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  • 1.
    Budd, Chelsea
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Arts, Department of historical, philosophical and religious studies.
    Lillie, Malcolm
    Umeå University, Faculty of Arts, Department of historical, philosophical and religious studies.
    All things bright: a link between copper grave goods and diet at the Neolithic site of Osłonki, northern Poland2020In: Antiquity, ISSN 0003-598X, E-ISSN 1745-1744Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Understanding socioeconomic inequality is fundamental in studies of societal development in European prehistory. This paper presents dietary (δ13C and δ15N) isotope values for human and animal bone collagen from Early Neolithic Osłonki 1, north-central Poland (c. 4600–4100 cal BC). Individuals interred with copper grave offerings show slightly, but significantly, lower δ13C values than those lacking such offerings. Their contemporaneity is confirmed by a new series of 14C determinations. Our results suggest a link between high-status goods and intra-community differences in diet and/or preferential access to the agro/pastoral landscape.

  • 2.
    Lindqvist, Anna-Karin
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Arts, Department of historical, philosophical and religious studies.
    Ramqvist, Per H.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Arts, Department of historical, philosophical and religious studies.
    Arkeologiska undersökningar av den förromerska boplatsen i Gene, Raä 59:1 i Själevads socken, Ångermanland2020Report (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Excavation report of an important site close to the farm from the Roman Iron Age and Migration Period site at Gene, in northern Ångermanland. The reported site shows new aspects of the transition from the traditional mobile and semi-mobile hunter-gatherer society to the new way of life style with three-aisled longe house and stalled animials. The closeness in time and space illuminate in a new way the how this transition took place. On this world-wide issue it is suggested that regional causes may be seeked.

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  • 3.
    Budd, Chelsea
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Arts, Department of historical, philosophical and religious studies.
    Potekhina, Inna
    Lillie, Malcolm
    Umeå University, Faculty of Arts, Department of historical, philosophical and religious studies.
    Continuation of fishing subsistence in the Ukrainian Neolithic: diet isotope studies at Yasinovatka, Dnieper Rapids2020In: Archaeological and Anthropological Sciences, ISSN 1866-9557, E-ISSN 1866-9565, Vol. 12, no 2, article id 64Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Yasinovatka is one of around 30 number of prehistoric cemetery sites of hunter-fisher-foragers located along the Dnieper River in southern Ukraine. Dating to c. 5540 - 4930 cal BC, the skeletal remains at Yasinovatka suggest that around sixty-eight individuals were interred at the cemetery, during three broad phases of interment: A-type burials (c. 5540-4930 cal BC), Ƃ1 pit burials (c. 5550-4750 cal BC), and Ƃ2 pit burials (c. 4980-4460 cal BC). The burials are characterized, in part, by the inclusion of a number of Mariupol-type plates of boar tusk, in addition to deer tooth pendants, Unio shells, knife-like flint blades, Cyprinidae teeth, sherds of Neolithic pottery, and significant deposits of ochre in the later burial pits. Here we analyse δ13C and δ15N values for 50 human bone collagen samples from the site.  The majority of the isotope results show a hunter-fisher-forager population reliant predominantly on freshwater aquatic proteins, which is in keeping with previous dietary isotope studies in the area. Two individuals however have δ15N values that are clearly depleted when compared to the main population; these reflect dietary protein intakes based on plant and animal terrestrial resources rather than the predominant focus on aquatic resources. Notably, the δ13C values of these anomalous individuals are not enriched compared to the fauna samples analysed from the region; this supports the possibility that they were incomers to the area, potentially from a nearby agrarian population.

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  • 4.
    Palsson, Gisli
    Umeå University, Faculty of Arts, Department of historical, philosophical and religious studies, Environmental Archaeology Lab. Umeå University, Faculty of Arts, Humlab.
    Cutting the network, knotting the line: a Linaeological Approach to Network Analysis2020In: Journal of archaeological method and theory, ISSN 1072-5369, E-ISSN 1573-7764Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Network methods have seen a rapid rise in archaeology in recent years. There are still concerns regarding how well formal networks are able to effectively model local interaction. These are often present in the so-called qualitative network approaches—studies that tend to be based on close readings of relations between entities and the way they form dynamic networks of agents. Such studies have demonstrated the value in scrutinizing the way in which relations might be acted on in practice, and how that might differ from expected results. But rarely do such studies produce network data of the kind analyzed by formal network analytical methods. Formal approaches, on the other hand, blur the specificity of individual relations and trade much of their specificity for the ability to make general statements about relations across large datasets. More generally, the modality of the relation/edge is a crucial way in which formal network analysis differs from other prevalent relational approaches popular in archaeology today, where the substantivity of individual relations is paramount. Such relations are often seen as starting points for subsequent hybridizations that radically alter, if only temporarily, the structure of their respective networks. I argue that a key step in allowing networks to reformulate from initial, data-driven network schemata is the introduction of a more symmetrical agency between the node and the edge. In this article, I discuss how ethnographic sources can be used to achieve this for archaeological survey data. I use assemblage theory as a framework to explore the potential the edge has to offer archaeological network modelling. While assemblage theory is helpful for this purpose, the lack of a computational formality to assemblage theory immediately places it at odds with network science. As a complement, I will also employ the computational ontology CIDOC-CRM to more explicitly articulate the character of links between nodes in archaeological networks. The paper will end by suggesting a method of network modelling which integrates the line as a key source of agency. As a nod to Ingold’s call for an increased emphasis on the line, I call this approach network linaeology.

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  • 5.
    Budd, Chelsea
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Arts, Department of historical, philosophical and religious studies.
    Lillie, Malcolm
    Umeå University, Faculty of Arts, Department of historical, philosophical and religious studies.
    Early Farmers in northwest Turkey: First dietary isotopes study of human diet at Neolithic Barcın Höyük2020In: Journal of Archaeological Science: Reports, ISSN 2352-409X, E-ISSN 2352-4103Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

     Barcın Höyük is one of the oldest Neolithic settlement sites in northwest Anatolia, with early layers of occupation radiocarbon dated to ca.6600 cal BC. The Neolithic phase at the site (ca.6600 – 6200 cal BC) has seven layers of occupation, and shows a number of affinities, in terms of structure and zooarchaeological remains, with contemporary sites in the coastal area near Istanbul (Özdoğan, 2013). The available zooarchaeological evidence suggests a diet of terrestrial fauna, with some inclusion from freshwater aquatic species. This study investigates the nature of human diet at Barcın Höyük through carbon and nitrogen analysis of human and animal bone collagen, and examines whether there is any isotopic evidence for a shift in diet after the re-organisation of the site at ca.6200 cal BC. Here we present 75 human and faunal analyses from the Neolithic layers at Barcın Höyük. Two new radiocarbon dates on human skeletons are also included in the study. 

  • 6. Farjon, Aljos
    et al.
    Horne, David J.
    Parfitt, Simon A.
    Buckland, Philip I.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Arts, Department of historical, philosophical and religious studies, Environmental Archaeology Lab.
    Lewis, Mark D.
    Early Pleistocene conifer macrofossils from Happisburgh, Norfolk, UK, and their environmental implications for early hominin occupation2020In: Quaternary Science Reviews, ISSN 0277-3791, E-ISSN 1873-457X, Vol. 232, article id 106115Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Continuing coastal erosion in the vicinity of Happisburgh in north Norfolk has revealed archaeological sites documenting early human presence during at least two episodes in the Early and early Middle Pleistocene. At Happisburgh 3, the oldest archaeological site in northern Europe (approximately 900,000 years old) finds include at least 80 flint artefacts and human footprints associated with abundant, well-preserved organic remains. The deposits consist of gravels and estuarine sands and silts contained within a complex of channels, which accumulated in the estuary of a large river, probably the ancestral River Thames. The environmental remains reflect a slow-flowing tidal river, at the limit of tidal influence, and a grassland valley bordered by conifer-dominated woodland. Analyses of the pollen, wood, cones and leaves have identified a diversity of coniferous taxa, with some unexpected central and southern European elements (Pinus mugo ssp. mugo, Pinus mugo ssp. rotundata and Juniperus thurifera) indicating a type of coniferous woodland no longer present in Europe today. Here we present the conifer finds and their environmental implications. A new multi-proxy consensus palaeoclimate reconstruction, using conifer and beetle mutual climatic ranges, confirms and refines previous indications of a more continental climate than today, with significantly colder winters. These results provide a new perspective for understanding the climate and environment encountered by Early Pleistocene hominins at the northernmost limit of their range.

  • 7. Buckland, Paul C.
    et al.
    Buckland, Philip I.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Arts, Department of historical, philosophical and religious studies, Environmental Archaeology Lab.
    Prosser, Tim
    Edlington Wood: using Lidar to put ancient fields and old excavations into their contemporary landscape.2020In: Transactions of the Hunter Archaeological Society, ISSN 0966-2251, Vol. 29, p. 84-101Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The Roman sites in Edlington Wood, three miles west-south-west of Doncaster, South Yorkshire,first came to wider notice as a result of finds by the woodman in the 1930s and the material was ofsufficient interest for Philip Corder to use it as the basis for a paper in a festschrift to O. G. S. Crawford.Most of these finds and later material were deposited in Doncaster Museum, although others went tothe owners and local metal detectorists. In 1970 a threat of quarrying led to a detailed survey of thesite by the Royal Commission on Historical Monuments and limited excavation on one site. Two largeareas within the Wood were cleared but remain as improved grassland. The recent availability of Lidarimagery allows the occupation sites and fragments of field system located by ground survey to beplaced in a broader context of small rectangular fields and some attempt at a landscape chronology tobe made. The cultivation of the fields in a system of cord rig is discussed.

  • 8.
    Júlíusson, Árni Daníel
    et al.
    Department of History, University of Iceland.
    Lárusdottir, Birna
    Árni Magnússon Institute for Icelandic Studies.
    Lucas, Gavin
    University of Iceland.
    Pálsson, Gísli
    Umeå University, Faculty of Arts, Department of historical, philosophical and religious studies, Environmental Archaeology Lab. Umeå University, Faculty of Arts, Humlab.
    Episcopal Economics: Property and Power in Post-Reformation Iceland2020In: Scandinavian Journal of History, ISSN 0346-8755, E-ISSN 1502-7716, Vol. 45, no 1, p. 95-120Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    It has been common to view the Icelandic economy either from the perspective of the individual farm in terms of its productivity or at the national scale in terms of trade and the role of imports/exports. Given the fact that the economy was largely a tenant-based system with a small number of landowners, there is an important middle ground between the household economics of individual farms and the state-sanctioned trade structures that needs to be explored. The objective of this paper is to examine this middle ground and the way the economy was structured in relation to property ownership and tenancy using the case study of the bishopric of Skálholt during the 17th and 18th centuries. Adopting a modified system of provision approach, three scales of analysis are adopted: the settlement itself, the immediate environs and finally the wider regional property network. Tracing the connections outward at successive scales reveals the complex nature of the economic infrastructure behind one of the largest landowners in Iceland at this time.

  • 9.
    Linderholm, Johan
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Arts, Department of historical, philosophical and religious studies, Environmental Archaeology Lab.
    Løchsen Rødsrud, Christian
    Kulturhistorisk museum, Universitet i Oslo..
    Mjærum, Axel
    Kulturhistorisk museum, Universitet i Oslo..
    Hambro Mikkelsen, Peter
    Afdeling for Konservering og Naturvidenskab, Moesgaard Museum..
    ET JERNALDERGRAVFELT PÅ SKILLINGSTAD I LØTEN2020In: Ingen vei utenom: Arkeologiske undersøkelser i forbindelse med etablering av ny rv. 3/25 i Løten og Elverum kommuner, Innlandet / [ed] Christian Løchsen Rødsrud, Axel Mjærum, Oslo: Cappelen Damm Akademisk, 2020, p. 77-100Chapter in book (Refereed)
  • 10.
    Fägerström, Christoffer
    et al.
    Biological Museum, Lund University, SE-223 62 Lund, Sweden.
    Buckland, Philip I.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Arts, Department of historical, philosophical and religious studies, Environmental Archaeology Lab.
    Lemdahl, Geoffrey
    Department of Biology and Environmental Science, Linnaeus University, SE-391 82 Kalmar, Sweden.
    Karsten, Per
    The Historical Museum at Lund University, SE-221 00 Lund, Sweden.
    Lagerås, Per
    National Historical Museums, Odlarevägen 5, SE-226 60 Lund, Sweden.
    Manhag, Andreas
    The Historical Museum at Lund University, SE-221 00 Lund, Sweden.
    Insects and other invertebrate remains from the coffin of a 17th century bishop in Lund Minster, S Sweden2020In: Journal of Archaeological Science: Reports, ISSN 2352-409X, E-ISSN 2352-4103, Vol. 31, article id 102299Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    An extraordinarily diverse and well-preserved material, including the remains of 47 insect taxa and 12 taxa of other invertebrates, extracted from the 17th century burial of Bishop Peder Winstrup in Lund Minster, is presented and discussed in terms of the treatment of the body, activities connected with the burial and faunal significance. The invertebrate assemblages include species from gardens, insects feeding on living plants as well as dried or decaying plant matter. Many of the species are regarded as closely associated with humans (synanthropic), and a number of these are associated with outbuildings, such as stables and cellars. The absence of species associated with cadavers (necrophilous taxa) in the studied insect material is significant. The most plausible explanation is that the bishop died, and was buried during the winter, when such species are inactive, and thus precluded from colonising the body. A number of species were recorded which are today rare or very rare in southern Sweden. This is a strong indication that they once were more common and widespread, perhaps due to a greater prevalence of their preferred habitats. Sweden’s earliest fossil bedbug is also amongst the finds.

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  • 11.
    Östman, Sofi
    Umeå University, Faculty of Arts, Department of historical, philosophical and religious studies, Environmental Archaeology Lab.
    Makrofossilanalys av tre prover från en rituell plats inom Högsbo, RAÄ Göteborg 522, L1959:2834, Göteborg kommun, Västergötland2020Report (Other academic)
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  • 12.
    Östman, Sofi
    Umeå University, Faculty of Arts, Department of historical, philosophical and religious studies, Environmental Archaeology Lab.
    Makrofossilanalys av två prover från en stenåldersboplats inom Högsbo, RAÄ Göteborg 523, L1959:2835, Göteborg kommun, Västergötland2020Report (Other academic)
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  • 13.
    Östman, Sofi
    Umeå University, Faculty of Arts, Department of historical, philosophical and religious studies, Environmental Archaeology Lab.
    Makrofossilanalys av två prover från en stenåldersboplats inom RAÄ Björlanda 374:1, L1970:6603, Göteborg kommun, Bohuslän2020Report (Other academic)
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  • 14. Geladi, Paul
    et al.
    Linderholm, Johan
    Umeå University, Faculty of Arts, Department of historical, philosophical and religious studies, Environmental Archaeology Lab.
    Principal Component Analysis☆2020In: Reference Module in Chemistry, Molecular Sciences and Chemical Engineering, Elsevier, 2020Chapter in book (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Principal Component Analysis (PCA) is a multivariate exploratory analysis method, useful to separate systematic variation from noise. It allows to define a space of reduced dimensions that preserves the relevant information of the original data and allows visualization of objects (scores) and variables (loadings). PCA requires multivariate data, meaning many variables measured on many objects. Data, vectors and matrices are defined and a short summary of necessary linear algebra is given. Purely mathematical almost identical definitions of PCA and Singular Value Decomposition (SVD) are shown, but in chemometrics, PCA always has a residual and a number of meaningful components, the rank. This leads to a discussion of numerical and visual diagnostics for finding the rank and checking the residual. The visualization of scores and loadings is introduced by means of two small examples. Data preprocessing is also given consideration.

  • 15.
    Budd, Chelsea
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Arts, Department of historical, philosophical and religious studies.
    Potekhina, Inna
    Snoeck, Christophe
    Lillie, Malcolm
    Umeå University, Faculty of Arts, Department of historical, philosophical and religious studies.
    The Aquatic Neolithic: isotope, aDNA, radiocarbon, and osteological data analysis reveal asynchronous behavior in early prehistoric human societies of Ukraine2020In: American Journal of Physical Anthropology, ISSN 0002-9483, E-ISSN 1096-8644, Vol. 171, no S69, p. 40-40Article in journal (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    In Europe the characterization of the Neolithic period is traditionally dominated by the advent of agro-pastoralism. Neolithic populations in the Dnieper Valley region of south-central Ukraine are notably divergent from this trend. From the Epi-Palaeolithic-Neolithic periods (ca. 10,000 - 6000 cal BC), evidence for the adoption of agro-pastoral technologies is absent from archaeological assemblages. It is not until the Eneolithic period (ca. 4500 cal BC) that we observe the beginnings of a transition to farming in the Dnieper region. One hypothesis suggests that spikes in aridity propagated a hunting crisis in Mesolithic populations, which prompted a delay in the transition and the reshaped of Mesolithic subsistence practices to focus on freshwater aquatic resources to supplement terrestrial herbivores such as boar and deer.

    This research presents 300+ human and faunal samples (including 80 unpublished results), using multi-disciplinary techniques such as DNA analysis and various isotope applications, alongside osteological analysis, to provide holistic individual life histories. The results show long-term continuation of ܪshing practices from the Epi-Palaeolithic to Neolithic periods - no distinct shift from hunting to ܪshing practices took place. DNA results show the predominance of indigenous hunter-gatherers, with limited genetic inclusions from proximal Anatolian farming populations. Thus, despite the availability of plentiful dietary resources and the westward inܫuence of extra-local farming populations, the prehistoric communities of the Dnieper region remained resistant to change and resilient in terms of their subsistence strategies, with freshwater resources providing a ‘buffer’ against any perceived impacts from climate variability.

  • 16. Buckland, Paul C.
    et al.
    Buckland, Philip I.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Arts, Department of historical, philosophical and religious studies, Environmental Archaeology Lab.
    G. Russell, Coope
    Jon P., Sadler
    School of Geography, Earth and Environmental Sciences, University of Birmingham.
    A BIBLIOGRAPHY OF QUATERNARY ENTOMOLOGY: (QBIB)2019Data set
    Abstract [en]

    Originally published in 1991 (Buckland & Coope, 1991), this is the most comprehensive bibliography of articles and books on Quaternary fossil insects and their use in palaeoclimatology, palaeoecology and environmental archaeology available on the planet. Updates are periodically posted here, at www.bugscep.com, and on other open resources.

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  • 17. Stephens, Lucas
    et al.
    Fuller, Dorian
    Boivin, Nicole
    Rick, Torben
    Gauthier, Nicolas
    Kay, Andrea
    Marwick, Ben
    Geralda, Chelsey
    Armstrong, Denise
    Barton, C. Michael
    Denham, Tim
    Douglass, Kristina
    Driver, Jonathan
    Janz, Lisa
    Roberts, Patrick
    Rogers, J. Daniel
    Thakar, Heather
    Altaweel, Mark
    Johnson, Amber L.
    Sampietro Vattuone, Maria Marta
    Aldenderfer, Mark
    Archila, Sonia
    Artioli, Gilberto
    Bale, Martin T.
    Beach, Timothy
    Borrell, Ferran
    Braje, Todd
    Buckland, Philip I.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Arts, Department of historical, philosophical and religious studies, Environmental Archaeology Lab.
    Jiménez Cano, Nayeli Guadalupe
    Capriles, José M.
    Diez Castillo, Agustín
    \c Cilingiro\u glu, \c Ciler
    Negus Cleary, Michelle
    Conolly, James
    Coutros, Peter R.
    Covey, R. Alan
    Cremaschi, Mauro
    Crowther, Alison
    Der, Lindsay
    di Lernia, Savino
    Doershuk, John F.
    Doolittle, William E.
    Edwards, Kevin J.
    Erlandson, Jon M.
    Evans, Damian
    Fairbairn, Andrew
    Faulkner, Patrick
    Feinman, Gary
    Fernandes, Ricardo
    Fitzpatrick, Scott M.
    Fyfe, Ralph
    Garcea, Elena
    Goldstein, Steve
    Goodman, Reed Charles
    Dalpoim Guedes, Jade
    Herrmann, Jason
    Hiscock, Peter
    Hommel, Peter
    Horsburgh, K. Ann
    Hritz, Carrie
    Ives, John W.
    Junno, Aripekka
    Kahn, Jennifer G.
    Kaufman, Brett
    Kearns, Catherine
    Kidder, Tristram R.
    Lanoë, Fran\c cois
    Lawrence, Dan
    Lee, Gyoung-Ah
    Levin, Maureece J.
    Lindskoug, Henrik B.
    López-Sáez, José Antonio
    Macrae, Scott
    Marchant, Rob
    Marston, John M.
    McClure, Sarah
    McCoy, Mark D.
    Miller, Alicia Ventresca
    Morrison, Michael
    Motuzaite Matuzeviciute, Giedre
    Müller, Johannes
    Nayak, Ayushi
    Noerwidi, Sofwan
    Peres, Tanya M.
    Peterson, Christian E.
    Proctor, Lucas
    Randall, Asa R.
    Renette, Steve
    Robbins Schug, Gwen
    Ryzewski, Krysta
    Saini, Rakesh
    Scheinsohn, Vivian
    Schmidt, Peter
    Sebillaud, Pauline
    Seitsonen, Oula
    Simpson, Ian A.
    So\ltysiak, Arkadiusz
    Speakman, Robert J.
    Spengler, Robert N.
    Steffen, Martina L.
    Storozum, Michael J.
    Strickland, Keir M.
    Thompson, Jessica
    Thurston, T. L.
    Ulm, Sean
    Ustunkaya, M. Cemre
    Welker, Martin H.
    West, Catherine
    Williams, Patrick Ryan
    Wright, David K.
    Wright, Nathan
    Zahir, Muhammad
    Zerboni, Andrea
    Beaudoin, Ella
    Munevar Garcia, Santiago
    Powell, Jeremy
    Thornton, Alexa
    Kaplan, Jed O.
    Gaillard, Marie-José
    Klein Goldewijk, Kees
    Ellis, Erle
    Archaeological assessment reveals Earth’s early transformation through land use2019In: Science, ISSN 0036-8075, E-ISSN 1095-9203, Vol. 365, no 6456, p. 897-902Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Humans began to leave lasting impacts on Earth’s surface starting 10,000 to 8000 years ago. Through a synthetic collaboration with archaeologists around the globe, Stephens et al. compiled a comprehensive picture of the trajectory of human land use worldwide during the Holocene (see the Perspective by Roberts). Hunter-gatherers, farmers, and pastoralists transformed the face of Earth earlier and to a greater extent than has been widely appreciated, a transformation that was essentially global by 3000 years before the present.Science, this issue p. 897; see also p. 865Environmentally transformative human use of land accelerated with the emergence of agriculture, but the extent, trajectory, and implications of these early changes are not well understood. An empirical global assessment of land use from 10,000 years before the present (yr B.P.) to 1850 CE reveals a planet largely transformed by hunter-gatherers, farmers, and pastoralists by 3000 years ago, considerably earlier than the dates in the land-use reconstructions commonly used by Earth scientists. Synthesis of knowledge contributed by more than 250 archaeologists highlighted gaps in archaeological expertise and data quality, which peaked for 2000 yr B.P. and in traditionally studied and wealthier regions. Archaeological reconstruction of global land-use history illuminates the deep roots of Earth’s transformation and challenges the emerging Anthropocene paradigm that large-scale anthropogenic global environmental change is mostly a recent phenomenon.

  • 18.
    Sciuto, Claudia
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Arts, Department of historical, philosophical and religious studies, Environmental Archaeology Lab.
    Allios, Dominique
    LAHM University of Rennes 2, France.
    Bendoula, Ryad
    ITAP, Irstea, Montepllier Sup Agro, Université de Montpellier, IRSTEA, France.
    Cocoual, Antoine
    W3DS, Rennes, France.
    Gardel, Marie-Elise
    Amicale Laïque de Carcassonne, France.
    Geladi, Paul
    SLU, Swedish university of Agricultural Sciences, Umeå, Sweden.
    Gobrecht, Alexia
    ITAP, Irstea, Montepllier Sup Agro, Université de Montpellier, IRSTEA, France.
    Gorretta, Natalie
    ITAP, Irstea, Montepllier Sup Agro, Université de Montpellier, IRSTEA, France.
    Guermeur, Nominoe
    LAHM University of Rennes 2, France.
    Jay, Sylvain
    ITAP, Irstea, Montepllier Sup Agro, Université de Montpellier, IRSTEA, France.
    Linderholm, Johan
    Umeå University, Faculty of Arts, Department of historical, philosophical and religious studies, Environmental Archaeology Lab.
    Thyrel, Mikael
    SLU, Swedish university of Agricultural Sciences, Umeå, Sweden.
    Characterization of building materials by means of spectral remote sensing: the example of Carcassonne's defensive wall (Aude, France)2019In: Journal of Archaeological Science: Reports, ISSN 2352-409X, E-ISSN 2352-4103, p. 396-405Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Geological and archaeological analysis of stone masonries in standing structures helps reveal information aboutuse of natural resources. At the same time, the study of historical materials is useful for conservators and culturalheritage management. Geochemical and petrographic analysis of building material types is usually done throughdestructive analysis on a few selected samples and can be problematic due to the costs of operations and the sizeof buildings themselves. This paper demonstrates that the combination of hyperspectral imaging portable NearInfrared (NIR) spectroscopy and Energy Dispersive X-ray Fluorescence (ED-XRF) spectroscopy can be useful foranalysing types of raw materials used in distinct construction phases of the inner defensive wall in the citadel ofCarcassonne (Aude, France). Stratigraphic analysis of the architecture, short-range spectral remote sensing andportable ED-XRF measurements were combined in an interdisciplinary approach to classify sandstone elements.The experimental protocol for in situ non-destructive analysis and classification of the masonry types allows theinvestigation of the monument in a diachronic perspective, collecting information to delineate raw materialsvarieties and their use or re-use through time.

  • 19.
    Pálsson, Gísli
    Umeå University, Faculty of Arts, Department of historical, philosophical and religious studies, Environmental Archaeology Lab. Umeå University, Faculty of Arts, Humlab.
    Domination, Subsistence, and Interdependence: Tracing Resource Claim Networks across Iceland's Post-Reformation Landscape2019In: Human Ecology, ISSN 0300-7839, E-ISSN 1572-9915, Vol. 47, p. 619-636Article in journal (Refereed)
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  • 20.
    Östman, Sofi
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Arts, Department of historical, philosophical and religious studies, Environmental Archaeology Lab.
    Hristova, Ivanka
    Umeå University, Faculty of Arts, Department of historical, philosophical and religious studies, Environmental Archaeology Lab.
    Buckland, Philip I.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Arts, Department of historical, philosophical and religious studies, Environmental Archaeology Lab.
    Wallin, Jan-Erik
    Eriksson, Samuel
    Umeå University, Faculty of Arts, Department of historical, philosophical and religious studies, Environmental Archaeology Lab.
    Environmental archaeological analysis of samples from Dronningens gate, Trondheim, Sør-Trøndelag2019Report (Other academic)
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  • 21.
    Östman, Sofi
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Arts, Department of historical, philosophical and religious studies, Environmental Archaeology Lab.
    Hristova, Ivanka
    Umeå University, Faculty of Arts, Department of historical, philosophical and religious studies, Environmental Archaeology Lab.
    Eriksson, Samuel
    Umeå University, Faculty of Arts, Department of historical, philosophical and religious studies, Environmental Archaeology Lab.
    Hristov, Kristian
    Umeå University, Faculty of Arts, Department of historical, philosophical and religious studies, Environmental Archaeology Lab.
    Wallin, Jan-Erik
    Umeå University, Faculty of Arts, Department of historical, philosophical and religious studies.
    Environmental archaeological analysis of samples from the Neolithic site of Alveberget, Arendal kommun, Aust-Agder Fylke. ID2194912019Report (Other academic)
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  • 22.
    Sciuto, Claudia
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Arts, Department of historical, philosophical and religious studies, Environmental Archaeology Lab.
    Geladi, Paul
    SLU Swedish University of Agricultural Sciences, Umeå, Sweden.
    La Rosa, Lorenza
    Department of Archaeology, Conservation and History, University of Oslo, Oslo, Norway.
    Linderholm, Johan
    Umeå University, Faculty of Arts, Department of historical, philosophical and religious studies, Environmental Archaeology Lab.
    Thyrel, Mikael
    SLU Swedish University of Agricultural Sciences, Umeå, Sweden.
    Hyperspectral Imaging for Characterization of Lithic Raw Materials: the Case of aMesolithic Dwelling in Northern Sweden2019In: Lithic Technology, ISSN 2051-6185, Vol. 44, no 1, p. 22-35Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This study proposes a method for the classification of lithic raw materials by means of hyperspectralimaging, a non-destructive fast analytical technique. The information potential of this approach wastested on a dwelling site dated to mid-late Mesolithic (7200–5800 BP) at Lillsjön, Ångermanland,Sweden. A dataset of lithic tools and flakes (2612 objects) made of quartz and quartzite, wasanalyzed using a shortwave infrared hyperspectral imaging system. The classification of the rawmaterials was performed applying multivariate statistical models. A random test set of 55artefacts was selected, classified according to spectral signature and divided into categoriescorresponding to different geological materials. The same test set was analyzed with EnergyDispersive X-Ray Fluorescence (ED XRF) to validate the classification. The entire dataset of lithicscollected on the site was then classified applying a SIMCA model. The distribution of items onthe site was visualized in a 3D GIS platform according to their geological characteristics tohighlight patterns that could indicate different use of the space and dynamics of raw materialssupply over time.

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  • 23.
    Hristova, Ivanka
    Umeå University, Faculty of Arts, Department of historical, philosophical and religious studies, Environmental Archaeology Lab.
    Macrofossil analysis of five samples from the site Heimdalsjordet - Vannrør, Sandefjord kommune, ID 216452019Report (Other academic)
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  • 24.
    Hristova, Ivanka
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Arts, Department of historical, philosophical and religious studies, Environmental Archaeology Lab.
    Östman, Sofi
    Umeå University, Faculty of Arts, Department of historical, philosophical and religious studies, Environmental Archaeology Lab.
    Macrofossil analysis of one sample from the site Raä Visingsö 217, Jönköping, Småland2019Report (Other academic)
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    2019-002
  • 25.
    Hristova, Ivanka
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Arts, Department of historical, philosophical and religious studies, Environmental Archaeology Lab.
    Östman, Sofi
    Umeå University, Faculty of Arts, Department of historical, philosophical and religious studies, Environmental Archaeology Lab.
    Macrofossil analysis of one sample from the site Skra bro, Raä Björlanda 3722019Report (Other academic)
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  • 26.
    Hristova, Ivanka
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Arts, Department of historical, philosophical and religious studies, Environmental Archaeology Lab.
    Östman, Sofi
    Umeå University, Faculty of Arts, Department of historical, philosophical and religious studies, Environmental Archaeology Lab.
    Macrofossil analysis of the site Lyngdal kirkegård, Lyngdal kommune, ID 1572422019Report (Other academic)
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    2019-003
  • 27.
    Hristova, Ivanka
    Umeå University, Faculty of Arts, Department of historical, philosophical and religious studies, Environmental Archaeology Lab.
    Macrofossil analysis of three samples from the site Linnheia del 1, Grimstad kommune, ID1602282019