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  • 1.
    Alexiadou, Nafsika
    et al.
    Umeå universitet, Samhällsvetenskapliga fakulteten, Institutionen för tillämpad utbildningsvetenskap.
    Hjelmér, Carina
    Umeå universitet, Samhällsvetenskapliga fakulteten, Institutionen för tillämpad utbildningsvetenskap.
    Policy change in ECE in Finland and Sweden2019Konferansepaper (Fagfellevurdert)
    Abstract [en]

    We analyse policy in Finland and Sweden in the post-1970s. Our research questions are: What are the key policies and goals for ECE, and the governance mechanisms in the sector? What are the policy and pedagogical ideas that define policy and change? Finland and Sweden invest substantially on ECE and developed delivery that is regulated by the state (Alila, 2013; Martin-Korpi, 2014). Expansion policies are underpinned by views on children’s' rights, equality and welfare (Vallberg-Roth, 2012). We examine 216 the changing policy ideas and institutional mechanisms for ECE provision and how these are affected by wider policy reforms. We combine two theoretical perspectives: A historical-policy approach on institutional formation (Mahoney & Thelen, 2010); and an examination of the role of ideas in the policy process (Schmidt, 2008). We view policy as dynamic, but also shaped by history, administrative traditions, and policy ideas that can instigate change of policy direction. We employ historical policy analysis. Our methods consist of documentary analysis and compilation of statistics (Alexander, 2000). Ethical consideration is given to a fair and balanced representation of policy documents and literature to avoid bias. Finland and Sweden have followed a similar trajectory of ECE policies, but with: a time-lag in implementation; a distinct approach to quasi-market provision; a different relation towards EU/OECD frameworks. We find that: surface similarities of policy discourses in different countries may hide differences in pedagogical assumptions about practice; and, an understanding of institutional contexts and values is necessary for the successful implementation of ECE reforms.

  • 2.
    Hjelmér, Carina
    Umeå universitet, Samhällsvetenskapliga fakulteten, Institutionen för tillämpad utbildningsvetenskap.
    Att återföra forskning till elever, lärare och rektorer2010Inngår i: Metoder i forsknings- og utviklingsarbeid i utdanning og lærerutdanning: Rapport fra en konferanse mellom Høgskolen i Østfold og Universitetet i Umeå / [ed] Anne-Lise Arnesen & Lisbeth Lundahl, Halden: Allkopi , 2010, s. 67-74Kapittel i bok, del av antologi (Annet vitenskapelig)
  • 3.
    Hjelmér, Carina
    Umeå universitet, Samhällsvetenskapliga fakulteten, Institutionen för tillämpad utbildningsvetenskap.
    Barns inflytande i utvärdering och dokumentation i förskolan2017Inngår i: Artikkel, forskningsoversikt (Annet (populærvitenskap, debatt, mm))
  • 4.
    Hjelmér, Carina
    Umeå universitet, Samhällsvetenskapliga fakulteten, Institutionen för tillämpad utbildningsvetenskap.
    Collective actions in the natural science programme2011Inngår i: Young people's influence and democratic education: ethnographic studies in upper secondary schools / [ed] Elisabet Öhrn, Lisbeth Lundahl & Dennis Beach, London: Tufnell Press, 2011, s. 34-51Kapittel i bok, del av antologi (Fagfellevurdert)
  • 5.
    Hjelmér, Carina
    Umeå universitet, Samhällsvetenskapliga fakulteten, Institutionen för tillämpad utbildningsvetenskap, Barn- och ungdomspedagogik, specialpedagogik och vägledning (BUSV).
    Collective actions in upper secondary school2010Konferansepaper (Fagfellevurdert)
  • 6.
    Hjelmér, Carina
    Umeå universitet, Samhällsvetenskapliga fakulteten, Institutionen för tillämpad utbildningsvetenskap.
    Democracy and critical scrutiny in two upper secondary school programmes2014Konferansepaper (Fagfellevurdert)
    Abstract [en]

    In Sweden the fostering of democratic values has a long history in schools and since the 1990s the question has been put forward as a very important social issue for education. International-comparative studies shows that Sweden and the other Nordic countries in the aspect how to ‘live democracy' in daily school life have a broader definition on democratic education than many other countries (Birzéa et al., 2004). This paper focuses democratic education in Swedish upper secondary school programmes with different gender and social class profiles. It especially covers how democracy and critical scrutiny are presented in the teaching. The analysis in this paper is based on Basil Bernstein's (2000) theories regarding power, control and pedagogic codes, in combination with feminist theories (principally those of Arnot & Dillabough (2000), Skeggs (1997), Gordon (2006) and Walkerdine (1990)). An ethnographic field study has been carried out at a major upper secondary school in Sweden during one school year, 2008-09, with participant observations, conversations, formal interviews and document analyses. The study involves two classes with 50 students (19 males, 31 females) in school year one, one from the Child and Recreation Programme (vocational, traditional female dominated) and one from the Natural Science Programme (academic, equal sex distribution). The democratic education appeared generally to be unplanned and was marginalised in school. Democracy was presented in the form of facts about formal democracy and formal participation in democracy in the future, while a more critical attitude and possible influence strategies for youths were marginalised. The discipline of critical scrutiny was placed within different subject assignments as part of training in a scientific attitude, while teaching was rarely scrutinised. This instruction were also significant different between the classes: the Natural Science class received more extensive and clearer instruction than the Child and Recreation class, a greater emphasis was laid on the benefit of this knowledge in preparation for higher education, and it was presented with a higher level of difficulty, complexity and context independence. These differences are related to the programmes' gender and class profiles and the students' expected positions in society.

  • 7.
    Hjelmér, Carina
    Umeå universitet, Samhällsvetenskapliga fakulteten, Institutionen för tillämpad utbildningsvetenskap.
    Democratic education for competent children?: Ethnographic research in preschools in different local contexts2016Konferansepaper (Fagfellevurdert)
    Abstract [en]

    With the starting point in a planned study about democracy in different preschools, this roundtable invites to a deepened discussion about power relations in democratic fostering of children and the need and value of studying their situation in preschools in different local contexts. In Sweden, as well as in other Nordic countries, preschool is the first important step for many children in the education to be a democratic citizen. The goals in the Swedish curricula are ambitious; girls and boys from different backgrounds shall, for example, have the same possibilities to exercise influence and to learn about, and “to live”, democracy in preschool (Skolverket 2010). How this should be carried out is left to the pedagogues to decide. The democratic commission in the curricula is sometimes contradictory (e.g. solidarity with others and individual freedom of choice), and research from Nordic countries reports that the commission are understood in different ways, and often seen as difficult to implement (Jansen, Johansson & Eriksen Ødegaard 2011). One often emphasized key component for children´s possibilities to participate is to be seen as competent persons. However, what is understood as competent is not neutral, for example, in Kjørholt´s (2008) study, competences that were highly valued in other cultures than the Norwegian, ran the risk of being interpreted as shortcomings.   

    The aim of the planned study is to develop knowledge about democratic fostering in preschools in different local contexts with respect to ethnical and socio-economic circumstances. Of special interest is the content and methods used in the pedagogic practice, as well as the children´s own attempts to influence in preschool. Questions about how democratic subjects are presented in the pedagogic practice, as well as questions about how, and what, the children are promoted to, and themselves try to, influence are focused. Three preschools will be selected to cover a variety of local contexts in terms of ethnicity and socio-economic circumstances, one from a rural area, and two from big cities (one district with a large number of immigrants and one district with a majority of “middle-/upper class”). A critical ethnographic approach will be applied, and the empirical material will consist of observations, conversations, interviews and documents (two months in each preschool). The analyses will focus on power relations such as gender, ethnicity and social class perspectives, and the relation to local contexts. It is central to consider both different groups of children´s attempts to influence, and the power relations in the pedagogic practices, i.e. the relationship between agency and structures in the different environments.

    References

    Jansen, K E, Johansson, E & Eriksen Ødegaard (2011). På jakt etter demokratibegrep i barnehagen. Nordisk barnehageforskning, 4(2), 61-64.

    Kjørholt, A T (2008). Children as new citizens: In the best Interests of the child? I: A James & A L James (eds.) European childhoods: Cultures, politics and childhoods in Europe. New York: Palgrave Macmillan.

    Skolverket (2010). Läroplan för förskolan Lpfö 98. Reviderad 2010. Stockholm: Fritzes.

  • 8.
    Hjelmér, Carina
    Umeå universitet, Samhällsvetenskapliga fakulteten, Institutionen för tillämpad utbildningsvetenskap.
    Democratic fostering for children´s influence in preschool?2017Konferansepaper (Fagfellevurdert)
    Abstract [en]

    In Sweden, as well as in other Nordic countries, preschool is the first important step for many children in their training to be a democratic citizen. The goals in the Swedish curricula are ambitious; girls and boys from different backgrounds shall, for example, have the same possibilities to exercise influence and to learn about, and “to live”, democracy in preschool (Skolverket, 2016). How this should be carried out in the daily activities is left to the pedagogues to decide. The democratic commission in the curricula is sometimes contradictory (e.g. solidarity with others and individual freedom of choice), and research from Nordic countries reports that teachers understand this commission in different ways, and often see it as difficult to implement (Jansen, Johansson & Eriksen Ødegaard 2011). This paper focuses ‘the lived democracy’ in preschools, with a special interest for children´s influence. It covers the processes when teachers invite children to influence, as well as in the children’s own attempts to influence in preschool (how and about what, and the responses of the teachers).

    The analysis in this paper is based on Basil Bernstein’s (2000) theories regarding power, control and pedagogic codes, in combination with pertinent feminist perspectives on democratic education (principally those of Arnot & Dillabough (2000), Arnot & Reay (2007) and Gordon (2006)). An ethnographic field study has been carried out during 2015-16, with participant observations in three preschool groups during two months each, eight group interviews with teacher teams, and eleven interviews with children in small groups. The preschools were selected to cover a diversity of local contexts in terms of ethnicity and socio-economic circumstances, from rural areas, and from districts in big cities (with a large number of immigrants, and with a majority of “middle-/upper class”). In the analyses it is central to consider both different groups of children´s attempts to influence, and the teacher’s invitations in the pedagogic practices. The preliminary result focuses, for example, if the processes of influence are individually or collectively oriented, the teachers´ attitudes to, and their expectations on, children’s´ possibilities to act, and what seem to be a legitimate way to exercise influence if wanting to reach the teachers ears.

     

    References

    Arnot, M & Dillabough, J-A (2000). Challenging democracy: International perspectives on gender, education and citizenship. London: RoutledgeFalmer.

    Arnot, M & Reay, D (2007). A sociology of pedagogic voice: Power, inequality and pupil consultation. Discourse: Studies in the Cultural Politics of Education 28(3), 311-325.

    Bernstein, B (2000). Pedagogy, symbolic control and identity: Theory, research, critique (reviderad upplaga) Lanham, Maryland: Rowman & Littlefield.

    Gordon, T (2006). Girls in education: Citizenship, gender and emotions. Gender and Education 18(1), 1-15.

    Jansen, K E, Johansson, E & Eriksen Ødegaard (2011). På jakt etter demokratibegrep i barnehagen. Nordisk barnehageforskning, 4(2), 61-64.

    Skolverket (2016). Curriculum for the preschool Lpfö 98. Revised 2016. [Läroplan för förskolan Lpfö 98. Reviderad 2016]. Stockholm: Skolverket.

  • 9.
    Hjelmér, Carina
    Umeå universitet, Samhällsvetenskapliga fakulteten, Institutionen för tillämpad utbildningsvetenskap.
    Demokratifostran i förskolan: För individen eller kollektivet?2018Inngår i: , s. 3Artikkel, forskningsoversikt (Annet (populærvitenskap, debatt, mm))
  • 10.
    Hjelmér, Carina
    Umeå universitet, Samhällsvetenskapliga fakulteten, Institutionen för tillämpad utbildningsvetenskap.
    Dokumentation för kontinuerlig utveckling2015Inngår i: Förskoletidningen, ISSN 1402-7135, Vol. 40, nr 6, s. 16-19Artikkel i tidsskrift (Annet vitenskapelig)
  • 11.
    Hjelmér, Carina
    Umeå universitet, Samhällsvetenskapliga fakulteten, Institutionen för tillämpad utbildningsvetenskap.
    Freedom to choose?: Children´s influence in preschools in different local areas2017Konferansepaper (Fagfellevurdert)
    Abstract [en]

    This paper focuses democratic fostering in different preschools from gender perspectives. It covers the teaching in and about democracy, as well as children’s power-positions and their attempts to affect daily preschool activities. Previous research show how teacher’s expectations on, and attitudes to, different children have impact on children’s way of acting (Eidevald 2011), children´s choices are not neutral, but unspoken influenced by gender norms (Ryan 2005), and gendered power-relationships are not statically realised, but vary depending on contexts (Walkerdine 1990). The analysis is based on Basil Bernstein’s (2000) theories regarding power and control, in combination with gender theories (Arnot 2006; Connell 1987). An interpretative and critical ethnographic approach was applied (Beach 2010), with participant observations to cover democratic processes in daily practice, and interviews with teacher teams and children (Hammersley & Atkinson 2007). Preschools in three districts (rural, immigrant, high-income) were analysed as different pedagogic codes (Bernstein), and with varying masculinities and femininities that children adopt (Connell 1987). A consent form including information about the project and informants rights was provided to all parents and teachers involved. Informed consent was negotiated with the children, and pseudonyms replaced the participants’ names. The results show boys and girls who exert influence in all groups. However, whether their agency were perceived as strong or boundless differed due to local context, as well as if the children´s free play choices were traditionally gendered or not. By showing how power relations interacts in preschools, the quality of democratic education for all children may increase.

  • 12.
    Hjelmér, Carina
    Umeå universitet, Samhällsvetenskapliga fakulteten, Institutionen för tillämpad utbildningsvetenskap.
    Individual or collective?: Democratic education in Swedish preschools2018Konferansepaper (Fagfellevurdert)
    Abstract [en]

    This paper focuses democratic education in Swedish preschools regarding children´s individual and collective influence. It covers planned activities, as well as unplanned in the daily life in preschool. A special interest is on instruction in situations when the influence has a collective stamp. Previous research show that preschool staff in Nordic countries foremost understand children´s participation in terms of individual choices and self-determination, which implies that instruction about democracy have an individual, rather than collective orientation (Bae 2010; Emilson & Johansson 2018). The analysis draws on Dillabough and Arnot ´s (2000) theories about democracy, whether the emphasis is on collective justice and struggles for equality or the rights of the individual.  Moreover, Bae´s (2012) concepts moments of democracy, and spacious and narrow interactional patterns, are used. An interpretative and critical ethnographic approach was applied, with participant observations to cover democratic processes in daily practice, and interviews with teacher teams and children (Hammersley & Atkinson 2007). A consent form including information about the project and informants rights was provided to all parents and teachers involved. Informed consent was negotiated with the children, and pseudonyms replaced the participants’ names. The invitations for children to exert influence during planned activities had an individual stamp even regarding group activities such as circle time. In the daily preschool life there were moments of democracy also of a collective character, often unconscious for the staff. By showing moments of democracy regarding children’s individual or collective participation, the quality of democratic education may increase.

  • 13.
    Hjelmér, Carina
    Umeå universitet, Samhällsvetenskapliga fakulteten, Institutionen för tillämpad utbildningsvetenskap.
    Kritik mot standardiserade program för bedömning i förskolan2017Annet (Annet (populærvitenskap, debatt, mm))
    Abstract [sv]

    I takt med att allt fler former av dokumentation och bedömning förs in i svenska förskolor, betonas i forskning vikten av att utveckla kunskap om förtjänster, begränsningar och hur förenliga de olika formerna av dokumentation är med intentionerna i läroplanen.

  • 14.
    Hjelmér, Carina
    Umeå universitet, Samhällsvetenskapliga fakulteten, Institutionen för tillämpad utbildningsvetenskap, Barn- och ungdomspedagogik, specialpedagogik och vägledning (BUSV).
    Leva och lära demokrati?: En etnografisk studie i två gymnasieprogram2012Doktoravhandling, monografi (Annet vitenskapelig)
    Abstract [en]

    The aim of this study is to acquire knowledge regarding democratic education in upper secondary school programmes with different gender and social class profiles. It covers the teaching in and about democracy, pupils’ power-positions and their attempts to affect routine school activities. A particular focus of attention was processes of influence, through which the pupils themselves pursue issues in school. The analysis is based on theories and previous research focused on gender and class perspectives of fostering democracy. Basil Bernstein’s theories regarding power, control and pedagogic codes, in combination with feminist theories (principally those of Arnot, Reay, Skeggs, Gordon and Walkerdine), form the basis of the theoretical framework. Ethnographic methods have been applied, including participatory observations, conversations, interviews, and analysis of relevant documents over one academic year. Two Swedish upper secondary school classes were followed: one from the vocational Child and Recreation Programme and one from the academic Natural Science Programme. Teaching students about democracy and invitations for them to exert influence appeared generally to be unplanned and were marginalised in school. The few invitations that occurred had an individual stamp and focused on pupils’ choices, responsibilities and duties, rather than on their rights in school. Democracy was presented in the form of facts about formal democracy and formal participation in democracy in the future, while a more critical   attitude and possible influence strategies for youths were marginalised. Pupils in both classes wished and attempted to influence teaching, primarily through informal means. There were, however, significant differences between the classes in what they were able to influence. Analysis of pupils’ voices in relation to the pedagogic context revealed that the power relationships in these influence processes depend partly on the focal academic subject. More   importantly, they also differ between the upper secondary school programs, which differ in strength of classification (sensu Bernstein), demands, pace and difficulty levels. These   differences are related, in turn, to whether the programmes are intended to prepare the pupils for higher education and/or a vocation after school. Generally, the Child and Recreation pupils exerted influence more successfully when they wished to reduce the pace and difficulty of lessons than when they wished to get more out of their education, while the opposite applied to the Natural Science class. Who had influence over what was principally   related to the programmes’ gender and class profiles and the pupils’ expected positions in society.

  • 15.
    Hjelmér, Carina
    Umeå universitet, Samhällsvetenskapliga fakulteten, Institutionen för tillämpad utbildningsvetenskap.
    Live and learn democracy? An Ethnographic study in two upper secondary school programmes2013Konferansepaper (Fagfellevurdert)
  • 16.
    Hjelmér, Carina
    Umeå universitet, Samhällsvetenskapliga fakulteten, Institutionen för tillämpad utbildningsvetenskap.
    Mångfald i förskolan ställer krav på den pedagogiska kompetensen2019Inngår i: Artikkel, forskningsoversikt (Annet (populærvitenskap, debatt, mm))
  • 17.
    Hjelmér, Carina
    Umeå universitet, Samhällsvetenskapliga fakulteten, Institutionen för tillämpad utbildningsvetenskap.
    Negotiations in the child and recreation programme2011Inngår i: Young people's influence and democratic education: ethnographic studies in upper secondary schools / [ed] Elisabet Öhrn, Lisbeth Lundahl & Dennis Beach, London: Tufnell Press, 2011, s. 52-70Kapittel i bok, del av antologi (Fagfellevurdert)
  • 18.
    Hjelmér, Carina
    Umeå universitet, Samhällsvetenskapliga fakulteten, Institutionen för tillämpad utbildningsvetenskap, Barn- och ungdomspedagogik, specialpedagogik och vägledning (BUSV).
    Separate worlds: Democratic education in Swedish upper secondary school2010Konferansepaper (Fagfellevurdert)
  • 19.
    Hjelmér, Carina
    Umeå universitet, Samhällsvetenskapliga fakulteten, Institutionen för tillämpad utbildningsvetenskap, Barn- och ungdomspedagogik, specialpedagogik och vägledning (BUSV).
    Who influences what? : Student influence in a vocational upper secondary class2011Konferansepaper (Fagfellevurdert)
  • 20.
    Hjelmér, Carina
    et al.
    Umeå universitet, Samhällsvetenskapliga fakulteten, Institutionen för tillämpad utbildningsvetenskap, Barn- och ungdomspedagogik, specialpedagogik och vägledning (BUSV).
    Lappalainen, Sirpa
    Rosvall, Per-Åke
    Collective actions, alliances and resistance of young people invocational upper secondary education: Cross cultural perspective2009Konferansepaper (Fagfellevurdert)
  • 21.
    Hjelmér, Carina
    et al.
    Umeå universitet, Samhällsvetenskapliga fakulteten, Institutionen för tillämpad utbildningsvetenskap, Barn- och ungdomspedagogik, specialpedagogik och vägledning (BUSV).
    Lappalainen, Sirpa
    Rosvall, Per-Åke
    Time, space and agency in vocational upper secondary education2009Konferansepaper (Fagfellevurdert)
  • 22.
    Hjelmér, Carina
    et al.
    Umeå universitet, Samhällsvetenskapliga fakulteten, Institutionen för tillämpad utbildningsvetenskap.
    Lappalainen, Sirpa
    Unit of Cultural and Feminist Studies, University of Helsinki.
    Rosvall, Per-Åke
    School of Education and Behavioural Sciences, University of Borås.
    Time, space and young people´s agency in vocational upper secondary education: a cross-cultural perspective2010Inngår i: European Educational Research Journal (online), ISSN 1474-9041, E-ISSN 1474-9041, Vol. 9, nr 2, s. 245-256Artikkel i tidsskrift (Fagfellevurdert)
    Abstract [en]

    This article is based on ethnographic studies in the context of vocational education: two in Sweden and one in Finland. The Swedish data originate from the Vehicle programme and the Child and Recreation programme; the Finnish data originate from the social and health-care sector. In this sense, the authors’ perspective is cross-cultural. The article focuses on temporal and spatial dimensions of these three educational contexts and analyzes how young people exhibit their agency when negotiating their time and constructing their own space. The authors’ analysis elucidates how time–space paths in the context of vocational education are classed and gendered. In the female-dominated fields of vocational upper secondary education, disciplinary practices related to time and space are more visible than in the male-dominated fields. Moreover, it is argued that the political atmosphere in Sweden has been more favourable for promoting equality than that in Finland. Despite this, divisions between students and pigeonholing exist in everyday school life.

  • 23.
    Hjelmér, Carina
    et al.
    Umeå universitet, Samhällsvetenskapliga fakulteten, Institutionen för tillämpad utbildningsvetenskap.
    Lappalainen, Sirpa
    Rosvall, Per-Åke
    Umeå universitet, Samhällsvetenskapliga fakulteten, Institutionen för tillämpad utbildningsvetenskap.
    Young people and spatial divisions in upper secondary education: a cross-cultural perspective2014Inngår i: Fair and competitive?: Critical perspectives on contemporary Nordic schooling / [ed] Anne-Lise Arnesen, Elina Lahelma, Lisbeth Lundahl & Elisabet Öhrn, London: Tufnell Press, 2014, s. 85-102Kapittel i bok, del av antologi (Fagfellevurdert)
  • 24.
    Hjelmér, Carina
    et al.
    Umeå universitet, Samhällsvetenskapliga fakulteten, Institutionen för tillämpad utbildningsvetenskap.
    Rosvall, Per-Åke
    Umeå universitet, Samhällsvetenskapliga fakulteten, Institutionen för tillämpad utbildningsvetenskap.
    Does social justice count?: 'Lived democracy' in mathematics classes in diverse Swedish upper secondary programmes2017Inngår i: Journal of Curriculum Studies, ISSN 0022-0272, E-ISSN 1366-5839, Vol. 49, nr 2, s. 216-234Artikkel i tidsskrift (Fagfellevurdert)
    Abstract [en]

    This article analyses what students attending four Swedish upper secondary school programmes with different social class profiles tried and wanted to influence in relation to mathematics teachers' pedagogic practice and responses during the year 2008/9. The theoretical framework is based on Bernstein's theories regarding power and control. The analyses draw on ethnographic observations of classes taking the Natural Science and Social Science academic programmes, and the Vehicle and Child & Recreation vocational programmes, at two Swedish upper secondary schools. Students attending different programmes tried to influence the teaching. However, what the students taking the academic and vocational programmes were able to influence considerably differed. Generally the vocational students exerted influence more successfully when they wanted to reduce the pace and difficulty of teaching, than when they wished to get more out of their education, while the opposite applied to the academic, especially Natural Science, students. Thus, the power relations reflected the programmes' social class profiles and the students' expected positions in society, despite policies at the time to promote democracy and reduce social reproduction in education. The findings support the importance of analysing not only students' voices, but also their voices in relation to the pedagogic practice they encounter.

  • 25.
    Hjelmér, Carina
    et al.
    Umeå universitet, Samhällsvetenskapliga fakulteten, Institutionen för tillämpad utbildningsvetenskap, Barn- och ungdomspedagogik, specialpedagogik och vägledning (BUSV).
    Rosvall, Per-Åke
    Joint work in ethnographic research: Possibilities and obstacles2008Konferansepaper (Fagfellevurdert)
  • 26.
    Rosvall, Per-Åke
    et al.
    Umeå universitet, Samhällsvetenskapliga fakulteten, Institutionen för tillämpad utbildningsvetenskap.
    Hjelmér, Carina
    Umeå universitet, Samhällsvetenskapliga fakulteten, Institutionen för tillämpad utbildningsvetenskap.
    'Lived democracy' in mathematics classes in diverse Swedish upper secondary school programmes2016Inngår i: JustEd: 2nd Biennial JustEd Conference: 'Actors for Social Justice in Education' : 8-9 March 2016, University of Helsinki, Helsinki, Finland : Abstracts, Helsinki: University of Helsinki , 2016, s. 18-19Konferansepaper (Annet vitenskapelig)
  • 27.
    Rosvall, Per-Åke
    et al.
    Umeå universitet, Samhällsvetenskapliga fakulteten, Institutionen för tillämpad utbildningsvetenskap.
    Hjelmér, Carina
    Umeå universitet, Samhällsvetenskapliga fakulteten, Institutionen för tillämpad utbildningsvetenskap.
    Lappalainen, Sirpa
    Institute of Behavioural Sciences, University of Helsinki, Finland.
    Staying in the comfort zones: low expectations in vocational education and training mathematics teaching in Sweden and Finland2017Inngår i: European Educational Research Journal (online), ISSN 1474-9041, E-ISSN 1474-9041, Vol. 16, nr 4, s. 425-439Artikkel i tidsskrift (Fagfellevurdert)
    Abstract [en]

    Vocational education has a historical legacy of being low-status and aimed at producing skilled workers. Students with low marks in comprehensive school are still often guided to the vocational educational track. In this article we examine how mathematics teaching in a vocational educational context is framed (henceforth VET). Therefore, our aim with this article is to explore how teacher responses come into play in school mathematics classes, and the teacher–student interactions within those practices. The empirical material is based on educational ethnographic research, i.e. classroom observations and interviews, conducted in three upper secondary institutions, two in Sweden and one in Finland. The results indicate that both teachers and students seem to remain in what might be called their ‘comfort zones’, i.e. that pedagogic practices tend to strengthen the idea of a vocational learner as being practically oriented; using their hands instead of their heads and in need of care and surveillance. The analysis focuses on mathematics teaching rather than on the content and was chosen because it is associated with general qualifications and the notion of lifelong learning. In this respect it exemplifies the growing tension in VET between workplace and academic knowledge.

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