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  • 1.
    Bailey, Leslie
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Molecular Biology (Faculty of Medicine).
    Engström, Patrik
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Department of Molecular Biology (Faculty of Science and Technology).
    Nordström, Anna
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Community Medicine and Rehabilitation, Rehabilitation Medicine. Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Surgical and Perioperative Sciences, Sports Medicine.
    Bergström, Sven
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Molecular Biology (Faculty of Medicine).
    Waldenström, Anders
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine, Medicine.
    Nordström, Peter
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Community Medicine and Rehabilitation, Geriatric Medicine.
    Chlamydia pneumoniae infection results in generalized bone loss in mice2008In: Microbes and infection, ISSN 1286-4579, E-ISSN 1769-714X, Vol. 10, no 10-11, p. 1175-1181Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 2.
    Ballin, Marcel
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Community Medicine and Rehabilitation, Geriatric Medicine. Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine, Section of Sustainable Health.
    Lundberg, Emmy
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Community Medicine and Rehabilitation, Geriatric Medicine. Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine, Section of Sustainable Health.
    Sörlén, Niklas
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Community Medicine and Rehabilitation, Geriatric Medicine. Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine, Section of Sustainable Health.
    Nordström, Peter
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Community Medicine and Rehabilitation, Geriatric Medicine.
    Hult, Andreas
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine, Section of Sustainable Health.
    Nordström, Anna
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine, Section of Sustainable Health. Department of Sport Science, School of Sport Sciences, The Arctic University of Norway, Tromsø, Norway..
    Effects of interval training on quality of life and cardiometabolic risk markers in older adults: a randomized controlled trial2019In: Clinical Interventions in Aging, ISSN 1176-9092, E-ISSN 1178-1998, Vol. 14, p. 1589-1599Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Purpose: To explore the effects of 10 weeks of progressive vigorous interval training as a single intervention on health-related quality of life (HRQoL) and cardiometabolic risk markers in centrally obese 70-year-old individuals.

    Participants and methods: A randomized controlled trial (ClinicalTrials.gov registration no. NCT03450655) including seventy-seven community-dwelling 70-year-old men and women with central obesity defined as > 1 kg visceral adipose tissue for women and > 2 kg for men. Participants randomized to the intervention group were offered a 10-week progressive vigorous interval training program performed three times per week. Control subjects were asked to maintain their daily living and routines throughout the trial. All participants in both groups had received tailored lifestyle recommendations focused on diet and physical activity at one occasion within 12 months prior to trial initiation. Prespecified outcome measures included: changes in HRQoL using the Short Form Health Survey Questionnaire (SF-36), blood pressure; resting heart rate (HR) and blood lipids. All analyses were conducted on an intention-to-treat basis.

    Results: The intervention resulted in significant effects on the SF-36 mental component summary (MCS) score and the mental health (MH) subscale (P< 0.05 for both), when compared to the control group. Specifically, the intervention group increased their MCS score by 6.3 points (95% confidence interval [CI] = 0.3–12.3) and their MH score by 6.0 points (95% CI = 1.7–10.4) compared to the control group. Moreover, significant effects were seen on resting HR, total cholesterol and LDL-cholesterol (P<0.05 for all).

    Conclusion: It was shown that 10 weeks of vigorous interval training as a single intervention was sufficient to improve mental aspects of HRQoL in older individuals with central obesity, which is a critical aspect of healthy ageing. Positive effects were seen also on cardiometabolic risk markers.

  • 3.
    Ballin, Marcel
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine, Occupational and Environmental Medicine. Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Community Medicine and Rehabilitation, Geriatric Medicine.
    Lundberg, Emmy
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Community Medicine and Rehabilitation, Geriatric Medicine. Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine, Occupational and Environmental Medicine.
    Sörlén, Niklas
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Community Medicine and Rehabilitation, Geriatric Medicine. Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine, Occupational and Environmental Medicine.
    Nordström, Peter
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Community Medicine and Rehabilitation, Geriatric Medicine.
    Hult, Andreas
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine, Occupational and Environmental Medicine.
    Nordström, Anna
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Community Medicine and Rehabilitation, Geriatric Medicine. Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine, Occupational and Environmental Medicine. School of Sport Sciences, The Arctic University of Norway, Tromsø, Norway..
    Effects of Interval Training on Visceral Adipose Tissue in Centrally Obese 70-Year-Old Individuals: A Randomized Controlled Trial2019In: Journal of The American Geriatrics Society, ISSN 0002-8614, E-ISSN 1532-5415, Vol. 67, no 8, p. 1625-1631Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    OBJECTIVE: To investigate the effects of 10 weeks of progressive vigorous-intensity interval training as a single intervention on body composition among 70-year-old individuals with central obesity.

    DESIGN: Randomized controlled trial (ClinicalTrials.gov registration No. NCT03450655).

    SETTING: Community-dwelling 70-year-old men and women living in the Umeå municipality in Sweden.

    PARTICIPANTS: Seventy-seven 70-year-old men and women with central obesity (greater than 1 kg visceral adipose tissue [VAT] for women and greater than 2 kg VAT for men).

    INTERVENTION: Participants allocated to the intervention group were offered a 10-week progressive concurrent exercise program performed three times per week. All participants in both groups had received tailored lifestyle recommendations focused on diet and physical activity at one occasion within 12 months prior to trial initiation.

    MEASUREMENTS: The primary outcome was changes in VAT, and secondary outcomes included changes in total fat mass (FM), total lean body mass (LBM), and body mass index.

    RESULTS: Comparing the groups, there were no significant differences in decrease of VAT mass (P = .10), although the intervention group significantly decreased FM by 716 g (P = .01) and gained LBM by 508 g (P = .03), compared to the control group. Furthermore, the effects of the training were significantly greater in the male subcohort (P < .05 for interaction), with positive effects also on VAT and FM, where men in the intervention group decreased VAT by 175 g (P < .05) and FM by 1364 g (P = .004), compared to the male controls.

    CONCLUSIONS: The present trial demonstrates that 10 weeks of progressive vigorous interval training is sufficient to significantly decrease FM in older adults with central obesity, with positive effects also on LBM.

  • 4.
    Berginström, Nils
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Community Medicine and Rehabilitation, Geriatric Medicine. Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Surgical and Perioperative Sciences, Sports Medicine. Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine, Occupational and Environmental Medicine.
    Johansson, Jonas
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Surgical and Perioperative Sciences, Sports Medicine. Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine, Occupational and Environmental Medicine.
    Nordström, Peter
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Community Medicine and Rehabilitation, Geriatric Medicine.
    Nordström, Anna
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Surgical and Perioperative Sciences, Sports Medicine. Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine, Occupational and Environmental Medicine.
    Attention in Older Adults: A Normative Study of the Integrated Visual and Auditory Continuous Performance Test for Persons Aged 70 Years2015In: Clinical Neuropsychologist (Neuropsychology, Development and Cognition: Section D), ISSN 1385-4046, E-ISSN 1744-4144, Vol. 29, no 5, p. 595-610Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Objective: Our objective was to present normative data from 70-year-olds on the Integrated Visual and Auditory Continuous Performance Test (IVA), a computerized measure of attention and response control. Method: 640 participants (330 men and 310 women), all aged 70years, completed the IVA, as well as the Mini-Mental State Examination and the Geriatric Depression Scale. Results: Data were stratified by education and gender. Education differences were found in 11 of 22 IVA scales. Minor gender differences were found in six scales for the high-education group, and two scales for the low-education group. Comparisons of healthy participants and participants with stroke, myocardial infarction, or diabetes showed only minor differences. Correlations among IVA scales were strong (all r > .34, p < .001), and those with the widely used Mini-Mental State Examination were weaker (all r < .21, p < .05). Skewed distributions of normative data from primary IVA scales measuring response inhibition (Prudence) and inattention (Vigilance) represent a weakness of this test. Conclusions: This study provides IVA norms for 70-year-olds stratified by education and gender, increasing the usability of this instrument when testing persons near this age. The data presented here show some major differences from original IVA norms, and explanations for these differences are discussed. Explanations include the broad age-range used in the original IVA norms (66-99years of age) and the passage of 15years since the original norms were collected.

  • 5.
    Berginström, Nils
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Community Medicine and Rehabilitation, Geriatric Medicine.
    Nordström, Peter
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Community Medicine and Rehabilitation, Geriatric Medicine.
    Ekman, Urban
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Integrative Medical Biology (IMB), Physiology. Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Umeå Centre for Functional Brain Imaging (UFBI). Karolinska Inst, Dept Neurobiol Care Sci & Soc, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Eriksson, Johan
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Integrative Medical Biology (IMB), Physiology. Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Umeå Centre for Functional Brain Imaging (UFBI).
    Andersson, Micael
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Integrative Medical Biology (IMB), Physiology. Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Umeå Centre for Functional Brain Imaging (UFBI).
    Nyberg, Lars
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Integrative Medical Biology (IMB), Physiology. Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Umeå Centre for Functional Brain Imaging (UFBI).
    Nordström, Anna
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine, Occupational and Environmental Medicine.
    Fatigue after traumatic brain injury is linked to altered striato-thalamic-cortical functioning2017In: Brain Injury: Accepted Abstracts from the International Brain Injury Association’s 12th World Congress on Brain Injury, 2017, Vol. 31, p. 755-755Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Mental fatigue is a common symptom in the chronic phase of traumatic brain injury. Despite its high prevalence, no treatmentis available for this disabling symptom, and the mechanisms underlying fatigue are poorly understood. Some studies have suggested that fatigue in traumatic brain injury and other neurological disorders might reflect dysfunction within striato-thalamic-cortical loops. In the present study, we investigated whether functional magnetic resonance imaging(fMRI) can be used to detect chronic fatigue after traumatic brain injury (TBI), with emphasis on the striato-thalamic cortical-loops. We included patients who had suffered traumatic brain injury (n = 57, age range 20–64 years) and experienced mental fatigue > 1 year post injury (mean = 8.79 years, SD = 7.35), and age- and sex-matched healthycontrols (n = 27, age range 25–65 years). All participants completed self-assessment scales of fatigue and other symptoms, underwent an extensive neuropsychological test battery and performed a fatiguing 27-minute attention task (the modified Symbol Digit Modalities Test) during fMRI. Accuracy did not differ between groups, but reaction times were slower in the traumatic brain injury group (p < 0.001). Patients showed a greater increase in fatigue than controls from before to after task completion (p < 0.001). Patients showed less fMRI blood oxygen level–dependent activity in several a priori hypothesized regions (family-wise error corrected,p < 0.05), including the bilateral caudate, thalamus and anterior insula. Using the left caudate as a region of interest and testing for sensitivity and specificity, we identified 91% of patients and 81% of controls. As expected, controls showed decreased activation over time in regions of interest—the bilateral caudate and anterior thalamus (p < 0.002, uncorrected)—whereas patients showed no corresponding activity decrease. These results suggest that chronic fatigue after TBI is linked to altered striato-thalamic-cortical functioning. The high precision of fMRI for the detection of fatigue is of great clinical interest, given the lack of objective measures for the diagnosis of fatigue.

  • 6.
    Berginström, Nils
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Community Medicine and Rehabilitation, Geriatric Medicine.
    Nordström, Peter
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Community Medicine and Rehabilitation, Geriatric Medicine.
    Ekman, Urban
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Umeå Centre for Functional Brain Imaging (UFBI). Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Integrative Medical Biology (IMB), Physiology. Karolinska Inst, Dept Neurobiol Care Sci & Soc, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Eriksson, Johan
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Umeå Centre for Functional Brain Imaging (UFBI). Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Integrative Medical Biology (IMB), Physiology.
    Andersson, Micael
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Umeå Centre for Functional Brain Imaging (UFBI). Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Integrative Medical Biology (IMB), Physiology.
    Nyberg, Lars
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Radiation Sciences. Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Umeå Centre for Functional Brain Imaging (UFBI). Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Integrative Medical Biology (IMB), Physiology.
    Nordström, Anna
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine, Occupational and Environmental Medicine. Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Community Medicine and Rehabilitation, Geriatric Medicine.
    Using Functional Magnetic Resonance Imaging to Detect Chronic Fatigue in Patients With Previous Traumatic Brain Injury: changes linked to altered Striato-Thalamic-Cortical Functioning2018In: The journal of head trauma rehabilitation, ISSN 0885-9701, E-ISSN 1550-509X, Vol. 33, no 4, p. 266-274Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Objective: To investigate whether functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) can be used to detect fatigue after traumatic brain injury (TBI).

    Setting: Neurorehabilitation clinic.

    Participants: Patients with TBI (n = 57) and self-experienced fatigue more than 1 year postinjury, and age- and gender-matched healthy controls (n = 27).

    Main Measures: Self-assessment scales of fatigue, a neuropsychological test battery, and fMRI scanning during performance of a fatiguing 27-minute attention task.

    Results: During testing within the fMRI scanner, patients showed a higher increase in self-reported fatigue than controls from before to after completing the task (P < .001).The patients also showed lower activity in several regions, including bilateral caudate, thalamus, and anterior insula (all P < .05). Furthermore, the patients failed to display decreased activation over time in regions of interest: the bilateral caudate and anterior thalamus (all P < .01). Left caudate activity correctly identified 91% of patients and 81% of controls, resulting in a positive predictive value of 91%.

    Conclusion: The results suggest that chronic fatigue after TBI is associated with altered striato-thalamic-cortical functioning. It would be of interest to study whether fMRI can be used to support the diagnosis of chronic fatigue in future studies.

  • 7.
    Berginström, Nils
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Community Medicine and Rehabilitation, Geriatric Medicine.
    Nordström, Peter
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Community Medicine and Rehabilitation, Geriatric Medicine. School of Sport Sciences, The Arctic University of Norway, Tromsø, Norway Medicine.
    Ekman, Urban
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Umeå Centre for Functional Brain Imaging (UFBI). Department of Neurobiology, Care Sciences and Society, Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Eriksson, Johan
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Umeå Centre for Functional Brain Imaging (UFBI).
    Nyberg, Lars
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Umeå Centre for Functional Brain Imaging (UFBI). Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Radiation Sciences.
    Nordström, Anna
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine, Section of Sustainable Health. School of Sport Sciences, The Arctic University of Norway, Tromsø, Norway.
    Pharmaco-fMRI in Patients With Traumatic Brain Injury: A Randomized Controlled Trial With the Monoaminergic Stabilizer (-)-OSU61622019In: The journal of head trauma rehabilitation, ISSN 0885-9701, E-ISSN 1550-509X, Vol. 34, no 3, p. 189-198Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    OBJECTIVE: To examine the effects of monoaminergic stabilizer (-)-OSU6162 on brain activity, as measured by blood-oxygen-level-dependent (BOLD) functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI), in patients in the chronic phase of traumatic brain injury suffering from fatigue.

    SETTING: Neurorehabilitation clinic.

    PARTICIPANTS: Patients with traumatic brain injury received either placebo (n = 24) or active treatment (n = 28). Healthy controls (n = 27) went through fMRI examination at one point and were used in sensitivity analysis on normalization of BOLD response.

    DESIGN: Randomized, double-blinded, placebo-controlled design.

    MAIN MEASURES: Effects on BOLD signal changes from before to after treatment during performance of a fatiguing attention task.

    RESULTS: The fMRI results revealed treatment effects within the right occipitotemporal cortex and the right orbitofrontal cortex. In these regions, the BOLD response was normalized relative to healthy controls at the postintervention fMRI session. No effects were seen in regions in which we previously observed activity differences between patients and healthy controls while performing this fMRI task, such as the striatum.

    CONCLUSION: (-)-OSU6162 treatment had influences on functional brain activity, although the normalized regional BOLD response was observed in regions that were not a priori hypothesized to be sensitive to this particular treatment, and was not accompanied by any effects on in-scanner test performance or on fatigue.

  • 8.
    Berginström, Nils
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Community Medicine and Rehabilitation, Geriatric Medicine. Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Community Medicine and Rehabilitation, Rehabilitation Medicine.
    Nordström, Peter
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Community Medicine and Rehabilitation, Geriatric Medicine.
    Nyberg, Lars
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Integrative Medical Biology (IMB), Physiology.
    Nordström, Anna
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine, Occupational and Environmental Medicine.
    White matter hyperintensities increases with traumatic brain injuryseverity: associations to neuropsychological performance and fatigueManuscript (preprint) (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Objective: To examine the prevalence of white matter hyperintensities (WMHs) in patients with traumatic brain injury (TBI) as compared to healthy controls, and to investigate whether there is an association between WMH lesion burden and performance on neuropsychological tests in patients with TBI.

    Methods: A total of 59 patients with TBI and 27 age- and gender- matched healthy controls underwent thorough neuropsychological testing and magnetic resonance imaging. The quantification of WMH lesions was performed using the fully automated Lesion Segmentation Tool.

    Results: WMH lesions were more common in patients with TBI than in healthy controls (p = 0.032), and increased with higher TBI severity (p = 0.025). Linear regressions showed that WMH lesions in patients with TBI were not related to performance on any neuropsychological tests (p > 0.05 for all). However, a negative relationship between number of WMH lesions in patients with TBI and self-assessed fatigue was found (r = –0.33, p = 0.026).

    Conclusion: WMH lesions are more common in patients with TBI than in healthy controls, and WMH lesions burden increases with TBI severity. However, these lesions do not seem to explain the decreased cognitive functioning or the increased fatigue in patients with TBI.

  • 9.
    Berginström, Nils
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Community Medicine and Rehabilitation, Geriatric Medicine.
    Nordström, Peter
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Community Medicine and Rehabilitation, Geriatric Medicine.
    Schuit, Robert
    Nordström, Anna
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine, Occupational and Environmental Medicine.
    The effects of (-)-OSU6162 on chronic fatigue in patients with traumatic brain injury: a randomized controlled trial2017In: The journal of head trauma rehabilitation, ISSN 0885-9701, E-ISSN 1550-509X, Vol. 32, no 2, p. E46-E54Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    OBJECTIVE: To examine the effects of the monoaminergic stabilizer (-)-OSU6162 on mental fatigue in patients with traumatic brain injury.

    SETTING: Single-center Neurorehabilitation Clinic.

    DESIGN: Randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled trial.

    PARTICIPANTS: Sixty-four subjects with traumatic brain injury were randomized to treatment (n = 33) and placebo (n = 31).

    MAIN MEASURES: The effects of (-)-OSU6162 at a dose of 15 mg twice a day were evaluated using self-assessment scales and neuropsychological tests measuring mental fatigue.

    RESULTS: No difference between groups was observed on any scale at baseline. At follow-up, both groups showed significant improvement on the Fatigue Severity Scale and the Mental Fatigue Scale (both Ps < .01). Similarly, the performance of both groups increased significantly on many neuropsychological tests. However, no significant between-group difference in changes on these scales was observed before or after adjustment for confounders except for one neuropsychological test favoring the control group. Sensitivity analyses showed significantly greater changes in levels of prolactin and folic acid and heart rate (all Ps < .05) in the treatment group. The mean plasma concentration after 4 weeks of treatment was 0.14 (range, 0.01-0.32) μM, which was lower than expected.

    INTERPRETATION: Treatment with (-)-OSU6162 had no significant effect on mental fatigue in patients with traumatic brain injury compared with placebo.

  • 10.
    Bergman, J
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Community Medicine and Rehabilitation, Geriatric Medicine.
    Nordström, Anna
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine, Occupational and Environmental Medicine. School of Sport Sciences, Arctic University of Norway, Tromsø, Norway..
    Nordström, Peter
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Community Medicine and Rehabilitation, Geriatric Medicine.
    Bisphosphonate use after clinical fracture and risk of new fracture: response to comments by Wu et al.2018In: Osteoporosis International, ISSN 0937-941X, E-ISSN 1433-2965, Vol. 29, no 9, p. 2159-2160Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 11.
    Bergman, Jonathan
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Community Medicine and Rehabilitation, Geriatric Medicine.
    Nordström, Anna
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine, Section of Sustainable Health. School of Sport Sciences, UiT Arctic University of Norway, Postboks 1621, 9509, Alta, Norway..
    Hommel, A.
    Department of Care Sciences, Malmö University, 20506, Malmö, Sweden..
    Kivipelto, M.
    Division of Clinical geriatrics, Department of Neurobiology, Care Sciences and Society, Karolinska Institutet, Plan 7, 14183, Huddinge, Sweden. Research and Development Unit, Stockholm Sjukhem, Mariebergsgatan 22, 11219, Stockholm, Sweden..
    Nordström, Peter
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Community Medicine and Rehabilitation, Geriatric Medicine.
    Bisphosphonates and mortality: confounding in observational studies?2019In: Osteoporosis International, ISSN 0937-941X, E-ISSN 1433-2965Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Summary: Numerous observational studies suggest that bisphosphonates reduce mortality. This study showed that bisphosphonate use is associated with lower mortality within days of treatment, although the association was not significant until the second week. Such an early association is consistent with confounding, although an early treatment effect cannot be ruled out.

    Introduction: The purpose of this study was to examine whether confounding explains why numerous observational studies show that bisphosphonate use is associated with lower mortality. To this end, we examined how soon after treatment initiation a lower mortality rate can be observed. We hypothesized that, due to confounding, the association would be observed immediately.

    Methods: This was a retrospective cohort study of hip fracture patients discharged from Swedish hospitals between 1 July 2006 and 31 December 2015. The data covered 260,574 hip fracture patients and were obtained from the Swedish Hip Fracture Register and national registers. Of the 260,574 patients, 49,765 met all eligibility criteria and 10,178 were pair matched (bisphosphonate users to controls) using time-dependent propensity scores. The matching variables were age, sex, diagnoses, prescription medications, type of hip fracture, type of surgical procedure, known or suspected dementia, and physical functioning status.

    Results: Over a median follow-up of 2.8 years, 2922 of the 10,178 matched patients died. The mortality rate was 7.9 deaths per 100 person-years in bisphosphonate users and 9.4 deaths in controls, which corresponded to a 15% lower mortality rate in bisphosphonate users (hazard ratio 0.85, 95% confidence interval 0.79–0.91). The risk of death was lower in bisphosphonate users from day 6 of treatment, although the association was not significant until the second week.

    Conclusion: Bisphosphonate use was associated with lower mortality within days of treatment initiation. This finding is consistent with confounding, although an early treatment effect cannot be ruled out.

  • 12.
    Bergman, Jonathan
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Community Medicine and Rehabilitation, Geriatric Medicine.
    Nordström, Anna
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine, Occupational and Environmental Medicine.
    Nordström, Peter
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Community Medicine and Rehabilitation, Geriatric Medicine.
    Alendronate use and the risk of nonvertebral fracture during glucocorticoid therapy: a retrospective cohort study2018In: Journal of Clinical Endocrinology and Metabolism, ISSN 0021-972X, E-ISSN 1945-7197, Vol. 103, no 1, p. 306-313Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Context: Glucocorticoids increase the risk of nonvertebral fracture, but no clinical trial has shown that nonvertebral fractures can be prevented by co-administration of an anti-osteoporotic drug.

    Objective: To estimate the effect of alendronate on the risk of nonvertebral fracture in older adults taking oral glucocorticoids.

    Design: Retrospective cohort study using national Swedish registers.

    Setting: Hospitalized care and ambulatory specialist care.

    Patients: Among adults aged 50 years or older (N=3,347,959), we identified those who initiated oral glucocorticoid therapy from 2006 through 2011 (≥2.5 mg/day of prednisone or equivalent for ≥91 days). The final analysis included 16,890 alendronate users and 16,890 nonusers, who were matched using time-dependent propensity scores.

    Main Outcome Measure: Nonvertebral fracture. This was not pre-specified.

    Results: Over a median follow-up of 14.5 months, the incidence rate of nonvertebral fracture was 2.0 cases per 100 person-years in alendronate users and 2.4 cases in nonusers. This difference corresponded to a 16% lower rate in users (hazard ratio 0.84, 95% confidence interval 0.75 to 0.94). For hip fractures specifically, the rate was 34% lower in alendronate users relative to nonusers (hazard ratio 0.66, 95% confidence interval 0.55 to 0.78). The association of alendronate use with a lower risk of nonvertebral fracture was strongest in patients who received high doses of glucocorticoid.

    Conclusion: Alendronate use was associated with a lower risk of nonvertebral fracture, including hip fracture. Similar, but not statistically significant, associations have been reported in meta-analyses of clinical trials.

  • 13.
    Bergman, Jonathan
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Community Medicine and Rehabilitation, Geriatric Medicine.
    Nordström, Anna
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine, Occupational and Environmental Medicine.
    Nordström, Peter
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Community Medicine and Rehabilitation, Geriatric Medicine.
    Bisphosphonate use after clinical fracture and risk of new fracture2018In: Osteoporosis International, ISSN 0937-941X, E-ISSN 1433-2965, Vol. 29, no 4, p. 937-945Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Summary: Among older adults with a previous fracture, treatment for osteoporosis was initially associated with a higher risk of new fracture. However, the relative risk of new fracture decreased over time, a trend that is consistent with a beneficial effect, as treatment for osteoporosis is prescribed to reduce high fracture risks.

    Introduction: The purpose of this study was to examine whether bisphosphonate use is associated with a lower risk of new fracture after a clinical fracture in older adults.

    Methods: Data were available for 3,329,400 adults in Sweden who were aged ae<yen> 50 years between 2006 and 2011. During this period, 260,353 sustained a clinical fracture and were naïve to bisphosphonates at the time. Those who subsequently received a bisphosphonate were matched to up to three others on sex, year of birth, and type and year of initial fracture. The final cohort comprised 83,104 adults (26.3% bisphosphonate users).

    Results: During the period from initial fracture to initiation of bisphosphonate treatment, the incidence rate of any new clinical fracture was higher in those who later became bisphosphonate users than in those who remained nonusers (175.1 vs. 75.9 per 1000 person-years; hazard ratio 2.30, 95% confidence interval 2.19 to 2.41). Similarly, during the first 6 months of treatment, the incidence rate was higher in bisphosphonate users than in nonusers (128.8 vs. 90.2 per 1000 person-years; hazard ratio 1.41, 95% confidence interval 1.32 to 1.51). However, this difference decreased over time: by months 12 to 18, the incidence rate was similar in users and nonusers (59.3 vs. 55.3 per 1000 person-years; hazard ratio 1.03, 95% confidence interval 0.91 to 1.16).

    Conclusions: There was a decrease in the relative risk of new fracture during bisphosphonate treatment, a trend that is consistent with a beneficial treatment effect, as bisphosphonates are prescribed to reduce high fracture risks.

  • 14.
    Bergman, Jonathan
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Community Medicine and Rehabilitation, Geriatric Medicine.
    Nordström, Anna
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine, Section of Sustainable Health. School of Sport Sciences, UiT Arctic University of Norway, Postboks 1621, 9509, Alta, Norway.
    Nordström, Peter
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Community Medicine and Rehabilitation, Geriatric Medicine.
    Epidemiology of osteonecrosis among older adults in Sweden2019In: Osteoporosis International, ISSN 0937-941X, E-ISSN 1433-2965, Vol. 30, no 5, p. 965-973Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Summary: This study estimated the incidence of osteonecrosis in a Swedish, nationwide cohort of older adults. Osteonecrosis was approximately 10 times more common than in previous studies. The strongest risk factors were dialysis, hip fracture, osteomyelitis, and organ transplantation, but only hip fractures could have contributed substantially to the disease burden.

    Introduction: The aim of this study was to estimate the incidence of osteonecrosis in a Swedish, nationwide cohort of older adults and in a large number of risk groups in that cohort.

    Methods: In this retrospective cohort study, we included everyone who was aged 50 years or older and who was living in Sweden on 31 December 2005. We used Swedish national databases to collect data about prescription medication use, diagnosed medical conditions, and performed medical and surgical procedures. The study outcome was diagnosis of primary or secondary osteonecrosis at any skeletal site. The strength of risk factors was assessed using age- and sex-standardized incidence ratios (SIRs).

    Results: The study cohort comprised 3,338,463 adults. The 10-year risk of osteonecrosis was 0.4% (n = 13,425), and the incidence rate was 4.7 cases/10000 person-years (95% confidence interval [CI], 4.6 to 4.7 cases). The strongest risk factors for osteonecrosis were hip fracture (SIR, 7.98; 95% CI, 7.69–8.27), solid organ transplantation (SIR, 7.14; 95% CI, 5.59–8.99), dialysis (SIR, 6.65; 95% CI, 5.62–7.81), and osteomyelitis (SIR, 6.43; 95% CI, 5.70–7.23). A history of hip fracture was present in 21.7% of cases of osteonecrosis, but osteomyelitis, dialysis, and solid organ transplantation were present in only 0.5 to 2% of cases.

    Conclusions: Osteonecrosis was approximately 10 times more common than a small number of previous population-based studies have suggested. The strongest risk factors for osteonecrosis were dialysis, hip fracture, osteomyelitis, and solid organ transplantation, but only hip fractures could have contributed substantially to the disease burden.

  • 15.
    Bergman, Jonathan
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Community Medicine and Rehabilitation, Geriatric Medicine.
    Nordström, Anna
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine, Section of Sustainable Health. School of Sport Sciences, Arctic University of Norway, Tromsø, Norway.
    Nordström, Peter
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Community Medicine and Rehabilitation, Geriatric Medicine.
    Overestimation of the Limitations of Randomized Controlled Trials2019In: Journal of Bone and Mineral Research, ISSN 0884-0431, E-ISSN 1523-4681Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 16.
    Eklund, Fredrik
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Surgical and Perioperative Sciences, Sports Medicine.
    Nordström, Anna
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Surgical and Perioperative Sciences, Sports Medicine.
    Björnstig, Ulf
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Surgical and Perioperative Sciences, Surgery.
    Nordström, Peter
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Community Medicine and Rehabilitation, Geriatric Medicine.
    Bone mass, size and previous fractures as predictors of prospective fractures in an osteoporotic referral population.2009In: Bone, ISSN 8756-3282, E-ISSN 1873-2763, Vol. 45, no 4, p. 808-813Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The influence of bone mass, bone size and previous low energy fractures upon prospective fractures has not been investigated in a referral osteoporotic population. We investigated the association between bone mass, bone size, previous fractures, body constitution, and prospective validated fractures in 5701 women and 1376 men, aged 30 years and older. Bone mass measurements of the femoral neck were collected at a single study center in Sweden. Most of the subjects were measured on suspicion of osteoporosis. Data on validated low energy retrospective and prospective fractures in the cohort were collected from the corresponding health care district. Bone mineral density (BMD, g/cm(2)) and estimated volumetric BMD (vBMD, g/cm(3)) were shown to be good independent predictors for fracture in both women and men (Hazard ratio per standard deviation decrease (HR)=1.27-1.52, p<0.05). Bone size did not predict prospective fractures in either sex (HR=0.91-0.99, p>0.05), and bone size completely explained the higher BMD in men than in women. In women, retrospective low energy fractures (HR=1.78, p<0.001) and height (HR=1.02, p=0.006) were additional independent predictors of osteoporotic fractures after adjusting for age and BMD. In conclusion, we show that in a large osteoporotic referral population, age, BMD and previous fractures are independent predictors of prospective low energy fractures. These results add additional strength to the recent change in focus towards a multivariate analysis when assessing the future risk of fracture.

  • 17.
    Eklund, Fredrik
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Surgical and Perioperative Sciences, Sports Medicine.
    Nordström, Anna
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Surgical and Perioperative Sciences, Sports Medicine. Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Community Medicine and Rehabilitation, Rehabilitation Medicine.
    Neovius, Martin
    Svensson, Olle
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Surgical and Perioperative Sciences, Orthopaedics.
    Nordström, Peter
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Community Medicine and Rehabilitation, Geriatric Medicine.
    Variation in fracture rates by country may not be explained by differences in bone mass2009In: Calcified Tissue International, ISSN 0171-967X, E-ISSN 1432-0827, Vol. 85, no 1, p. 10-16Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    It is unclear whether the high fracture incidence in Sweden compared with other countries is related to low bone mass. We present and compare bone mineral density (BMD, g/cm(2)) at the femoral neck in a mainly osteoporotic referral population consisting of 2,031 men and 6,932 women with that of previous population-based cohorts. BMD measurements were collected at a single study center in Sweden, and data on validated hip fractures were collected from the corresponding health-care district and the cohort investigated. The BMD values of our cohort were similar to those of population-based cohorts from other countries. In contrast, the total incidence of hip fractures in 80-year-old women and men in the health-care district where our BMD measurements were performed was high (1.8% and 0.9%, respectively). The correlation between age and BMD was more negative in men aged 20-49 years than in women of the same age group (-0.011 vs. -0.006 g/cm(2) yearly, P < 0.001). In contrast, at 50-80 years of age, more negative regression coefficients were seen in women (-0.007 vs. -0.004 g/cm(2) yearly, P < 0.001 for comparison). In conclusion, a low BMD may not be the key factor explaining Sweden's comparatively high fracture incidence. In our cross-sectional data, age trends in BMD at the femoral neck differ between men and women. It would be highly interesting to further study the underlying causes of the global variations in fracture incidence rates.

  • 18.
    Gustafsson, Helena
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Community Medicine and Rehabilitation, Geriatric Medicine.
    Aasly, Jan
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Pharmacology and Clinical Neuroscience, Clinical Neuroscience.
    Stråhle, Stefan
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Community Medicine and Rehabilitation, Rehabilitation Medicine.
    Nordström, Anna
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine, Occupational and Environmental Medicine.
    Nordstrom, Peter
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Community Medicine and Rehabilitation, Geriatric Medicine.
    Low muscle strength in late adolescence and Parkinson disease later in life2015In: Neurology, ISSN 0028-3878, E-ISSN 1526-632X, Vol. 84, no 18, p. 1862-1869Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Objective:To evaluate maximal isometric muscle force at 18 years of age in relation to Parkinson disease (PD) later in life.Methods:The cohort consisted of 1,317,713 men who had their muscle strength measured during conscription (1969-1996). Associations between participants' muscle strength at conscription and PD diagnoses, also in their parents, were examined using multivariate statistical models.Results:After adjustment for confounders, the lowest compared to the highest fifth of handgrip strength (hazard ratio [HR] 1.38, 95% confidence interval [CI] 1.06-1.79), elbow flexion strength (HR 1.34, 95% CI 1.02-1.76), but not knee extension strength (HR 1.24, 95% CI 0.94-1.62) was associated with an increased risk of PD during follow-up. Furthermore, men whose parents were diagnosed with PD had reduced handgrip (fathers: mean difference [MD] -5.7 N [95% CI -7.3 to -4.0]; mothers: MD -5.0 N [95% CI -7.0 to -2.9]) and elbow flexion (fathers: MD -4.3 N [95% CI -5.7 to -2.9]; mothers: MD -3.9 N [95% CI -5.7 to -2.2]) strength, but not knee extension strength (fathers: MD -1.1 N [95% CI -2.9 to 0.8]; mothers: MD -0.7 N [95% CI -3.1 to 1.6]), than those with no such familial history.Conclusions:Maximal upper extremity voluntary muscle force was reduced in late adolescence in men diagnosed with PD 30 years later. The findings suggest the presence of subclinical motor deficits 3 decades before the clinical onset of PD.

  • 19.
    Gustafsson, Helena
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Community Medicine and Rehabilitation, Geriatric Medicine. Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine, Occupational and Environmental Medicine.
    Nordström, Anna
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine, Occupational and Environmental Medicine.
    Nordström, Peter
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Community Medicine and Rehabilitation, Geriatric Medicine.
    Depression and subsequent risk of Parkinson disease: A nationwide cohort study2015In: Neurology, ISSN 0028-3878, E-ISSN 1526-632X, Vol. 84, no 24, p. 2422-2429Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    OBJECTIVE: To investigate the long-term risk of Parkinson disease (PD) after depression and evaluate potential confounding by shared susceptibility to the 2 diagnoses.

    METHODS: The nationwide study cohort included 140,688 cases of depression, matched 1:3 using a nested case-control design to evaluate temporal aspects of study parameters (total, n = 562,631). Potential familial coaggregation of the 2 diagnoses was investigated in a subcohort of 540,811 sibling pairs. Associations were investigated using multivariable adjusted statistical models.

    RESULTS: During a median follow-up period of 6.8 (range, 0-26.0) years, 3,260 individuals in the cohort were diagnosed with PD. The multivariable adjusted odds ratio (OR) for PD was 3.2 (95% confidence interval [CI], 2.5-4.1) within the first year of depression, decreasing to 1.5 (95% CI, 1.1-2.0) after 15 to 25 years. Among participants with depression, recurrent hospitalization was an independent risk factor for PD (OR, 1.4; 95% CI, 1.1-1.9 for ≥5 vs 1 hospitalization). In family analyses, siblings' depression was not significantly associated with PD risk in index persons (OR, 1.1; 95% CI, 0.9-1.4).

    CONCLUSIONS: The time-dependent effect, dose-response pattern for recurrent depression, and lack of evidence for coaggregation among siblings all indicate a direct association between depression and subsequent PD. Given that the association was significant for a follow-up period of more than 2 decades, depression may be a very early prodromal symptom of PD, or a causal risk factor.

  • 20.
    Gustafsson, Helena
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Surgical and Perioperative Sciences, Sports Medicine.
    Nordström, Peter
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Community Medicine and Rehabilitation, Geriatric Medicine.
    Strahle, Stefan
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Community Medicine and Rehabilitation.
    Nordström, Anna
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Surgical and Perioperative Sciences, Sports Medicine. Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine, Occupational and Environmental Medicine.
    Parkinsons Disease: A population-based investigation of life satisfaction and employment2015In: Journal of Rehabilitation Medicine, ISSN 1650-1977, E-ISSN 1651-2081, Vol. 47, no 1, p. 45-51Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Objective:

    To investigate relationships between individuals' socioeconomic situations and quality of life in working-aged subjects with Parkinson's disease.

    Methods:

    A population-based cohort comprising 1,432 people with Parkinson's disease and 1,135 matched controls, who responded to a questionnaire. Logistic regression analysis was performed to identify factors associated with life satisfaction and likelihood of employment.

    Results:

    In multivariate analyses, Parkinson's disease was associated with an increased risk of dissatisfaction with life (odds ratio (OR) = 5.4, 95% confidence interval (95% CI) = 4.2-7.1) and reduced likelihood of employment (OR = 0.30, 95% CI = 0.25-0.37). Employers' support was associated with greater likelihood of employment (p < 0.001). Twenty-four percent of people with Parkinson's disease for ≥ 10 years remained employed and 6% worked full-time. People with Parkinson's disease also more frequently experienced work demands that exceeded their capacity; this factor and unemployment independently correlated with greater risk of dissatisfaction with life (both p < 0.05).

    Conclusion:

    People with Parkinson's disease have an increased risk of dissatisfaction with life. Employment situation is important for general life satisfaction among working-aged individuals. People with Parkinson's disease appear to find it difficult to meet the challenge of achieving a balanced employment situation.

  • 21.
    Hallkvist, Olle M.
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine, Occupational and Environmental Medicine.
    Johansson, Jonas
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine, Occupational and Environmental Medicine. Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Community Medicine and Rehabilitation, Geriatric Medicine.
    Nordström, Anna
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine, Occupational and Environmental Medicine.
    Nordström, Peter
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Community Medicine and Rehabilitation, Geriatric Medicine.
    Hult, Andreas
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine, Occupational and Environmental Medicine.
    Dairy product intake and bone properties in 70-year-old men and women2018In: Archives of Osteoporosis, ISSN 1862-3514, Vol. 13, no 1, article id 9Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    SUMMARY: In the present population-based study including 70-year-old men and women, total dairy product intake was associated with a weak positive association with tibia trabecular and cortical cross-sectional areas.

    PURPOSE: Milk consumption has recently been suggested to increase fracture risk. Therefore, we aimed to investigate associations between dairy product consumption and peripheral bone properties. Furthermore, we explored whether consumption of milk and fermented dairy products affected bone properties differently.

    METHODS: The Healthy Aging Initiative is a population-based, cross-sectional study investigating the health of 70-year-old men and women. Out of the 2904 individuals who met the inclusion criteria, data on self-reported daily dairy product consumption (dl/day), peripheral quantitative computed tomography (pQCT) examinations at the 4 and 66% scan sites of the tibia and radius, and dual-energy X-ray absorptiometry (DXA) scans were collected from 2040 participants. Associations between dairy product consumption and bone properties were examined using multiple linear regression models adjusted for sex, muscle area, meal size, dietary protein proportion, current smoking status, and objectively measured physical activity.

    RESULTS: Total dairy product intake was associated with larger trabecular (2.296 (95% CI, 0.552-4.039) mm2, per dl/day increase, p = 0.01) and cortical cross-sectional areas (CSAs) in the tibia (1.757 (95% CI, 0.683-2.830 mm2, p = 0.001) as measured by pQCT and higher areal bone mineral density (aBMD) of the radius (3.231 (95% CI, 0.764-5.698) mg/cm2, p = 0.01) as measured by DXA. No other measurement in the tibia, radius, femoral neck, or lower spine was associated significantly with dairy product intake. Bone properties did not differ according to the type of dairy product consumed.

    CONCLUSION: No evidence of a negative association between dairy product consumption and bone health was found. Furthermore, total dairy product consumption was associated with increased CSAs in the tibia, regardless of dairy product type. Collectively, our findings indicate the existence of a weak but significant positive association between dairy product consumption bone properties in older adults.

  • 22.
    Hogstrom, Magnus
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Surgical and Perioperative Sciences, Sports Medicine.
    Nordstrom, Anna
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Surgical and Perioperative Sciences, Sports Medicine.
    Nordstrom, Peter
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Community Medicine and Rehabilitation, Geriatric Medicine.
    Retinol, retinol-binding-protein-4, abdominal fat mass, peak bone mineral density and markers of bone metabolism in men: the NO2-studyManuscript (Other academic)
  • 23.
    Holmquist, Sofie
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Psychology.
    Mattsson, Sabina
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Psychology. School of Sport Scieces, UiT The Arctic University of Norway, Tromsø, Norway.
    Schele, Ingrid
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Psychology.
    Nordström, Peter
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Community Medicine and Rehabilitation, Geriatric Medicine.
    Nordström, Anna
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine, Occupational and Environmental Medicine.
    Low physical activity as a key differentiating factor in the potential high-risk profile for depressive symptoms in older adults2017In: Depression and anxiety (Print), ISSN 1091-4269, E-ISSN 1520-6394, Vol. 34, no 9, p. 817-825Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    BACKGROUND: The identification of potential high-risk groups for depression is of importance. The purpose of the present study was to identify high-risk profiles for depressive symptoms in older individuals, with a focus on functional performance.

    METHODS: The population-based Healthy Ageing Initiative included 2,084 community-dwelling individuals (49% women) aged 70. Explorative cluster analysis was used to group participants according to functional performance level, using measures of basic mobility skills, gait variability, and grip strength. Intercluster differences in depressive symptoms (measured by the Geriatric Depression Scale [GDS]-15), physical activity (PA; measured objectively with the ActiGraph GT3X+), and a rich set of covariates were examined.

    RESULTS: The cluster analysis yielded a seven-cluster solution. One potential high-risk cluster was identified, with overrepresentation of individuals with GDS scores >5 (15.1 vs. 2.7% expected; relative risk = 6.99, P < .001); the prevalence of depressive symptoms was significantly lower in the other clusters (all P < .01). The potential high-risk cluster had significant overrepresentations of obese individuals (39.7 vs. 17.4% expected) and those with type 2 diabetes (24.7 vs. 8.5% expected), and underrepresentation of individuals who fulfilled the World Health Organization's PA recommendations (15.6 vs. 59.1% expected; all P < .01), as well as low levels of functional performance.

    CONCLUSIONS: The present study provided a potential high-risk profile for depressive symptoms among elderly community-dwelling individuals, which included low levels functional performance combined with low levels of PA. Including PA in medical screening of the elderly may aid in identification of potential high-risk individuals for depressive symptoms.

  • 24.
    Hult, Andreas
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine, Occupational and Environmental Medicine.
    Johansson, Jonas
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Community Medicine and Rehabilitation, Geriatric Medicine.
    Nordström, Peter
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Community Medicine and Rehabilitation, Geriatric Medicine.
    Nordström, Anna
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine, Occupational and Environmental Medicine.
    Objectively Measured Physical Activity in Older Adults With and Without Diabetes2019In: Clinical Diabetes, ISSN 0891-8929, E-ISSN 1945-4953, Vol. 37, no 2, p. 142-149, article id cd180041Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: Increased physical activity (PA) is ordinated to increase glycemic control in subjects with diabetes. We evaluated objectively measured as well as self-reported PA in elderly individuals with and without diabetes.

    Method: The study included 1872 community-dwelling individuals (49% women), all aged 70 years. Objective PA was measured by accelerometers worn for 1 week. Physical activity patterns in subjects with and without diabetes were evaluated using multivariable adjustable regression models.

    Results: In the cohort 210 subjects (138 men and 72 women) were found to have diabetes. Self-reported PA showed a weak association with objective PA (r = 0.06, p = 0.01).  Individuals with known diabetes had fewer steps per day (mean 5,754) than those with detected diabetes at baseline (mean 6,359) or no diabetes (mean 7,375, all p < 0.05). A cut-off value of at least 6,000 steps per day discriminated best between individuals with and without diabetes (multi-adjusted odds ratio (OR), 0.50, 95% CI, 0.36–0.69), and overall step-count also showed the strongest correlation with objective visceral adipose tissue (VAT, β = 0.29, p < 0.001). In contrast, objectively measured PA in at least 10-minute bouts, as recommended by WHO, did not discriminate between individuals with a without diabetes (OR, 0.92, 95% CI, 0.66–1.28).

    Conclusion: Despite recommendations given to subjects with diabetes, objectively measured PA was more than 20% lower in elderly individuals with diabetes. Daily step-counts was also associated with VAT, a potential mediator of the effects of PA.

  • 25.
    Hult, Andreas
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine, Occupational and Environmental Medicine.
    Johansson, Jonas
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Community Medicine and Rehabilitation, Geriatric Medicine. Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine, Occupational and Environmental Medicine.
    Nordström, Peter
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Community Medicine and Rehabilitation, Geriatric Medicine.
    Nordström, Anna
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine, Occupational and Environmental Medicine.
    The importance of bouts of physical activity for type 2 diabetes prevalence2016In: Active People, Active Places, Active Policy: Book of Abstracts, 2016Conference paper (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Purpose: The World Health Organization (WHO) suggest that people at least 65 year old should perform 150 min physical activity (PA) per week in bouts of at least 10 minutes. The guidelines are based on predominantly studies with self-reported PA. We evaluated objective measures of PA on T2D prevalence and the WHO guidelines.

    Methods: During 2012-2015, a total of 1939 (49% women) individuals, all 70 year old were included in a cross sectional study investigating risk factors for non-communicable diseases; the Healthy Ageing Initiative. Objective measures of PA was attained from accelerometers, worn for one week. T2D was defined by a fasting glucose of ≥7.0 mmol/L or a prior T2D diagnosis.

    Results: Based on objectively measured PA, 39% of the studied population reached the minimum requirements for PA as stated by the WHO. Using logistic regression, the odds ratio (OR) for T2D when achieving the WHO recommendations was 0.94 (CI 0.68-1.30). By removing the 10 minute bout prerequisite, the OR decreased to 0.61 (CI 0.45-0.84). Using a cutoff value of 6 000 steps a day further lowered the OR to 0.51 (CI 0.37-0.70), for T2D after adjusting for sex, smoking and amount of visceral fat. Additionally, individuals with no T2D had significantly higher step count as compared with diabetics diagnosed in the study (p<0.05) and prior known T2D diagnosis (p<0.001).

    Conclusions: In our investigated cohort, adhering to the WHO guidelines of PA did not reduce the risk for T2D. By discarding the requirement of at least 10 min of consecutive PA, the relative risk was significantly lowered, while the cutoff level of 6 000 steps a day presented the highest risk reduction, demonstrating that every step counts. Notably, individuals with known diabetes had the lowest PA.

  • 26. Hägglund, Martin
    et al.
    Ekstrand, Jan
    Kristenson, Karolina
    Lundblad, Matilda
    Bengtsson, Håkan
    Gajhede, Mariann
    Nordström, Anna
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine, Occupational and Environmental Medicine. Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Community Medicine and Rehabilitation, Sports medicine.
    Karlsson, Jón
    Magnusson, Henrik
    Waldén, Markus
    VM ökar skaderisken2014In: Svensk Idrottsforskning: Organ för Centrum för Idrottsforskning, ISSN 1103-4629, no 2, p. 6-9Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [sv]

    Colombias Falcao är skadad och missar VM. Samma öde drabbade flera stjärnor redan före avresan till Brasilien. En hög skaderisk i mästerskap innebär sannolikt att fler får åka hem innan turneringen är över. Det visar 13 års erfarenhet av skadestudier inom europeisk toppfotboll. Sedan år 2001 har 27 olika fotbollslag från tio professionella ligor i Europa deltagit i den så kallade UEFA Elite Club Injury Study (2).

    Det medicinska teamet i varje lag, oftast läkare och fysioterapeuter, rapporterar på månadsbasis in tränings och matchtid för samtliga spelare i A-truppen samt information om de skador som har inträffat. För studien registreras de skador som skett i samband med träning eller match och som innebär att spelaren avbryter eller tvingas avstå från kommande träning eller match, så kallade frånvaroskador. Till dags dato har över 10 000 skador registrerats under drygt en miljon tränings- och matchtimmar. Det är troligen världens största skadedatabas inom elitfotboll.

    Fakta

    Sedan år 2001 har Football Research Group i Linköping bedrivit skadestudier inom elitfotboll i samarbete med Europeiska fotbollförbundet (Uefa) och nationella förbund och organisationer, till exempel Svenska Fotbollförbundet och engelska Premier League (1). I ett temanummer om fotbollsmedicin i tidskriften British Journal of Sports Medicine i augusti 2013 presenterade gruppen  flera studier från det pågående forskningsprojektet. Den här artikeln sammanfattar några av studierna och lärdomar som vi kan ta med oss under VM-slutspelet i Brasilien.

  • 27.
    Högström, Gabriel
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Surgical and Perioperative Sciences, Sports Medicine.
    Nordström, Anna
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Surgical and Perioperative Sciences, Sports Medicine.
    Eriksson, Marie
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Umeå School of Business and Economics (USBE), Statistics.
    Nordström, Peter
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Community Medicine and Rehabilitation, Geriatric Medicine.
    Risk factors assessed in adolescence and the later risk of stroke in men: a 33-year follow-up study2015In: Cerebrovascular Diseases, ISSN 1015-9770, E-ISSN 1421-9786, Vol. 39, no 1, p. 63-71Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    BACKGROUND: Stroke is a common cause of death, and a leading contributor to long-term disability. The cost associated with the disease is great. Several modifiable risk factors for stroke have been found in older cohorts; however, no study to date has investigated the effects of these risk factors from late adolescence.

    METHODS: The study cohort comprised 811,579 Swedish men (mean age, 18 years) that participated in the mandatory military conscription service in Sweden between 1969 and 1986. Some risk factors for stroke, such as body mass index, systolic and diastolic blood pressure, and cognitive function, were assessed at conscription. Aerobic fitness was also assessed at conscription, using a braked ergometer cycle test. Other risk factors for stroke, including stroke in subjects' parents, and socioeconomic factors including highest achieved level of education and annual income 15 years after conscription, were collected through national register linkage using the personal identification number. Stroke diagnosis among the study participants was tracked in the National Hospital Discharge Patient Register.

    RESULTS: During a median follow-up period of 33 years 6,180 ischemic strokes and 2,104 hemorrhagic strokes were diagnosed in the cohort at a mean age of 47.9 years. Strong independent risk factors (all p <1.0 × 10-(6)) for ischemic stroke included low aerobic fitness (hazard ratio [HR], 0.84 per standard deviation [SD] increase), high BMI (HR, 1.15 per SD increase), diabetes (HR, 2.85), alcohol intoxication (HR, 1.93), low annual income (HR, 0.85 per SD decrease), and stroke in the mother (HR, 1.31). Similar risk factors were found for hemorrhagic stroke including low aerobic fitness (HR, 0.82 per SD increase), high BMI (HR, 1.18 per SD increase) alcohol intoxication (HR, 2.92), diabetes (HR, 2.06), and low annual income (HR, 0.75). The population attributable risks associated with all evaluated risk factors were 69% for ischemic stroke and 88% for hemorrhagic stroke (p < 0.001 for both).

    CONCLUSIONS: In the present study we have shown that several known risk factors for stroke are present already in late adolescence, and that they are independent of each other. The strongest risk factors were low physical fitness, high BMI, diabetes, low annual income and a maternal history of stroke. Several of the aforementioned risk factors are potentially modifiable.

  • 28.
    Högström, Gabriel
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Community Medicine and Rehabilitation, Geriatric Medicine. Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine, Occupational and Environmental Medicine.
    Nordström, Anna
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Community Medicine and Rehabilitation, Geriatric Medicine. Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine, Occupational and Environmental Medicine.
    Nordström, Peter
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Community Medicine and Rehabilitation, Geriatric Medicine.
    Aerobic fitness in late adolescence and the risk of early death: a prospective cohort study of 1.3 million Swedish men2016In: International Journal of Epidemiology, ISSN 0300-5771, E-ISSN 1464-3685, Vol. 45, no 4, p. 1159-1168Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    BACKGROUND: Fitness level and obesity have been associated with death in older populations. We investigated the relationship between aerobic fitness in late adolescence and early death, and whether a high fitness level can compensate the risk of being obese.

    METHODS: The cohort comprised 1 317 713 Swedish men (mean age, 18 years) that conscripted between 1969 and 1996. Aerobic fitness was assessed by an electrically braked cycle test. All-cause and specific causes of death were tracked using national registers. Multivariable adjusted associations were tested using Cox regression models.

    RESULTS: During a mean follow-up period of 29 years, 44 301 subjects died. Individuals in the highest fifth of aerobic fitness were at lower risk of death from any cause [hazard ratio (HR), 0.49; 95% confidence interval (CI), 0.47-0.51] in comparison with individuals in the lowest fifth, with the strongest association seen for death related to alcohol and narcotics abuse (HR, 0.20; 95% CI, 0.15-0.26). Similar risks were found for weight-adjusted aerobic fitness. Aerobic fitness was associated with a reduced risk of death from any cause in normal-weight and overweight individuals, whereas the benefits were reduced in obese individuals (P < 0.001 for interaction). Furthermore, unfit normal-weight individuals had 30% lower risk of death from any cause (HR, 0.70; 95% CI, 0.53-0.92) than did fit obese individuals.

    CONCLUSIONS: Low aerobic fitness in late adolescence is associated with an increased risk of early death. Furthermore, the risk of early death was higher in fit obese individuals than in unfit normal-weight individuals.

  • 29.
    Högström, Gabriel
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Surgical and Perioperative Sciences, Sports Medicine.
    Nordström, Anna
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Surgical and Perioperative Sciences, Sports Medicine.
    Nordström, Peter
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Community Medicine and Rehabilitation, Geriatric Medicine.
    High aerobic fitness in late adolescence is associated with a reduced risk of myocardial infarction later in life: a nationwide cohort study in men2014In: European Heart Journal, ISSN 0195-668X, E-ISSN 1522-9645, Vol. 35, no 44, p. 3133-3140Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    AIMS: Cardiovascular disease is the leading cause of morbidity and mortality worldwide, and signs of atherosclerosis are present in all large arteries already in adolescence. We investigated the association between high physical fitness in late adolescence and myocardial infarction (MI) later in life.

    METHODS AND RESULTS: The study cohort comprised 743 498 Swedish men examined at the age of 18 years during conscription 1969-84. Aerobic fitness (Wmax) and muscle strength at conscription were measured using standardized methods. Myocardial infarctions occurring in the cohort were tracked through national registers. During a median follow-up period of 34 years, 11 526 MIs were registered in the cohort. After adjusting for age, body mass index (BMI), diseases, education, blood pressure, and socio-economic factors, one standard deviation increase in the level of physical fitness (Wmax) was associated with an 18% decreased risk of later MI [hazard ratio (HR) 0.82, 95% confidence interval (CI) 0.80-0.85]. The beneficial effects of Wmax were significant across all recognized BMI groups, ranging from lean (BMI < 18.5) to obese (BMI > 30) (P < 0.05 for all). However, obese men (BMI > 30) in the highest fourth of Wmax had a higher risk of MI than did lean men (BMI < 18.5) in the highest (HR 4.6, 95% CI 1.9-11.2), and lowest (HR 1.7, 95% CI 1.2-2.6) fourth of Wmax.

    CONCLUSIONS: We report a significant graded association between aerobic fitness in late adolescence and MI later in life in men. However, obese men with a high aerobic fitness had a higher risk of MI than lean men with a low aerobic fitness.

  • 30.
    Högström, Gabriel
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Surgical and Perioperative Sciences, Sports Medicine.
    Pietilä, Tom
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Surgical and Perioperative Sciences, Sports Medicine.
    Nordström, Peter
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Community Medicine and Rehabilitation, Geriatric Medicine. Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Surgical and Perioperative Sciences, Sports Medicine.
    Nordström, Anna
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Surgical and Perioperative Sciences, Sports Medicine. Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Community Medicine and Rehabilitation, Rehabilitation Medicine.
    Body composition and performance: influence of sport and gender among adolescents2012In: Journal of Strength and Conditioning Research, ISSN 1064-8011, E-ISSN 1533-4287, Vol. 26, no 7, p. 1799-1804Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Body composition is well known to be associated with endurance performance amongst adult skiers, however the association among adolescent cross-country and alpine skiers is inadequately explored. The study sample was comprised of 145 male and female adolescent subjects (aged 15-17 years), including 48 cross-country skiers, 33 alpine skiers, and 68 control subjects. Body composition [%body fat, %lean mass, bone mineral density (g/cm2)] was measured with a dual-emission X-ray absorptiometer, and pulse and oxygen uptake were measured at three break points during incremental performance tests to determine physical fitness levels. Female cross-country and alpine skiers were found to have significantly higher %lean mass (mean difference = 7.7%, p < 0.001) and lower %body fat (mean difference = (8.1%, p < 0.001) than female control subjects. Male cross-country skiers were found to have lower %body fat (mean difference = 3.2%, p < 0.05) and higher %lean mass (mean difference = 3.3%, p < 0.01) than male alpine skiers and higher % lean mass (mean difference = 3.7%, p < 0.05) and % body fat (mean difference = 3.2%, p < 0.05) than controls. The present study found strong associations between %lean mass and the OBLA and VO2 max weight adjusted thresholds among both genders of the cross-country skiing cohort (r = 0.47-0.67, p < 0.05) and the female alpine skiing cohort (r = 0.77-0.79, p < 0.001 for all). The present study suggests that body composition is associated with physical performance already in adolescent athletes.

  • 31.
    Högström, M
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Surgical and Perioperative Sciences, Sports Medicine.
    Nordström, Anna
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Surgical and Perioperative Sciences, Sports Medicine.
    Alfredson, H
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Surgical and Perioperative Sciences, Sports Medicine.
    Lorentzon, R
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Surgical and Perioperative Sciences, Sports Medicine.
    Thorsen, K
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Surgical and Perioperative Sciences, Sports Medicine.
    Nordström, P
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Surgical and Perioperative Sciences, Sports Medicine.
    Current physical activity is related to bone mineral density in males but not in females.2007In: International Journal of Sports Medicine, ISSN 0172-4622, E-ISSN 1439-3964, Vol. 28, no 5, p. 431-436Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 32.
    Högström, Magnus
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Surgical and Perioperative Sciences, Sports Medicine.
    Nordström, Anna
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Surgical and Perioperative Sciences, Sports Medicine.
    Nordström, Peter
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Surgical and Perioperative Sciences, Sports Medicine. Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Community Medicine and Rehabilitation, Geriatric Medicine.
    Relationship between vitamin D metabolites and bone mineral density in young males: a cross-sectional and longitudinal study.2006In: Calcified Tissue International, ISSN 0171-967X, E-ISSN 1432-0827, Vol. 79, no 2, p. 95-101Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 33.
    Högström, Magnus
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Surgical and Perioperative Sciences, Sports Medicine.
    Nordström, Anna
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Surgical and Perioperative Sciences, Sports Medicine.
    Nordström, Peter
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Surgical and Perioperative Sciences, Sports Medicine.
    Retinol, retinol-binding protein 4, abdominal fat mass, peak bone mineral density, and markers of bone metabolism in men: the Northern Osteoporosis and Obesity (NO2) Study.2008In: European Journal of Endocrinology, ISSN 0804-4643, E-ISSN 1479-683X, Vol. 158, no 5, p. 765-770Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    CONTEXT: The association between retinol and bone mineral density (BMD) in males after puberty has not been fully investigated previously. OBJECTIVE: To investigate the association between retinol, retinol-binding protein-4 (RBP-4), BMD (g/cm(2)), abdominal fat mass, and markers of bone metabolism in young men. DESIGN: Longitudinal study. PARTICIPANTS: Seventy-eight healthy males with a mean age of 22.6+/-0.7 years at baseline. A follow-up was conducted in 73 of the participants 2.0+/-0.4 years later. MAIN OUTCOME MEASURES: Associations between serum concentrations of retinol and RBP-4, and BMD of the total body, lumbar spine, and hip, serum concentrations of osteocalcin, and carboxy terminal telopeptide of type 1 collagen (CTX), were investigated. RESULTS: Both retinol and RBP-4 showed an inverse relationship with that of osteocalcin (r=-0.23 to -0.25, P<0.05). Levels of RBP-4 (r=0.26, P=0.02) and osteocalcin (r=-0.23, P=0.04) were also related to abdominal fat mass, and the relationship between RBP-4, retinol, and osteocalcin disappeared after adjusting for this influence of abdominal fat mass. Neither retinol nor RBP-4 concentrations were associated with BMD at any site, CTX as baseline, or changes in BMD during the 2-year follow-up period. Levels of RBP-4 showed a strong association with levels of retinol (r=0.61, P<0.001). CONCLUSION: We found a negative association between the bone formation marker osteocalcin with retinol and RBP-4. The association disappeared when adjusting for the influence of abdominal fat mass. Neither retinol nor RBP-4 were associated with peak BMD in young men.

  • 34.
    Högström, Magnus
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Surgical and Perioperative Sciences, Sports Medicine.
    Nordström, Peter
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Surgical and Perioperative Sciences, Sports Medicine. Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine.
    Nordström, Anna
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Surgical and Perioperative Sciences, Sports Medicine. Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Community Medicine and Rehabilitation.
    n-3 Fatty acids are positively associated with peak bone mineral density and bone accrual in healthy men: the NO2 Study2007In: American Journal of Clinical Nutrition, ISSN 0002-9165, E-ISSN 1938-3207, ISSN 0002-9165, Vol. 85, no 3, p. 803-807Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background:Knowledge of the influence of nutritional intake on bone health is limited. Polyunsaturated fatty acids have been suggested to influence bone growth and modeling in humans, although data are sparse.

    Objective:The objective was to investigate the role of fatty acids in bone accumulation and the attainment of peak bone mass in young men.

    Design:The cohort studied consisted of 78 healthy young men with a mean age of 16.7 y at baseline. Bone mineral density (BMD; in g/cm2) of total body, hip, and spine was measured at baseline and at 22 and 24 y of age. Fatty acid concentrations were measured in the phospholipid fraction in serum at 22 y of age.

    Results:Concentrations of n−3 fatty acids were positively associated with total BMD (r = 0.27, P = 0.02) and spine BMD (r = 0.25, P = 0.02) at 22 y of age. A positive correlation between n−3 fatty acid concentrations and the changes in BMD at the spine (r = 0.26, P = 0.02) was found between 16 and 22 y of age. Concentrations of docosahexaenoic acid (DHA, 22:6n−3) were positively associated with total BMD (r = 0.32, P = 0.004) and BMD at the spine (r = 0.30, P = 0.008) at 22 y of age. A positive correlation was also found between DHA concentrations and the changes in BMD at the spine (r = 0.26, P = 0.02) between 16 and 22 y of age.

    Conclusion:The results showed that n−3 fatty acids, especially DHA, are positively associated with bone mineral accrual and, thus, with peak BMD in young men.

  • 35.
    Johansson, Jonas
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine, Occupational and Environmental Medicine. Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Community Medicine and Rehabilitation, Geriatric Medicine.
    Hult, Andreas
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine, Occupational and Environmental Medicine.
    Morseth, Bente
    Department of Community Medicine, The Arctic University of Norway, Tromsø, Norway.School of Sport Sciences, The Arctic University of Norway, Tromsø, Norway..
    Nordström, Anna
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine, Occupational and Environmental Medicine. School of Sport Sciences, The Arctic University of Norway, Tromsø, Norway..
    Nordström, Peter
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Community Medicine and Rehabilitation, Geriatric Medicine.
    Self-reported protein intake and properties of bone in community-dwelling older individuals2018In: Archives of Osteoporosis, ISSN 1862-3514, Vol. 13, no 1, article id 10Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    SUMMARY:This study revealed that a quick and simple estimation of protein intake was related to measures of bone density and area in 70-year-old individuals. Furthermore, these associations were mediated by muscle mass when investigating peripheral measurement sites such as arms and legs.

    PURPOSE: Recent evidence suggests that dietary protein is beneficial for bone health in older individuals, but less is known about the influence of muscle mass on this relationship. This cross-sectional study aimed to investigate associations among protein intake, bone health, and muscle mass in 2332 men and women aged 70 years.

    METHODS: Volumetric bone mineral density of the radius and tibia was measured using peripheral quantitative computed tomography. Using dual-energy X-ray absorptiometry, we measured areal bone mineral density (aBMD) at the L1-L4 vertebrae, radius, and femoral neck, together with appendicular lean mass. Participants reported their average meal size and proportion of meat/fish intake. Associations were investigated using multiple linear regression models, adjusted for multiple covariates.

    RESULTS: Self-reported protein intake was associated with aBMD of the femoral neck (β = 0.082) and L1-L4 vertebrae (β = 0.063) in men (both p < 0.05) after adjusting for multiple covariates, including appendicular muscle mass. No significant association was detected among women. In addition, protein intake was associated with tibial cortical area (β = 0.08), periosteal circumference (β = 0.072), radial aBMD (β = 0.064), and trabecular area (β = 0.078) in men (all p < 0.05), although these associations were attenuated after adjustment for appendicular muscle mass (all p > 0.05).

    CONCLUSION: Self-reported protein intake was associated with bone properties in 70-year-old men. The strength of these associations in peripheral bone sites may be partially mediated by muscle mass from protein intake.

  • 36.
    Johansson, Jonas
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine, Section of Sustainable Health. Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Community Medicine and Rehabilitation, Geriatric Medicine.
    Jarocka, Ewa
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Integrative Medical Biology (IMB), Physiology.
    Westling, Göran
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Integrative Medical Biology (IMB), Physiology.
    Nordström, Anna
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine, Section of Sustainable Health.
    Nordström, Peter
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Community Medicine and Rehabilitation, Geriatric Medicine.
    Predicting incident falls: Relationship between postural sway and limits of stability in older adults2019In: Human Movement Science, ISSN 0167-9457, E-ISSN 1872-7646, Vol. 66, p. 117-123Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background We have previously shown that objective measurements of postural sway predicts fall risk, although it is currently unknown how limits of stability (LOS) might influence these results.

    Research question: How integrated postural sway and LOS measurements predict the risk of incident falls in a population-based sample of older adults.

    Methods: The sample for this prospective observational study was drawn from the Healthy Ageing Initiative cohort and included data collected between June 2012 and December 2016 for 2396 men and women, all 70 years of age. LOS was compared to postural sway with measurements during eyes-open (EO) and eyes-closed (EC) trials, using the previously validated Wii Force Plate. Fall history was assessed during baseline examination and incident falls were collected during follow-up at 6 and 12 months. Independent predictors of incident falls and additional covariates were investigated using multiple logistic regression models.

    Results: During follow-up, 337 out of 2396 participants (14%) had experienced a fall. Unadjusted regression models from the EO trial revealed increased fall risk by 6% (OR 1.06, 95% CI 1.02–1.11) per each centimeter squared increase in sway area and by 16% (OR 1.16, 95% CI 1.07–1.25) per 1-unit increase in Sway-Area-to-LOS ratio. Odds ratios were generally lower when analyzing EC trials and only slightly attenuated in fully adjusted models.

    Significance: Integrating postural sway and LOS parameters provides valid fall risk prediction and a holistic analysis of postural stability. Future work should establish normative values and evaluate clinical utility of these measures.

  • 37.
    Johansson, Jonas
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine, Occupational and Environmental Medicine. Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Community Medicine and Rehabilitation, Geriatric Medicine.
    Nordström, Anna
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine, Occupational and Environmental Medicine.
    Gustafson, Yngve
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Community Medicine and Rehabilitation, Geriatric Medicine.
    Westling, Göran
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Integrative Medical Biology (IMB).
    Nordström, Peter
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Community Medicine and Rehabilitation, Geriatric Medicine.
    Increased postural sway during quiet stance as a risk factor for prospective falls in community-dwelling elderly individuals2017In: Age and Ageing, ISSN 0002-0729, E-ISSN 1468-2834, Vol. 46, no 6, p. 964-970Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Objective: fall-related injuries constitute major health risks in older individuals, and these risks are projected to increase in parallel with increasing human longevity. Impaired postural stability is a potential risk factor related to falls, although the evidence is inconclusive, partly due to the lack of prospective studies. This study aimed to investigate how objective measures of postural sway predict incident falls.

    Design, setting and participants: this prospectively observational study included 1,877 community-dwelling individuals aged 70 years who participated in the Healthy Ageing Initiative between June 2012 and December 2015.

    Measurements: postural sway was measured during eyes-open (EO) and eyes-closed (EC) trials using the Wii Balance Board. Functional mobility, muscle strength, objective physical activity and cognitive performance were also measured. Participants reported incident falls 6 and 12 months after the examination.

    Results: during follow-up, 255 (14%) prospective fallers were identified. Division of centre of pressure (COP) sway lengths into quintiles revealed a nonlinear distribution of falls for EO trial data, but not EC trial data. After adjustment for multiple confounders, fall risk was increased by 75% for participants with COP sway lengths ≥400 mm during the EO trial (odds ratio [OR] 1.75, 95% confidence interval [CI] 1.09-2.79), and approximately doubled for sway lengths ≥920 mm during the EC trial (OR 1.90, 95% CI 1.12-3.22).

    Conclusion: objective measures of postural sway independently predict incident falls in older community-dwelling men and women. Further studies are needed to evaluate whether postural sway length is of interest for the prediction of incident falls in clinical settings.

  • 38.
    Johansson, Jonas
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Community Medicine and Rehabilitation, Geriatric Medicine. Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine, Occupational and Environmental Medicine.
    Nordström, Anna
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine, Occupational and Environmental Medicine.
    Nordström, Peter
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Community Medicine and Rehabilitation, Geriatric Medicine.
    Greater Fall Risk in Elderly Women Than in Men Is Associated With Increased Gait Variability During Multitasking2016In: Journal of the American Medical Directors Association, ISSN 1525-8610, E-ISSN 1538-9375, Vol. 17, no 6, p. 535-540Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Objective: As 90% of fractures are caused by falls, and as fractures are more common in elderly women than in elderly men, a better understanding of potential sex differences in fall rates and underlying mechanisms is needed. The purpose of this study was to determine whether women are more prone than men to falling, and to evaluate whether the risk of falling is associated with variations in gait patterns.

    Design, setting, and participants: The cohort for this prospective observational study consisted of 1390 community-dwelling men and women aged 70 years, examined in a health survey between July 2012 and November 2014.

    Measurements: Gait patterns were measured using a computerized walkway system during normal-speed, fast-speed, and dual-task trials. Triaxial accelerometers were used to collect objective data on physical activity, and self-reported fall data were collected by telephone 6 and 12 months after examination. Incident low-energy falls were defined as unexpected events in which participants came to rest on the ground.

    Results: During the follow-up period, 148 study participants (88 women, 60 men; P = .01) reported falls. After adjusting for multiple confounders, including objective measures of physical activity, socioeconomic factors, cardiovascular disease, and cognitive function, the odds ratio for falling in women was 1.49 (95% confidence interval [CI] 1.02–2.19). Variations in gait pattern were significantly (20%–40%) increased in fallers compared with nonfallers during the dual-task trial for step width, step length, stride length, step time, stance time, stride velocity, and single support time (all P < .05). Furthermore, women showed 15% to 35% increased variability in all of these gait parameters during the dual-task trial compared with men (all P < .01).

    Conclusion: In the present cohort, 70-year-old women were at greater risk of falls compared with their male counterparts. This increased risk was associated with increased variation in gait pattern during dual-task activities, and may contribute to women's greater fracture risk compared with men.

  • 39.
    Johansson, Jonas
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Community Medicine and Rehabilitation, Geriatric Medicine. Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Community Medicine and Rehabilitation, Sports medicine.
    Nordström, Anna
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine, Occupational and Environmental Medicine.
    Nordström, Peter
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Community Medicine and Rehabilitation, Geriatric Medicine.
    Objectively measured physical activity is associated with parameters of bone in 70-year-old men and women2015In: Bone, ISSN 8756-3282, E-ISSN 1873-2763, Vol. 81, p. 72-79Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    As the world's population ages, the occurrence of osteoporosis-related fractures is projected to increase. Low areal bone mineral density (aBMD), a well-known risk factor for fractures, may be influenced by physical activity (PA). In this cross-sectional study, we aimed to investigate potential associations between objective measures of PA and bone properties, in a population-based cohort of 1228 70-year-old men and women. We measured volumetric BMD (vBMD, mg/cm3) together with cross-sectional area (CSA, mm2) by peripheral quantitative computed tomography at sites located 4% and 66% in the distal–proximal trajectory at the tibia and radius. We also measured aBMD (g/cm2) by dual energy X-ray absorptiometry at the femoral neck, lumbar spine (L1–L4) and radius. Participants wore triaxial accelerometers for 7 consecutive days to obtain objective estimates of PA. The intensity of the objective PA was divided into light (100–1951 counts/min [CPM]), moderate (1952– 5724 cpm) and vigorous (≥5725 cpm). Maximal accelerations for the anterior–posterior (z), medio-lateral (x), and vertical (y) axes were also separately assessed. Associations were investigated using bivariate correlations and multiple linear regression, adjusted for height, weight and sex. Vigorous PA showed the strongest association with femoral neck aBMD (β = 0.09, p b 0.001), while both moderate and vigorous PAs were associated with cor- tical area and trabecular vBMD in the weight-bearing tibia (all p b 0.05). Peak vertical accelerations were associated significantly with cortical area (β = 0.09, p b 0.001) and trabecular vBMD (β = 0.09, p = 0.001) of the tibia, whereas peak anterior–posterior accelerations showed no correlation with these properties. No positive association was found between objectively measured PA and bone parameters of the radius. In conclusion, vertical accelerations and moderate to vigorous PA independently predict bone properties, especially in the weight-bearing tibia, in 70-year-old men and women.