umu.sePublikasjoner
Endre søk
Begrens søket
1 - 4 of 4
RefereraExporteraLink til resultatlisten
Permanent link
Referera
Referensformat
  • apa
  • ieee
  • modern-language-association-8th-edition
  • vancouver
  • Annet format
Fler format
Språk
  • de-DE
  • en-GB
  • en-US
  • fi-FI
  • nn-NO
  • nn-NB
  • sv-SE
  • Annet språk
Fler språk
Utmatningsformat
  • html
  • text
  • asciidoc
  • rtf
Treff pr side
  • 5
  • 10
  • 20
  • 50
  • 100
  • 250
Sortering
  • Standard (Relevans)
  • Forfatter A-Ø
  • Forfatter Ø-A
  • Tittel A-Ø
  • Tittel Ø-A
  • Type publikasjon A-Ø
  • Type publikasjon Ø-A
  • Eldste først
  • Nyeste først
  • Skapad (Eldste først)
  • Skapad (Nyeste først)
  • Senast uppdaterad (Eldste først)
  • Senast uppdaterad (Nyeste først)
  • Disputationsdatum (tidligste først)
  • Disputationsdatum (siste først)
  • Standard (Relevans)
  • Forfatter A-Ø
  • Forfatter Ø-A
  • Tittel A-Ø
  • Tittel Ø-A
  • Type publikasjon A-Ø
  • Type publikasjon Ø-A
  • Eldste først
  • Nyeste først
  • Skapad (Eldste først)
  • Skapad (Nyeste først)
  • Senast uppdaterad (Eldste først)
  • Senast uppdaterad (Nyeste først)
  • Disputationsdatum (tidligste først)
  • Disputationsdatum (siste først)
Merk
Maxantalet träffar du kan exportera från sökgränssnittet är 250. Vid större uttag använd dig av utsökningar.
  • 1. Fritzell, S.
    et al.
    Trygg, Nadja
    Umeå universitet, Medicinska fakulteten, Institutionen för epidemiologi och global hälsa. Public Health Agency of Sweden, Solna, Sweden.
    Busch, H.
    Bremberg, S.
    Inequalities in determinants and mental health in Sweden: results from a governmental initiative2018Inngår i: European Journal of Public Health, ISSN 1101-1262, E-ISSN 1464-360X, Vol. 28, s. 124-124Artikkel i tidsskrift (Annet vitenskapelig)
    Abstract [en]

    Mental health is an increasing concern in all European countries. Social inequalities may appear both in the distribution of mental health and the social and economic consequences. In 2016, the government commissioned The Public Health Agency of Sweden (PHAS) to increase knowledge on socioeconomic determinants of mental health problems. The present study addresses the social distribution of mental health problems and what mediates this.

    Drawing on patient registry data of the population from 2014 and a national survey representative of the population aged 16-84, years 2013-2016 (n = 155339) we analyze how mental health is distributed in social groups and what determinants mediate poor mental health. Outcomes include psychiatric in- and outpatient care (numbers and cases/1000), and for self-reported measures (ie. GHQ, stress, anxiety) odds ratios (OR) from multivariate logistic regression, adjusting for social and economic determinants.

    Preliminary results show that most outcomes in self-reported poor mental health and psychiatric diagnoses were more common among women. Social patterns differed between diagnoses.

    Among working ages in- and outpatient care, low educated showed fourfold increased risk of psychotic disorders, while neurotic stress related disorders showed a doubled risk among low educated. Care for any mental disorder (excluding dementia) was more common among lower educated men and women aged 65+ but had a reverse social gradient. In analyses modelling the risk of poor mental health (GHQ12), controlling for background-, social and economic factors in particular financial strain (OR 2.42, CI 2.11-2.77) mediated poor mental health among women 25-64.

    An educational gradient was found in most mental health outcomes with more pronounced gradient in more severe outcomes. Patterns differ by age groups, social group, and outcome. Results will be used to inform practitioners and policy makers at national and regional level to decrease inequalities in mental health.

    Key messages:

    • Social inequalities in mental health and its’ determinants are found in most age groups, and most outcomes studied.

    • Focusing on living conditions, particularly economic strain is essential for achieving equity in mental health.

  • 2. Fritzell, S.
    et al.
    Trygg, Nadja
    Umeå universitet, Medicinska fakulteten, Institutionen för epidemiologi och global hälsa. Public Health Agency of Sweden, Solna, Sweden.
    Busch, H.
    Bremberg, S.
    Scoping the evidence on mental health inequalities and underlying determinants in Sweden2018Inngår i: European Journal of Public Health, ISSN 1101-1262, E-ISSN 1464-360X, Vol. 28, s. 316-316Artikkel i tidsskrift (Annet vitenskapelig)
    Abstract [en]

    Mental health is an increasing concern in all European countries. Social inequalities may appear in both the distribution of mental health and the social and economic consequences. In 2016, the government commissioned The Public Health Agency of Sweden (PHAS) to increase the knowledge on mental health inequalities and their underlying determinants. In all, 18 research projects were initiated within different universities in Sweden and PHAS.

    Research questions addressed dimensions of inequality such as age, gender, SES, sexual orientation and disability. PHAS involved researchers from the fields of social medicine, epidemiology and economics to explore all levels of social determinants, different mechanisms, interacting forces of inequalities and consequences of disease. Evidence from scoping literature reviews were coupled with analyses of Swedish data on a range of outcomes; from positive mental health to in-patient care.

    Preliminary results have been discussed in joint workshops and show social inequalities in mental health in all age groups in Sweden, including small children, with a more pronounced gradient in severe outcomes. Generally, the results points towards policy actions focusing girls and women, low income earners, those experiencing financial strain, hbtq persons and persons with disability. Also, the interaction of different dimensions of inequality need consideration.

    The project is a collaboration between PHAS and a range of research disciplines all joining to discuss mental health and inequalities. Though challenging as interpretations may differ due to field of research, overall it has allowed for a broad approach and joint learning as experts have collaborated. This is a step towards understanding country specific determinants of mental health inequalities. Combined, the results make up a knowledge base that will guide policy makers and practitioners to develop efficient policies and practices in order to decrease inequalities in mental health.

    Key messages:

    • Combining evidence from international literature with context specific secondary data analyses improves its local relevance.

    • Collaboration between research fields enables a more comprehensive basis for decision making.

  • 3.
    Trygg, Nadja
    et al.
    Umeå universitet, Medicinska fakulteten, Institutionen för epidemiologi och global hälsa.
    Gustafsson, Per E
    Umeå universitet, Medicinska fakulteten, Institutionen för epidemiologi och global hälsa.
    Månsdotter, A.
    Public Health Agency of Sweden, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Does it add up?: intersectional inequalities in mental health in the Swedish adult population2018Inngår i: European Journal of Public Health, ISSN 1101-1262, E-ISSN 1464-360X, Vol. 28, s. 95-95Artikkel i tidsskrift (Annet vitenskapelig)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: Social inequalities in mental health is a growing public health concern, but has so far been approached in a disentangled manner. To better capture the complexity of reality with multiple interlocking axes of inequalities, intersectionality theory instead highlights how health is expressed in the interactions between these axes. This may expose important knowledge about particular risk groups and protective factors. In this study, we explore how mental health is distributed across intersections of gender, income, education, class, country of birth and sexual orientation as well as their interaction effects.

    Methods: The study population (N = 52,743) consists of a yearly random sample of the Swedish population 26-84 years between 2010 and 2015, from The Health on Equal Terms survey coordinated by the Public Health Agency of Sweden. Mental health was measured through self-administered General Health Questionnaire (GHQ)-12, and gender, income, education, class, country of birth and sexual orientation through survey and linked register data. Intersectional inequalities in mental health were estimated for all pairwise combination of inequalities by joint disparity, excess intersectional disparity and referent disparities.

    Results: The prevalence of symptoms of poor mental health were highest among non-heterosexuals with low income (40%) followed by non-heterosexual women (38%). However, intersectional inequalities showed unpredictable patterns; among non-heterosexuals, those with long education reported more symptoms (36%) than those with short education (31%). The excess intersectional disparity showed synergistic effects for income in combination with education; country of birth and class, but antagonistic effects for the intersections of gender and income as well as education and class.

    Conclusions: Multiple inequalities in mental health may add up in various and unexpected manners, which needs to be considered in efforts for equity in mental health.

    Key messages:

    • Mental health is distributed in various and unexpected manners across intersections of inequality dimensions.

    • Intersectionality theory may be useful when addressing mental health inequalities.

  • 4.
    Trygg, Nadja
    et al.
    Umeå universitet, Medicinska fakulteten, Institutionen för epidemiologi och global hälsa.
    Gustafsson, Per E
    Umeå universitet, Medicinska fakulteten, Institutionen för epidemiologi och global hälsa.
    Månsdotter, Anna
    Umeå universitet, Medicinska fakulteten, Institutionen för epidemiologi och global hälsa.
    Languishing in the crossroad?: A scoping review of intersectional inequalities in mental health2019Inngår i: International Journal for Equity in Health, ISSN 1475-9276, E-ISSN 1475-9276, Vol. 18, artikkel-id 115Artikkel, forskningsoversikt (Fagfellevurdert)
    Abstract [en]

    The concept of intersectionality has gradually been introduced to health inequality research, adding depth and breadth to the way inequalities in health are approached. We conducted a scoping review with the purpose to systematically map, describe and analyze the literature about intersectional inequalities in mental health. For eligibility, the study had to analyze and report inequality defined by combinations of socioeconomic position, gender, race/ethnicity, sexual orientation or religion. The mental health outcome had to be measured as self-reported symptoms assessed through validated scales, or disorders assessed through diagnostic interviews. The search strategy was applied in two databases and the screening process yielded 20 studies. The interaction of intersectional positions showed no consistent patterns in mental health across studies, but both synergistic and antagonistic effects were observed. In most studies an absolute measure of inequality was used and few studies analyzed factors potentially explaining the intersectional inequalities. Taken together, the findings of this review highlight the value of assessing intersectional inequalities across population groups for priority setting and action on mental health inequalities.

1 - 4 of 4
RefereraExporteraLink til resultatlisten
Permanent link
Referera
Referensformat
  • apa
  • ieee
  • modern-language-association-8th-edition
  • vancouver
  • Annet format
Fler format
Språk
  • de-DE
  • en-GB
  • en-US
  • fi-FI
  • nn-NO
  • nn-NB
  • sv-SE
  • Annet språk
Fler språk
Utmatningsformat
  • html
  • text
  • asciidoc
  • rtf