umu.sePublikationer
Ändra sökning
Avgränsa sökresultatet
1 - 6 av 6
RefereraExporteraLänk till träfflistan
Permanent länk
Referera
Referensformat
  • apa
  • ieee
  • modern-language-association-8th-edition
  • vancouver
  • Annat format
Fler format
Språk
  • de-DE
  • en-GB
  • en-US
  • fi-FI
  • nn-NO
  • nn-NB
  • sv-SE
  • Annat språk
Fler språk
Utmatningsformat
  • html
  • text
  • asciidoc
  • rtf
Träffar per sida
  • 5
  • 10
  • 20
  • 50
  • 100
  • 250
Sortering
  • Standard (Relevans)
  • Författare A-Ö
  • Författare Ö-A
  • Titel A-Ö
  • Titel Ö-A
  • Publikationstyp A-Ö
  • Publikationstyp Ö-A
  • Äldst först
  • Nyast först
  • Skapad (Äldst först)
  • Skapad (Nyast först)
  • Senast uppdaterad (Äldst först)
  • Senast uppdaterad (Nyast först)
  • Disputationsdatum (tidigaste först)
  • Disputationsdatum (senaste först)
  • Standard (Relevans)
  • Författare A-Ö
  • Författare Ö-A
  • Titel A-Ö
  • Titel Ö-A
  • Publikationstyp A-Ö
  • Publikationstyp Ö-A
  • Äldst först
  • Nyast först
  • Skapad (Äldst först)
  • Skapad (Nyast först)
  • Senast uppdaterad (Äldst först)
  • Senast uppdaterad (Nyast först)
  • Disputationsdatum (tidigaste först)
  • Disputationsdatum (senaste först)
Markera
Maxantalet träffar du kan exportera från sökgränssnittet är 250. Vid större uttag använd dig av utsökningar.
  • 1.
    Back, Andreas
    Umeå universitet, Samhällsvetenskapliga fakulteten, Institutionen för geografi och ekonomisk historia, Kulturgeografi.
    Den mångsidiga fritidshusturismen2018Ingår i: Ikaros, ISSN 1796-1998, nr 1, s. 9-13Artikel i tidskrift (Övrig (populärvetenskap, debatt, mm))
  • 2.
    Back, Andreas
    Umeå universitet, Samhällsvetenskapliga fakulteten, Institutionen för geografi.
    Temporary resident evil?: Managing diverse impacts of second-home tourism2019Ingår i: Current Issues in Tourism, ISSN 1368-3500, E-ISSN 1747-7603Artikel i tidskrift (Refereegranskat)
    Abstract [en]

    Second-home tourism is a popular form of tourism in many countries. Sweden has over 600,000 second homes and more than half of the population have access to such properties. Previous literature on second-home tourism indicates that it impacts local communities and municipalities in many different ways, ranging from public services and land-use planning to the housing market and the local economy. However, it has not been sufficiently investigated how, where and by which spatial patterns these impacts might come into effect. Previous research has mostly been in the form of case studies, making generalizations difficult. This paper examines whether a theorized heterogeneity of second-home landscapes transfers into actual spatial variance in the impacts of second-home tourism. The investigation is done through semi-structured interviews with officials from 20 Swedish municipalities, selected using a theoretical model and comprehensive quantitative data. Results reveal considerable variance between different locations and argues for more context-aware second-home research.

  • 3.
    Back, Andreas
    et al.
    Umeå universitet, Samhällsvetenskapliga fakulteten, Institutionen för geografi och ekonomisk historia, Kulturgeografi. Umeå University.
    Marjavaara, Roger
    Umeå universitet, Samhällsvetenskapliga fakulteten, Institutionen för geografi och ekonomisk historia, Kulturgeografi.
    Mapping an invisible population: the uneven geography of second-home tourism2017Ingår i: Tourism Geographies, ISSN 1461-6688, E-ISSN 1470-1340, Vol. 19, nr 4, s. 596-611Artikel i tidskrift (Refereegranskat)
    Abstract [en]

    Second-home tourism is a very popular form of tourism in many countries, particularly in the Nordic countries. More than half of the Swedish population have access to second homes. Previous studies have revealed that there is great variation between different second homes. Examples range from rustic Australian shacks, lonely cabins in the Norwegian mountains, spacious Swedish archipelago villas and palatial Russian dachas. Still, second homes are often seen and analysed as a unitary category – a perspective that obscures the considerable heterogeneity within the category as well as spatial differences in the impact of second-home tourism. Using a second-home typology from previous research and data on about 660,000 second homes, we analyse the heterogeneity of second homes by mapping the composition of the Swedish second-home stock. Results show the uneven geography of second-home tourism, revealing significant and sometimes steep differences between peripheral areas and urban hinterlands, tourism hot-spots, and areas in decline. Based on these results, we assert that there is good cause to move away from using second homes as a unitary category. Instead, we argue for viewing second homes as an umbrella concept with dwelling use in focus. This enables a greater sensibility to place and more accurate analyses of the uneven impacts of second-home tourism. The results also give greater insights into the impact of the ‘invisible population’ of second-home owners from a public planning perspective.

  • 4.
    Hoogendoorn, Gijsbert
    et al.
    University of Johannesburg.
    Back, Andreas
    Umeå universitet, Samhällsvetenskapliga fakulteten, Institutionen för geografi.
    Snowballing in 35oC: an inquiry into second-home tourism in Mozambique2019Ingår i: Tourism, ISSN 1332-7461, Vol. 67, nr 3, s. 311-317Artikel i tidskrift (Refereegranskat)
    Abstract [en]

    Increased mobility has played an important role in promoting and developing tourism as a global phenomenon. One result since the late 1990s has been the development of the well-researched second-home tourism phenomenon in the Global North. Fewer studies on second-home tourism have been carried out in the Global South, especially in the least developed countries (LDCs). The difficulty of collecting reliable data in LDCs is presented as a key contributing factor to the lack of studies. Whereas researchers in, for example, the Nordic countries have access to comprehensive public registries of second homes enabling large-scale data-driven research, studying this phenomenon in data-poor contexts requires appropriate fieldwork methods and strategies. The following research note discusses snowballing and participant observation methods employed in fieldwork on second-home tourism in two small coastal Mozambican towns. It concludes with a brief discussion on the findings and the prospects for future research in historically and socio-economically comparable locations.

  • 5.
    Marjavaara, Roger
    et al.
    Umeå universitet, Samhällsvetenskapliga fakulteten, Institutionen för geografi.
    Müller, Dieter K.
    Umeå universitet, Samhällsvetenskapliga fakulteten, Institutionen för geografi.
    Back, Andreas
    Umeå universitet, Samhällsvetenskapliga fakulteten, Institutionen för geografi.
    Från sommarnöje till Airbnb: en översikt av svensk fritidshusforskning2019Ingår i: Turismen och resandets utmaningar / [ed] Sandra Wall-Reinius och Susanna Heldt Cassel, Stockholm: Svenska sällskapet för antropologi och geografi , 2019, s. 53-77Kapitel i bok, del av antologi (Övrigt vetenskapligt)
  • 6.
    Åkerlund, Ulrika
    et al.
    Karlstads universitet, Institutionen för geografi, medier och kommunikation.
    Back, Andreas
    Umeå universitet, Samhällsvetenskapliga fakulteten, Institutionen för geografi.
    Turism på landsbygden - en betydande näring2019Ingår i: Samhällsplaneringens teori och praktik / [ed] Gunnel Forsberg, Stockholm: Liber, 2019, 1, s. 235-244Kapitel i bok, del av antologi (Övrigt vetenskapligt)
1 - 6 av 6
RefereraExporteraLänk till träfflistan
Permanent länk
Referera
Referensformat
  • apa
  • ieee
  • modern-language-association-8th-edition
  • vancouver
  • Annat format
Fler format
Språk
  • de-DE
  • en-GB
  • en-US
  • fi-FI
  • nn-NO
  • nn-NB
  • sv-SE
  • Annat språk
Fler språk
Utmatningsformat
  • html
  • text
  • asciidoc
  • rtf