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  • 1.
    Adjei, Evans
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Geography and Economic History.
    Eriksson, Rikard
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Geography and Economic History.
    Lindgren, Urban
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Geography and Economic History.
    Social proximity and firm performance: the importance of family member ties in workplaces2016In: Regional Studies, Regional Science, ISSN 0080-0694, E-ISSN 2168-1376, Vol. 3, no 1, p. 303-319Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This study empirically assesses the role of social proximity, defined as the concentration of family members (FM) in firms, on firm performance. Based on longitudinal micro-data for the period 1995–2010 connecting information on workers and their workplaces in the Swedish labour market, the effects of FM (parents, children, siblings and grandparents) on per capita productivity in 15,359 firms were analysed. The results indicate that FM positively affect firm performance. In particular, the results suggest that in specialized regions (mainly small regions) FM have a positive influence on performance and can thus compensate for relative shortage of regional agglomeration economies.

  • 2.
    Adjei, Evans
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Geography and Economic History.
    Eriksson, Rikard
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Geography and Economic History.
    Lindgren, Urban
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Geography and Economic History.
    Holm, Einar
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Geography and Economic History.
    Familial relationships and firm performance: the impact of entrepreneurial family relationships2019In: Entrepreneurship and Regional Development, ISSN 0898-5626, E-ISSN 1464-5114, Vol. 31, no 5-6, p. 357-377Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    While the family may serve as a resource for entrepreneurs, it has been studied separately in different disciplines. In this paper, we combine the arguments on familial relationships (family firm literature) and skill variety (regional learning literature) to analyse how different forms of entrepreneurial family relationships (co-occurrences) facilitate firm performance, and how familial relationships moderate the effects of skill variety on firm performance. Using longitudinal data (2002-2012) on a sample of privately owned firms with up to 50 employees with matched information on all employees, our results show that entrepreneur children relationship is the dominant dyad familial relationship in family firms. The fixed effects estimates demonstrate that entrepreneurial family relationships do affect firm performance but that this is dependent on the type of familial relationship. Children and spouses show a positive relationship with firm performance while siblings of the entrepreneur show no significant relationship with performance. The estimates further indicate that familial relationships involving spouses abate the negative effects of having too similar or too different types of skills. The paper thus contributes to new knowledge regarding not only whether family relationships matter for performance, but also in what way they matter.

  • 3.
    Borggren, Jonathan
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Geography and Economic History.
    Eriksson, Rikard
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Geography and Economic History.
    Lindgren, Urban
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Geography and Economic History.
    Knowledge flows in high-impact firms: how does relatedness influence survival, acquisition and exit?2016In: Journal of Economic Geography, ISSN 1468-2702, E-ISSN 1468-2710, Vol. 16, no 3, p. 637-665Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Following the impact on regional renewal and employment ascribed to rapidly growing firms (high-impactfirms, HIFs), this paper argues that little is still known in economic geography and business studies todayregarding the mechanisms influencing growth of such firms and, hence, the potential impact on regionalemployment. The aim of this paper is thus to explore how the qualitative content of skills (i.e. the degree ofsimilarity, relatedness and unrelatedness) recruited to a firm during a period of fast growth influences itsfuture success. Our findings, based on a sample of 1,589 HIFs in the Swedish economy, suggest that it is notonly the number of people employed that matters in aiding the understanding of the future destiny of the firms– but also, more importantly, it is the scope of the skills recruited and their proximity to related industries.

  • 4.
    Borrie, Mats
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Social and Economic Geography.
    Olsson Skog, Frida
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Sociology.
    Nilsson, Karina
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Sociology.
    Lindgren, Urban
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Social and Economic Geography.
    The importance of stressful events during childhood on adult labour market outcome2011Conference paper (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    This paper examines if stressful events during childhood impact the labour market position in adulthood within the Swedish 1973 birth cohort. Empirical analyses are based on individual, longitudinal register data from the ASTRID database covering the total Swedish population between 1960-2008. We will analyze the different ways in which three specific events; parental separation, death of parent(s) and/or frequent migration, affect labour market outcome in an OLS-regression, controlling for family background characteristics. These events can occur in isola- tion or they can be interrelated. It is of importance to examine the effect of one single event as well as the accumulated effect of several events. The 1973 cohort makes an interesting case, since they both have experienced change in the nuclear family system during their childhood, and a period of recession and youth unemployment as well as cutbacks in social policy programmes during their age of labour market entrance. Our study thus focuses on how stressful events in childhood affect children’s life courses in turbulent times.

  • 5.
    Boschma, Ron
    et al.
    Department of Economic Geography, Utrecht University, NL-3508 TC, Utrecht, The Netherlands.
    Eriksson, Rikard
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Social and Economic Geography.
    Lindgren, Urban
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Social and Economic Geography.
    How does labour mobility affect the performance of plants?: The importance of relatedness and geographical proximity2009In: Journal of Economic Geography, ISSN 1468-2702, E-ISSN 1468-2710, Vol. 9, no 2, p. 169-190Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This article analyses the impact of skill portfolios and labour mobility on plantperformance by means of a unique database that connects attributes of individuals to features of plants for the whole Swedish economy. We found that a portfolio of related competences at the plant level increases significantly productivity growth of plants, in contrast to plant portfolios consisting of either similar or unrelated competences. Based on the analysis of 101,093 job moves, we found that inflows of skills that are related to the existing knowledge base of the plant had a positive effect on plant performance, while the inflow of new employees with skills that are already present in the plant had a negative impact. Our analyses also show that geographical proximityinfluences the effect of different skill inflows. Inflows of unrelated skills only contribute positively to plant performance when these are recruited in the same region. Labour mobility across regions only has a positive effect on productivity growth of plants when this concerns new employees with related skills.

  • 6.
    Boschma, Ron
    et al.
    CIRCLE, Lund University / Utrecht University.
    Eriksson, Rikard
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Geography and Economic History, Economic and social geography.
    Lindgren, Urban
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Geography and Economic History, Economic and social geography.
    Labour market externalities and regional growth in Sweden: the importance of labour mobility between skill-related industries2014In: Regional studies, ISSN 0034-3404, E-ISSN 1360-0591, Vol. 48, no 10, p. 1669-1690Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This study investigates the relationship between labour market externalities and regional growth based on real labour flows. In particular, we test for the importance of labour mobility across so-called skill-related industries. We make use of a sophisticated indicator that measures the degree of skill-relatedness between all industries, and we employ actual labour flows between 435 4-digit industries within 72 Swedish functional labour market regions to estimate how labour market externalities are related to regional growth in the period 1998-2002. Both our fixed effect models and GMM-estimates demonstrate that a strong intensity of intra-regional labour flows between skill-related industries impacts positively on regional productivity growth, but less so on regional employment growth. Labour mobility between unrelated industries tends to dampen regional unemployment growth while a high degree of intra-industry labour flows is only found to be associated with rising regional unemployment.

  • 7.
    Boschma, Ron
    et al.
    Utrecht University.
    Eriksson, Rikard
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Geography and Economic History.
    Lindgren, Urban
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Geography and Economic History.
    Labour mobility, related variety and the performance of plants: A Swedish study2008Report (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    This paper analyses the impact of skill portfolios and labour mobility on plant performance by means of a unique database that connects attributes of individuals to features of plants for the whole Swedish economy. We found that a portfolio of related competences at the plant level increases significantly productivity growth of plants, in contrast to plant portfolios consisting of either similar or unrelated competences. Based on the analysis of 101,093 job moves, we found that inflows of skills that are related to the existing knowledge base of the plant had a positive effect on plant performance, while the inflow of new employees with skills that are already present in the plant had a negative impact. Our analyses show that inflows of unrelated skills only contribute positively to plant performance when these are recruited in the same region. Labour mobility across regions only has a positive effect on productivity growth of plants when this concerns new employees with related skills.

  • 8. Chaparro, M Pia
    et al.
    de Luna, Xavier
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Umeå School of Business and Economics (USBE), Statistics.
    Häggström, Jenny
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Umeå School of Business and Economics (USBE), Statistics.
    Ivarsson, Anneli
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine, Epidemiology and Global Health.
    Lindgren, Urban
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Geography and Economic History, Economic and social geography.
    Nilsson, Karina
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Sociology.
    Koupil, Ilona
    Childhood family structure and women's adult overweight risk: A longitudinal study2017In: Scandinavian Journal of Public Health, ISSN 1403-4948, E-ISSN 1651-1905, Vol. 45, no 5, p. 511-519Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    AIM: The aim of this study was to investigate whether women's adult overweight and obesity risk was associated with their childhood family structure, measured as their mothers' marital status history, during the women's first 18 years of life.

    METHODS: Using linked register data, we analyzed 30,584 primiparous women born in Sweden in 1975 who were between 19-35 years of age when their height and pre-pregnancy weight was recorded. The outcomes were women's overweight/obesity (body mass index (BMI) ≥ 25 kg/m(2)) and obesity (BMI ≥ 30 kg/m(2)) and the predictor was mothers' marital status history, which was summarized using sequence analysis. We carried out nested logistic regression models adjusting for women's age and maternal sociodemographic characteristics.

    RESULTS: Mothers' marital status history was summarized into six clusters: stable marriage, stable cohabitation, married then divorcing, cohabiting then separating, varied transitions, and not with father. In fully adjusted models and compared with women whose mothers belonged to the stable marriage cluster: (1) women whose mothers belonged to the other marital status clusters had higher odds of overweight/obesity (odds ratio (OR) ranging 1.15-1.19; p < 0.05); and (2) women whose mothers belonged to the stable cohabitation (OR = 1.31; 95% confidence interval (CI) = 1.14-1.52), cohabiting then separating (OR = 1.23; 95% CI = 1.01-1.49), varied transitions (OR = 1.24; 95% CI = 1.11-1.39), and not with father (OR = 1.24; 95% CI = 1.00-1.54) clusters had higher odds of obesity.

    CONCLUSIONS: Women whose mothers were not in stable marriage relationships had higher odds of being overweight or obese in adulthood. The finding that even women raised in the context of stable cohabitation had higher odds of being overweight or obese is intriguing as these relationships are socially accepted in Sweden.

  • 9.
    Chaparro, M Pia
    et al.
    Centre for Health Equity Studies (CHESS).
    Ivarsson, Anneli
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine, Epidemiology and Global Health.
    Koupil, Ilona
    Centre for Health Equity Studies (CHESS).
    Nilsson, Karina
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Sociology.
    Häggström, Jenny
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Umeå School of Business and Economics (USBE), Statistics.
    de Luna, Xavier
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Umeå School of Business and Economics (USBE), Statistics.
    Lindgren, Urban
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Geography and Economic History.
    Regional inequalities in overweight and obesity among first-time pregnant women in Sweden, 1992–20102015In: 22nd European Congress on Obesity (ECO2015), Prague, Czech Republic, May 6-9, 2015: abstracts, S. Karger, 2015, Vol. 8: suppl 1, p. 119-119Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 10.
    Chaparro, M. Pia
    et al.
    Centre for Health Equity Studies (CHESS).
    Ivarsson, Anneli
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine, Epidemiology and Global Health.
    Koupil, Ilona
    Centre for Health Equity Studies (CHESS).
    Nilsson, Karina
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Sociology.
    Häggström, Jenny
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Umeå School of Business and Economics (USBE), Statistics.
    de Luna, Xavier
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Umeå School of Business and Economics (USBE), Statistics.
    Lindgren, Urban
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Geography and Economic History.
    Regional inequalities in pre-pregnancy overweight and obesity in Sweden, 1992, 2000, and 20102015In: Scandinavian Journal of Public Health, ISSN 1403-4948, E-ISSN 1651-1905, Vol. 43, no 5, p. 534-539Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Aims: To investigate regional differences and time trends in women’s overweight and obesity in Sweden. Methods: Using datafrom the Swedish Medical Birth Register (women aged ⩾18 years, first pregnancy only) and the Total Population Registeraccessed through the Umeå SIMSAM Lab, age-standardized prevalence of pre-pregnancy overweight/obesity (BMI ⩾ 25 kg/m2) and obesity (BMI ⩾ 30 kg/m2) were estimated by county for the years 1992, 2000, and 2010. Maps were created usingArcMap v10.2.2 to display regional variations over time and logistic regression analyses were used to assess if the observedtrends were significant. Results: The prevalence of pre-pregnancy overweight/obesity and obesity increased significantly inall Swedish counties between 1992, and 2010. In 2010, Södermanland and Gotland exhibited the highest age-standardizedoverweight/obesity (39.7%) and obesity (15.1%) prevalence, respectively. The sharpest increases between 1992 and 2010were observed in Västerbotten for overweight/obesity (75% increase) and in Gotland for obesity (233% increase). Across theyears, Stockholm had the lowest prevalence of overweight/obesity (26.3% in 2010) and obesity (7.3% in 2010) and one ofthe least steep increases in prevalence of both between 1992 and 2010. Conclusions: Substantial regional differencesin pre-pregnancy overweight and obesity prevalence are apparent in Sweden. Further research should elucidatethe mechanisms causing these differences.

  • 11.
    Eliasson, Kent
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Economics.
    Lindgren, Urban
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Social and Economic Geography.
    Westerlund, Olle
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Economics.
    Geographical Labour Mobility: Migration or Commuting?2003In: Regional Studies, Vol. 37, no 8, p. 827-837Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    ELIASSON K., LINDGREN U. and WESTERLUND O. (2003) Geographical labour mobility: migration or commuting?, Reg.

    Studies 37, 827–837. In this paper, we examine how individual labour market status and spatial variations in employment

    opportunities influence interregional job search behaviour and mobility decisions in Sweden. The econometric analysis is based

    on 290,000 individual observations and refers to the years 1994–95. The empirical results show that the probability of

    interregional labour mobility unexpectedly decreases with the accessibility to employment opportunities in neighbouring

    regions. As expected, the findings reveal that accessibility to job openings in surrounding regions significantly increases the

    likelihood of choosing commuting as the mobility mode.Moreover, the empirical findings indicate that individual unemployment

    experience increases the likelihood of mobility as well as migration.

  • 12. Elmquist, Helena
    et al.
    Mäkilä, Kalle
    Lindgren, Urban
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Social and Economic Geography.
    Decision-Making and Environmental Impacts: A dynamic simulation model of a farm business2004Report (Other academic)
  • 13.
    Eriksson, Malin
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Social Work.
    Lindgren, Urban
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Geography and Economic History.
    Ivarsson, Anneli
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine, Epidemiology and Global Health.
    Ng, Nawi
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine, Epidemiology and Global Health.
    Child health and place: How is neighborhood social capital associated with child health injuries?2017In: European Journal of Public Health, ISSN 1101-1262, E-ISSN 1464-360X, Vol. 27, no Suppl_3, p. 41-41Article in journal (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: Child health inequalities can be explained by social determinants of health, including neighborhood social capital. Swedish research about place effects on children's health is limited. This project aims to contribute to knowledge on how neighborhood social capital may influence child health in the Swedish context. The overall research questions were: What is the incidence rate of child injuries in the living environments among boys and girls? What are the associations between neighborhood social capital and child injuries?

    Methods: Child injury data from the Umeå SIMSAM Lab were utilized, with data from all children 0-12 years of age, living in Umeå municipality during 2006-2009. Individual child injury and residential area data were linked to a neighborhood social capital index, where 49 defined neighborhoods were assigned a score from low- high in social capital, based on people’s perceptions about their neighborhoods. Individual, household and neighborhood demographic and socioeconomic variables (country of birth, educational level, income and family type) were also extracted from the Umeå SIMSAM lab. Logistic regression analyses were conducted to analyze factors associated with child injury.

    Results: We observed 3930 injury events that occurred in the living environments, experienced by 24 000 children who lived in 14 767 households within 49 neighborhoods. The incidence rate of child injuries was about 72.5/1000 for boys and 60/1000 for girls. The odds for child injures was lower in neighborhoods with high social capital compared to neighborhoods with low social capital (OR 0.87 95%CI 0.80-0.95) after controlling for demographic and socioeconomic factors at individual, household and neighborhood level. The protective effects of neighborhood social capital were stronger for girls than boys.

    Conclusions: Neighborhood social capital may have a protective effect on child injuries and especially so for girls.

    Key messages:

    • Neighborhood conditions have a significant influence on child health inequalities in the Swedish context, including inequalities in child injuries.
    • Mobilization of neighborhood social capital might be good investment for reducing child injuries.
  • 14.
    Eriksson, Malin
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Social Work.
    Lindgren, Urban
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Geography.
    Ivarsson, Anneli
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Epidemiology and Global Health.
    Ng, Nawi
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Epidemiology and Global Health. Department of Public Health and Community Medicine, Institution of Medicine, Sahlgrenska Academy, University of Gothenburg, Gothenburg, Sweden.
    The effect of neighbourhood social capital on child injuries: a gender-stratified analysis2019In: Health & Place, Vol. 60, article id 102205Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    We designed a longitudinal retrospective cohort study to analyse the associations between neighbourhood social capital and child injures. Register data from the Umeå Simsam Lab in Sweden was used to measure child injuries and demographic and socioeconomic factors at individual, household and neighbourhood level. A social capital score from a previous survey was used to measure neighbourhood social capital. We conducted a three-level multilevel negative binomial regression analysis, with children (level 1, N = 77,193) nested within households (level 2, N = 10,465), and households nested within neighbourhoods (level 3, N = 49). The incidence rate of child injuries was lower in high social capital neighbourhoods. When controlling for factors at individual, household and neighbourhood levels, living in a high social capital neighbourhood was protective of injuries among girls, but not among boys. Promoting social capital in local neighbourhoods could be seen as a prevention strategy for injuries among girls.

  • 15.
    Eriksson, Rikard
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Geography and Economic History, Economic and social geography.
    Hansen, Høgni Kalsø
    Department of Geography and Geology, University of Copenhagen.
    Lindgren, Urban
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Geography and Economic History, Economic and social geography.
    The importance of business climate and people climate on regional performance2014In: Regional studies, ISSN 0034-3404, E-ISSN 1360-0591, Vol. 8, no 6, p. 1135-1155Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Creativity and talent are considered key-factors in regional development due to the connection between growth, city regions and human capital. To come to a deeper understanding on the relevance of recent amenity-driven theories and how they are related to employment and GRP at regional level, this paper analyses the influence of business-climate (business friendly assets) and people-climate (amenities). Based on panel-data regressions, we show that both business- and people-climate is related to regional performance. The exact nature of these relationships is however dependent on how both regional performance and business- or people climate is defined.

  • 16.
    Eriksson, Rikard
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Social and Economic Geography.
    Lindgren, Urban
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Social and Economic Geography.
    Agglomeration och ekonomisk utveckling: Betydelsen av arbetskraftsrörlighet för lärande och innovation2011In: Geografiska Notiser, ISSN 0016-724X, Vol. 69, no 2, p. 87-93Article in journal (Other academic)
  • 17.
    Eriksson, Rikard
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Social and Economic Geography.
    Lindgren, Urban
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Social and Economic Geography.
    Localized mobility clusters: Impacts of labour market externalities on firm performance2009In: Journal of Economic Geography, ISSN 1468-2702, E-ISSN 1468-2710, Vol. 9, no 1, p. 33-53Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This article analyses the impact of labour market-induced externalities on firm performance by using a unique database that connects attributes of individuals to workplaces for the entire Swedish economy. Based on the analysis of 256,985 workplaces, our results show that firms belonging to networks of local job mobility (i.e. ‘localized mobility clusters’) significantly outperform other similar firms within the local labour market. The results also indicate that concentrations of similar and related firms do not explain any considerable part of the variations in firm competitiveness. Labour market externalitiesderived via local job mobility produce significantly more powerful effects for the involved firms as compared to the degree of co-location, diversity and scale.

  • 18.
    Eriksson, Rikard
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Social and Economic Geography.
    Lindgren, Urban
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Social and Economic Geography.
    What about people in evolutionary economic geography?2011Conference paper (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    In recent years an increasing interest has been directed towards evolutionary processes of economic change following the notion that history matters for future development. These studies put special emphasis on how the spatial structures of the economy emerge from the micro-behaviours of economic agents (often firms). It this paper we argue that while such an approach indeed may provide new and novel insights on the uneven process of economic change, one important aspect of the economy tend to be neglected, namely the spatial behavior and restrictions of people. In this paper, we therefore outline the ideas to a theoretical framework which more thorough integrates evolutionary economic geography with the time-geographical contribution provided by Torsten Hägerstrand and his adherents in order to provide a synthesis between the interdependent dynamic processes occurring in and between place-specific institutions, firms and people. The paper is structured as followed: First, a critical appraisal of recent evolutionary contributions is presented. This is followed by a discussion on the developments made in time-geography the last couple of decades. The paper ends with a concluding section and an empirical example showing that modern micro-simulation techniques may provide useful insights to the evolutionary processes shaping economic change. The empirical example is framed in recent studies analyzing knowledge flows via the job mobility of skilled individuals within and between local labour markets in Sweden.

  • 19.
    Eriksson, Rikard
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Social and Economic Geography.
    Lindgren, Urban
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Social and Economic Geography.
    Malmberg, Gunnar
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Social and Economic Geography.
    Agglomeration mobility: Effects of localisation, urbanisation, and scale on job changes2008In: Environment and planning A, ISSN 0308-518X, E-ISSN 1472-3409, Vol. 40, p. 2419-2434Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Following increased attention being paid to the importance of labour-market processes in relation to knowledge diffusion and learning, this study addresses the influence of agglomeration economies (localisation, urbanisation, and scale) on the propensity to change jobs between and within local labour markets. From the use of longitudinal individual data (1990 ^ 2002), controlling for factors such as age, sex, income, and social relations, the results show that the composition of regional economies influences labour-market dynamism. We identify two cases of intraregional agglomeration mobility, that is, positive effects on job mobility, due to the concentration of similar activities (localisation economies) and the size of the labour market (urbanisation economies). The results also show that localisation economies compensate for regional structural disadvantages connected to small population numbers, as localisation effects in small regions have a significantlypositive effect on intraregional job-mobility rates, even compared with localisation effects in large and diversified metropolitan areas. The results indicate that the concentration of similar activities may be useful for small regions, if high levels of job mobility are crucial for the transfer of knowledge and the performance of firms.

  • 20.
    Haugen, Katarina
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Geography and Economic History, Economic and social geography.
    Lindgren, Urban
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Geography and Economic History, Economic and social geography.
    On the importance of forest assets for micro-firm performance2013In: Fennia, E-ISSN 1798-5617, Vol. 191, no 2, p. 122-142Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Business start-ups are on the increase, a development which is accompanied by hopes that these new firms will generate a potential for, e.g., local and regional development and a strengthening of local labour markets as well as the national economy. However, the long-term performance and viability of new firms are often rather poor. This research aims to analyse the importance of ownership of areal resources in the form of forest holdings for the performance of Swedish micro-firms. The analyses are based on official register data and fixed-effects panel regression modelling. A hypothesis is that a firm whose owner also possesses forest holdings is more viable thanks to the different resources (in the form of capital from logging or mortgaging, or non-pecuniary other values) the forest holdings may provide, and which possibly contribute to the firm’s economic stability and resilience to economic fluctuations. From a general point of view, we find support for the hypothesis that forest ownership positively and significantly influences firm performance in terms of earnings before interest and taxes (EBIT), but not in terms of value added. Forest ownership is never detrimental to firm performance, although it does not have a significant effect in all sub-categories of entrepreneurs based on different combinations of age, gender and firm type. Particularly, the economic performance of private firms run by older men benefits from resources stemming from their forest holdings. No significant effects were found for female entrepreneurs or for limited companies. As regards regional variations, firms located outside the metropolitan regions – as compared to those at the top of the urban hierarchy – are likely to perform better, thus indicating that local development may benefit from resource transfers from the forest sector to micro-firms engaged in non-primary activities.

  • 21.
    Helmersson, Pernilla
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Social and Economic Geography.
    Lindgren, Urban
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Social and Economic Geography.
    Fördel Nordanstig: Befolkningen, fastighetsmarknaden och kommunikationerna2007Report (Other academic)
  • 22.
    Holm, Einar
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Social and Economic Geography.
    Holme, Kirsten
    Strömgren, Magnus
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Social and Economic Geography.
    Lindgren, Urban
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Social and Economic Geography.
    Mäkilä, Kalle
    Eriksson, Madeleine
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Social and Economic Geography.
    Schrödl, Daniel
    Tid för arbete2004Report (Other academic)
  • 23.
    Holm, Einar
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Geography and Economic History.
    Lindgren, Urban
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Geography and Economic History.
    Socio-economic impacts of locating a nuclear waste repository in Sweden1997In: Geografiska Annaler. Series B, Human Geography, ISSN 0435-3684, E-ISSN 1468-0467, Vol. 79, no 1, p. 27-40Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 24.
    Holm, Einar
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Social and Economic Geography.
    Lindgren, Urban
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Social and Economic Geography.
    Eriksson, Madeleine
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Social and Economic Geography.
    Eriksson, Rikard
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Social and Economic Geography.
    Häggström Lundevaller, Erling
    Statistics. Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Social and Economic Geography.
    Holme, Kirsten
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Social and Economic Geography.
    Strömgren, Magnus
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Social and Economic Geography.
    Transfereringar och arbete2004Report (Other academic)
  • 25.
    Holm, Einar
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Social and Economic Geography.
    Lindgren, Urban
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Social and Economic Geography.
    Häggström Lundevaller, Erling
    Statistics. Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Social and Economic Geography.
    Strömgren, Magnus
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Social and Economic Geography.
    SVERIGE2007In: Modelling our Future: Population Ageing, Health and Aged Care, Elsevier, Amsterdam , 2007, p. 543-549Chapter in book (Refereed)
  • 26.
    Holm, Einar
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Social and Economic Geography.
    Lindgren, Urban
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Social and Economic Geography.
    Häggström Lundevaller, Erling
    Statistics. Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Social and Economic Geography.
    Strömgren, Magnus
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Social and Economic Geography.
    The SVERIGE spatial micro simulation model2006In: 8th Nordic Seminar on Microsimulation Models, 2006Conference paper (Other academic)
  • 27.
    Holm, Einar
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Social and Economic Geography.
    Lindgren, Urban
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Social and Economic Geography.
    Malmberg, Gunnar
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Social and Economic Geography.
    Arbete och tillväxt i hela landet: Betydelsen av arbetskraftsmobilisering2004Report (Other academic)
  • 28.
    Holm, Einar
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Geography and Economic History.
    Lindgren, Urban
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Social and Economic Geography.
    Malmberg, Gunnar
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Social and Economic Geography.
    Mäkilä, Kalle
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Social and Economic Geography.
    Simulating an entire nation1996In: Microsimulation for urban and regional policy analysis / [ed] Clarke, G.P., London: Pion , 1996, p. 164-186Chapter in book (Refereed)
  • 29.
    Holm, Einar
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Social and Economic Geography.
    Lindgren, Urban
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Social and Economic Geography.
    Strömgren, Magnus
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Social and Economic Geography.
    Socioekonomiska effekter av stora investeringar i Oskarshamn: En framtidsstudie2008Report (Other academic)
  • 30.
    Holm, Einar
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Social and Economic Geography.
    Lindgren, Urban
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Social and Economic Geography.
    Strömgren, Magnus
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Social and Economic Geography.
    Socioekonomiska effekter av stora investeringar i Östhammar: En framtidsstudie2007Report (Other academic)
  • 31.
    Holmström, Anna
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine, Epidemiology and Global Health.
    Oudin, Anna
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine, Occupational and Environmental Medicine.
    de Luna, Xavier
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Statistics.
    Nilsson, Karina
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Sociology.
    Lindgren, Urban
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Social and Economic Geography.
    Bergdahl, Ingvar
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine, Occupational and Environmental Medicine.
    Ivarsson, Anneli
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine, Epidemiology and Global Health.
    SIMSAM-nätverket i Umeå strävar mot att bli ett framstående center för registerforskning som knyter samman barndomen med livslång hälsa och välfärd2011In: SVEPET - Medlemstidning för Svensk Epidemiologisk Förening (SVEP), ISSN 1101-4385, Vol. 29, no 3, p. 8-9Article in journal (Other academic)
    Abstract [sv]

    Vetenskapsrådets SIMSAM initiativ syftar till att stärka multidisciplinär registerforskning i Sverige. Inom SIMSAM-nätverket i Umeå arbetar vi tvärvetenskapligt med sikte på att utvecklas till ett center med excellens kring mikrodataforskning som knyter samman barndomen med livslång hälsa och välfärd. Just nu fokuserar vi på att få tillgång till sammanlänkade data från ett flertal nationella och regionala register för att komma vidare med vår planerade forskning. Dessutom har Umeå-nätverket nyligen fått i uppdrag att leda den nationella samordningen av SIMSAM initiativet.

  • 32.
    Häggström Lundevaller, Erling
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Statistics. Social and Economic Geography.
    Holm, Einar
    Social and Economic Geography.
    Strömgren, Magnus
    Social and Economic Geography.
    Lindgren, Urban
    Social and Economic Geography.
    Spatial dynamic micro-simulation of demographic development2007In: 1st General Conference of the International Microsimulation Association: Celebrating 50 Years of Microsimulation, 2007Conference paper (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    In a world of changing demographical patterns, tools for keeping track of these changes are of great importance. Different regions are in different stages of the demographic transition and are affected differently of migration patterns. A tool to project the demographic development at a regional level is therefore of great importance. This article we discusses the demographic development in the county Västerbotten in Sweden and in that context why and how a micro simulation model can be used for these purposes.

  • 33.
    Häggström Lundevaller, Erling
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Statistics.
    Lindgren, Urban
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Social and Economic Geography.
    Strömgren, Magnus
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Social and Economic Geography.
    Statistik i geografi: Slutrapport av pedagogiskt projekt2010Report (Other academic)
    Abstract [sv]

    Statistik ingår som ett viktigt hjälpämne i andra akademiska ämnen som använder kvantitativa data, till exempel kulturgeografi. Kulturgeografi har vidare betydande inslag av användning av Geografiska informationssystem (GIS), där det finns stora beröringsytor med statistik. En integrering av områdena geografi och statistik kan således ge studenterna stort mervärde. Det innebär ofta en pedagogisk utmaning att förmedla statistisk kunskap till studenter som i huvudsak har sin bakgrund inom ämnen som innehåller lite kontakt med statistiska tankegångar. Detta projekts huvudsyfte har varit att utveckla en pedagogisk ansats som är lämplig i denna situation. Projektet har i första hand genomförts inom ramen för en kurs på avancerad nivå, där statistik och geografi integrerats och lärts ut med en casebaserad ansats.

  • 34.
    Ivarsson, Anneli
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine, Epidemiology and Global Health.
    de Luna, Xavier
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Statistics.
    Nilsson, Karina
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Sociology.
    Lindgren, Urban
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Social and Economic Geography.
    Bergdahl, Ingvar
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine, Occupational and Environmental Medicine.
    Registerdata om barndomen: kunskapsbas för hållbar hälsa och välfärd2010In: SVEPET. Medlemsbladet för Svensk Epidemiologisk Förening (Svep), Vol. 28, no 3, p. 4-6Article in journal (Other academic)
  • 35.
    Jansson, Johan
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Umeå School of Business and Economics (USBE), Business Administration. Lund University School of Economics and Management, Box 7080, SE-220 07 Lund, Sweden.
    Pettersson, Thomas
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Geography and Economic History, Economic history.
    Mannberg, Andrea
    UiT the Arctic University of Norway, School of Business and Economics, Postboks 6050 Langnes, 9037 Tromsø, Norway.
    Brännlund, Runar
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Umeå School of Business and Economics (USBE), Economics.
    Lindgren, Urban
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Geography and Economic History, Economic and social geography.
    Adoption of alternative fuel vehicles: Influence from neighbors, family and coworkers2017In: Transportation Research Part D: Transport and Environment, ISSN 1361-9209, E-ISSN 1879-2340, Vol. 54, p. 61-73Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    During the last years, many governments have set targets for increasing the share of biofuels in the transportation sector. Understanding consumer behavior is essential in designing policies that efficiently increase the uptake of cleaner technologies. In this paper we analyze adopters and non-adopters of alternative fuel vehicles (AFVs). We use diffusion of innovation theory and the established notion that the social system and interpersonal influence play important roles in adoption. Based on a nationwide database of car owners we analyze interpersonal influence on adoption from three social domains: neighbors, family and coworkers. The results point primarily at a neighbor effect in that AFV adoption is more likely if neighbors also have adopted. The results also point at significant effects of interpersonal influence from coworkers and family members but these effects weaken or disappear when income, education level, marriage, age, gender and green party votes are controlled for. The results extend the diffusion of innovation and AFV literature with empirical support for interpersonal influence based on objective data where response bias is not a factor. Implications for further research, environmental and transport policy, and practitioners are discussed.

  • 36.
    Karlsson, Svante
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Social and Economic Geography.
    Lindgren, Urban
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Social and Economic Geography.
    From manufacturing to retail: Cross-border shopping and economic restructuring in West Sweden2010Conference paper (Other academic)
  • 37.
    Keskitalo, E. Carina H.
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Geography and Economic History, Economic and social geography.
    Karlsson, Svante
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Geography and Economic History, Economic and social geography.
    Lindgren, Urban
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Geography and Economic History, Economic and social geography.
    Pettersson, Örjan
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Geography and Economic History, Economic and social geography.
    Lundmark, Linda
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Geography and Economic History, Economic and social geography.
    Slee, Bill
    Villa, Mariann
    Feliciano, Diana
    Rural-urban policies: changing conceptions of the human-environment relationship2017In: Globalisation and change in forest ownership and forest use: natural resource management in transition / [ed] E. Carina H. Keskitalo, London: Palgrave Macmillan, 2017, p. 183-224Chapter in book (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This chapter describes how understandings of the "rural" have progressed from a focus on either decline or amenity, whereby these more simplified understandings can be seen to have had an impact on rural policy development. The chapter argues that rural areas, including forests, need to be understood in relation to both production and integration with urban landscapes. It thus illustrates the role of both historical processes and policy in creating current understandings of the rural: drawing upon an example from the Swedish case, it amongst others shows that a redistributive tax system has played a larger and more crucial role than rural policy in retaining active rural areas in Sweden.

  • 38.
    Keskitalo, E. Carina H.
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Geography and Economic History.
    Nordlund, Annika
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Psychology.
    Lindgren, Urban
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Geography and Economic History.
    Environmental Impact Assessment as a Social Process: The Case of Nuclear Waste Storage in Sweden2015In: CyberGeo: European Journal of Geography, ISSN 1278-3366, E-ISSN 1278-3366, article id 715Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The process underlying the Environmental Impact Assessment (EIA) for large developments is often designed to allow opportunities for members of the public and NGOs to voice their opinions. This study describes the EIA process leading to a decision in the question of radioactive waste storage in Sweden. While it should be possible for a deciding authority to reject an EIA on the basis of non-involvement of the public or NGOs, this study illustrates the way in which the EIA process may be formed by different social norms that relate to the specific case. Authorities can be considered to represent a plan paradigm (by which the project itself as well as political decisions made about it are in focus), whereas many environmental organizations traditionally represent an environment paradigm, focusing on the risk of potentially ecologically harmful processes. These differences can also be seen as symptomatic of the inclusion of parts of an environment paradigm in legislation such as the Swedish Environmental Code.

  • 39.
    Keskitalo, E. Carina H.
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Social and Economic Geography.
    Nordlund, Annika
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Psychology.
    Lindgren, Urban
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Social and Economic Geography.
    Grunden för beslut i kärnavfallsfrågan: Upplevelser av lagstiftningsgrund och MKB-process2009Report (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
  • 40.
    Klint, Mats B.
    et al.
    Mittuniversitetet.
    Lindgren, Urban
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Geography and Economic History.
    How are suppliers chosen and where are they located?1992In: Zeitschrift für Planung, ISSN 0936-8787, Vol. 3, no 4, p. 317-330Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 41.
    Klint, Mats B.
    et al.
    Mittuniversitetet.
    Lindgren, Urban
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Geography and Economic History.
    How are suppliers chosen and where are they located?: The results of a large-scale industrial investment1993In: Zeitschrift für Planung, ISSN 0936-8787, Vol. 4, no 1, p. 31-48Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 42.
    Li, Wenjuan
    et al.
    Institute of Agricultural Resources and Regional Planning of CAAS.
    Holm, Einar
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Geography and Economic History, Economic and social geography.
    Lindgren, Urban
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Geography and Economic History, Economic and social geography.
    Linking spatial scale to changes in workplace earnings: an exploratory approach2015In: CyberGeo: European Journal of Geography, ISSN 1278-3366, E-ISSN 1278-3366, article id 740Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The paper investigates the importance of spatial scale for changes in earnings at the workplace by using spatial regression applied to workplace-level micro data in an exploratory purpose. A floating grid technique is used to define equal-sized workplaces and their daily-reach surrounding zones as divided into three spatial entities: working-square, local area and hinterland. On the basis of geo-referenced information on workplaces and places of residence along with numerous individual-level socio-economic indicators, the results of the regression models reveal that the indicators of the daily-reach area play a dominant role and that their contribution varies over spatial entities. Among the spatial entities, the working-square (km square) surrounding the workplace is more important than the workplace itself, the local area and the hinterland. Moreover, the results suggest that internal factors related to population size, diversity of trade and industry and educational level contribute to about one-third of changes in work income at the workplace level. It can be concluded that knowledge, learning and human capital are strongly associated with increased earnings.

  • 43.
    Li, Wenjuan
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Social and Economic Geography.
    Holm, Einar
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Social and Economic Geography.
    Lindgren, Urban
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Geography and Economic History.
    Localised conditions for economic growth: testing the endogenous growth hypothesisManuscript (preprint) (Other academic)
  • 44.
    Lindgren, Eva
    et al.
    Umeå University.
    Lindgren, Urban
    Umeå University.
    Pettersson, Thomas
    Umeå University.
    Driving from the center to the periphery?: The diffusion of private cars in Sweden, 1960-19752010In: Journal of Transport History, ISSN 0022-5266, E-ISSN 1759-3999, Vol. 31, no 2, p. 164-181Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The diffusion of private cars in Sweden has not yet been examined in a national long-run perspective covering all individuals. This article enquires whether the diffusion of private cars followed the overall socioeconomic and geographical changes in Sweden from 1960 to 1975. In particular, it asks if ownership per capita followed changes in incomes or changes in population density (urbanisation). In the 1960s Swedish traffic and regional policy aimed at making the car an instrument of national integration and regional equality, and making it available throughout the country. This article tracks the effects of that policy. The analysis is based on Swedish parish-scale census material that includes all car owners for the years 1960, 1970 and 1975. The conclusion is that income levels were more important than other explanations for the diffusion of private cars in Sweden between 1960 and 1975. National policy goals regarding cars as means of regional integration and equalisation were not fulfilled up to 1975.

  • 45.
    Lindgren, Eva
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Teacher Education, Department of Interactive Media and Learning.
    Sullivan, Kirk P. H.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Arts, Philosophy and Linguistics.
    Lindgren, Urban
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Social and Economic Geography.
    Spelman Miller, Kristyan
    GIS for writing: Applying Geographical Information Systems Techniques to Data Mine Writings' Cognitive Processes2007In: Writing and Cognition: Research and Applications, Amsterdam: Elsevier, 2007, p. 83-96Chapter in book (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    This chapter presents the use of the Geographical Information Systems (GIS) for data mining and visualising information about cognitive activities involved in writing. The information can be collected from various sources, such as keystroke logs, manual analysis of stimulated recall sessions and think-aloud protocols. After an introduction to the GIS, an English as a foreign language (EFL) writing session is used to explain how to create the various GIS layers from the different information/analysis sources, and show how they can be easily data mined using the GIS techniques to improve our understanding of the cognitive processes in writing. The illustrative graphs used to provide an insight into the methodology are based on keystroke-logged data, manual researcher-based analyses and coded stimulated recall data that were collected after the writing session. Also a tool for visualisation and data mining, the GIS technique can support analysis of the interaction of cognitive processes during writing focusing on the individual writer, differences between writers or the writing processes in general. Depending on the research question, GIS affords the possibility to aggregate data to the level of writers, de-aggregate data in any way chosen or display data as attributes of individuals.

  • 46.
    Lindgren, Urban
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Social and Economic Geography.
    Corporate spatial restructuring within forest-based industries1994Licentiate thesis, comprehensive summary (Other academic)
  • 47.
    Lindgren, Urban
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Social and Economic Geography. Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Centre for Regional Science (CERUM).
    Counter-Urban Migration in the Swedish Urban System2002Report (Other academic)
  • 48.
    Lindgren, Urban
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Social and Economic Geography.
    Kontraurbana flyttare i retrospektiv2004Report (Other academic)
  • 49.
    Lindgren, Urban
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Social and Economic Geography.
    Local impacts of large investments1997Doctoral thesis, comprehensive summary (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    The aim of the thesis is to investigate local impacts of large investments. This problem has been approached from three directions and, therefore, the study consists of three themes, namely: the changing spatial patterns of corporate activities, the short-term local economic impacts of invest­ments, and the long-term socio-economic impacts of investments on the local municipality.

    In order to put the impact studies of investments into a broader context the first theme provides an analysis of the macro-orientated processes that change the spatial pattern of a forest- based industry. The empirical investigation is based on a case-study of a major Swedish forest company (SCA — Svenska Cellulosa Aktiebolaget), analysing its development from the 1950s to the present (Paper I). The locational changes of production plants, sales units and headquarters have been mapped and, parallel to this study of the company's spatial evolution, the underlying corporate strategies are discussed.

    The second theme focuses on the short-term local economic impacts of investments which are carried out at production units. The empirical data has been collected from a major investment introducing a new technology (Light Weight Coated paper - LWC) at Ortviken, an SCA-owned paper mill in Sundsvall. The point of departure for the analysis is the identification of contracted suppliers and their location in order to obtain a picture of the investment's diffusion in the local economy. As the choice of supplier is an important part of the study, criteria on how suppliers are chosen have also been examined (Paper II). Moreover, by using results from a number of similar investment studies, an attempt is made to summarize general experiences within a tentative model for estimating the share of local purchase deriving from major investments: the Local or Non-Local (LNL) model (Paper III).

    The third theme of the thesis pinpoints long-term local impacts of large investments. The investment generates impacts not only concurrently with the implementation phase, but also during the operation period of the invested item. The investigation of long-term socio-economic impacts has been performed by two studies employing different methodological approaches. The first study (Paper IV) deals with ex ante local impacts of locating a nuclear waste repository in Storuman or Mala, two sparsely populated municipalities in northern Sweden. The model is a traditional macro- formulated cohort model which is combined with a 'basic/non-basic' assumption regarding the intcrdependency within the local trade and business. The second study (Paper V) refers once again to the forest-based industry by emphasising the long-term socio-economic impacts of the investment examined in Paper II. This paper employs a micro-analytical modelling approach, so that, the municipal population is represented individually within the model. A microsimulation model is elaborated in order to analyse the long-term (15 years) local population and labour market dynamics induced by the LWC-investment.

    Some major findings of the thesis are:

    * The share of local purchase is connected to the composition of the investment. Analyses have shown that the higher the technological demand and the more technically advanced the goods and services related to the investment, the smaller is the local share of the purchase.

    *  It has proved possible to trace chain effects on different local labour-markets induced by changes in production at a particular place of work. Through linkages between the partial labour markets the closure of a major place of work will not only affect the occupational groups to which laid-off employees belong, but also give rise to changes in unemployment levels in many other occupations.

  • 50.
    Lindgren, Urban
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Social and Economic Geography.
    Long-term socio-economi impacts of industrial investments: a microsimulation approach1994Book (Other academic)
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