroots networks influences proactive entrepreneurship for local resilience.

    Design/methodology/approach

    Three theoretical propositions are developed on the basis of the existing literature. These propositions are assisted with brief empirical illustrations of grassroots innovations from the context of agri-food systems.

    Findings

    Embeddedness in place and in trans-local grassroots networks enables proactive entrepreneurship for local resilience. Social-cultural embeddedness in place facilitates access to local resources and legitimacy, and creation of social value in the community. Ecological embeddedness in place facilitates spotting and leveraging of environmental feedbacks and creation of ecological value. Embeddedness in trans-local grassroots networks provides entrepreneurs with unique resources, including globally transferable knowledge about sustainability challenges and practical solutions to these challenges. As result, entrepreneurship for resilience is explained as an embedding process. Embedding means attuning of practices to local places, as well as making global resources, including knowledge obtained in grassroots networks, work in local settings.

    Research limitations/implications

    Researchers should continue developing the emerging domain of entrepreneurship for resilience.

    Practical implications

    The objective of resilience and due respect to local environment may entail a need to consider appropriate resourcing practices and organisational models.

    Social implications

    The critical roles of place-based practices for resilience deserve more recognition in today’s globalised world.

    Originality/value

    The specific importance of the ecological dimension of embeddedness in place is emphasised. Moreover, by combining entrepreneurship and grassroots innovation literatures, which have talked past each other to date, this paper shows how local and global resources are leveraged throughout the embedding process. Thereby, it opens unexplored research avenues within the emerging domain of entrepreneurship for resilience.

  • 20.
    Vlasov, Maxim
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Umeå School of Business and Economics (USBE), Business Administration.
    Vincze, Zsuzsanna
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Umeå School of Business and Economics (USBE), Business Administration. International Business at the University of Turku, Finland.
    Re-learning with permaculture: exploring knowledges of innovation for strong sustainability2018In: Strongly sustainable societies: organising human activities on a hot and full Earth / [ed] Karl Johan Bonnedahl, Pasi Heikkurinen, Routledge, 2018, p. 249-268Chapter in book (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    It is often claimed that humanity needs more innovation in order to depart from unsustainable practices that degrade ecosystems, although opinions as to what may constitute such innovation diverge. The starting argument of this chapter is that sustainable value of innovation essentially depends on the knowledge, on which this innovation is based. Inspired by Permaculture, an ecological design framework and a trans-local grassroots movement, several moves from Weak to Strong Sustainability Innovation are suggested. The first move is re-learning – from the universal knowledge of global markets, science and technology towards place-based and alternative knowledges that are found, for example, in many indigenous cultures or grassroots movements for sustainability. Other moves include mindful recombining of these different knowledges, embedding of human activities in local places, regenerating ecosystems, and frugalising – making do with less resources. As long as Strong Sustainability can be considered as a viable objective for humanity to strive for, we can conclude that innovation is necessary in its pursuit. Such innovation would involve reinvention of age-old methods and technologies that were used "before oil", and importantly, social innovation that enables transition to less resource-intensive and less technological-dependent practices.

  • 21.
    Zettinig, Peter
    et al.
    Turku School of Economics, University of Turku, Turku, Finland.
    Vincze, Zsuzsanna
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Umeå School of Business and Economics (USBE).
    How clusters evolve2012In: Competitiveness Review, ISSN 1059-5422, Vol. 22, no 2, p. 110-132Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Purpose– The purpose of this paper is to construct a process theory of cluster development, in order to complement the many studies focusing on the factors that determine successful clusters.

    Design/methodology/approach– This theory-building effort relies on event-driven methodology, which triangulates narratives collected at different points in time with other documented materials, in order to trace cluster development over a six-year period. The empirical data are analysed according to theoretical classes formed a priori and anchored in Aldrich’s framework of emergence, events and consequences. The idea is to identify critical events that subsequently inform theory development.

    Findings– The authors show that three critical processes drive sustainable cluster development: the exploitation of current opportunities, the exploration of future opportunities, and processes that facilitate the balancing of the two. Whereas the conceptual focus in the extant literature is on exploration and exploitation processes, the authors find that balancing processes are also critical.

    Practical implications– The paper’s findings are of practical relevance to private and public policy makers with regard to the management and financing of balancing mechanisms that help to secure sustainable development. The authors will continue to follow the development of this specific cluster in order to identify a wider range of sub-processes that contribute to the long-term viability of clusters in general.

    Originality/value– This work is original in the sense that it extends March’s exploration and exploitation theory, applies it to the inter-organisational context of clusters, and links the two processes through a process of balancing. The empirical evidence and the methodological approach used contribute in terms of building a “real process theory”, according to Aldrich’s specification of an event-driven research approach.

  • 22.
    Zettinig, Peter
    et al.
    Turku School of Economics, University of Turku, Finland.
    Vincze, Zsuzsanna
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Umeå School of Business.
    The domain of international business: futures and future relevance of international business2011In: Thunderbird International Business Review, ISSN 1520-6874, Vol. 53, no 3, p. 337-349Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Using data generated by a global Delphi study involving international business (IB) scholars and practitioners, this article reflects on the core and domain of a discipline that, on one side, has to deal with increasing competition from related disciplines, which internationalize their research focus, and, on the other side, is trying to develop conceptual knowledge to explain ever more complex international phenomena. Generating a multilevel framework of important issues for IB leads to propositions, which may widen the focus of the discipline to go beyond the firm, which, comparing IB to related disciplines, can provide pathways that maintain IB highly relevant for most diverse communities affected by international business.

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