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  • 1.
    Gouveia-Figueira, Sandra
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Department of Chemistry. Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Pharmacology and Clinical Neuroscience, Pharmacology.
    Bosson, Jenny A.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine, Pulmonary Medicine.
    Unosson, Jon
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine, Pulmonary Medicine.
    Behndig, Annelie F.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine, Pulmonary Medicine.
    Nording, Malin
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Department of Chemistry.
    Fowler, Christopher
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Pharmacology and Clinical Neuroscience, Pharmacology.
    Relative and absolute reliability of measures of linoleic acid-derived oxylipins in human plasma2015In: Prostaglandins & other lipid mediators, ISSN 1098-8823, E-ISSN 2212-196X, Vol. 121, no Part B, p. 227-233Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Modern analytical techniques allow for the measurement of oxylipins derived from linoleic acid in biological samples. Most validatory work has concerned extraction techniques, repeated analysis of aliquots from the same biological sample, and the influence of external factors such as diet and heparin treatment upon their levels, whereas less is known about the relative and absolute reliability of measurements undertaken on different days. A cohort of nineteen healthy males were used, where samples were taken at the same time of day on two occasions, at least 7 days apart. Relative reliability was assessed using Lin's concordance correlation coefficients (CCC) and intraclass correlation coefficients (ICC). Absolute reliability was assessed by Bland-Altman analyses. Nine linoleic acid oxylipins were investigated. ICC and CCC values ranged from acceptable (0.56 [13-HODE]) to poor (near zero [9(10)- and 12(13)-EpOME]). Bland-Altman limits of agreement were in general quite wide, ranging from ±0.5 (12,13-DiHOME) to ±2 (9(10)-EpOME; log10 scale). It is concluded that relative reliability of linoleic acid-derived oxylipins varies between lipids with compounds such as the HODEs showing better relative reliability than compounds such as the EpOMEs. These differences should be kept in mind when designing and interpreting experiments correlating plasma levels of these lipids with factors such as age, body mass index, rating scales etc.

  • 2.
    Gouveia-Figueira, Sandra C.
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Department of Chemistry.
    Karimpour, Masoumeh
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Department of Chemistry.
    Bosson, Jenny A.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine, Medicine.
    Blomberg, Anders
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine, Medicine.
    Unosson, Jon
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine, Medicine.
    Sehlstedt, Maria
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine, Medicine.
    Pourazar, Jamshid
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine, Medicine.
    Sandström, Thomas
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine, Medicine.
    Behndig, Annelie F.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine, Medicine.
    Nording, Malin L.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Department of Chemistry.
    Mass spectrometry profiling reveals altered plasma levels of monohydroxy fatty acids and related lipids in healthy humans after controlled exposure to biodiesel exhaust2018In: Analytica Chimica Acta, ISSN 0003-2670, E-ISSN 1873-4324, Vol. 1018, p. 62-69Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Experimental human exposure studies are an effective tool to study adverse health effects from acute inhalation of particulate matter and other constituents of air pollution. In this randomized and double-blinded crossover study, we investigated the systemic effect on bioactive lipid metabolite levels after controlled biodiesel exhaust exposure of healthy humans and compared it to filtered air at a separate exposure occasion. Eicosanoids and other oxylipins, as well as endocannabinoids and related lipids, were quantified in plasma from 14 healthy volunteers at baseline and at three subsequent time points (2, 6, and 24 h) after 1 h exposure sessions. Protocols based on liquid chromatography (LC) coupled to tandem mass spectrometry (MS/MS) methods were developed to detect temporal changes in circulating levels after biodiesel exhaust exposure. The exhaust was generated by a diesel engine fed with an undiluted rapeseed methyl ester fuel. Among the 51 analyzed lipid metabolites, PGF(2 alpha), 9,10-DiHOME, 9-HODE, 5-HETE, 11-HETE, 12-HETE, and DEA displayed significant responsiveness to the biodiesel exhaust exposure as opposed to filtered air. Of these, 9-HODE and 5-HETE at 24 h survived the 10% false discovery rate cutoff (p < 0.003). Hence, the majority of the responsive lipid metabolites were monohydroxy fatty acids. We conclude that it is possible to detect alterations in circulating bioactive lipid metabolites in response to biodiesel exhaust exposure using LC-MS/MS, with emphasis on metabolites with inflammation related properties and implications on cardiovascular health and disease. These observations aid future investigations on air pollution effects, especially with regard to cardiovascular outcomes.

  • 3.
    Gouveia-Figueira, Sandra
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Department of Chemistry.
    Karimpour, Masoumeh
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Department of Chemistry.
    Bosson, Jenny A.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine, Medicine.
    Blomberg, Anders
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine, Medicine.
    Unosson, Jon
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine, Medicine.
    Pourazar, Jamshid
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine, Medicine.
    Sandström, Thomas
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine, Medicine.
    Behndig, Annelie F.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine, Medicine.
    Nording, Malin L.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Department of Chemistry.
    Mass spectrometry profiling of oxylipins, endocannabinoids, and N-acylethanolamines in human lung lavage fluids reveals responsiveness of prostaglandin E2 and associated lipid metabolites to biodiesel exhaust exposure2017In: Analytical and Bioanalytical Chemistry, ISSN 1618-2642, E-ISSN 1618-2650, Vol. 409, no 11, p. 2967-2980Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The adverse effects of petrodiesel exhaust exposure on the cardiovascular and respiratory systems are well recognized. While biofuels such as rapeseed methyl ester (RME) biodiesel may have ecological advantages, the exhaust generated may cause adverse health effects. In the current study, we investigated the responses of bioactive lipid mediators in human airways after biodiesel exhaust exposure using lipidomic profiling methods. Lipid mediator levels in lung lavage were assessed following 1-h biodiesel exhaust (average particulate matter concentration, 159 mu g/m(3)) or filtered air exposure in 15 healthy individuals in a double-blinded, randomized, controlled, crossover study design. Bronchoscopy was performed 6 h post exposure and lung lavage fluids, i.e., bronchial wash (BW) and bronchoalveolar lavage (BAL), were sequentially collected. Mass spectrometry methods were used to detect a wide array of oxylipins (including eicosanoids), endocannabinoids, Nacylethanolamines, and related lipid metabolites in the collected BWand BAL samples. Six lipids in the human lung lavage samples were altered following biodiesel exhaust exposure, three from BAL samples and three from BW samples. Of these, elevated levels of PGE2, 12,13-DiHOME, and 13-HODE, all of which were found in BAL samples, reached Bonferroni-corrected significance. This is the first study in humans reporting responses of bioactive lipids following biodiesel exhaust exposure and the most pronounced responses were seen in the more peripheral and alveolar lung compartments, reflected by BAL collection. Since the responsiveness and diagnostic value of a subset of the studied lipid metabolites were established in lavage fluids, we conclude that our mass spectrometry profiling method is useful to assess effects of human exposure to vehicle exhaust.

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  • 4.
    Gouveia-Figueira, Sandra
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Department of Chemistry.
    Karimpour, Masoumeh
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Department of Chemistry.
    Bosson, Jenny
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine, Medicine.
    Blomberg, Anders
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine, Medicine.
    Unosson, Jon
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine, Medicine.
    Pourazar, Jamshid
    Sandström, Thomas
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine, Medicine.
    Behndig, Annelie F.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine, Medicine.
    Nording, Malin L.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Department of Chemistry.
    Mass spectrometry profiling of oxylipins, endocannabinoids and N-acylethanolamines in human lung lavage fluids reveal responsiveness of prostaglandin E2 and associated lipid metabolites to biodiesel exhaust exposureManuscript (preprint) (Other academic)
  • 5.
    Gouveia-Figueira, Sandra
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Department of Chemistry.
    Karimpour, Masoumeh
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Department of Chemistry.
    Bosson, Jenny
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine, Medicine.
    Pourazar, Jamshid
    Blomberg, Anders
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine, Medicine.
    Unosson, Jon
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine, Medicine.
    Sandström, Thomas
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine, Medicine.
    Behndig, Annelie F.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine, Medicine.
    Nording, Malin L.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Department of Chemistry.
    Effect of controlled exposure to biodiesel exhaust on human plasma bioactive lipid profilesManuscript (preprint) (Other academic)
  • 6.
    Hunter, Amanda
    et al.
    University of Edinburgh.
    Unosson, Jon
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine, Pulmonary Medicine.
    Bosson, Jenny A
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine, Pulmonary Medicine.
    Langrish, Jeremy P
    University of Edinburgh.
    Pourazar, Jamshid
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine, Pulmonary Medicine.
    Raftis, Jennifer B
    University of Edinburgh.
    Miller, Mark R
    University of Edinburgh.
    Lucking, Andrew J
    University of Edinburgh.
    Boman, Christoffer
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Department of Applied Physics and Electronics.
    Nyström, Robin
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Department of Applied Physics and Electronics.
    Donaldson, Kenneth
    University of Edinburgh.
    Flapan, Andrew D
    University of Edinburgh.
    Pung, Louis
    University of Edinburgh.
    Sadiktsis, Ioannis
    Stockholm University.
    Masala, Silvia
    Stockholm University.
    Westerholm, Roger
    Stockholm University.
    Sandström, Thomas
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine, Pulmonary Medicine.
    Blomberg, Anders
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine, Pulmonary Medicine.
    Newby, David E
    University of Edinburgh.
    Mills, Nicholas L
    University of Edinburgh.
    Effect of wood smoke exposure on vascular function and thrombus formation in healthy fire fighters2014In: Particle and Fibre Toxicology, ISSN 1743-8977, E-ISSN 1743-8977, Vol. 11, article id 62Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: Myocardial infarction is the leading cause of death in fire fighters and has been linked with exposure to air pollution and fire suppression duties. We therefore investigated the effects of wood smoke exposure on vascular vasomotor and fibrinolytic function, and thrombus formation in healthy fire fighters. Methods: In a double-blind randomized cross-over study, 16 healthy male fire fighters were exposed to wood smoke (~1 mg/m3 particulate matter concentration) or filtered air for one hour during intermittent exercise. Arterial pressure and stiffness were measured before and immediately after exposure, and forearm blood flow was measured during intra-brachial infusion of endothelium-dependent and -independent vasodilators 4–6 hours after exposure. Thrombus formation was assessed using the ex vivo Badimon chamber at 2 hours, and platelet activation was measured using flow cytometry for up to 24 hours after the exposure. Results: Compared to filtered air, exposure to wood smoke increased blood carboxyhaemoglobin concentrations (1.3% versus 0.8%; P < 0.001), but had no effect on arterial pressure, augmentation index or pulse wave velocity (P > 0.05 for all). Whilst there was a dose-dependent increase in forearm blood flow with each vasodilator (P < 0.01 for all), there were no differences in blood flow responses to acetylcholine, sodium nitroprusside or verapamil between exposures (P > 0.05 for all). Following exposure to wood smoke, vasodilatation to bradykinin increased (P = 0.003), but there was no effect on bradykinin-induced tissue-plasminogen activator release, thrombus area or markers of platelet activation (P > 0.05 for all). Conclusions: Wood smoke exposure does not impair vascular vasomotor or fibrinolytic function, or increase thrombus formation in fire fighters. Acute cardiovascular events following fire suppression may be precipitated by exposure to other air pollutants or through other mechanisms, such as strenuous physical exertion and dehydration.

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  • 7. Langrish, J. P.
    et al.
    Bosson, Jenny
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine, Pulmonary Medicine.
    Unosson, Jon
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine, Pulmonary Medicine.
    Muala, Ala
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine, Pulmonary Medicine.
    Newby, D. E.
    Mills, N. L.
    Blomberg, Anders
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine, Pulmonary Medicine.
    Sandström, Thomas
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine, Pulmonary Medicine.
    Cardiovascular effects of particulate air pollution exposure: time course and underlying mechanisms2012In: Journal of Internal Medicine, ISSN 0954-6820, E-ISSN 1365-2796, Vol. 272, no 3, p. 224-239Article, review/survey (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Objective Air pollution is now recognized as an important independent risk factor for cardiovascular morbidity and mortality and may be responsible for up to 3 similar to million premature deaths each year worldwide. The mechanisms underlying the observed effects are poorly understood but are likely to be multifactorial. Here, we review the acute and chronic effects of air pollution exposure on the cardiovascular system and discuss how these effects may explain the observed increases in cardiovascular morbidity and mortality.

  • 8. Langrish, J. P.
    et al.
    Unosson, Jon
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine.
    Pourazar, Jamshid
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine.
    Stannett, C.
    Mills, N. L.
    Newby, D. E.
    Blomberg, Anders
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine.
    Sandström, Thomas
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine.
    Bosson, Jenny
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine.
    The use of a highly-efficient facemask to protect against the acute cardiovascular effects of dilute diesel exhaust exposure2016In: European Heart Journal, ISSN 0195-668X, E-ISSN 1522-9645, Vol. 37, p. 550-551Article in journal (Other academic)
  • 9. Langrish, Jeremy P
    et al.
    Unosson, Jon
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine, Pulmonary Medicine.
    Bosson, Jenny
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine, Pulmonary Medicine.
    Barath, Stefan
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine, Pulmonary Medicine.
    Muala, Ala
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine, Pulmonary Medicine.
    Blackwell, Scott
    Söderberg, Stefan
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine, Cardiology.
    Pourazar, Jamshid
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine, Pulmonary Medicine.
    Megson, Ian L
    Treweeke, Andrew
    Sandström, Thomas
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine, Pulmonary Medicine.
    Newby, David E
    Blomberg, Anders
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine, Pulmonary Medicine.
    Mills, Nicholas L
    Altered nitric oxide bioavailability contributes to diesel exhaust inhalation-induced cardiovascular dysfunction in man2013In: Journal of the American Heart Association: Cardiovascular and Cerebrovascular Disease, ISSN 2047-9980, E-ISSN 2047-9980, Vol. 2, no 1, p. e004309-Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background Diesel exhaust inhalation causes cardiovascular dysfunction including impaired vascular reactivity, increased blood pressure, and arterial stiffness. We investigated the role of nitric oxide (NO) bioavailability in mediating these effects.

    Methods and Results In 2 randomized double-blind crossover studies, healthy nonsmokers were exposed to diesel exhaust or filtered air. Study 1: Bilateral forearm blood flow was measured during intrabrachial infusions of acetylcholine (ACh; 5 to 20 mu g/min) and sodium nitroprusside (SNP; 2 to 8 mu g/min) in the presence of the NO clamp (NO synthase inhibitor N-G-monomethyl-L-arginine (L-NMMA) 8 mu g/min coinfused with the NO donor SNP at 90 to 540 ng/min to restore basal blood flow). Study 2: Blood pressure, arterial stiffness, and cardiac output were measured during systemic NO synthase inhibition with intravenous L-NMMA (3 mg/kg). Following diesel exhaust inhalation, plasma nitrite concentrations were increased (68 +/- 48 versus 41 +/- 32 nmol/L; P=0.006) despite similar L-NMMA-induced reductions in basal blood flow (-20.6 +/- 14.7% versus -21.1 +/- 14.6%; P=0.559) compared to air. In the presence of the NO clamp, ACh and SNP caused dose-dependent vasodilatation that was not affected by diesel exhaust inhalation (P>0.05 for both). Following exposure to diesel exhaust, L-NMMA caused a greater increase in blood pressure (P=0.048) and central arterial stiffness (P=0.007), but reductions in cardiac output and increases in systemic vascular resistance (P>0.05 for both) were similar to those seen with filtered air.

    Conclusions Diesel exhaust inhalation disturbs normal vascular homeostasis with enhanced NO generation unable to compensate for excess consumption. We suggest the adverse cardiovascular effects of air pollution are, in part, mediated through reduced NO bioavailability.

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    NO bioavailabiltiy
  • 10.
    Langrish, Jeremy P.
    et al.
    University of Edinburgh, University/BHF Centre for Cardiovascular Science, Edinburgh, United Kingdom.
    Watts, Simon J.
    University of Edinburgh, University/BHF Centre for Cardiovascular Science, Edinburgh, United Kingdom.
    Hunter, Amanda J.
    University of Edinburgh, University/BHF Centre for Cardiovascular Science, Edinburgh, United Kingdom.
    Shah, Anoop S. V.
    University of Edinburgh, University/BHF Centre for Cardiovascular Science, Edinburgh, United Kingdom.
    Bosson, Jenny A
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine, Pulmonary Medicine.
    Unosson, Jon
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine, Pulmonary Medicine.
    Barath, Stefan
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine, Pulmonary Medicine.
    Lundbäck, Magnus
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine, Pulmonary Medicine.
    Cassee, Flemming R.
    National Institute for Public Health and the Environment (RIVM), Bilthoven, the Netherlands .
    Donaldson, Ken
    University of Edinburgh, University/BHF Centre for Cardiovascular Science, Edinburgh, United Kingdom.
    Sandström, Thomas
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine, Pulmonary Medicine.
    Blomberg, Anders
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine, Pulmonary Medicine.
    Newby, David E.
    University of Edinburgh, University/BHF Centre for Cardiovascular Science, Edinburgh, United Kingdom.
    Mills, Nicholas L.
    University of Edinburgh, University/BHF Centre for Cardiovascular Science, Edinburgh, United Kingdom.
    Controlled exposures to air pollutants and risk of cardiac arrhythmia2014In: Journal of Environmental Health Perspectives, ISSN 0091-6765, E-ISSN 1552-9924, Vol. 122, no 7, p. 747-753Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    BACKGROUND: Epidemiological studies have reported associations between air pollution exposure and increases in cardiovascular morbidity and mortality. Exposure to air pollutants can influence cardiac autonomic tone and reduce heart rate variability, and may increase the risk of cardiac arrhythmias, particularly in susceptible patient groups. OBJECTIVES: We investigated the incidence of cardiac arrhythmias during and after controlled exposure to air pollutants in healthy volunteers and patients with coronary heart disease. METHODS: We analyzed data from 13 double-blind randomized crossover studies including 282 participants (140 healthy volunteers and 142 patients with stable coronary heart disease) from whom continuous electrocardiograms were available. The incidence of cardiac arrhythmias was recorded for each exposure and study population. RESULTS: There were no increases in any cardiac arrhythmia during or after exposure to dilute diesel exhaust, wood smoke, ozone, concentrated ambient particles, engineered carbon nanoparticles, or high ambient levels of air pollution in either healthy volunteers or patients with coronary heart disease. CONCLUSIONS: Acute controlled exposure to air pollutants did not increase the short-term risk of arrhythmia in participants. Research employing these techniques remains crucial in identifying the important pathophysiological pathways involved in the adverse effects of air pollution, and is vital to inform environmental and public health policy decisions.

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  • 11.
    Muala, Ala
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine, Pulmonary Medicine.
    Rankin, Gregory
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine, Pulmonary Medicine.
    Sehlstedt, Maria
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine, Pulmonary Medicine.
    Unosson, Jon
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine, Pulmonary Medicine.
    Bosson, Jenny A.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine, Pulmonary Medicine.
    Behndig, Annelie
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine, Pulmonary Medicine.
    Pourazar, Jamshid
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine, Pulmonary Medicine.
    Nyström, Robin
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Department of Applied Physics and Electronics.
    Pettersson, Esbjörn
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Department of Applied Physics and Electronics.
    Bergvall, Christoffer
    Westerholm, Roger
    Jalava, Pasi I.
    Happo, Mikko S.
    Uski, Oskari
    Hirvonen, Maija-Riitta
    Kelly, Frank J.
    Mudway, Ian S.
    Blomberg, Anders
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine, Pulmonary Medicine.
    Boman, Christoffer
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Department of Applied Physics and Electronics.
    Sandström, Thomas
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine, Pulmonary Medicine.
    Acute exposure to wood smoke from incomplete combustion - indications of cytotoxicity2015In: Particle and Fibre Toxicology, ISSN 1743-8977, E-ISSN 1743-8977, Vol. 12, article id 33Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: Smoke from combustion of biomass fuels is a major risk factor for respiratory disease, but the underlying mechanisms are poorly understood. The aim of this study was to determine whether exposure to wood smoke from incomplete combustion would elicit airway inflammation in humans. Methods: Fourteen healthy subjects underwent controlled exposures on two separate occasions to filtered air and wood smoke from incomplete combustion with PM1 concentration at 314 mu g/m(3) for 3 h in a chamber. Bronchoscopy with bronchial wash (BW), bronchoalveolar lavage (BAL) and endobronchial mucosal biopsies was performed after 24 h. Differential cell counts and soluble components were analyzed, with biopsies stained for inflammatory markers using immunohistochemistry. In parallel experiments, the toxicity of the particulate matter (PM) generated during the chamber exposures was investigated in vitro using the RAW264.7 macrophage cell line. Results: Significant reductions in macrophage, neutrophil and lymphocyte numbers were observed in BW (p < 0.01, < 0.05, < 0.05, respectively) following the wood smoke exposure, with a reduction in lymphocytes numbers in BAL fluid (< 0.01. This unexpected cellular response was accompanied by decreased levels of sICAM-1, MPO and MMP-9 (p < 0.05, < 0.05 and < 0.01). In contrast, significant increases in submucosal and epithelial CD3+ cells, epithelial CD8+ cells and submucosal mast cells (p < 0.01, < 0.05, < 0.05 and < 0.05, respectively), were observed after wood smoke exposure. The in vitro data demonstrated that wood smoke particles generated under these incomplete combustion conditions induced cell death and DNA damage, with only minor inflammatory responses. Conclusions: Short-term exposure to sooty PAH rich wood smoke did not induce an acute neutrophilic inflammation, a classic hallmark of air pollution exposure in humans. While minor proinflammatory lymphocytic and mast cells effects were observed in the bronchial biopsies, significant reductions in BW and BAL cells and soluble components were noted. This unexpected observation, combined with the in vitro data, suggests that wood smoke particles from incomplete combustion could be potentially cytotoxic. Additional research is required to establish the mechanism of this dramatic reduction in airway leukocytes and to clarify how this acute response contributes to the adverse health effects attributed to wood smoke exposure.

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  • 12.
    Muala, Ala
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine, Pulmonary Medicine.
    Rankin, Gregory
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine, Pulmonary Medicine.
    Sehlstedt, Maria
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine, Pulmonary Medicine.
    Unosson, Jon
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine, Pulmonary Medicine.
    Bosson, Jenny
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine, Pulmonary Medicine.
    Behndig, Annelie
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine, Pulmonary Medicine.
    Nyström, Robin
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Department of Applied Physics and Electronics.
    Pettersson, Esbjörn
    Bergvall, Christoffer
    Westerholm, Roger
    Boman, Christoffer
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Department of Applied Physics and Electronics.
    Pourazar, Jamshid
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine, Pulmonary Medicine.
    Kelly, Frank
    Mudway, Ian
    Blomberg, Anders
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine, Pulmonary Medicine.
    Sandström, Thomas
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine, Pulmonary Medicine.
    Bronchial mucosal inflammation in healthy subjects after exposure to wood smoke from incomplete combustionManuscript (preprint) (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Indoor smoke from combustion of solid biomass fuel is a major risk factor for respiratory disease worldwide. The mechanisms by which wood smoke exhibits its effects on human health are not well understood. The aim of this study was to determine whether exposure to wood smoke produced from incomplete combustion would elicit an airway inflammatory response.

    Methods Fourteen healthy subjects underwent controlled chamber exposure on two occasions to filtered air and to sooty wood smoke (PM1 ~ 314 μg/m3), generated by a common Nordic wood stove firing birch logs. The study was performed with a double-blind randomized cross-over design and the subjects alternated between exercise (VE=20 L/min/m2) and rest at 15-minute intervals for 3 hours. Bronchoscopies were performed 24 hours after each exposure where bronchial wash (BW), bronchoalveolar lavage (BAL) and endobronchial biopsies were taken. Differential cell counts and soluble components were analyzed in BW and BAL. Bronchial mucosal biopsies were analyzed using immunohistochemistry. Blood tests for inflammatory markers were sampled pre-exposure as well as at 24 and 44-hour time points post-exposure. Spirometry and Fraction of exhaled nitric oxide (FENO) were performed before, immediately after and 24 hours after each exposure.

    Results There was a significant increase in submucosal and epithelial CD3+ lymphocytes (p<0.01 and <0.05 respectively), together with CD8+ cells in the epithelium (p<0.05) after exposure to wood smoke compared to filtered air. Mast cells were also significantly increased in the submucosa (p<0.01) after wood smoke exposure.

    There were significant reductions in macrophages, neutrophils and lymphocytes in BW after exposure to wood smoke compared to filtered air, accompanied by decreased levels of soluble Intercellular Adhesion Molecule-1 (sICAM-1), myeloperoxidase (MPO) and matrix metalloproteinase-9 (MMP-9). No significant effects on cell numbers or acute inflammatory markers were demonstrated in BAL fluid or peripheral blood. Lung function and FENO were not affected by exposure to wood smoke.

    Conclusions Wood smoke exposure caused a significant increase in bronchial epithelial and submucosal CD3+ lymphocytes together with an increase in mucosal mast cells. Further examination revealed a significant increase in CD8+ lymphocytes within the epithelium. Unexpectedly there were no indications of any neutrophilic airway response or recruitment of alveolar macrophages. BW cell numbers, MPO and MMP-9 levels were also significantly reduced after wood smoke exposure. Further research is needed to determine the precise role of these events in relationship to the adverse health effects attributed to wood smoke exposure.

  • 13.
    Pourazar, Jamshid
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine, Pulmonary Medicine.
    Behndig, Annelie F.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine, Pulmonary Medicine.
    Helleday, Ragnberth
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine.
    Muala, Ala
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine.
    Rankin, Gregory
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine, Pulmonary Medicine.
    Sehlstedt, Maria
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine, Pulmonary Medicine.
    Unosson, Jon
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine.
    Langrish, J. P.
    Blomberg, Anders
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine, Pulmonary Medicine.
    Sandström, Thomas
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine, Pulmonary Medicine.
    Bosson, Jenny A.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine, Pulmonary Medicine.
    Airway Inflammatory Response In Healthy Subjects Following Chamber Exposure To 100% Rme Biodiesel2015In: American Journal of Respiratory and Critical Care Medicine, ISSN 1073-449X, E-ISSN 1535-4970, Vol. 191, article id A5252Article in journal (Other academic)
  • 14.
    Pourazar, Jamshid
    et al.
    Umeå University.
    Rankin, Gregory Dominique
    Umeå University.
    Muala, Ala
    Umeå University.
    Unosson, Jon
    Umeå University.
    Sehlstedt, M.
    Umeå University.
    Behndig, A. F.
    Umeå University.
    Boman, C.
    Umeå University.
    Blomberg, A.
    Umeå University.
    Bosson, J.
    Umeå University.
    Sandstrom, T.
    Umeå University.
    Bronchoalveolar Eosinophilia In Human Subjects After Exposure To Biomass Smoke From Wood Pellet Combustion2016Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 15.
    Surowiec, Izabella
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Department of Chemistry.
    Karimpour, Masoumeh
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Department of Chemistry.
    Gouveia-Figueira, Sandra
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Department of Chemistry.
    Wu, Junfang
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Department of Chemistry.
    Unosson, Jon
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine, Medicine.
    Bosson, Jenny A.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine, Medicine.
    Blomberg, Anders
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine, Medicine.
    Pourazar, Jamshid
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine, Medicine.
    Sandström, Thomas
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine, Medicine.
    Behndig, Annelie F.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine, Medicine.
    Trygg, Johan
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Department of Chemistry.
    Nording, Malin L.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Department of Chemistry.
    Multi-platform metabolomics assays for human lung lavage fluids in an air pollution exposure study2016In: Analytical and Bioanalytical Chemistry, ISSN 1618-2642, E-ISSN 1618-2650, Vol. 408, no 17, p. 4751-4764Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Metabolomics protocols are used to comprehensively characterize the metabolite content of biological samples by exploiting cutting-edge analytical platforms, such as gas chromatography (GC) or liquid chromatography (LC) coupled to mass spectrometry (MS) assays, as well as nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) assays. We have developed novel sample preparation procedures combined with GC-MS, LC-MS, and NMR metabolomics profiling for analyzing bronchial wash (BW) and bronchoalveolar lavage (BAL) fluid from 15 healthy volunteers following exposure to biodiesel exhaust and filtered air. Our aim was to investigate the responsiveness of metabolite profiles in the human lung to air pollution exposure derived from combustion of biofuels, such as rapeseed methyl ester biodiesel, which are increasingly being promoted as alternatives to conventional fossil fuels. Our multi-platform approach enabled us to detect the greatest number of unique metabolites yet reported in BW and BAL fluid (82 in total). All of the metabolomics assays indicated that the metabolite profiles of the BW and BAL fluids differed appreciably, with 46 metabolites showing significantly different levels in the corresponding lung compartments. Furthermore, the GC-MS assay revealed an effect of biodiesel exhaust exposure on the levels of 1-monostearylglycerol, sucrose, inosine, nonanoic acid, and ethanolamine (in BAL) and pentadecanoic acid (in BW), whereas the LC-MS assay indicated a shift in the levels of niacinamide (in BAL). The NMR assay only identified lactic acid (in BW) as being responsive to biodiesel exhaust exposure. Our findings demonstrate that the proposed multi-platform approach is useful for wide metabolomics screening of BW and BAL fluids and can facilitate elucidation of metabolites responsive to biodiesel exhaust exposure.

  • 16.
    Unosson, Jon
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine, Pulmonary Medicine.
    Acute cardiovascular effects of biofuel exhaust exposure2014Doctoral thesis, comprehensive summary (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Background

    Anthropogenic air pollution is a global health problem estimated to contribute to millions of premature deaths. Exposure to biomass smoke is common due to varying sources, such as wildfires, indoor cooking over open fires, and residential heating from wood stoves. In urban environments transportation and industry rely heavily on the combustion of fossil fuels yet environmental policies increasingly support a shift to renewable fuels such as biodiesel. It has not been investigated how either wood smoke or biodiesel exhaust affect human health in general or the cardiovascular system in particular. We hypothesized that wood smoke exposure would induce acute cardiovascular impairment via similar underlying mechanisms as have been established for petrodiesel exhaust exposure. We also hypothesized that replacing petrodiesel with biodiesel, as a blend or pure biodiesel, would generate an exhaust profile with a less harmful effect on the cardiovascular system than petrodiesel exhaust.

    Methods

    In four separate studies healthy non-smoking subjects were exposed to different air pollutants in controlled exposure chambers followed by clinical investigations of the cardiovascular system. All studies were performed as randomized controlled trials in a crossover fashion with each individual acting as her own control. In study I healthy volunteers were exposed to wood smoke at a target concentration of particulate matter (PM) 300 µg/mfor three hours followed by measures of blood pressure, heart rate variability and central arterial stiffness. In study II subjects were exposed to wood smoke at a target concentration of PM 1000 µg/mfor one hour followed by measures of thrombus formation using the Badimon technique and vasomotor function using forearm venous occlusion plethysmography. In study III subjects were exposed to petrodiesel exhaust and a 30% rapeseed methyl ester (RME30) biodiesel blend for one hour at a target concentration of PM 300 µg/m3. Following exposure, thrombus formation and vasomotor function were assessed as in study II. In study IV subjects were exposed to petrodiesel exhaust at a target concentration of PM 300 μg/m3for one hour and pure rapeseed methyl ester (RME100) exhaust generated at identical running conditions of the engine. Following exposure, thrombus formation and vasomotor function were assessed as in study II and III.

    Results

    In study I fourteen subjects (8 males) were exposed to wood smoke at P M 294±36 μg/m3. Compared to filtered air exposure, measures of central arterial stiffness were increased and heart rate variability was decreased following wood smoke exposure. No effect was seen on blood pressure. In study II sixteen males were exposed to wood smoke at PM 899±100 μg/m3. We found no evidence of increased thrombus formation or impaired vasomotor function following wood smoke exposure. In study III sixteen subjects (14 males) were exposed to petrodiesel exhaust (PM 314±27 µg/m3) and RME30 exhaust (PM 309±30 µg/m3). Thrombus formation and vasomotor function were equal following either exposure. In study IV nineteen males were exposed to petrodiesel exhaust (PM 310±34 µg/m3, 1.7±0.3 x105 particles/cm3) and RME100 exhaust (PM 165±16 µg/m3, 2.2±0.1 x10particles/cm3). As in study III, thrombus formation and vasomotor function were identical following both exposures.

    Conclusions

    We have for the first time demonstrated that wood smoke exposure can increase central arterial stiffness and decrease heart rate variability in healthy subjects. We did not, however find evidence of increased thrombus formation and impaired vasomotor function following wood smoke exposure at a higher concentration for a shorter time period. We have, for the first time, demonstrated that exhaust from RME biodiesel induced acute adverse cardiovascular effects of increased thrombus formation and impaired vasomotor function in man. These effects are on par with those seen following exposure to petrodiesel exhaust, despite marked physicochemical differences of the exhaust characteristics.

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  • 17.
    Unosson, Jon
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine, Pulmonary Medicine.
    Blomberg, Anders
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine, Pulmonary Medicine.
    Sandström, Thomas
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine, Pulmonary Medicine.
    Boman, Christoffer
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Department of Applied Physics and Electronics.
    Nyström, Robin
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Department of Applied Physics and Electronics.
    Kabele, Mikael
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine, Pulmonary Medicine.
    Sadiktsis, Ioannis
    Stockholm University.
    Westerholm, Roger
    Stockholm University.
    Mudway, Ian
    King's College London.
    Purdie, Esme
    King's College London.
    Raftis, Jennifer
    University of Edinburgh.
    Mills, Nicholas L
    University of Edinburgh.
    Newby, David E
    University of Edinburgh.
    Langrish, Jeremy P
    University of Edinburgh.
    Bosson, Jenny A
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine, Pulmonary Medicine.
    Rapeseed Methyl Ester Biodiesel Exhaust Exposure Causes Vascular Dysfunction in ManManuscript (preprint) (Other academic)
  • 18.
    Unosson, Jon
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine, Pulmonary Medicine.
    Blomberg, Anders
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine, Pulmonary Medicine.
    Sandström, Thomas
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine, Pulmonary Medicine.
    Muala, Ala
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine, Pulmonary Medicine.
    Boman, Christoffer
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Department of Applied Physics and Electronics, Energy Technology and Thermal Process Chemistry.
    Nyström, Robin
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Department of Applied Physics and Electronics.
    Westerholm, Roger
    Mills, Nicholas L.
    Newby, David E.
    Langrish, Jeremy P.
    Bosson, Jenny
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine, Pulmonary Medicine.
    Exposure to wood smoke increases arterial stiffness and decreases heart rate variability in humans2013In: Particle and Fibre Toxicology, ISSN 1743-8977, E-ISSN 1743-8977, Vol. 10, p. 20-Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: Emissions from biomass combustion are a major source of indoor and outdoor air pollution, and are estimated to cause millions of premature deaths worldwide annually. Whilst adverse respiratory health effects of biomass exposure are well established, less is known about its effects on the cardiovascular system. In this study we assessed the effect of exposure to wood smoke on heart rate, blood pressure, central arterial stiffness and heart rate variability in otherwise healthy persons. Methods: Fourteen healthy non-smoking subjects participated in a randomized, double-blind crossover study. Subjects were exposed to dilute wood smoke (mean particle concentration of 314 +/- 38 mu g/m(3)) or filtered air for three hours during intermittent exercise. Heart rate, blood pressure, central arterial stiffness and heart rate variability were measured at baseline and for one hour post-exposure. Results: Central arterial stiffness, measured as augmentation index, augmentation pressure and pulse wave velocity, was higher after wood smoke exposure as compared to filtered air (p < 0.01 for all), and heart rate was increased (p < 0.01) although there was no effect on blood pressure. Heart rate variability (SDNN, RMSSD and pNN50; p = 0.003, p < 0.001 and p < 0.001 respectively) was decreased one hour following exposure to wood smoke compared to filtered air. Conclusions: Acute exposure to wood smoke as a model of exposure to biomass combustion is associated with an immediate increase in central arterial stiffness and a simultaneous reduction in heart rate variability. As biomass is used for cooking and heating by a large fraction of the global population and is currently advocated as a sustainable alternative energy source, further studies are required to establish its likely impact on cardiovascular disease.

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