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  • 1. Hardon, Anita
    et al.
    Kageha, Emmy
    Kinsman, John
    University of Amsterdam.
    Kyaddondo, David
    Wanyenze, Rhoda
    Obermeyer, Carla Makhlouf
    Dynamics of care, situations of choice: HIV tests in times of ART2011In: Medical Anthropology, ISSN 0145-9740, E-ISSN 1545-5882, Vol. 30, no 2, p. 183-201Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In the 1990s, African AIDS programs followed a voluntary counseling and testing (VCT) approach to HIV testing. In the wake of large scale AIDS treatment programs, policymakers opted for routine provider-initiated testing (PITC) with less emphasis on counseling, which led to concerns about the ethical conduct of HIV testing. Inspired by Annemarie Mol, we ask if PITC can be framed as good care, rather than as medical domination that threatens to violate patients' rights. Based on fieldwork in Ugandan and Kenyan health facilities, we reveal that situations of choice vary: patients in hospital wards, are given time to decide whether they want a test, while in antenatal care testing women find it very hard to opt-out. We argue that the medical context inherent in PITC provides an attractive moral space for people to undergo HIV tests.

  • 2.
    Jansen, Karine Aasgaard
    Department of Archaeology , History, Cultural Studies and Religion, University of Bergen , Bergen , Norway .
    The 2005-2007 chikungunya epidemic in Reunion: Ambigious etiologies, memories and meaning-making2013In: Medical Anthropology, ISSN 0145-9740, E-ISSN 1545-5882, Vol. 32, no 2, p. 174-189Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    From March 2005 to April 2007 the French overseas department and Indian Ocean island of Réunion was significantly affected by an epidemic of chikungunya. Chikungunya is a vector-spread disease (by the aedes albopictus mosquito) that leads to painful rheumatic symptoms. The disease infected approximately one third of the island's total population of 802,000 inhabitants (Rallu 2009) This article is a discussion of local etiological accounts of chikungunya. The primary topic raised by informants was whether chikungunya was a vector- or air-borne disease. Even though informants had access to substantial biomedical information concerning the disease and its transmission, some were convinced by it and others were not. In order to make meaning of the disease, the Réunionese drew on various types of medical knowledge from different health sectors simultaneously. To understand people's experiences with chikungunya, we must account for all of their etiological explanations.

  • 3.
    Jansen, Karine Aasgaard
    Department of archaeology, history, cultural studies and religion, University of Bergen.
    The 2005-2007 chikungunya epidemic in Reunion: Ambigious etiologies, memories and meaning-making2013In: Medical Anthropology, ISSN 0145-9740, E-ISSN 1545-5882, Vol. 32, no 2, p. 174-189Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    From March 2005 to April 2007 the French overseas department and Indian Ocean island of Réunion was significantly affected by an epidemic of chikungunya. Chikungunya is a vector-spread disease (by the aedes albopictus mosquito) that leads to painful rheumatic symptoms. The disease infected approximately one third of the island's total population of 802,000 inhabitants (Rallu 2009). This article is a discussion of local etiological accounts of chikungunya. The primary topic raised by informants was whether chikungunya was a vector- or air-borne disease. Even though informants had access to substantial biomedical information concerning the disease and its transmission, some were convinced by it and others were not. In order to make meaning of the disease, the Réunionese drew on various types of medical knowledge from different health sectors simultaneously. To understand people's experiences with chikungunya, we must account for all of their etiological explanations.

  • 4.
    Lundgren, Britta
    Umeå University, Faculty of Arts, Department of culture and media studies.
    Narrating narcolepsy: centering a side effect2015In: Medical Anthropology, ISSN 0145-9740, E-ISSN 1545-5882, Vol. 34, no 2, p. 150-165Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The mass-vaccination with Pandemrix was the most important preventive measure in Sweden during the A(H1N1) influenza pandemic of 2009–2010, and covered 60% of the population. From 2010, an increased incidence of the neurological disease narcolepsy was reported, and an association with Pandemrix was affirmed for more than 200 children and young adults. The parental experience of this side effect provided a starting point for a collectively shaped critical narrative to be acted out in public, but also personalized narratives of continual learning about the disease and its consequences. This didactic functionality resulted in active meaning-making practices about how to handle the aftermath—using dark humor, cognitive tricks, and making themselves and their children’s bodies both objects and subjects of knowledge. Using material from interviews with parents, this mixing of knowledge work and political work, and the potential for reflective consciousness, is discussed.

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