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  • 101.
    Hall, C. Michael
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Social and Economic Geography.
    Tourism: Rethinking the Social Science of Mobility2005Book (Other academic)
  • 102. Hall, C. Michael
    et al.
    Müller, Dieter K.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Social and Economic Geography.
    Second homes: curse or blessing?2004In: Tourism, Mobility and Second Homes: Between Elite Landscape and Common Ground, Channel View, Clevedon , 2004, p. 3-14Chapter in book (Other academic)
  • 103. Hall, C. Michael
    et al.
    Müller, Dieter K.Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Social and Economic Geography.
    Tourism, Mobility and Second Homes: Between Elite Landscape and Common Ground2004Collection (editor) (Other academic)
  • 104. Hall, C. Michael
    et al.
    Müller, Dieter K.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Social and Economic Geography.
    Saarinen, Jarkko
    Nordic Tourism: Issues and Cases2009Book (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Tourism is a major industry in the Nordic countries (Denmark, Finland, Iceland, Norway and Sweden) as well as a growing field of academic study. For many cities and regions tourism is also increasingly recognised as being integral to economic, social and sustainable development. In addition, tourism also contributes to Nordic identity through destination promotion and tourism activities, including winter tourism and the tradition of access to common land, as well as specific forms of tourism, such as second homes.

    This book is the first comprehensive and accessible introduction to tourism in the region that links Nordic tourism research and concerns with key concept in tourism studies. The book consists of eleven chapters dealing with issues ranging from marketing and policy to nature-based tourism, culture and the contribution of tourism to environmental change. The inclusion of case studies from leading Nordic researchers on specific destinations, attractions, resources, sectors and developments also provide a valuable learning tool for all students of tourism.

  • 105.
    Hall, C. Michael
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Social and Economic Geography.
    Rath, Jan
    Tourism, migration and place advantage in the global cultural economy2007In: Tourism, Ethnic diversity, and the City / [ed] Jan Rath, London: Routledge, 2007, p. 1-24Chapter in book (Refereed)
  • 106.
    Hansson, Lars
    et al.
    Lunds tekniska universitet.
    Westin, Kerstin
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Social and Economic Geography.
    Tidsdifferentierade taxor i kollektivtrafiken1990Report (Other academic)
  • 107.
    Haugen, Katarina
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Social and Economic Geography.
    Pendling mellan Umeå och Örnsköldsvik – en studie av arbets- och utbildningsrelaterade resor2005Report (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
  • 108.
    Haugen, Katarina
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Social and Economic Geography.
    The accessibility paradox: Everyday geographies of proximity, distance and mobility2012Doctoral thesis, comprehensive summary (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    This thesis aims to explore the importance of proximity and mobility, respectively, for individuals’ accessibility, as well as the relationship between these two key spatial dimensions of accessibility in the context of everyday life. The thesis is based upon three empirical research papers which focus on accessibility-related preferences, actual accessibility conditions, and travel patterns. Focus is directed towards the spatial relationships between individuals’ residential location vis-à-vis the location of a selection of different amenities including work, education, service and leisure functions as well as social relations. The analyses are based on a wide range of quantitative data, including questionnaire surveys as well as official register data for the Swedish population.

         The first paper shows that residential proximity to amenities was most valued by individuals in the case of social relations and basic daily activities. The level of satisfaction with current accessibility conditions was generally high, with the exception of social relations where the findings suggest the existence of a ‘proximity deficit’. The second paper shows that observed average distances to most amenities have decreased over time (1995–2005). Concerning service amenities, the increases in proximity over the period were primarily due to a restructuring of the localization patterns within the service sector. A comparison of potential accessibility conditions and actual travel patterns revealed that people tend to travel farther than to the nearest amenity options, presumably to a large extent because of selective individual preferences, which may downplay the importance of distance in destination choice. The third paper shows that although the numerical supply of amenities within different spatial ranges has a significant influence on how far individuals travel for service errands, supply size alone is not sufficient for explaining travel length. The findings also suggest that although people tend to utilize the supply of amenities available locally, they are also willing to extend their travel distance in order to reach the amenity supply available within the region. Thus, even when there is a local supply, a rich regional supply may induce longer trips.

         A juxtaposition of the findings of the three empirical studies suggests the existence of an ‘accessibility paradox’ with several facets. First, although people express an affinity for residential proximity to many amenities, this is not necessarily reflected in actual destination choices, since minimization of travel distance is apparently not always a key criterion. This is also suggested by the conclusion that the spatial structure of the amenity supply alone accounts for only a relatively small part of the explanation of travel length, which is influenced by many other factors. In addition, actual travel distances show an increasing trend over time despite the concurrent reductions in potential distances. Second, the development over time indicates that the proximity deficit regarding social relations may be increasing in the sense that average distances have increased to many of the amenities considered important to have nearby, for instance adult children, but have decreased to those where proximity is not considered particularly important. Third, there is a discrepancy between the observed trend towards increased proximity to many amenities and much of the general discourse on accessibility, which tends to emphasize deteriorating conditions. 

  • 109.
    Haugen, Katarina
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Social and Economic Geography.
    The advantage of 'near': Which accessibilities matter to whom?2011In: European Journal of Transport and Infrastructure Research, ISSN 1567-7133, E-ISSN 1567-7141, Vol. 11, no 4, p. 368-388Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This paper explores people’s preferences for living close to destinations such as work, service, leisure and social activities, satisfaction with the proximities offered by their residential location, as well as more general residential satisfaction. The paper draws on the literature on accessibility, residential choice and residential preferences, and is empirically based on a survey targeted at individuals aged 20-64 in the Swedish population. The results suggest that ‘proximity preferences’ are structured by both practical and social rationales. Preferences also differ to varying degrees between groups with respect to gender, age and type of residential environment. Self-reported distances are short for virtually all destina-tions except those relating to social relations. People’s satisfaction with their residential location relative to their everyday life accessibility needs is also explored in regression analyses. The findings imply that residential location satisfaction is related to type of resi-dential environment, dwelling type/tenure, whether the respondents had considered mov-ing to increase the proximity to certain destinations, and their level of satisfaction with the distances from home to various destinations.

  • 110.
    Haugen, Katarina
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Social and Economic Geography.
    Holm, Einar
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Social and Economic Geography.
    Häggström Lundevaller, Erling
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Social and Economic Geography. Statistics.
    Westin, Kerstin
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Social and Economic Geography.
    Friska, småkrassliga och sjuka2006In: Sjukförsäkring, kulturer och attityder - Fyra aktörers perspektiv, Försäkringskassan , 2006Chapter in book (Refereed)
  • 111.
    Haugen, Katarina
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Social and Economic Geography.
    Holm, Einar
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Social and Economic Geography.
    Häggström Lundevaller, Erling
    Statistics. Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Social and Economic Geography.
    Westin, Kerstin
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Social and Economic Geography.
    Individer, attityder och ohälsa2006In: Sjukförsäkring, kulturer och attityder - Fyra aktörers perspektiv, Försäkringskassan , 2006Chapter in book (Refereed)
  • 112.
    Haugen, Katarina
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Social and Economic Geography.
    Holm, Einar
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Social and Economic Geography.
    Häggström Lundevaller, Erling
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Statistics. Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Social and Economic Geography.
    Westin, Kerstin
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Social and Economic Geography.
    Localised attitudes matter: a study of sickness absence in Sweden2008In: Population, Space and Place, ISSN 1544-8444, E-ISSN 1544-8452, Vol. 14, no 3, p. 189-207Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The central issues explored in this article are the importance of geographical location in explaining the attitudes of individuals, and the interplay between these attitudes and overt behaviour. The context is as follows: In the late 1990's, sick-listings in Sweden underwent a substantial increase, causing the public expenses for the general sickness insurance to soar. Moreover, the extent of the usage of the insurance was found to vary significantly across different regions within the country. This development of the sickness insurance generally, and the regional differences specifically, have since been the subject of an intense debate. Differences and/or changes in attitudes toward sick leave within the population have been proposed as possible reasons for the regional variations. Much of the discussion has, however, been based on speculative arguments rather than empirical studies. Using data from a survey conducted in 2005, this research explores whether geographical location influences individual attitudes toward sick leave, and whether these attitudes in turn influence the sickness absence of individuals. The data are analysed using factor analysis, ordinary linear regressions and logistic regressions. The results provide some support for the idea that geographical factors matter to individual attitudes, and that variation in these attitudes is in turn associated with propensity for sickness absence. Copyright © 2008 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  • 113.
    Haugen, Katarina
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Social and Economic Geography.
    Holm, Einar
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Social and Economic Geography.
    Strömgren, Magnus
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Social and Economic Geography.
    Westin, Kerstin
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Social and Economic Geography.
    Changes in accessibility 1995-20052009In: Paper presented at the NECTAR Cluster on Accessibility, Cagliari, Italy, Cagliari, 2009Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 114.
    Haugen, Katarina
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Social and Economic Geography. Transportation Research Unit (TRUM).
    Westin, Kerstin
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Social and Economic Geography. Transportation Research Unit (TRUM).
    Framtidens lastbilschaufförer - en förstudie2005Report (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
  • 115.
    Haugen, Katarina
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Social and Economic Geography.
    Westin, Kerstin
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Social and Economic Geography.
    The Advantage of Near.2008Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 116.
    Hedkvist, Fred
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Social and Economic Geography. Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Centre for Regional Science (CERUM).
    Great Expectations: Russian Attitudes to the Barents Region Co-operation2001Report (Other academic)
  • 117.
    Hedkvist, Fred
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Social and Economic Geography. Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Centre for Regional Science (CERUM).
    Weissglas, Gösta
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Social and Economic Geography. Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Centre for Regional Science (CERUM).
    Regionalisation in North-Western Europe: Spatial Planning or Building a Frame for Development Co-operation The Case of the Barents Region2001Report (Other academic)
  • 118. Helgesson, Anita
    et al.
    Johansson, Ulla-Britt
    Walther-Stenmark, Karin
    Eriksson, John
    Strömgren, Magnus
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Social and Economic Geography.
    Karlsson, Roger
    Faculty of Medicine, Public Health and Clinical Medicine.
    Coordinated care planning for elderly patients using videoconferencing2005In: Journal of Telemedicine and Telecare, ISSN 1357-633X, Vol. 11, no 2, p. 85-92Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    We studied the transfer of information during coordinated care planning between a university hospital and a local health care centre/social welfare department about 35 km away. During a seven-month study period, 10 sessions were conducted by videoconferencing and seven sessions were conducted by face-to-face conferencing. Videoconferencing reduced the time required for each coordinated care-planning session from an average of 60 to 45 min. There was also an increase in the number of participating professional categories. Travel time for the staff in the face-to-face group was 60-180 min each. Use of a care-planning report during the sessions resulted in improved quality of documentation, which contributed to better care following discharge. The technical problems that occurred did not detract from the beneficial experience of participating. Interviews with next of kin showed that they had been able to influence the content of the care during the care-planning sessions. Videoconferencing proved useful in coordinated care planning. It resulted in time saved due to reduced travel time, participation by more staff categories and an enhancement of the documentation quality.

  • 119.
    Helgesson, Linda
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Social and Economic Geography.
    Getting Ready for Life: Life Strategies of Town Youth in Mozambique and Tanzania2006Doctoral thesis, monograph (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    The aim of this dissertation is to explore how and under what conditions life strategies of young men and women unfold in the towns of Masasi in southern Tanzania and Montepuez in northern Mozambique. These towns are located in regions which in their national contexts are perceived as peripheral and rural. The thesis examines the life strategies of youth, with particular emphasis on livelihood, education and mobility. How the life strategies can be related to the representations of young people in national and local discourses, and how global processes are involved in young people’s daily lives are also examined. The fieldwork was conducted between 2002 and 2004 and the main part of the empirical material consists of structured and semi-structured interviews.

    Many young people are under substantial pressure to support themselves and their families, but a conflict exists between the expectations on youth to contribute to the household economy and their possibilities to do so. There is also a contradiction between being needed for labour and being trusted with responsibilities. Harsh economic conditions, combined with a weak position in terms of power, increase the vulnerability of young people in these places.

    Global processes influence young people’s lives, primarily expressed through changed patterns of consumption. However, there is a feeling of exclusion from globalisation in terms of work. Self-employment is promoted as a solution to poverty by the government and by various organisations, but young people contest this discourse and demand ‘real’ employment for themselves and for their children. Young people’s mobility experiences are mainly local due to a local social network and limited resources. Those with larger resources tend to be more mobile and the more privileged youth aspire to move to the larger cities or abroad. Agriculture is a complementary livelihood strategy, which implies that the rural economy still has an important function as a safety net within the urban landscape.

  • 120.
    Helgesson, Linda
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Social and Economic Geography. Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Centre for Regional Science (CERUM).
    Why Some Girls Go to School and Others Don’t2000Report (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Girls are in minority in primary schools in Mozambique, a pattern that can be seen in most Sub-Saharan countries. The aim of this qualitative study is to examine why there are few girls in the Mozambican schools. The area chosen for the field study is the small town Montepuez in the Cabo Delgado province, northern Mozambique and the school level is upper primary school, i.e. grade 6 and 7 . In the study, factors involved with whether or not girls go to school have been looked into and to some extent, a comparison between girls’- and boys’ schooling situation has been made. An attempt to identify patterns in both urban and rural areas regarding the education of girls has also been made. The theoretical framework consists of the constraints used in Timegeography: capability , coupling and authority constraints, but a few complementary theories have also been used: The life course theory, the importance of social networks and the value of cultural capital. The social situation differs between rural and urban areas and so does the schooling situation. Montepuez is a small town with both rural and urban characters and therefore a comparison between rural and urban schooling situations was partly made possible. The predominant activity is agriculture and most people are peasants, but still Montepuez is the district town with administrative posts, markets and shops. It has in this study been shown that a critical point in the school career for both girls and boys comes after grade five when they in order to continue school, have to move to town. This project is however less adventurous when it comes to boys’ education, but valid for both girls and boys is that a social network with relatives in town and the possession of cultural capital is an advantage. In rural Montepuez, school is not as important as other forms of education, such as the initiation rite, and there is no affinity to the school environment. The girls play important roles in the household and in the cultivation, both in town and on the countryside and it can therefore be difficult to find time for school activities. A major drop out cause pointed out by the respondents and informants was that in order to be properly dressed in school, it was common that girls found older boyfriend in order to pay for the clothes. This often resulted in pregnancy and the girls had to leave school anyway. The initiation rite is an important rite of passage in the girl’s lives and after this transition, school is no longer considered to be important for her. Many teachers take bribes in order to let the pupils pass the exam and the teachers here use their powerful position. The bribes consist of money, food or labour force and sexual favours. To give and take bribes seems to have become part of the social norm in school and the bribes increase with the size of the town. 4 Why Some Girls Go to School and Others Don’t The matter of girls’ schooling is full of nuances and has to be understood within a general social context where the factors interact, as one ’cause’ can or will lead to another.

  • 121.
    Helmersson, Pernilla
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Social and Economic Geography.
    Lindgren, Urban
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Social and Economic Geography.
    Fördel Nordanstig: Befolkningen, fastighetsmarknaden och kommunikationerna2007Report (Other academic)
  • 122.
    Hjort, Susanne
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Social and Economic Geography.
    Rural gentrfication as a migration process: Evidence from Sweden2009In: Migration Letters, ISSN 1741-8984, Vol. 6, no 1, p. 91-100Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The aim of this study is to investigate rural gentrification as a migration process in parts of the sparsely populated countryside. The aim is sought through an analysis of the socio-economic and demographic composition of migration patterns using register data and employing different methods including logistic regression analysis. The particular time set of the analyses from the late 1980s until the early 1990s has been utilized as a way to understand the changing migration pattern of a changing economy; from boom to bust. The results show that rural gentrification is of marginal importance in the sparsely populated countryside of Sweden.

  • 123.
    Hjort, Susanne
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Social and Economic Geography.
    Rural migration in Sweden: a new green wave or a blue ripple?2005Licentiate thesis, monograph (Other academic)
  • 124.
    Hjort, Susanne
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Social and Economic Geography.
    Socio-economic differentiation and selective migration in rural and urban Sweden2009Doctoral thesis, comprehensive summary (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    The aim of this thesis is to analyse migration and socio-economic differentiation in rural and urban spaces: where people move, what the characteristics of migrants are and whether experiences of rural and urban space affect attitudes toward the local living environment and place attachment. The background consists of five themes discussing different aspects of socio-economic differentiation and selective migration, for example polarization and rural gentrification. Integrated in the five themes are summaries of the four papers.

    The first paper, The divided city? Socio-economic changes in Stockholm metropolitan area, 1970-1994, analyses the income distribution in the Stockholm metropolitan area using residential area statistics regarding income among residents. The results show that polarization and segregation has increased during the study period. The second paper, The attraction of the rural: Characteristics of rural migrants, analyses the socio-economic and demographic characteristics of migrants to the countryside in Sweden using individual register data. The results show that urban areas attract the young, the highly educated and those with high income while rural areas attract older migrants, the self employed and families, but when comparing rural areas, periurban countrysides were more attractive to those with high income and education than more remote areas.  The third paper, Rural gentrification as a migration process: Evidence from Sweden, focuses on rural gentrification as a migration process and is based on an analysis of register data. The results show that rural gentrification in the remote countrysides of Sweden is of marginal importance. In the fourth paper, Place attachment and attitudes among young adults in rural/urban spaces, young adults’ (25-40 years of age) attitudes toward the rural/urban qualities of their local living environment and their place attachments are investigated using a survey. The results show that most people appreciate the environment they live in and they are also attached to this place. However, urban residents with a rural background seem less pleased with and are less attached to their present environment.

    In conclusion, migration selectivity works to reinforce both patterns of segregation and patterns of ageing. There is indication of both demographic and socio-economic polarization between and within rural and urban areas and this polarization is reinforced by selective migration flows. However, the results also indicate that rural areas are attractive living environments to many, particularly the periurban countryside and that there may be a rural migration potential among urban residents with a rural background.

  • 125.
    Hjort, Susanne
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Social and Economic Geography.
    Malmberg, Gunnar
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Social and Economic Geography.
    The Attraction of the Rural - Characteristics of Rural Migrants in Sweden2005In: Rural Migration in Sweden: a new green wave or a blue ripple?, Kulturgeografi, Umeå , 2005Chapter in book (Other academic)
  • 126.
    Hjort, Susanne
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Social and Economic Geography.
    Malmberg, Gunnar
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Social and Economic Geography.
    The attraction of the rural characteristics of rural migrants in Sweden2006In: Scottish Geographical Journal, Vol. 122, no 1, p. 55-75Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 127.
    Hjort, Susanne
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Social and Economic Geography.
    Malmberg, Gunnar
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Social and Economic Geography.
    Westin, Kerstin
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Geography and Economic History.
    Place attachment and attitudes among young adults in rural and urban spaces2009Manuscript (preprint) (Other academic)
  • 128.
    Hjälm, Anna
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Social and Economic Geography.
    A family landscape: On the geographical distances between elderly parents and adult children in Sweden2011Doctoral thesis, comprehensive summary (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    With a background in the ageing of the population and the new challenges facing individuals, families and the welfare state, the aim of this thesis is to analyse the changing family landscape and the geographical distances between elderly parents and adult children.

    The thesis consists of four empirical studies derived from three different sources of data: In the first paper (Paper I), historical population data is combined with modern register data for two Swedish regions. In the second and third papers, individual-level register data covering the entire Swedish population serves as the empirical starting point. The fourth paper leaves the registers aside and builds upon interviews. Paper I provides an introduction and historical background to the question of intergenerational geographical proximity and distance. The paper analyses intergenerational distances and seeks to compare and discuss the significance of the variations. It is shown that concerning extreme proximity a great decrease has occurred over 200 years, however when it comes to having kin within reach the decrease is less dramatic, and that now, just as then, a majority of elderly parents have an adult child within reach. The article concludes that even though geographical distances between generations vary over time and space, no clear linear trend towards intergenerational geographical separation can be established. In Paper II we analyse some features and trends in intergenerational distances in Sweden. We find that 10% of all elderly parents have at least one child living very close and that a majority, 85%, have an adult child within reach. The study shows no clear trend towards increasing intergenerational separation, but suggests that periods of intense societal restructuring, such urbanisation, can lead to spells of increased intergenerational separation on an aggregated level. Paper III investigates whether, and to what extent, elderly parents and adult children move close to each other. We find that even though the older generation makes up a smaller share of the moves made, when they do move they are more likely to move closer to an adult child. Further, having more than one relative at a destination adds to the attraction, and that older elderly are less likely to move close to a child than younger elderly. One interpretation is that young-old parents serve as a resource for their adult children, while older elderly are more influenced by the need for welfare state based assistance. The last paper, IV, returns to the elderly parents living very close to an adult child. In interviews with 14 elderly the aim of the paper is to gain new understanding about the interaction between intergenerational proximity, assistance and the meaning of being close. Some of the issues raised in the paper relate to migration histories, reciprocity and independence.

  • 129.
    Hjälm, Anna
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Social and Economic Geography.
    Intergenerational proximity and distance over 200 years: examples from two Swedish regionsManuscript (preprint) (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    In most Western societies of today populations are ageing, which is expected to pose new challenges to the welfare state. Still, the family might also be affected by an ageing population, if more extensive needs of the elderly cannot be met by the welfare state. For the family, one important factor for managing intergenerational interaction is geographical proximity, and living close has been shown to be a vital prerequisite for help and assistance between elderly parents and adult children. When it comes to the possibility to interact with kin, a common notion has been that as society develops through industrialisation, urbanisation and individualisation, families and kin become less dependent on each other and more spread out geographically, which would challenge their possibilities to offer assistance to each other. In this paper, intergenerational geographical distance in modern and historical times is examined through the unique possibility to combine population register data from six cross-section years stretching from 1820 to 2002. The main finding from the study is that there has been a dramatic decrease over time in generations living extremely close to each other. On the other hand, when it comes to having an adult child within time adjusted daily reach the decline has been much less drastic. Intergenerational geographical distances, beyond the extreme proximity, thus seem to be stable and resilient even though society is changing.

  • 130.
    Holm, Einar
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Social and Economic Geography.
    Holme, Kirsten
    Strömgren, Magnus
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Social and Economic Geography.
    Lindgren, Urban
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Social and Economic Geography.
    Mäkilä, Kalle
    Eriksson, Madeleine
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Social and Economic Geography.
    Schrödl, Daniel
    Tid för arbete2004Report (Other academic)
  • 131.
    Holm, Einar
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Social and Economic Geography.
    Lindgren, Urban
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Social and Economic Geography.
    Eriksson, Madeleine
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Social and Economic Geography.
    Eriksson, Rikard
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Social and Economic Geography.
    Häggström Lundevaller, Erling
    Statistics. Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Social and Economic Geography.
    Holme, Kirsten
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Social and Economic Geography.
    Strömgren, Magnus
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Social and Economic Geography.
    Transfereringar och arbete2004Report (Other academic)
  • 132.
    Holm, Einar
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Social and Economic Geography.
    Lindgren, Urban
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Social and Economic Geography.
    Häggström Lundevaller, Erling
    Statistics. Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Social and Economic Geography.
    Strömgren, Magnus
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Social and Economic Geography.
    SVERIGE2007In: Modelling our Future: Population Ageing, Health and Aged Care, Elsevier, Amsterdam , 2007, p. 543-549Chapter in book (Refereed)
  • 133.
    Holm, Einar
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Social and Economic Geography.
    Lindgren, Urban
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Social and Economic Geography.
    Häggström Lundevaller, Erling
    Statistics. Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Social and Economic Geography.
    Strömgren, Magnus
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Social and Economic Geography.
    The SVERIGE spatial micro simulation model2006In: 8th Nordic Seminar on Microsimulation Models, 2006Conference paper (Other academic)
  • 134.
    Holm, Einar
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Social and Economic Geography.
    Lindgren, Urban
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Social and Economic Geography.
    Malmberg, Gunnar
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Social and Economic Geography.
    Arbete och tillväxt i hela landet: Betydelsen av arbetskraftsmobilisering2004Report (Other academic)
  • 135.
    Holm, Einar
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Geography and Economic History.
    Lindgren, Urban
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Social and Economic Geography.
    Malmberg, Gunnar
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Social and Economic Geography.
    Mäkilä, Kalle
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Social and Economic Geography.
    Simulating an entire nation1996In: Microsimulation for urban and regional policy analysis / [ed] Clarke, G.P., London: Pion , 1996, p. 164-186Chapter in book (Refereed)
  • 136.
    Holm, Einar
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Social and Economic Geography.
    Lindgren, Urban
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Social and Economic Geography.
    Strömgren, Magnus
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Social and Economic Geography.
    Socioekonomiska effekter av stora investeringar i Oskarshamn: En framtidsstudie2008Report (Other academic)
  • 137.
    Holm, Einar
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Social and Economic Geography.
    Lindgren, Urban
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Social and Economic Geography.
    Strömgren, Magnus
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Social and Economic Geography.
    Socioekonomiska effekter av stora investeringar i Östhammar: En framtidsstudie2007Report (Other academic)
  • 138.
    Holm, Einar
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Social and Economic Geography.
    Mahieu, Ron
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Social and Economic Geography.
    Westin, Kerstin
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Social and Economic Geography.
    Post- och teleutvecklingens drivkrafter och konsekvenser - en forskningsöversikt1991Report (Refereed)
  • 139.
    Holm, Einar
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Social and Economic Geography.
    Rephann, Terrence
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Social and Economic Geography.
    Economic-Demographic Effects of Immigration: Results from a dynamic, spatial microsimulation model2004In: International Regional Science Review, Vol. 27, no 4, p. 379-410Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 140.
    Holm, Einar
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Social and Economic Geography.
    Sanders, Lena
    Spatial Microsimulation Models2007In: Models in Spatial Analysis., 2007Chapter in book (Other academic)
  • 141.
    Holm, Einar
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Social and Economic Geography.
    Strömgren, Magnus
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Social and Economic Geography.
    Spatial data creation for Europe: A test case2011Report (Other academic)
  • 142.
    Holm, Einar
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Social and Economic Geography.
    Timpka, Toomas
    A discrete time-space geography for epidemiology: from mixing groups to pockets of local order in pandemic simulations2007In: MEDINFO 2007 - Proceedings of the 12th World Congress on Health (Medical) Informatics: Building Sustainable Health Systems, 2007, p. 464-468Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 143.
    Holm, Einar
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Social and Economic Geography.
    Öberg, Sture
    Contagious social practice?2004In: Geografiska Annaler, Vol. 86B, no 4, p. 297-314Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 144.
    Holmgren, Eva
    et al.
    Department of Forest Resource Management, Swedish University of Agricultural Sciences, Umeå, Sweden.
    Keskitalo, E. Carina H.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Social and Economic Geography.
    Lidestav, Gun
    Department of Forest Resource Management, Swedish University of Agricultural Sciences, Umeå, Sweden.
    Swedish forest commons: A matter of governance?2010In: Forest Policy and Economics, ISSN 1389-9341, E-ISSN 1872-7050, Vol. 12, no 6, p. 423-431Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Around 100 years ago, when Crown land in the interior of northern Sweden was privatized, part of the forest land was set aside as forest commons. Today, there are 33 such forest commons jointly managed and owned in common mainly by private forest owners. The forest commons may be looked upon as a means by which the state controls the production of and returns from the forests belonging to small and less affluent forest owners. Further, an attempt has been made to use the forests as a tool to move the self-interests of these small forest owners closer to providing public goods. Forest commons thus hold a contested status, as private lands under public control and as a partly de-regulated form of ownership. This paper examines the extent to which forest commons are currently managed directly by the government, comparing this with the general trend in forest policy towards governance and less prescriptive measures, which often take account of market and participative goals. Building upon Appelstrand (2007), this paper describes the major policy instruments relevant for forest commons from 1861 to 2005. We conclude that direct government management remains dominant, with the major legislation pertaining to forest commons dating back to the 1950s. While governance may seem to be inherent in the forest commons concept, the development of governance has not been fully realised given the relatively strict government-steered framework.

  • 145.
    Holmström, Anna
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine, Epidemiology and Global Health.
    Oudin, Anna
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine, Occupational and Environmental Medicine.
    de Luna, Xavier
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Statistics.
    Nilsson, Karina
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Sociology.
    Lindgren, Urban
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Social and Economic Geography.
    Bergdahl, Ingvar
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine, Occupational and Environmental Medicine.
    Ivarsson, Anneli
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine, Epidemiology and Global Health.
    SIMSAM-nätverket i Umeå strävar mot att bli ett framstående center för registerforskning som knyter samman barndomen med livslång hälsa och välfärd2011In: SVEPET - Medlemstidning för Svensk Epidemiologisk Förening (SVEP), ISSN 1101-4385, Vol. 29, no 3, p. 8-9Article in journal (Other academic)
    Abstract [sv]

    Vetenskapsrådets SIMSAM initiativ syftar till att stärka multidisciplinär registerforskning i Sverige. Inom SIMSAM-nätverket i Umeå arbetar vi tvärvetenskapligt med sikte på att utvecklas till ett center med excellens kring mikrodataforskning som knyter samman barndomen med livslång hälsa och välfärd. Just nu fokuserar vi på att få tillgång till sammanlänkade data från ett flertal nationella och regionala register för att komma vidare med vår planerade forskning. Dessutom har Umeå-nätverket nyligen fått i uppdrag att leda den nationella samordningen av SIMSAM initiativet.

  • 146.
    Häggström Lundevaller, Erling
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Statistics. Social and Economic Geography.
    Demografisk mikrosimulering2007In: Qvartilen, ISSN 0283-3654, Vol. 22, no 3Article in journal (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
  • 147.
    Häggström Lundevaller, Erling
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Statistics. Social and Economic Geography.
    Prognostisering och simulering av turistresor i Sverige: Med fokus på den framtida skidturismen2008Report (Other academic)
  • 148.
    Häggström Lundevaller, Erling
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Statistics. Social and Economic Geography.
    Holm, Einar
    Social and Economic Geography.
    Strömgren, Magnus
    Social and Economic Geography.
    Lindgren, Urban
    Social and Economic Geography.
    Spatial dynamic micro-simulation of demographic development2007In: 1st General Conference of the International Microsimulation Association: Celebrating 50 Years of Microsimulation, 2007Conference paper (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    In a world of changing demographical patterns, tools for keeping track of these changes are of great importance. Different regions are in different stages of the demographic transition and are affected differently of migration patterns. A tool to project the demographic development at a regional level is therefore of great importance. This article we discusses the demographic development in the county Västerbotten in Sweden and in that context why and how a micro simulation model can be used for these purposes.

  • 149.
    Häggström Lundevaller, Erling
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Statistics.
    Lindgren, Urban
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Social and Economic Geography.
    Strömgren, Magnus
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Social and Economic Geography.
    Statistik i geografi: Slutrapport av pedagogiskt projekt2010Report (Other academic)
    Abstract [sv]

    Statistik ingår som ett viktigt hjälpämne i andra akademiska ämnen som använder kvantitativa data, till exempel kulturgeografi. Kulturgeografi har vidare betydande inslag av användning av Geografiska informationssystem (GIS), där det finns stora beröringsytor med statistik. En integrering av områdena geografi och statistik kan således ge studenterna stort mervärde. Det innebär ofta en pedagogisk utmaning att förmedla statistisk kunskap till studenter som i huvudsak har sin bakgrund inom ämnen som innehåller lite kontakt med statistiska tankegångar. Detta projekts huvudsyfte har varit att utveckla en pedagogisk ansats som är lämplig i denna situation. Projektet har i första hand genomförts inom ramen för en kurs på avancerad nivå, där statistik och geografi integrerats och lärts ut med en casebaserad ansats.

  • 150.
    Häggström Lundevaller, Erling
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Statistics. Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Social and Economic Geography.
    Terämä, Emma
    Demographic projections at local level for case study regions: Report for Peri-urban land use relationships (PLUREL), Module 1, EU sixth framework programme2008Report (Other academic)
1234567 101 - 150 of 536
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