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  • 1.
    Ahlqvist, Jenny
    Umeå universitet, Humanistiska fakulteten, Institutionen för idé- och samhällsstudier, Miljöarkeologiska laboratoriet.
    Miljöarkeologi i Umeå stads hamn och slagfältsarkeologi på Krutbrånet: Två fallstudier inom historisk arkeologi i Umeås 1800-tal2014Independent thesis Advanced level (degree of Master (Two Years)), 20 poäng / 30 hpOppgave
    Abstract [en]

    This master thesis deals with two case studies in environmental archaeology and battlefield archaeology focusing on two major events in the late history of the Swedish coastal town Umeå and its nearby village Sävar. Established in the early 1600's, Umeå was known for its export of timber and import of cereals. The town has suffered from numerous fires, the fire in 1888 being the most devastating. Few written records of the town remain from before the 1900's. The latest war in Sweden's history is documented in historical sources and took place at Krutbrånet, Sävar where the Swedish troops suffered defeat against the russian forces in 1809. The old port in Umeå has not been previously excavated archaeologically and only a small part of the battlefield area at Krutbrånet has been surveyed. Neither of the sites have yet been protected sites under Swedish heritage conservation act. The purpose of these two case studies is to present new research results from these two sites.In the first case study, archaeobotany and soil chemistry methods were used to analyse soil samples from undisturbed cultural layers in a construction trench at the old port of Umeå. A thick burnt layer consisted of charcoal, oats and weeds, suggesting storage and possibly intended as food for horses. Oat and pea were radiocarbon dated to most likely late 1800's which places the burned layer with oats to the big city fire in 1888. The area could have intact cultural layers that are important to investigate for understanding the  unknown history of Umeås old port.The basis for the second case study is the material evidence of lead musket bullets found during a small field survey at Krutbrånet, conducted in 2010. The bullets were studied using X-ray Fluorescence together with spatial analysis to determine if troop nationality could be possible to distinguish based on composition, characteristics and spatial positions. The results revealed bullets  in varied sizes and composed of lead but also alloys of copper, antimony and tin that appear in mixed quantities spread in all the studied areas of the battlefield. Field surveys of uninvestigated areas at Krutbrånet are needed to understand the context of the studied material and of troop formations. Further studies could also be isotope analyses to determine the origins of the oats and bullets. 

  • 2.
    Ahlqvist, Jenny
    et al.
    Umeå universitet, Humanistiska fakulteten, Institutionen för idé- och samhällsstudier, Miljöarkeologiska laboratoriet.
    Eriksson, Samuel
    Umeå universitet, Humanistiska fakulteten, Institutionen för idé- och samhällsstudier, Miljöarkeologiska laboratoriet.
    Östman, Sofi
    Umeå universitet, Humanistiska fakulteten, Institutionen för idé- och samhällsstudier, Miljöarkeologiska laboratoriet.
    Engelmark, Roger
    Umeå universitet, Humanistiska fakulteten, Institutionen för idé- och samhällsstudier, Miljöarkeologiska laboratoriet.
    Makrofossil- och markkemisk analys av prover från Tanum Raä 1885, Tanum sn, Bohuslän2016Rapport (Annet vitenskapelig)
  • 3.
    Ahlqvist, Jenny
    et al.
    Umeå universitet, Humanistiska fakulteten, Institutionen för idé- och samhällsstudier, Miljöarkeologiska laboratoriet.
    Wallin, Jan-Erik
    Östman, Sofi
    Umeå universitet, Humanistiska fakulteten, Institutionen för idé- och samhällsstudier, Miljöarkeologiska laboratoriet.
    Olsson, Fredrik
    Miljöarkeologiska analyser av prover från Drognes 196/270 ID114281, Nes kommune, Akershus, Norge2018Rapport (Annet vitenskapelig)
  • 4.
    Ahlqvist, Jenny
    et al.
    Umeå universitet, Humanistiska fakulteten, Institutionen för idé- och samhällsstudier, Miljöarkeologiska laboratoriet.
    Östman, Sofi
    Umeå universitet, Humanistiska fakulteten, Institutionen för idé- och samhällsstudier, Miljöarkeologiska laboratoriet.
    Eriksson, Samuel
    Umeå universitet, Humanistiska fakulteten, Institutionen för idé- och samhällsstudier, Miljöarkeologiska laboratoriet.
    Eriksson, Mats
    Umeå universitet, Humanistiska fakulteten, Institutionen för idé- och samhällsstudier, Miljöarkeologiska laboratoriet.
    Linderholm, Johan
    Umeå universitet, Humanistiska fakulteten, Institutionen för idé- och samhällsstudier, Miljöarkeologiska laboratoriet.
    Miljöarkeologiska analyser av prover från huslämningar i Dobbeltspor Dilling, ID 216874, Rygge kommune, Østfold, Norge2018Rapport (Annet vitenskapelig)
  • 5. Ahl-Waris, Eva
    et al.
    Nordlund, Christer
    Umeå universitet, Humanistiska fakulteten, Institutionen för idé- och samhällsstudier.
    Om tillkomsten och användningen av en fornlämningsplats: arkeologibruk kring Kökars franciskankonvent2014Inngår i: Historisk Tidskrift för Finland, ISSN 0046-7596, E-ISSN 2343-2888, Vol. 99, nr 2, s. 147-190Artikkel i tidsskrift (Fagfellevurdert)
  • 6.
    Aili Törmä, Maria
    Umeå universitet, Humanistiska fakulteten, Institutionen för idé- och samhällsstudier.
    Fornlämningen Luleå Gammelstad: De äldsta spåren från de arkeologiska undersökningarna inom Nederluleå socken Raä 330:1.2012Independent thesis Basic level (degree of Bachelor), 10 poäng / 15 hpOppgave
  • 7. Aldred, Oscar
    et al.
    Palsson, Gisli
    Umeå universitet, Humanistiska fakulteten, Institutionen för idé- och samhällsstudier.
    Archaeological Imprints: We Follow Lines and Trace Them2017Inngår i: Journal of Contemporary Archaeology, ISSN 2051-3429, E-ISSN 2051-3437, Vol. 4, nr 2, s. 163-176Artikkel i tidsskrift (Fagfellevurdert)
  • 8.
    Allios, Dominique
    et al.
    Rennes University, France.
    Guermeur, Nominoë
    Rennes University, France.
    Cocoual, Antoine
    Rennes University, France.
    Linderholm, Johan
    Umeå universitet, Humanistiska fakulteten, Institutionen för idé- och samhällsstudier, Miljöarkeologiska laboratoriet.
    Sciuto, Claudia
    Umeå universitet, Humanistiska fakulteten, Institutionen för idé- och samhällsstudier, Miljöarkeologiska laboratoriet.
    Geladi, Paul
    Sveriges Lantbruksuniversitet.
    Gobrecht, Alexia
    IRSTEA-Montpellier, France.
    Bendoula, Ryad
    IRSTEA-Montpellier, France.
    Moura, Daniel
    IRSTEA-Montpellier, France.
    Jay, Sylvain
    IRSTEA-Montpellier, France.
    Gardel, Marie-Elise
    Amicale laïque de Carcassonne-LA3M/UMR 7298, France.
    Near infrared spectra and hyperspectral imaging of medieval fortress walls in Carcassonne: a comprehensive interdisciplinary field study2016Inngår i: NIR news, ISSN 0960-3360, E-ISSN 1756-2708, Vol. 27, nr 3, s. 16-20Artikkel i tidsskrift (Annet vitenskapelig)
    Abstract [en]

    A comprehensive study has been launched in the medieval fortress of Carcassonne involving a cooperation between the universities of Umeå and Rennes, and the research institute of IRSTEA of Montpellier. This study aims to combine several spectroscopic techniques in order to resolve archaeological problems related to which raw materials were used during the city wall construction, and also to improve our understanding of the different phases of construction and use of the city walls. This study was also used for elucidating the different qualities and weak points of the applied field methods.

  • 9. Andersen, Oddmund
    et al.
    Lorås, Jostein
    Storaunet, Ken Olaf
    Hjortfors, Lis-Mari
    Árran, julevsáme guovdasj/lulesamiskt center.
    Sámi settlement and the use of pine inner bark in Lønsdal, Nordland, Norway: dating and historical context2013Inngår i: Fennoscandia Archaeologica, ISSN 0781-7126, Vol. 30, nr XXX, s. 55-66Artikkel i tidsskrift (Fagfellevurdert)
    Abstract [en]

    Inner bark of Pinus sylvestris (L.) used to be an important dietary resource for the Sámi. The bark was harvested in June. In the Lule Sámi language this month is called biehtsemánno meaning ‘pine month’. In Lønsdalen, within Pite-Sámi area in Nordland county, northern Norway, we recorded 107 pine trees with 125 bark-peelings, of which 103 were successfully cross-dated by dendrochronology. The oldest peeling was from 1636, whereas the youngest peeleing was done in the 1880s. The same area also contains many physical cultural remains of the Sámi. We performed archaeological excavations of four hearths which were located between these bark-peeled trees. Radiocarbon datings showed that these settlements were used from the Late Iron Age or Early Medieval to the present time. Thus, the region has been important to the Sámi people for a long time. In this article we argue for a relationship between the many bark-peeled trees and the settlements.

  • 10. Bergman, Ingela
    et al.
    Påsse, Tore
    Olofsson, Anders
    Umeå universitet, Humanistiska fakulteten, Arkeologi och samiska studier.
    Zachrisson, Olle
    Hörnberg, Greger
    Hellberg, Erik
    Bohlin, Elisabeth
    Isostatic land uplift and Mesolithic landscapes: lake tilting, a key to the discovery of Mesolithic sites in the interior of Northern Sweden2003Inngår i: Journal of Archaeological Science, ISSN 0305-4403, E-ISSN 1095-9238, Vol. 30, nr 11, s. 1451-1458Artikkel i tidsskrift (Fagfellevurdert)
    Abstract [en]

    Until recently only a few Mesolithic sites were known from the interior of N. Sweden, although extensive archaeological surveys have been carried out since the 1950s. The lack of archaeological data made every attempt to interpret the process of pioneer colonization quite fruitless. In this paper we present a model of non-uniform glacio-isostatic uplift and lake-tilting used to identify potential areas of Mesolithic habitation. By reconstructing shoreline displacement of ancient lakes, archaeological, palaeoecological and geological studies have resulted in the discovery of a significant number of Mesolithic sites and of an early post-glacial landscape previously unknown.

  • 11.
    Bergman, Ingela
    et al.
    Silvermuseet, Institute for Subarctic Landscape Research (INSARC), Arjeplog, Sweden.
    Ramqvist, Per H.
    Silvermuseet, Institute for Subarctic Landscape Research (INSARC), Arjeplog, Sweden.
    Farmer-fishermen: interior lake fishing and inter-cultural and intra-cultural relations among coastal and interior Sámi communities in northern Sweden AD 1200–16002017Inngår i: Acta Borealia, ISSN 0800-3831, E-ISSN 1503-111X, Vol. 34, nr 2, s. 134-158Artikkel i tidsskrift (Fagfellevurdert)
    Abstract [en]

    Although the productive fishing grounds had long attracted the Crown and the Church to northern Sweden, it was not until the sixteenth century that the judicial and fiscal powers of the Swedish Crown were exercised in full. Records show that the regular fishing in interior lakes formed a prominent enterprise among coastal farmer communities. This paper examines the social and economic context of farmers engaged in interior fishing with respect to the internal organization of village communities, principles of private and collective ownership, land-use strategies and inter-community relations. There are no a-priori assumptions about the coastal population being “Swedish”. Instead of applying ethnonyms, the terms “farmer” and “coastal” are used throughout the paper. The main area of investigation includes the coastal area of northernmost Sweden and the western parts of Finnish Lapland. The study shows that interior lakes fitted into village resource areas, long sanctioned by usage, and that usufruct belonged to village members collectively. A large part of the fishing lakes are situated in interior Sámi territory. Fishermen were internalizing Sámi place names, implying close relations between the groups. Archeological investigations point to subsistence strategies including systemic interior lake fishing being established before AD 1200. The authors propose that coastal and interior communities should be perceived as two economic strategies representing indigenous and pre-colonial land-use schemes.

  • 12.
    Bergman, Ingela
    et al.
    Silvermuseet Arjeplog.
    Ramqvist, Per H
    Umeå universitet, Humanistiska fakulteten, Institutionen för idé- och samhällsstudier.
    Hunters of forests and waters: Late Iron Age and Medieval subsistence and social processes in coastal northern Sweden2018Inngår i: Acta Borealia, ISSN 0800-3831, E-ISSN 1503-111X, Vol. 35, nr 1, s. 1-28Artikkel i tidsskrift (Fagfellevurdert)
    Abstract [en]

    During the course of the 14th century the Swedish Crown and the Catholic Church made robust attempts to include the areas beside the Bothnian bay within their central fiscal and clerical organization. Salmon fishing in the productive river rapids became major targets for external commercial interests. Written records inform us about the situation from the perspective of the exploiters. However, there is a story running in parallel – that of the local population already occupying the lands and the fishing grounds. The study aims to analyse the significance of hunting and fishing to the overall subsistence of coastal communities in northern Sweden during the period AD 500–1600. The social context is of particular interest, specifically in relation to the successive conformation by the local communities to the Swedish fiscal system. The study draws on archaeological records and on historical records from the 14th to the 17th century, in addition to ethnographic accounts for hunting and fishing. We conclude that the legal cultures embraced by the indigenous population and that of the Swedish central powers were in essence incompatible. The acquisition of land and fishing rights was never settled between two equal parties, but one-sidedly enforced by the party holding the pen.

  • 13.
    Bergman, Ingela
    et al.
    Silver Museum, Arjeplog, Sweden.
    Zackrisson, Olle
    Swedish University of Agricultural Sciences, Umeå, Sweden.
    Early Mesolithic Hunter–Gatherers and Landscape Acquisition by the Arctic Circle: The Ipmatis valley 7000 BC–1 AD2007Inngår i: Journal of Northern Studies, ISSN 1654-5915, Vol. 1, nr 1-2, s. 123-142Artikkel i tidsskrift (Fagfellevurdert)
    Abstract [en]

    Archaeological and palaeoecological studies in the Arjeplog area of northern Sweden have verified the arrival of hunter–gatherers soon after deglaciation. After modelling and subsequently surveying the reconstructed shorelines of tilted watercourses, Early Mesolithic settlements dating to 86008000 BP (14C years BP) were discovered. Makrosubfossil-, pollen- and charcoal analyses of peat stratigrafies and lake sediments corroborated that deglaciation was completed more than 1000 years earlier than has previously been postulated. Pollen records show that the early postglacial environment included complex plant communities lacking present day analogies, providing optimal subsistence conditions for the pioneer settlers. Studies of charcoal influx into lake sediments indicate that fires were more frequent than ever after, contributing to a productive natural environment. Regional studies in the Ipmatis valley in combination with in-depth analyses of selected archaeological sites, display that hunter–gatherers made the resources of the valley an integral part of their subsistence at an early stage. Landscape acquisition included not only the adjustment to existing conditions, but the actual manipulation of the environment. The interdisciplinary research approach has produced unique sets of archaeological and palaeoecological data. Results open new perspectives on human pioneer colonisation and landscape acquisition in relation to deglaciation and the development of postglacial ecosystems. The variety of methods applied sets a new standard for future research on early societies in sub-arctic regions.

  • 14.
    Bindler, Richard
    et al.
    Umeå universitet, Teknisk-naturvetenskapliga fakulteten, Institutionen för ekologi, miljö och geovetenskap.
    Karlsson, Jon
    Umeå universitet, Teknisk-naturvetenskapliga fakulteten, Institutionen för ekologi, miljö och geovetenskap.
    Rydberg, Johan
    Umeå universitet, Teknisk-naturvetenskapliga fakulteten, Institutionen för ekologi, miljö och geovetenskap.
    Karlsson, Björn
    Berg Nilsson, Lena
    Biester, Harald
    Segerström, Ulf
    Copper-ore mining in Sweden since the pre-Roman Iron Age: lake-sediment evidence of human activities at the Garpenberg ore field since 375 BCE2017Inngår i: Journal of Archaeological Science: Reports, ISSN 2352-409X, E-ISSN 2001-1199, Vol. 12, s. 99-108Artikkel i tidsskrift (Fagfellevurdert)
    Abstract [en]

    Historical documents, archaeological evidence and lake-sediment records indicate thus far that significant mining of iron and copper ores in the Berglsagen mining region in central Sweden did not begin until the late 12th century -first with iron in Norberg - and thereafter spreading rapidly throughout the region during the 13th century when also copper was included (e.g. Falun). Prior to this, iron was produced domestically from secondary sources such as bog iron, while geochemical analyses of bronze artefacts indicate copper was imported. The parish of Garpenberg was at the intersection between historical iron-and copper-mining districts, and consequently we expected our sediment record from the lake Gruvsjon ('mine lake') to follow the established 13th century development. However, a 2-3-fold enrichment in copper and lead occurred already during 375-175 BCE (pre-Roman Iron Age), together with small increases in zinc, magnesium and charcoal particles, and changes in pollen. Together these indicate a clear pattern of human disturbance connected with the ore body bordering the lake. A second distinct phase occurred 115-275 CE, but with an 8-9-fold increase in copper and lead along with other indicators. From 400 CE a permanent increase in copper and lead occurred, which then accelerated from the 13th century as seen elsewhere in the region. Our results push back the evidence for early ore mining in Sweden from the Middle Ages to the pre-Roman Iron Age. 

  • 15.
    Bindler, Richard
    et al.
    Umeå universitet, Teknisk-naturvetenskapliga fakulteten, Institutionen för ekologi, miljö och geovetenskap.
    Rydberg, Johan
    Umeå universitet, Teknisk-naturvetenskapliga fakulteten, Institutionen för ekologi, miljö och geovetenskap.
    Revisiting Key Sedimentary Archives Yields Evidence Of A Rapid Onset Of Mining In The Mid-13th Century At The Great Copper Mountain, Falun, Sweden2016Inngår i: Archaeometry, ISSN 0003-813X, E-ISSN 1475-4754, Vol. 58, nr 4, s. 642-658Artikkel i tidsskrift (Fagfellevurdert)
    Abstract [en]

    Mining in Falun, Sweden, was first mentioned in a deed from AD 1288, but previous studies of peat and lake sediments inferred that mining began during the fifth to eighth centuries. In order to reassess these findings, we performed new geochemical analyses on new samples from three key sites: Tisksjobergets myr, a buried mire alongside the mine; Tisken, a small lake in Falun; and Runn, the main recipient for waters draining through Falun. At Tisksjobergets myr, the peat contains up to 6% copper, giving it the characteristics of a cupriferous bog. Hence, this record is not useful for tracing early mining. The sediments of Tisken-upon which many of the old interpretations have relied-contain numerous cut wood fragments, and two of those gave young and reversed radiocarbon dates (19th and 16th centuries for 192 and 187 cm, respectively). This indicates that the sediment was derived from infilling and, thus, has little value as a historical record. Runn's sediment-the only reliable record-provides clear evidence of a rapid onset of large-scale mining from c. AD 1245, with abrupt increases in ore-related elements-for example, a 34-fold increase in copper-this increase is consistent with the mid-13th century burial of the mire at Tisksjoberget.

  • 16.
    Borg, Julius
    Umeå universitet, Humanistiska fakulteten, Institutionen för idé- och samhällsstudier.
    Metalldetektorn som ett arkeologiskt redskap – ris eller ros?: En studie kring metalldetektorns bidrag till arkeologin med exempel från undersökningarna i Uppåkra och Gudme2018Independent thesis Basic level (degree of Bachelor), 20 poäng / 30 hpOppgave
    Abstract [en]

    The metal detector as an archaeological tool: good or bad?

    Over the past six decades, the metal-detector has taken both the public as the archaeology by storm. The amount of people that has started to use it both as a hobby and in their jobs, is consistently growing, and the finds that it has provided has been of great value to the archaeologists. This paper examines how the metal-detector has been used and what kind of information it has provided for archaeologists.

    Firstly, there will be a short presentation of the metal-detector as a tool where its history and function get depicted. Thereafter a short summary around the legislation concerning metal-detectors follows of both Sweden and Denmark, which will end with a comparison.

    Then, the archaeological excavations with metal-detectors that has taken place in Uppåkra and Gudme during the last 40 years gets presented. There will be a short historical comprehension around both places which is followed by the surveys that has been conducted with metal-detectors and some of the finds that has been made.

    Finally, there will be a short summary around the debate in Sweden whether the legislation concerning metal-detectors should be liberalized or not. The text will end with a discussion where the author talks about his thoughts of metal-detectors in archaeology.

  • 17. Broadbent, Noel D.
    et al.
    Lantto, Patrik
    Umeå universitet, Humanistiska fakulteten, Centrum för samisk forskning (CeSam).
    Terms of engagement: An Arctic perspective on the narratives and politics of global climate change2009Inngår i: Anthropology and Climate Change: From Encounters to Actions, Walnut Creek: Left Coast Press , 2009, s. 341-355Kapittel i bok, del av antologi (Annet vitenskapelig)
  • 18. Buckland, Paul C.
    et al.
    Buckland, Philip
    Umeå universitet, Humanistiska fakulteten, Arkeologi och samiska studier.
    Hughes, Damian
    Palaeoecological evidence for the Vera hypothesis?2005Inngår i: Large herbivores in the wildwood and modern naturalistic grazing systems, English Nature , 2005, s. 62-116Kapittel i bok, del av antologi (Annet vitenskapelig)
    Abstract [en]

    This report stems from work commissioned by English Nature into the role of largeherbivores in the post-glacial landscape of Britain and the potential for using free-ranginggrazing animals to create and maintain diverse landscape mosaics in modern conditions.Some aspects may be disputed or considered controversial; it is an active field of research.Therefore we stress that the views expressed are those of the authors at the current time.Subsequent research may confirm our views or lead us to modify them.We hope they will be useful in future discussions, both within English Nature and inconservation land-management circles more generally.

  • 19. Buckland, Paul C.
    et al.
    Buckland, Philip I.
    Umeå universitet, Humanistiska fakulteten, Arkeologi och samiska studier, Miljöarkeologiska laboratoriet.
    Insect Remains from GUS: an interim report1998Inngår i: Man, Culture and Environment in Ancient Greenland / [ed] J. Arneborg & H.C. Gulløv, Copenhagen: Danish Polar Center, Copenhagen , 1998, s. 74-79Kapittel i bok, del av antologi (Annet vitenskapelig)
  • 20. Buckland, Paul C.
    et al.
    Buckland, Philip I.
    Umeå universitet, Humanistiska fakulteten, Institutionen för idé- och samhällsstudier, Miljöarkeologiska laboratoriet.
    The Alder Leaf Beetle Agelastica alni (L.) (Col.: Chrysomelidae) in the Dearne Valley. Climate change or poor quarantine.2014Inngår i: Sorby Record, ISSN 0260-2245, nr 50, s. 2-6Artikkel i tidsskrift (Annet vitenskapelig)
  • 21. Buckland, Paul C.
    et al.
    Buckland, Philip I.
    Umeå universitet, Humanistiska fakulteten, Institutionen för idé- och samhällsstudier, Miljöarkeologiska laboratoriet.
    Panagiotakopulu, Eva
    Department of Geography, School of Geosciences, University of Edinburgh.
    Caught in a trap: landscape and climate implications of the insect fauna from a Roman well in Sherwood Forest2018Inngår i: Archaeological and Anthropological Sciences, ISSN 1866-9557, E-ISSN 1866-9565, Vol. 10, nr 1, s. 125-140Artikkel i tidsskrift (Fagfellevurdert)
    Abstract [en]

    Sherwood Forest in Nottinghamshire is often considered a well preserved ancient landscape, subsequently having survived by way of centuries of management as a hunting preserve. Archaeological evidence suggests otherwise, with an enclosed landscape beginning in the pre-Roman Iron Age and continuing through the Romanperiod. Due to the nature of the region's soils, however, there is little empirical, palaeoecological evidence on its environmental history prior to the medieval period. This paper presents an insect fauna from a Roman well in a small enclosure in north Nottinghamshire, on the edge of Sherwood Forest, and its interpretation in terms of contemporary land use. Wells and small pools act as large pitfall traps and mayeffectively sample aspects of the local and regional insect fauna. The Wild Goose Cottage fauna and its environmental implications are also compared with a number of archaeologically and geographically similar contexts.

  • 22. Buckland, Paul C.
    et al.
    Panagiotakopulu, Eva
    Buckland, Philip I.
    Umeå universitet, Humanistiska fakulteten, Institutionen för idé- och samhällsstudier, Miljöarkeologiska laboratoriet.
    Fossil insects and the Neolithic: methods and potencial2004Inngår i: ANTAEUS 27: Annals of the Archaeological Instititute of the Hungarian Academy of Sciences, 2004, s. 235-252Konferansepaper (Fagfellevurdert)
  • 23. Buckland, Paul C.
    et al.
    Panagiotakopulu, Eva
    Buckland, Philip I.
    Umeå universitet, Humanistiska fakulteten, Arkeologi och samiska studier.
    What's eating Halvdan the Black?: Fossil insects and the study of a burial mound in its landscape context2004Inngår i: Halvdanshaugen: arkeologi, historie og naturvetenskap / [ed] Jan Henning Larsen og Perry Rolfsen, Oslo: University Museum of Cultural Heritage , 2004, 1, s. 353-375Kapittel i bok, del av antologi (Annet vitenskapelig)
    Abstract [en]

    Although the earliest work with insects from archaeological contexts dates back to was work on Egyptian mummies in the early nineteenth century, they were not widely used in archaeological interpretation until an effective technique for concentrating their remains was developed during the 1960s by Coope and Osborne at the University of Birmingham in England. Whilst most of their research centred upon climate and environment during the Late Quaternary, Osborne in particular began to examine assemblages from archaeological sites, and his work was expanded by Kenward, initially concentrating upon Roman and early medieval deposits in the city of York and later by Robinson at Oxford, whose main interest is in the late Holocene history of the Thames valley. Funding from the Leverhulme Trust in the UK allowed Buckland to examine the origins of the insect faunas of the Atlantic islands and this work has continued until recently. Initially research was concentrated upon the Coleoptera (beetles), but Kenward added identifications of Hemiptera (true bugs), and Skidmore and Panagiotakopulu Diptera (true flies). Panagiotakopulu has also worked closely with ectoparasite remains from archaeological sites. Although identification work still relies heavily upon the availability of extensive reference collections, the development of an extensive computer-based database, BUGS, of habitat, distribution and the fossil record of Quaternary insects has made interpretation considerably easier. In Scandinavia, early work was pioneered by Henriksen and later Lindroth. More recently Lemdahl has worked extensively on Lateglacial into Holocene natural assemblages and, in association with Hellqvist, has also examined archaeological contexts. Apart from Ponel’s work in France, there has been little recent research elsewhere in Europe, and most published work concerns natural assemblages. Similarly apart from Bain’s work on post-Columbian assemblages in the eastern US and Canada, and some work by Elias in the mid-West, insects have rarely been utilised in site interpretation in the Americas and, apart from Egypt, Africa, Asia and Australasia have fared even worse. Part of the reason behind this is the scattered nature of published results, and the frequent failure of archaeologists to cost scientific aspects of work upon their sites into project design. This paper attempts to outline some of the evidence which has been obtained from the study of insect remains, as well as to outline the methods used to concentrate the fossils. The fairly extensive bibliography allows access to the published literature, particularly that relevant to the Scandinavian World.

  • 24.
    Buckland, Paul C.
    et al.
    University of Sheffield, UK.
    Panagiotakopulu, Eva
    Edinburgh University, Scotland.
    Buckland, Philip I.
    Umeå universitet, Humanistiska fakulteten, Arkeologi och samiska studier, Miljöarkeologiska laboratoriet.
    Perdikaris, Sophia
    Skidmore, Peter
    Insect faunas from Medieval Langenes in Arctic Norway2006Inngår i: Proceedings from the VIII Nordic Conference on the Application of Scientific Methods In Archaeology, Umeå, Sweden, 2001. / [ed] Engelmark, Roger & Linderholm, Johan, 2006, s. 17-32Konferansepaper (Fagfellevurdert)
    Abstract [en]

    Cultural sediments containing significant amounts of fish bone at Langenesværet, Vesterålen, Northern Norway provide an opportunity to characterise activity during and prior to the establishment of a late medieval commercial fishing station (fiskevaer). Radiometric and AMS dating techniques are used to establish a chronology for the deposits, while activities associated with the sediments are characterised fossil insect faunas. The results highlight a series of problems with the dating of the heavily disturbed organic deposits of many archaeological sites, and the need for greater care in sample selection and interpretation.

  • 25. Buckland, Paul C.
    et al.
    Panagiotakopulu, Eva
    University of Edinburgh, Scotland.
    Skidmore, Peter
    Snæsdóttir, Mjöll
    Institute of Archaeology, Iceland.
    Buckland, Philip I.
    Umeå universitet, Humanistiska fakulteten, Arkeologi och samiska studier, Miljöarkeologiska laboratoriet.
    Insect faunas from Stóraborg, a farm mound in Southern Iceland2004Rapport (Annet vitenskapelig)
  • 26.
    Buckland, Philip
    Umeå universitet, Humanistiska fakulteten, Institutionen för idé- och samhällsstudier, Miljöarkeologiska laboratoriet.
    Lessons from extinctions2017Inngår i: Wood Wise, s. 22-27Artikkel i tidsskrift (Annet (populærvitenskap, debatt, mm))
    Abstract [en]

    Many beetles are very good at colonising new areas when changes in the landscape open up new possibilities. Equally, they are highly susceptible to local extinction in the face of landscape scale changes in their environment.

  • 27.
    Buckland, Philip
    Umeå universitet, Humanistiska fakulteten, Institutionen för idé- och samhällsstudier, Miljöarkeologiska laboratoriet.
    The development and implementation of software for palaeoenvironmental and palaeoclimatological research: the Bugs Coleopteran Ecology Package (BugsCEP)2007Doktoravhandling, monografi (Annet vitenskapelig)
    Abstract [en]

    This thesis documents the development and application of a unique database orientated software package, BugsCEP, for environmental and climatic reconstruction from fossil beetle (Coleoptera) assemblages. The software tools are described, and the incorporated statistical methods discussed and evaluated with respect to both published modern and fossil data, as well as the author’s own investigations.

    BugsCEP consists of a reference database of ecology and distribution data for over 5 800 taxa, and includes temperature tolerance data for 436 species. It also contains abundance and summary data for almost 700 sites - the majority of the known Quaternary fossil coleopteran record of Europe. Sample based dating evidence is stored for a large number of these sites, and the data are supported by a bibliography of over 3 300 sources. Through the use of built in statistical methods, employing a specially developed habitat classification system (Bugs EcoCodes), semi-quantitative environmental reconstructions can be undertaken, and output graphically, to aid in the interpretation of sites. A number of built in searching and reporting functions also increase the efficiency with which analyses can be undertaken, including the facility to list the fossil record of species found by searching the ecology and distribution data. The existing Mutual Climatic Range (MCR) climate reconstruction method is implemented and improved upon in BugsCEP, as BugsMCR, which includes predictive modelling and the output of graphs and climate space maps.

    The evaluation of the software demonstrates good performance when compared to existing interpretations. The standardization method employed in habitat reconstructions, designed to enable the inter-comparison of samples and sites without the interference of differing numbers of species and individuals, also appears to be robust and effective. Quantitative climate reconstructions can be easily undertaken from within the software, as well as an amount of predictive modelling. The use of jackknifing variants as an aid to the interpretation of climate reconstructions is discussed, and suggested as a potential indicator of reliability. The combination of the BugStats statistical system with an enhanced MCR facility could be extremely useful in increasing our understanding of not only past environmental and climate change, but also the biogeography and ecology of insect populations in general.

    BugsCEP is the only available software package integrating modern and fossil coleopteran data, and the included reconstruction and analysis tools provide a powerful resource for research and teaching in palaeo-environmental science. The use of modern reference data also makes the package potentially useful in the study of present day insect faunas, and the effects of climate and environmental change on their distributions. The reconstruction methods could thus be inverted, and used as predictive tools in the study of biodiversity and the implications of sustainable development policies on present day habitats.

    BugsCEP can be downloaded from http://www.bugscep.com

  • 28.
    Buckland, Philip I.
    Umeå universitet, Humanistiska fakulteten, Arkeologi och samiska studier.
    Archaeological Field Assessment of the Proposed Borrow Pits at Staythorpe Power Station, Staythorpe, Nottinghamshire: Assessment of the fossil insects1999Rapport (Annet vitenskapelig)
  • 29.
    Buckland, Philip I.
    Department of Archaeology and Prehistory, University of Sheffield, Sheffield, UK.
    ARCUS project 220: report on palaeochannel prospection at Elvaston Castle Tarmac site, Derbyshire1995Rapport (Annet vitenskapelig)
  • 30.
    Buckland, Philip I.
    Department of Archaeology and Prehistory, University of Sheffield, Sheffield, UK.
    ARCUS: Report on a site at Walmgate, York: Report on the fossil insect fauna from a site at Walmgate, York1995Rapport (Annet vitenskapelig)
  • 31.
    Buckland, Philip I.
    Umeå universitet, Humanistiska fakulteten, Institutionen för idé- och samhällsstudier, Miljöarkeologiska laboratoriet.
    Environmental Archaeology: Climate Change and E-Science2010Inngår i: Thule: Kungliga Skytteanska Samfundets Årsbok 2010, Umeå: Kungliga Skytteanska Samfundet , 2010, s. 55-69Kapittel i bok, del av antologi (Annet vitenskapelig)
  • 32.
    Buckland, Philip I.
    Umeå universitet, Humanistiska fakulteten, Institutionen för idé- och samhällsstudier, Miljöarkeologiska laboratoriet.
    Freeing information to the people: Using the past to aid the future2011Inngår i: International Innovation - Disseminating Science Research and Technology, ISSN 2041-4552, nr 4, s. 51-53Artikkel i tidsskrift (Annet (populærvitenskap, debatt, mm))
    Abstract [en]

    Dr Philip Buckland discusses his recent project SEAD: the web-accessible scientific database that crosses archaeological and environmental disciplines. 

    Disciplines as diverse as anthropology and palaeoecology take an interest in our environment and how we have treated it. The Strategic Environmental Archaeology Database aims to create a multi-proxy, GIS-ready database for environmental and archaeological data to aid multidisciplinary research

  • 33.
    Buckland, Philip I
    Umeå universitet, Humanistiska fakulteten, Arkeologi och samiska studier, Miljöarkeologiska laboratoriet.
    Insect remains from Pástóftir, Kárahnjúkar, Iceland2006Rapport (Annet vitenskapelig)
  • 34.
    Buckland, Philip I
    Umeå universitet, Humanistiska fakulteten, Arkeologi och samiska studier, Miljöarkeologiska laboratoriet.
    Preliminary report: fossil insect remains from Karahnjukar, Iceland2006Rapport (Annet vitenskapelig)
  • 35.
    Buckland, Philip I.
    Umeå universitet, Humanistiska fakulteten, Institutionen för idé- och samhällsstudier, Miljöarkeologiska laboratoriet.
    Redaktion: Stenålderns landskap väntar i havet2017Inngår i: Populär Arkeologi, ISSN 0281-014, nr 3Artikkel i tidsskrift (Annet (populærvitenskap, debatt, mm))
  • 36.
    Buckland, Philip I.
    Umeå universitet, Humanistiska fakulteten, Institutionen för idé- och samhällsstudier, Miljöarkeologiska laboratoriet. Umeå universitet, Humanistiska fakulteten, Humlab.
    SEAD - The Strategic Environmental Archaeology Database Inter-linking Multiproxy Environmental Data with Archaeological Investigations and Ecology2013Inngår i: Archaeology in the Digital Era: Papers from the 40th Annual Conference of Computer Applications and Quantitative Methods in Archaeology (CAA), Southampton, 26-29 March 2012 / [ed] Graeme Earl, Tim Sly, Angeliki Chrysanthi, Patricia Murrieta-Flores, Constantinos Papadopoulos, Iza Romanowska & David Wheatley, Amsterdam University Press, 2013, Vol. 1, s. 320-331Konferansepaper (Fagfellevurdert)
    Abstract [en]

    The volume of data on past environmental and climate changes, as well as human interactions with these, has long since passed the level where it is manageable outside of large scale database systems. The Strategic Environmental Archaeology Database project aims to not only store and disseminate such data, but also provide tools for querying and analysing them, whilst maintaining a close connection with the archaeological and ecological data that are essential for their comprehensive interpretation. Large scale, geographically and chronologically unrestricted databases provide us with essentially unlimited scope for putting individual sites into a broader context and applying locally collated data to the investigation of earth system level changes. By providing integrated access to data from a variety of proxies, including plant macrofossils, pollen, insects and geochemistry, along with dating evidence, more complex questions can be answered where any single proxy would not be able to provide comprehensive answers.

  • 37.
    Buckland, Philip I.
    Umeå universitet, Humanistiska fakulteten, Institutionen för idé- och samhällsstudier, Miljöarkeologiska laboratoriet.
    The Bugs Coleopteran Ecology Package (BugsCEP): the development and implementation of software for palaeoenvironmental and palaeoclimatological research2009Bok (Annet vitenskapelig)
    Abstract [en]

    This book describes the development and practical application of a unique database orientated software package, BugsCEP, for environmental, climatic and biodiversity reconstruction from beetle assemblages. BugsCEP consists of a database of ecology and distribution data for over 9400 insect taxa, and includes temperature tolerance data for 436 species. It contains abundance and summary data for over 770 sites, most of the known European Quaternary fossil coleopteran record, supported by a bibliography of over 3700 sources. Built in statistics, including a specially developed habitat classification system, provide semi-quantitative environmental reconstructions to aid in the interpretation of sites. BugsCEP's querying and reporting functions also increase the efficiency with which analyses can be undertaken, including the facility to explore the fossil record of species by searching ecology and distribution data. The Mutual Climatic Range (MCR) reconstruction method is implemented and improved upon, including predictive modelling and the graphical output of reconstructions and climate space maps. BugsCEP is available from www.bugscep.com.

  • 38.
    Buckland, Philip I.
    Umeå universitet, Humanistiska fakulteten, Institutionen för idé- och samhällsstudier, Miljöarkeologiska laboratoriet. Umeå universitet, Humanistiska fakulteten, Humlab.
    The Bugs Coleopteran Ecology Package (BugsCEP) database: 1000 sites and half a million fossils later2014Inngår i: Quaternary International, ISSN 1040-6182, E-ISSN 1873-4553, Vol. 341, s. 272-282Artikkel i tidsskrift (Fagfellevurdert)
    Abstract [en]

    The Bugs database project started in the late 1980s as what would now be considered a relatively simple system, albeit advanced for its time, linking fossil beetle species lists to modern habitat and distribution information. Since then, Bugs has grown into a complex database of fossils records, habitat and distribution data, dating and climate reference data wrapped into an advanced software analysis package. At the time of writing, the database contains raw data and metadata for 1124 sites, and Russell Coope directly contributed to the analysis of over 154 (14%) of them, some 98790 identifications published in 231 publications. Such quantifications are infeasible without databases, and the analytical power of combining a database of modern and fossil insects with analysis tools is potentially immense for numerous areas of science ranging from conservation to Quaternary geology.

    BugsCEP, The Bugs Coleopteran Ecology Package, is the latest incarnation of the Bugs database project. Released in 2007, the database is continually added too and is available for free download from http://www.bugscep.com. The software tools include quantitative habitat reconstruction and visualisation, correlation matrices, MCR climate reconstruction, searching by habitat and retrieving, among other things, a list of taxa known from the selected habitat types. It also provides a system for entering, storing and managing palaeoentomological data as well as a number of expert system like reporting facilities.

    Work is underway to create an online version of BugsCEP, implemented through the Strategic Environmental Archaeology Database (SEAD) project (http://www.sead.se). The aim is to provide more direct access to the latest data, a community orientated updating system, and integration with other proxy data. Eventually, the tools available in the offline BugsCEP will be duplicated and Bugs will be entirely in the web.

    This paper summarises aspects of the current scope, capabilities and applications of the BugsCEP database and software, with special reference to and quantifications of the contributions of Russell Coope to the field of palaeoentomology as represented in the database. The paper also serves to illustrate the potential for the use of BugsCEP in biographical studies, and discusses some of the issues relating to the use of large scale sources of quantitative data.

    All datasets used in this article are available through the current version of BugsCEP available at http://www.bugscep.com.

  • 39.
    Buckland, Philip I.
    Umeå universitet, Humanistiska fakulteten, Institutionen för idé- och samhällsstudier, Miljöarkeologiska laboratoriet.
    The Strategic Environmental Archaeology Database (SEAD): An International Research Cyber-Infrastructure for Studying Past Changes in Climate, Environment and Human Activities2010Inngår i: Journal of Northern Studies, ISSN 1654-5915, nr 1, s. 120-126Artikkel i tidsskrift (Annet vitenskapelig)
  • 40.
    Buckland, Philip I.
    et al.
    Umeå universitet, Humanistiska fakulteten, Institutionen för idé- och samhällsstudier, Miljöarkeologiska laboratoriet. Umeå universitet, Humanistiska fakulteten, Humlab.
    Buckland, Paul C.
    BugsCEP, an entomological database twenty-five years on2014Inngår i: Antenna (Journal of the Royal Entomological Society), ISSN 0140-1890, Vol. 38, nr 1, s. 21-28Artikkel i tidsskrift (Fagfellevurdert)
  • 41.
    Buckland, Philip I.
    et al.
    Umeå universitet, Humanistiska fakulteten, Arkeologi och samiska studier, Miljöarkeologiska laboratoriet.
    Buckland, Paul C.
    BugsCEP: Coleopteran Ecology Package (software)2006Annet (Annet (populærvitenskap, debatt, mm))
    Abstract [en]

    BugsCEP is a research and teaching aid for palaeoentomology, entomology and ecology. As well as habitat and distribution data, it includes tools for climate and environmental reconstruction, and facilities for storing site based abundance/collection data. A variety of searching and reporting functions greatly augment the efficiency of beetle based research.

    Bugs is built around a comprehensive database of beetle ecology and European fossil records which has been accumulated over the past 20 years.

  • 42.
    Buckland, Philip I.
    et al.
    Umeå universitet, Humanistiska fakulteten, Arkeologi och samiska studier.
    Buckland, Paul C.
    How can a database full of Bugs help reconstruct the climate?2002Inngår i: Archaeological Informatics - Pushing the Envelope - CAA 2001 - Computer Applications and Quantitative Methods in Archaeology: Proceedings of the 29th Conference, Gotland, April 2001, British Archaeological Reports , 2002, s. 453-461Konferansepaper (Annet vitenskapelig)
    Abstract [en]

    The BUGS Insect Ecology Package was originally constructed (using Dbase and Clipper) to compile Coleoptera (beetle) habitat and distribution data from a myriad of sources into one, easy to use, and publicly available database. Its primary users were researchers and teachers within the palaeoentomology field. The present system, five versions and many revisions later, is built in MS Access 2000, and covers some 5300 species, 2000 references, and 240 sites (archaeological and Quaternary), and is of value to archaeologists, ecologists, and conservationists alike.

    BUGS is essentially a relational database management system constructed around three components:

    - the species data (modern ecology and distribution)

    - the bibliography

    - the site data with species lists

    Its implementation in several institutions has greatly accelerated the efficiency with which palaeoentomological investigations can be carried out, and greatly improved the teaching of the subject.

    Palaeoenvironmental reconstructions are performed by the superimposition of the ecology and distribution of modern insect populations over fossil assemblages. At the moment, this is essentially performed semi-quantitatively by cross-reference of the data (which BUGS collates for a species list and then exports as an RTF file to any word processing package). BUGS contains a wealth of ecological data which can be employed in the interpretation of archaeological sites and contexts. In natural deposits, away from the artificial heat islands created by human activity, insect distributions are essentially constrained by climatic parameters. Tim Atkinson (UEA) and Dave Perry (formerly at Birmingham University) digitally encoded the temperature range data for over 400 species into a program for the calculation of palaeoclimates through the MCR (Mutual Climatic Range) method, and this has been extensively used in the modelling of Quaternary climates from beetle remains. The aim of our present phase of BUGS development is to implement MCR functionality into the BUGS database system. From this point it should be possible to move on to other ecological variables such as habitat and vegetation types, and increase the precision of modern climatic data, thus enhancing the value of insects in archaeological interpretation and the modelling of past climates.

  • 43.
    Buckland, Philip I.
    et al.
    Umeå universitet, Humanistiska fakulteten, Institutionen för idé- och samhällsstudier, Miljöarkeologiska laboratoriet. Umeå universitet, Arktiskt centrum vid Umeå universitet (Arcum).
    Buckland, Paul C.
    Species found as fossils in Quaternary sediments2012Inngår i: Checklist of Beetles of the British Isles / [ed] A.G. Duff, United Kingdom: Pemberley Books , 2012, 2nd, s. 127-130Kapittel i bok, del av antologi (Fagfellevurdert)
    Abstract [en]

    This new checklist is the most up-to-date and comprehensive checklist of the beetle fauna of the British Isles, representing many man-years of effort by leading British coleopterists. The main checklist is fully annotated with detailed endnotes.

  • 44.
    Buckland, Philip I.
    et al.
    Umeå universitet, Humanistiska fakulteten, Institutionen för idé- och samhällsstudier, Miljöarkeologiska laboratoriet.
    Buckland, Paul C.
    When a Waterhole is Full of Dung: An Illustration of the Importance of Environmental Evidence for Refining Archaeological Interpretation of Excavated Features2019Inngår i: Archaeometry, ISSN 0003-813X, E-ISSN 1475-4754, Vol. 61, nr 4, s. 977-990Artikkel i tidsskrift (Fagfellevurdert)
    Abstract [en]

    Prehistoric field systems sometimes encompass excavated, pit-like features which are difficult to classify due to the complex stratigraphies resulting from reuse, infilling and collapse. They are frequently classified as wells and watering holes, but other potential uses for excavated depressions are rarely cited. We argue the need for environmental archaeology in the interpretation of features of this nature, and present a case study from a Bronze Age site at Pode Hole, near Peterborough (UK), where fossil insect material clearly contradicts the archaeological interpretation. We present empirical evidence for a sealed context filled with dung which cannot be interpreted as a water source. This evidence strongly contrasts with other superficially similar features at the site.

  • 45.
    Buckland, Philip I.
    et al.
    Umeå universitet, Humanistiska fakulteten, Institutionen för idé- och samhällsstudier, Miljöarkeologiska laboratoriet.
    Buckland, Paul C.
    Olsson, Fredrik
    Umeå universitet, Humanistiska fakulteten, Institutionen för idé- och samhällsstudier, Miljöarkeologiska laboratoriet.
    Paleoentomology: Insects and other Arthropods in Environmental Archaeology2014Inngår i: The Encyclopedia of Global Archaeology / [ed] Claire Smith, Springer Science+Business Media B.V., 2014, s. 5740-5755Kapittel i bok, del av antologi (Fagfellevurdert)
    Abstract [en]

    Insects are the most diverse group of animals on the planet, and as suchare present in a wider variety of habitats than most other organism groups.This diversity, in addition to a long evolutionary history (Grimaldi &Engel 2005), and together with a propensity to be preserved in both desiccatingand anaerobic environments, has provided an excellent tool for thereconstruction of both Quaternary and more immediate archaeologicalenvironments. Insect remains often provide proxy environmental information onthe immediate context from which the fossils are derived, and as such may beeither complementary to the more regional picture provided by palynology orindicate site conditions, such as levels of hygiene and evidence of tradingconnections, which are rarely available from any other palaeoecological source.They therefore provide information on a broad range of habitats and conditions,on- and off-site, and in addition, in appropriate contexts, also climate.Processing of samples is essentially simple, requiring readily availablematerials, yet is time consuming, and identification of the usuallydisarticulated fragments (sclerites) requires diligence and patience and accessto well curated reference collections. Fortunately, abundant literature,computer software and database tools now exist to aid in their interpretation.

  • 46.
    Buckland, Philip I.
    et al.
    Umeå universitet, Humanistiska fakulteten, Institutionen för idé- och samhällsstudier, Miljöarkeologiska laboratoriet.
    Buckland, Paul C.
    Olsson, Fredrik
    Paleoentomology: insects and other arthropods in environmental archaeology2018Inngår i: Encyclopedia of global archaeology / [ed] Claire Smith, Cham: Springer, 2018, 2Kapittel i bok, del av antologi (Fagfellevurdert)
    Abstract [en]

    Insects are the most diverse group of animals on the planet and as such are present in a wider variety of habitats than most other complex organisms. This diversity, in addition to a long evolutionary history (Grimaldi and Engel 2005), and together with a propensity to be preserved in both desiccating and anaerobic environments, has provided an excellent tool for the reconstruction of both Quaternary and more immediate archaeological environments. Insect remains often provide proxy environmental information on the immediate context from which the fossils are derived, and as such may be either complementary to the more regional picture provided by palynology or indicate site conditions, such as levels of hygiene and evidence of trading connections, which are rarely available from any other palaeoecological source. They therefore provide information on a broad range of habitats and conditions, on- and off-site, and in addition, in appropriate contexts, also climate. Processing of samples is essentially simple, requiring readily available materials, yet is time consuming, and identification of the usually disarticulated fragments (sclerites) requires diligence and patience and access to well-curated reference collections. Fortunately, abundant literature, computer software, and database tools now exist to aid in their interpretation.

  • 47.
    Buckland, Philip I.
    et al.
    Umeå universitet, Humanistiska fakulteten, Arkeologi och samiska studier.
    Buckland, Paul C.
    Panagiotakopulu, Eva
    Sadler, Jon P.
    A Database for Egyptian Entomology2004Inngår i: Bulletin of the Entomological Society of Egypt, ISSN 1110-0885, Vol. 81Artikkel i tidsskrift (Fagfellevurdert)
    Abstract [en]

    EGBUGS, the Egyptian incarnation of the BUGS Coleopteran Ecology Package is a simple yet highly valuable aid to research and education in the fields of entomology and palaeoentomology. The ability to rapidly look up species habitat and distribution data compiled from various sources in itself saves hours of library and internet searching. Added to this is the ability to query habitat data and produce ecologically defined subsets of the EGBUGS dataset, and rapidly summarise the ecology of species found at a particular site, which again are tasks that would take hours to perform manually. It is hoped that the system will greatly benefit those working in the aforementioned fields, and even inspire others to engage in similar activities. The program can be freely downloaded from the BUGS2000 WWW site at http://www.bugs2000.org, and the authors would be grateful for comments, revisions and new data for entry.

  • 48.
    Buckland, Philip I
    et al.
    Umeå universitet, Humanistiska fakulteten, Arkeologi och samiska studier.
    Engelmark, Roger
    Umeå universitet, Humanistiska fakulteten, Arkeologi och samiska studier.
    Linderholm, Johan
    Umeå universitet, Humanistiska fakulteten, Arkeologi och samiska studier.
    Wagner, Patricia
    Environmental archaeological investigation of samples from the Kaupang 2000 excavations2001Rapport (Annet vitenskapelig)
  • 49.
    Buckland, Philip I.
    et al.
    Umeå universitet, Humanistiska fakulteten, Institutionen för idé- och samhällsstudier, Miljöarkeologiska laboratoriet. Umeå universitet, Humanistiska fakulteten, Humlab.
    Eriksson, Erik J.
    Umeå universitet, Humanistiska fakulteten, Institutionen för idé- och samhällsstudier, Miljöarkeologiska laboratoriet.
    Strategic Environmental Archaeology Database (SEAD)2014Inngår i: The Encyclopedia of Global Archaeology / [ed] Claire Smith, Springer Science+Business Media B.V., 2014, s. 7076-7085Kapittel i bok, del av antologi (Fagfellevurdert)
    Abstract [en]

    Environmental archaeology encompasses a wide range of scientific methods for analyzing the results of past human activities, environments, climates and perhaps most importantly, the relationships between these. Many of these methods are referred to as proxy analyses, denoting the illumination of the past as interpreted through the evidence of fossil organisms or properties. These lines of evidence, or proxy data sources, are assumed to reflect past conditions by way of their dependence on them. For example, crops will only grow within a specific climate range; organic waste will lead to increased soil phosphate levels and burning increases magnetic susceptibility. Whilst it is easier to store, manage and analyze the data produced by these methods individually, there is much to be gained from multi-proxy integration at the raw data level. Despite this methodological diversity, the common factors of space, time and context allow us to compare and integrate the results of analyses. This is, however, easier said than done, and without efficient data handling systems the data rapidly become unmanageable. SEAD represents one solution to this problem, and forms a node in an international web of open access paleoenvironmental and archaeological databases which are driving archaeological science into new realms of more complex, multi-site, multi-proxy analyses and meta-analyses. This article sets out to describe the system, the scientific implications of which are covered in Buckland et al. 2010.

  • 50.
    Buckland, Philip I.
    et al.
    Umeå universitet, Humanistiska fakulteten, Institutionen för idé- och samhällsstudier, Miljöarkeologiska laboratoriet.
    Eriksson, Erik J.
    Umeå universitet, Humanistiska fakulteten, Institutionen för idé- och samhällsstudier, Miljöarkeologiska laboratoriet.
    Palm, Fredrik
    Umeå universitet, Humanistiska fakulteten, Humlab.
    SEAD - The Strategic Environmental Archaeology Database: Progress Report Spring 20142014Rapport (Annet vitenskapelig)
    Abstract [en]

    This report provides an overview of the progress and results of the VR:KFI infrastructure projects 2007-7494 and (825-)2010-5976. It should be considered as a status report in an on-going long-term research infrastructure development project.

1234567 1 - 50 of 617
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