umu.sePublikasjoner
Endre søk
Begrens søket
1 - 11 of 11
RefereraExporteraLink til resultatlisten
Permanent link
Referera
Referensformat
  • apa
  • ieee
  • modern-language-association-8th-edition
  • vancouver
  • Annet format
Fler format
Språk
  • de-DE
  • en-GB
  • en-US
  • fi-FI
  • nn-NO
  • nn-NB
  • sv-SE
  • Annet språk
Fler språk
Utmatningsformat
  • html
  • text
  • asciidoc
  • rtf
Treff pr side
  • 5
  • 10
  • 20
  • 50
  • 100
  • 250
Sortering
  • Standard (Relevans)
  • Forfatter A-Ø
  • Forfatter Ø-A
  • Tittel A-Ø
  • Tittel Ø-A
  • Type publikasjon A-Ø
  • Type publikasjon Ø-A
  • Eldste først
  • Nyeste først
  • Skapad (Eldste først)
  • Skapad (Nyeste først)
  • Senast uppdaterad (Eldste først)
  • Senast uppdaterad (Nyeste først)
  • Disputationsdatum (tidligste først)
  • Disputationsdatum (siste først)
  • Standard (Relevans)
  • Forfatter A-Ø
  • Forfatter Ø-A
  • Tittel A-Ø
  • Tittel Ø-A
  • Type publikasjon A-Ø
  • Type publikasjon Ø-A
  • Eldste først
  • Nyeste først
  • Skapad (Eldste først)
  • Skapad (Nyeste først)
  • Senast uppdaterad (Eldste først)
  • Senast uppdaterad (Nyeste først)
  • Disputationsdatum (tidligste først)
  • Disputationsdatum (siste først)
Merk
Maxantalet träffar du kan exportera från sökgränssnittet är 250. Vid större uttag använd dig av utsökningar.
  • 1.
    Bernholt, Andrea
    et al.
    Leibniz Institute for Science and Mathematics Education (IPN), Germany.
    Kampa, Nele
    Leibniz Institute for Science and Mathematics Education (IPN), Germany.
    Lindfors, Maria
    Umeå universitet, Samhällsvetenskapliga fakulteten, Pedagogiska institutionen. Umeå universitet, Teknisk-naturvetenskapliga fakulteten, Institutionen för naturvetenskapernas och matematikens didaktik.
    Edelsbrunner, Peter
    ETH Zurich, Switzerland.
    Development of students’ epistemic beliefs profiles across secondary school2019Inngår i: Book of abstracts: EARLI 2019, RWTH Aachen University , 2019, s. 131-132Konferansepaper (Fagfellevurdert)
    Abstract [en]

    Although the field of epistemic cognition is still growing, only few studies so far have dealt with the question of how epistemic beliefs of school children can be described in a valid way, taking different learning opportunities as possibilities for developmental trajectories into account. A valuable research approach to overcome some of the methodological problems might be classifying students into homogeneous groups according to their epistemic beliefs in science. In our study, we ask 1) what kind of science-related epistemic profiles, exist across grades 5 to 12, 2) how these profiles differ with regard to learning related outcomes, and 3) how students’ epistemic belief profiles change during secondary school? A longitudinal survey with two starting cohorts (grades 5 and 9) was administered to secondary school students over a period of 4 years. The results indicate that it is valuable to identify distinctive groups of students with homogenous science-related epistemic belief patterns in both cohorts. Furthermore, results show that the epistemic belief patterns differ with regard to motivational and cognitive outcomes indicating more helpful but also more diametrical patterns of beliefs with respect to science learning in school. Moreover, results of transition analyses strengthen the finding of high stability of students’ beliefs. The results will be discussed with regard to learning opportunities in every-day school live as well as adaptive interventions for specific subgroups of students for a helpful development of students’ beliefs about knowledge and knowing for science learning.

  • 2.
    Bernholt, Andrea
    et al.
    Leibniz Institute for Science and Mathematics Education (IPN), Kiel University, Kiel, Germany.
    Lindfors, Maria
    Umeå universitet, Samhällsvetenskapliga fakulteten, Institutionen för tillämpad utbildningsvetenskap.
    Winberg, Mikael
    Umeå universitet, Teknisk-naturvetenskapliga fakulteten, Institutionen för naturvetenskapernas och matematikens didaktik.
    Students’ epistemic beliefs in Sweden and Germany and their interrelations with classroom characteristics2019Inngår i: Scandinavian Journal of Educational Research, ISSN 0031-3831, E-ISSN 1470-1170, Vol. Published online: 29 Aug 2019Artikkel i tidsskrift (Fagfellevurdert)
    Abstract [en]

    In the field of epistemic belief research, more studies on how these beliefs are formed in different cultural contexts are called for. Moreover, there are strong assumptions that teachers’ instructional practices are paramount to the development of students’ epistemic beliefs. The current study aims at investigating differences between Sweden and Germany in both, and in their relationships. A cross-sectional study was conducted with 4,731 students in Grades 5 through 11. To sum up, latent multi group comparison revealed several differences in the level of students’ beliefs and classroom characteristics. Moreover, latent regression analyses showed that the observed classroom characteristics were significant predictors of students’ beliefs concerning the justification and development of knowledge, and that the prediction pattern differ between countries.

  • 3.
    Bernholt, Andrea
    et al.
    Leibniz Institute for Science and Mathematics Education (IPN), Germany.
    Winberg, Mikael
    Umeå universitet, Teknisk-naturvetenskapliga fakulteten, Institutionen för naturvetenskapernas och matematikens didaktik.
    Lindfors, Maria
    Umeå universitet, Teknisk-naturvetenskapliga fakulteten, Institutionen för naturvetenskapernas och matematikens didaktik.
    Students’ epistemic beliefs in Sweden and Germany: Correlations with classroom characteristics2017Inngår i: Education in the Crossroads of Economy and Politics: Role of Research in the Advancement of Public Good. Book of Abstracts, 2017, s. 678-678Konferansepaper (Fagfellevurdert)
    Abstract [en]

    The study aims at describing students’ epistemic beliefs over school years 5–11, investigating differences between Sweden and Germany regarding the ‘trajectories’ of epistemic beliefs over the grades, and if classroom factors can explain these differences. A cross-sectional survey, covering grades 5–11, was distributed to 1501 students in Sweden and 2839 in Germany to assess their epistemic beliefs and perceived classroom environment in chemistry. Factor analysis revealed four valid constructs for students’ epistemic beliefs and perceived classroom environment, respectively.  A common trend for both countries was an increasing sophistication over grades as to the Certainty of knowledge and an emphasis in all grades on the need for evidence from several sources to make claims of knowing (Justification). Trust in authorities decreased over the grades in Germany, while Swedish students showed similar levels in all grades. Beliefs in dynamic and changing knowledge was strong in both countries, with an increasing trend in Germany while stable in Sweden. Significant correlations between epistemic beliefs and perceived classroom environment were found in both countries, but stronger in Sweden than Germany

  • 4.
    Lindfors, Maria
    Umeå universitet, Teknisk-naturvetenskapliga fakulteten, Institutionen för naturvetenskapernas och matematikens didaktik.
    "Kunskap är vad du vet, och vet du inte kan du alltid googla!": elevers epistemic beliefs i naturvetenskaplig undervisningskontext2018Doktoravhandling, med artikler (Annet vitenskapelig)
    Abstract [en]

    One important goal of science education is to help students develop an adequate understanding of what science is and how it is done. An understanding of science includes epistemic beliefs, that is, individuals’ beliefs about the nature of knowledge, how knowledge is constructed, and how knowledge can be justified. The epistemic beliefs are hypothesized to exist on a continuum ranging from naïve to sophisticated. Students’ epistemic beliefs and their epistemic cognition have been shown to influence various facets of learning. The overarching purpose of this thesis is to contribute to our knowledge and understanding of the role played by epistemic beliefs within the context of science education. The thesis intended to answer the following three general questions within a scientific context: 1) What prerequisites for drawing conclusions about epistemic beliefs are given based on the choice of questionnaire as a measurement method, including its design and content? 2) What is the relation between students’ epistemic beliefs and other phenomena that are important in learning situations? 3) What is the relation between students’ epistemic beliefs and their epistemic practices?

    The studies used both quantitative and qualitative methods to examine students’ epistemic beliefs and epistemic practices. Data sources included questionnaires, video and screen observations, and semi-structured interviews. Participants in the studies were students in Grade 5-11 in Sweden and Germany. A series of four papers address the purpose of the thesis and respond to the three general questions. The first paper investigate relations between students’ epistemic beliefs and perceived classroom characteristics and whether differences could be found between the two countries. The second paper investigate the relative importance of epistemic beliefs dimensions for predicting achievement goals in Grade 5 through 11, in both a cross-sectional and a longitudinal study. The third paper explore the relationships between students’ scientific epistemic beliefs, their problemsolving process, and the quality of solutions produced by students. Finally, the fourth paper describe students’ epistemic practices of problem solving in science and their sense making in the moment, to deepen the understanding of the process of the students’ epistemic cognition. In relation to the first question, results indicate that the chosen measurement method for epistemic beliefs generates certain prerequisites for how epistemic beliefs can be understood and characterized. This in turn may have consequences when epistemic beliefs are studied in relation to, for example, other phenomena and epistemic practices. With regard to the second question, findings show that there are many relationships between epistemic beliefs and other phenomena, but also that they are in many cases context and/or situation dependent. Regarding the third question, the results point out that the relationship between students’ epistemic beliefs and their epistemic practices should be understood by how the students show, through words and actions, that they understand what the situation requires. Thus, there is no universal relationship between sophisticated epistemic beliefs and successful epistemic practices. It can be concluded that students’ epistemic beliefs do not exist in a vacuum without interacting with other phenomena, but that they depend on the surrounding context or situation in different ways. More studies that take into account different types of situations are required. This would in turn most likely also contribute to a better understanding of how students’ epistemic beliefs, epistemic cognition, and epistemic practices develop in relation to the surrounding teaching context.

  • 5.
    Lindfors, Maria
    et al.
    Umeå universitet, Teknisk-naturvetenskapliga fakulteten, Institutionen för naturvetenskapernas och matematikens didaktik.
    Bodin, M.
    Simon, S.
    Unpacking Students’ Epistemic Cognition in a Physics Problem Solving EnvironmentManuskript (preprint) (Annet vitenskapelig)
  • 6.
    Lindfors, Maria
    et al.
    Umeå universitet, Teknisk-naturvetenskapliga fakulteten, Institutionen för naturvetenskapernas och matematikens didaktik.
    Bodin, Madelen
    Umeå universitet, Teknisk-naturvetenskapliga fakulteten, Institutionen för naturvetenskapernas och matematikens didaktik.
    Simon, Shirley
    Unpacking students’ epistemic cognition in a problem solving environment2017Konferansepaper (Fagfellevurdert)
    Abstract [en]

    It is a widely held view that students’ epistemic beliefs influence the way they learn and think in any given context. However, in the science learning context, the relation between the sophistication of epistemic beliefs and success in scientific practice is sometimes ambiguous. Taking this inconsistency as a point of departure, we examined the relationships between students’ scientific epistemic beliefs (SEB), their epistemic practices, and hence their epistemic cognition in a computer simulation in classical mechanics. The 19 tenth grade students’ manipulations of the simulation, spoken comments, behavior, and embodied communication were screen and video-recorded and subsequently described and coded by an inductive approach. The screen and video recordings were triangulated with a stimulated recall interview to access a broader understanding of the dynamic processes of epistemic cognition. Our findings focusing on three different students reveal a dynamic pattern of interactions between SEB and knowledge, i.e., epistemic cognition, showing how epistemic cognition can be understood in a specific problem solving context due to the actions the student express.

  • 7.
    Lindfors, Maria
    et al.
    Umeå universitet, Teknisk-naturvetenskapliga fakulteten, Institutionen för naturvetenskapernas och matematikens didaktik.
    Bodin, Madelen
    Umeå universitet, Teknisk-naturvetenskapliga fakulteten, Institutionen för naturvetenskapernas och matematikens didaktik.
    Simon, Shirley
    Unpacking students’ epistemic cognition in a problem-solving environment2017Konferansepaper (Fagfellevurdert)
    Abstract [en]

    It is a widely held view that students’ epistemic beliefs influence the way they learn and think in any given context. However, in the science learning context, the relation between the sophistication of epistemic beliefs and success in scientific practice is sometimes ambiguous. Taking this inconsistency as a point of departure, we examined the relationships between students’ scientific epistemic beliefs (SEB), their epistemic practices, and hence their epistemic cognition in a computer simulation in classical mechanics. The 19 tenth grade students’ manipulations of the simulation, spoken comments, behavior, and embodied communication were screen and video-recorded and subsequently described and coded by an inductive approach. The screen and video recordings were triangulated with a stimulated recall interview to access a broader understanding of the dynamic processes of epistemic cognition. Our findings focusing on three different students reveal a dynamic pattern of interactions between SEB and knowledge, i.e., epistemic cognition, showing how epistemic cognition can be understood in a specific problem solving context due to the actions the student express.

  • 8.
    Lindfors, Maria
    et al.
    Umeå universitet, Teknisk-naturvetenskapliga fakulteten, Institutionen för naturvetenskapernas och matematikens didaktik. Umeå universitet, Samhällsvetenskapliga fakulteten, Pedagogiska institutionen.
    Roos, Helena
    Linneus university, Sweden.
    Bagger, Anette
    Umeå universitet, Teknisk-naturvetenskapliga fakulteten, Institutionen för naturvetenskapernas och matematikens didaktik. Umeå universitet, Teknisk-naturvetenskapliga fakulteten, Umeå forskningscentrum för matematikdidaktik (UFM). Umeå universitet, Samhällsvetenskapliga fakulteten, Institutionen för tillämpad utbildningsvetenskap.
    The nature of knowing and students in need of special education2019Inngår i: Book of abstracts: EARLI 2019, RWTH Aachen University , 2019, s. 142-142Konferansepaper (Fagfellevurdert)
    Abstract [en]

    The purpose of this research is to explore teachers’ mathematical epistemic beliefs in relation to students in need of special education in mathematics (SEM-students). Teachers’ views on the subject and the students in need are central aspects for the support (Scherer, Beswick, DeBlois, Healey & Opitz, 2016). In more detail, the interest lies in revealing the epistemologies of teachers’ beliefs on the nature of knowing in two very different educational practices: the general situation of the teaching and learning and in the practice of national testing. The research process is guided by four steps: 1; The identification of statements regarding the justification of and source of knowledge 2; The explanatory paraphrasing into groups of statements. 3; A search for concurrence, differences and patterns within and between groups. 4. Finally, a summary of what is characteristic for the nature of knowing in mathematics in relation to SEM-students in these two practices is given.

  • 9.
    Lindfors, Maria
    et al.
    Umeå universitet, Teknisk-naturvetenskapliga fakulteten, Institutionen för naturvetenskapernas och matematikens didaktik.
    Winberg, Mikael
    Umeå universitet, Teknisk-naturvetenskapliga fakulteten, Institutionen för naturvetenskapernas och matematikens didaktik.
    Bodin, Madelen
    Umeå universitet, Teknisk-naturvetenskapliga fakulteten, Institutionen för naturvetenskapernas och matematikens didaktik.
    The role of scientific epistemic beliefs in computer-simulated problem solving2016Konferansepaper (Annet vitenskapelig)
    Abstract [en]

    Research has shown that students’ epistemic beliefs influence the way they learn, think and reason in any given context (Schommer-Aikins, 2004). However, in the science learning context, the relationship between the level of epistemic sophistication, learning, and learning outcomes is sometimes ambiguous (Elby & Hammer, 2001). Taking this result as a point of departure, we examined the relationships between students’ scientific epistemic beliefs (SEB), their approaches to a computer simulated task, and the quality of their solutions. 19 tenth grade students, with different SEB, were selected to participate in a constructionist computer-simulation in classical mechanics. Constructionist learning environments emphasize the scope for students’ to take control of their own learning, draw their own conclusions, and use their own knowledge in order to construct objects (Harel & Papert, 1991). Students’ manipulations of the simulation and any spoken comments were video-recorded and subsequently coded by an inductive approach. Relationships between students’ SEB and problem solving quality were explored by hierarchical orthogonal partial least squares analysis. The results revealed that different sets of SEB were conducive to different aspects of students’ problem solving process and outcomes.  Theoretically sophisticated beliefs were in general associated with logical strategies and high solution complexity. However, our results suggest that there might not be a universal relationship between the degree of theoretical sophistication of students’ SEB and quality of learning outcomes. The relationship can only be understood in terms of the actions they induce, and the results of these actions. It is therefore of great importance to further explore the productiveness of SEB in different types of learning situations.

  • 10.
    Lindfors, Maria
    et al.
    Umeå universitet, Teknisk-naturvetenskapliga fakulteten, Institutionen för naturvetenskapernas och matematikens didaktik.
    Winberg, Mikael
    Umeå universitet, Teknisk-naturvetenskapliga fakulteten, Institutionen för naturvetenskapernas och matematikens didaktik.
    Bodin, Madelen
    Umeå universitet, Teknisk-naturvetenskapliga fakulteten, Institutionen för naturvetenskapernas och matematikens didaktik.
    The role of students' scientific epistemic beliefs in computer-simulated problem solving2019Inngår i: Scandinavian Journal of Educational Research, ISSN 0031-3831, E-ISSN 1470-1170, Vol. 63, nr 1, s. 124-144Artikkel i tidsskrift (Fagfellevurdert)
    Abstract [en]

    Research on how epistemic beliefs influence students' learning in different contexts is ambiguous. Given this, we have examined the relationships between students' scientific epistemic beliefs, their problem solving, and solutions in a constructionist computer-simulation in classical mechanics. The problem solving process and performance of 19 tenth grade students, with different scientific epistemic beliefs, was video recorded and inductively coded. Quantitative analysis revealed that different sets of epistemic beliefs were conducive to different aspects of students' problem solving process and outcomes.  Theoretically sophisticated beliefs were in general associated with logical strategies and high solution complexity. However, authority dependence was associated with high degree of adherence to instructions. Hence, there might not be a universal relationship between theoretical sophistication of students' epistemic beliefs and quality of learning outcomes. We suggest that the conduciveness to desired outcomes is a better measure of sophistication than theoretical non-contextualized a priori assumptions.

  • 11.
    Winberg, Mikael T.
    et al.
    Umeå universitet, Teknisk-naturvetenskapliga fakulteten, Institutionen för naturvetenskapernas och matematikens didaktik.
    Hofverberg, Anders
    Umeå universitet, Teknisk-naturvetenskapliga fakulteten, Institutionen för naturvetenskapernas och matematikens didaktik.
    Lindfors, Maria
    Umeå universitet, Teknisk-naturvetenskapliga fakulteten, Institutionen för naturvetenskapernas och matematikens didaktik.
    Relationships between epistemic beliefs and achievement goals: developmental trends over grades 5–112019Inngår i: European Journal of Psychology of Education, ISSN 0256-2928, E-ISSN 1878-5174, Vol. 34, nr 2, s. 295-315Artikkel i tidsskrift (Fagfellevurdert)
    Abstract [en]

    Examining how students' epistemic beliefs (EB) influence their cognition is central to EB research. Recently, the relation between students' EB and their motivation has gained attention. In the present study, we investigate the development of the relationship between students' EB and their achievement goals (AG) over grades 5–11. Previous studies on this topic are limited, in both number and range, and have produced inconsistent results. We performed a cross-sectional study, ranging over grades 5–11, and a 3-year longitudinal study (n = 1230 and 323, respectively). Data on students' EB and AG were collected via questionnaires. Confirmatory factor analysis (CFA) supported a two-factor goal model (Mastery and Performance goals) and a structure of students' EB comprising Certainty, Source, Development, and Justification. For each grade, students' CFA scores on the respective goals were regressed on their scores on the EB dimensions by orthogonal projection to latent structures analysis. Although results indicated a weak relation between students' EB and AG, trends in the cross-sectional data were largely replicated in the longitudinal study. Though naïve EB were in general associated with performance goals and sophisticated EB with mastery goals, the transition to upper secondary school was associated with changes in the relationship between students' EB and AG. We discuss how the commonly used formulations of EB items may affect their ability to measure the naïve-sophisticated continuum, in turn affecting the predictive roles of EB dimensions.

1 - 11 of 11
RefereraExporteraLink til resultatlisten
Permanent link
Referera
Referensformat
  • apa
  • ieee
  • modern-language-association-8th-edition
  • vancouver
  • Annet format
Fler format
Språk
  • de-DE
  • en-GB
  • en-US
  • fi-FI
  • nn-NO
  • nn-NB
  • sv-SE
  • Annet språk
Fler språk
Utmatningsformat
  • html
  • text
  • asciidoc
  • rtf