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  • 101.
    Bodin, Madelen
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Department of Physics.
    Students’ progress during an assignment in computational physics: mental models and code developmentManuscript (preprint) (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Solving physics problems in university physics education using a numerical approach requires knowledge and skills in several domains, for example, physics, mathematics, programming, and modeling. In this study students' mental models are monitored using interviews at several occasions during an assignment in computational physics. The interview data was analysed using a network analysis approach. Interview transcripts were coded according to the context dependent concepts that were used to define the particular context and situation of this assignment. The adjacency of concepts in the transcripts was assumed to reflect the associations between them made by students, and thus representing students' mental models of the problem solving situation at the time of the interview. For each student a network was built where the concepts were nodes and their adjacency formed the links between them. The changes in students' mental models between the interview occasions gave important information about what the students were focusing on at different stages of the solution process. What students focused on at the different interview occasions was assumed to be an indication of what they believed was useful in solving the task. The visualization of the mental models showed that at the beginning students were concerned about how to deal with writing the Matlab code that was needed to model the problem. As students got more comfortable with the coding process, the physics needed to assure that their simulation was following physics principles, such as energy conservation, became more and more central in their narratives. This study gives important contribution to how networks can be used to model students' thinking in a particular context and provides important knowledge about students' progress in a task in computational physics.

  • 102.
    Bodin, Madelen
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Department of Physics.
    Winberg, Mikael
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Department of Science and Mathematics Education.
    Learning physics in a simulation environment2007Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 103.
    Bodin, Madelen
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Department of Physics.
    Winberg, Mikael
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Department of Science and Mathematics Education.
    Model of competencies for modeling and numerical problem solving in university physics education2008In: GIREP 2008 Conference, Physics Curriculum Design, Development and Validation, August 18-22, Nicosia, Cyprus, 2008Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 104.
    Bodin, Madelen
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Department of Physics.
    Winberg, Mikael
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Department of Science and Mathematics Education.
    Role of beliefs and emotions in numerical problem solving in university physics education2012In: Physical Review Special Topics : Physics Education Research, ISSN 1554-9178, E-ISSN 1554-9178, Vol. 8, no 1, p. 010108-Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Numerical problem solving in classical mechanics in university physics education offers a learning situation where students have many possibilities of control and creativity. In this study, expertlike beliefs about physics and learning physics together with prior knowledge were the most important predictors of the quality of performance of a task with many degrees of freedom. Feelings corresponding to control and concentration, i.e., emotions that are expected to trigger students’ intrinsic motivation, were also important in predicting performance. Unexpectedly, intrinsic motivation, as indicated by enjoyment and interest, together with students’ personal interest and utility value beliefs did not predict performance. This indicates that although a certain degree of enjoyment is probably necessary, motivated behavior is rather regulated by integration and identification of expertlike beliefs about learning and are more strongly associated with concentration and control during learning and, ultimately, with high performance. The results suggest that the development of students’ epistemological beliefs is important for students’ ability to learn from realistic problem-solving situations with many degrees of freedom in physics education.

  • 105.
    Boesen, Jesper
    et al.
    Göteborgs universitet.
    Helenius, Ola
    Göteborgs universitet och Örebro universitet.
    Bergqvist, Ewa
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Department of Science and Mathematics Education. Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Umeå Mathematics Education Research Centre (UMERC).
    Bergqvist, Tomas
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Umeå Mathematics Education Research Centre (UMERC). Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of applied educational science.
    Lithner, Johan
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Department of Science and Mathematics Education. Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Umeå Mathematics Education Research Centre (UMERC).
    Palm, Torulf
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Department of Science and Mathematics Education. Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Umeå Mathematics Education Research Centre (UMERC).
    Palmberg, Björn
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Department of Mathematics and Mathematical Statistics. Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Umeå Mathematics Education Research Centre (UMERC).
    Developing mathematical competence: from the intended to the enacted curriculum2014In: Journal of Mathematical Behavior, ISSN 0732-3123, E-ISSN 1873-8028, Vol. 33, p. 72-87Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This study investigates the impact of a national reform in Sweden introducing mathematical competency goals. Data were gathered through interviews, classroom observations, and online surveys with nearly 200 teachers. Contrasting to most studies of this size, qualitative analyses were conducted. The results show that teachers are positive to the message, but the combination of using national curriculum documents and national tests to convey the reform message has not been sufficient for teachers to identify the meaning of the message. Thus, the teachers have not acquired the functional knowledge of the competence message required to modify their teaching in alignment with the reform. The results indicate that for complex reform messages, such as the competency message, to have intended impact on classroom practice, special attention needs to be put on the clarity of the message. To have high-stakes tests, for example, does not alone seem to be sufficient. 

  • 106.
    Boesen, Jesper
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Umeå Mathematics Education Research Centre (UMERC).
    Lithner, Johan
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Department of Science and Mathematics Education. Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Umeå Mathematics Education Research Centre (UMERC).
    Palm, Torulf
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Department of Science and Mathematics Education. Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Umeå Mathematics Education Research Centre (UMERC).
    The relation between types of assessment tasks and the mathematical reasoning students use2010In: Educational Studies in Mathematics, ISSN 0013-1954, E-ISSN 1573-0816, Vol. 75, no 1, p. 89-105Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The relation between types of tasks and the mathematical reasoning used by students trying to solve tasks in a national test situation is analyzed. The results show that when confronted with test tasks that share important properties with tasks in the textbook the students solved them by trying to recall facts or algorithms. Such test tasks did not require conceptual understanding. In contrast, test tasks that do not share important properties with the textbook mostly elicited creative mathematically founded reasoning. In addition, most successful solutions to such tasks were based on this type of reasoning.

  • 107.
    Bogdanov, Sergey
    et al.
    Petrozavodsk State University.
    Oversby, John
    University of Reading.
    Popov, Oleg
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Department of Science and Mathematics Education.
    Teteleva, Ekaterina
    Petrozavodsk State University.
    Physics insight into “The Canterbury Tales” Chronotope2015In: Physics Education, ISSN 0031-9120, E-ISSN 1361-6552, Vol. 50, no 4, p. 462-467Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Many students regard physics as an isolated, sophisticated and perhaps a boring branch of science. Meanwhile, physics is embedded in most events and issues of society, culture and everyday life. To find and include such relevant contexts is one of the challenges for every physics teacher. Here we present our findings, which concern the classic The Canterbury Tales by Geoffrey Chaucer. Some important questions are still open and disputed, such as the dates of events in the story. In particular, physics can provide a method for an approximate estimation of the dates and places of the events in the tales. This paper provides some of the details.

  • 108.
    Borg, Kajsa
    Umeå University, Faculty of Teacher Education, Creative Studies (Teacher Education). slöjd.
    Comparison between Swedish Sloyd and its counterpart in Japan.1981Other (Other academic)
  • 109.
    Borg, Kajsa
    Umeå University, Faculty of Teacher Education, Department of Creative Studies.
    Kreativitet eller problemlösning - vad bedömer vi i slöjden?2008In: Slöjda för livet: om pedagogisk slöjd / [ed] Kajsa Borg och Lars Lindström, Lärarförbundets förlag, Stockholm , 2008, p. 199-201Chapter in book (Other academic)
  • 110.
    Borg, Kajsa
    Linköpings universitet.
    Läroplanen - stöd eller hinder i skolslöjdens utveckling?1999In: Nordisk Pedagogik, ISSN 0901-8050, E-ISSN 1504-2995, Vol. 19, no 2, p. 121-129Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 111.
    Borg, Kajsa
    Umeå University, Faculty of Teacher Education, Department of Creative Studies.
    Repertory grid som forskningsmetod2008In: Kunskapande, kommunikation och bedömning i gestaltande utbildning / [ed] Kajsa Borg & Viveca Lindberg, Stockholm: Stockholms universitets förlag, 2008Chapter in book (Other academic)
  • 112.
    Borg, Kajsa
    Umeå University, Faculty of Teacher Education, Department of Creative Studies.
    Slöjd för flickor och slöjd för gossar2008In: Slöjda för livet: om pedagogisk slöjd / [ed] Kajsa Borg och Lars Lindström, Stockholm: Lärarförbundets förlag , 2008, p. 51-64Chapter in book (Other academic)
  • 113.
    Borg, Kajsa
    Umeå University, Faculty of Teacher Education, Department of Creative Studies.
    Slöjdlärares språkbruk vid bedömning: kognitiva mariser som metod2008In: Se skolan: forskningsmetoder i pedagogiskt arbete / [ed] Carina Rönnqvist & Monika Vinterek, Umeå: Fakultesnämnden för lärarutbildning, Umeå universitet , 2008, p. 123-135Chapter in book (Other academic)
  • 114.
    Borg, Kajsa
    Linköpings universitet.
    Slöjdämnet i förändring: 1962 - 19941995Licentiate thesis, monograph (Other academic)
    Abstract [sv]

    The first aim is to decide what is the core of the school subject Sloyd. The second aim is to find out how the subject has changed during the last 30 years and what and who have influenced the change.

    Empirical sources are the national sylabuses för Sloyd, the national sylabuses for the teacher training from 1960 - 1977, a questionnaire to Sloyd teachers and interviews with a smaller number of teachers in both textile and wood and metal Sloyd.

    The findings are that the curriculum text change slightly from old to new version, but the teachers do not usually realize the change. What really causes change and new approaches are based on different waus of organizing teaching in the Sloyd subject.

  • 115.
    Borg, Kajsa
    Umeå University, Faculty of Teacher Education, Department of Creative Studies. slöjd.
    The Sloyd subject in Swedish Schools2005In: Craft and Home Economics nowadays, 2005Conference paper (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
  • 116.
    Borg, Kajsa
    Umeå University, Faculty of Teacher Education, Department of Creative Studies.
    What is Sloyd?: a question of legitimacy and identity2006In: Tidskrift för lärarutbildning och forskning,: Theme: Sloyd-tradition in transition., ISSN 1404-7659, no 2-3, p. 35-51Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The purpose of this article is to discuss the development of the Sloyd subject in Swedish schools over the last 100 years. The Sloyd subject is described in terms of legitimacy and identity related to society changes. Legitimacy is used as the external perspective from society on the subject. Identity is used as the internal perspective of the subject used by the actors, how they seem to understand and interpret the main purpose, aims and goals of the subject. The article ends with a view towards the future and some new possible aspects on legitimacy and identity regarding Sloyd.

  • 117.
    Boström, Erika
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Department of Science and Mathematics Education. Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Umeå Mathematics Education Research Centre (UMERC).
    Formativ bedömning: en enkel match eller en svår utmaning? Effekter av en kompetensutvecklingssatsning på lärarnas praktik och på elevernas prestationer i matematik2017Doctoral thesis, comprehensive summary (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Research reviews have shown that the use of formative assessment in classroom practice can substantially improve student achievement. However, a strong research base about how to support teachers’ implementation of such formative classroom practice is lacking. In this thesis, I investigate the effects of a comprehensive professional development programme (PDP) in formative assessment on teachers’ classroom practice and students’ achievement in mathematics. In addition, I identify reasons for the changes made in the teachers’ formative classroom practice. Fourteen randomly selected year - 7 mathematics teachers participated in the PDP. The teachers’ formative classroom practice before and after attending the programme was analysed and described, and reasons for their change in practice were explored. The effect of the changes in formative classroom practice on students’ mathematics achievement was examined using pre- and post-tests administered to both the intervention group and a control group. A mixed methods approach with classroom observations, teacher interviews, questionnaires and student achievement tests in mathematics was used in the studies included in the thesis.

    The results show that the teachers used aspects of formative assessment in their classroom practice before the PDP, but that there was plenty of room for development towards a more effective formative assessment practice. Several possibilities for developing the practice were identified. After the PDP the teachers believed in the idea of formative assessment and were motivated to make changes towards a more formative classroom practice. The teachers included new formative assessment activities in their classroom practice, but in different ways and to different degrees. The characteristics of these changes were identified, and also the characteristics of the PDP that the teachers found to be influential for their development of the formative classroom practice. Results also show that the teachers’ motivational beliefs held after the PDP was an explanatory factor for their changes in practice. However, the formative assessment practice the teachers implemented did not have a significant effect on their students’ achievement compared to the control group. In addition, there was no correlation between the number of formative assessment activities implemented by the teachers and their students’ achievement gains. Reasons for these non-effects on student achievement, and for the teachers’ degree and type of implementation of formative assessment in the classroom practice, are discussed in the thesis.

  • 118.
    Boström, Erika
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Umeå Mathematics Education Research Centre (UMERC). Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Department of Science and Mathematics Education.
    The impact of a teacher professional development program in formative assessment on mathematics teachers’ classroom practice2014In: Development of mathematics teaching: Design, Scale, Effects, 2014Conference paper (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    This study is a sub study in a project about a comprehensive professional development program (PDP) for mathematics teachers in formative assessment (FA). My aim is to investigate in which ways the participating teachers’ classroom practice change, due to the delivered PDP, and also to identify reasons for the changes and the variation in changes. Fourteen randomly chosen mathematics teachers in secondary school participated in the PDP. The teachers were interviewed and their classroom practice observed before and after the PDP. They have also answered two questionnaires. Preliminary results show that all teachers were motivated to change and did change their practice, but to varying degrees. Factors that were important for the change to take place have been identified.

  • 119.
    Boström, Erika
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Umeå Mathematics Education Research Centre (UMERC). Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Department of Science and Mathematics Education.
    The impact of a teacher professional development program in formative assessment on mathematics teachers’ classroom practice2013In: Spaces for learning: past, present and future. Proceedings of the FMSERA 30th annual symposium in Vaasa, November 6-8, 2013 / [ed] Röj-Lindberg, A-S., Burman, L., Kurtén-Finnäs, B. & Linnanmäki, K. (in, 2013Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This is a substudy in a project about a comprehensiveprofessional development program (PDP) in formative assessment (FA) formathematics teachers. My aim is to investigate in which ways the teachers’classroom practice change, with respect to FA, after participating in the PDP andwhat some of the reasons may be for these changes. Fourteen randomly chosenmathematics teachers in secondary school participated in the PDP. The teachers wereinterviewed and their classroom practice observed before and after the PDP.They have also answered two questionnaires. The PDPand the analysis about the teachers’ change is based on Dylan Wiliam and his colleagues’framework of FA. Preliminary results showthat all teachers were motivated to change and did change their practice, butto varying degrees.

  • 120.
    Boström, Ulrika
    Umeå University, Faculty of Arts, Department of historical, philosophical and religious studies.
    ”När man kollar på bilden tänker man så här”: en receptionsstudie av gymnasieelevers uppfattning om bilder som kunskapskällor i historieundervisningen2014Licentiate thesis, monograph (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Images are used in history education for a variety of reasons, not least to generate interest through a better understanding of historical events and people. The aim of this study was to investigate how historical pictures, either illustrated or documentary/photographic, can be used as a resource for activating and improving pupils' historical empathy, in the way described by Stéphane Lévasque.

    I conducted a reception study on five different focus groups consisting of pupils from different upper secondary schools in Sweden. The pupils varied with regard to number of credits for admission to upper secondary school. A sixth group of pupils was interviewed as a contrasting control group in order to add perspective to the results. The discussions were based on the pupils' interpretations of 34 selected pictures, all of which were taken from the most common history textbooks. Each pupil was asked to choose the picture he/she felt was the most representative historical image. On the basis of the strategies used by the pupils when interpreting the pictures and discussing them, the material was analysed in accordance with Lévesque's categories: imagination, historical contextualisation and morals. The last category, morals, was further divided into three sub-categories: sense of justice, sympathy and progression.

    The reflections of the pupils and the degree of contextualisation varied. It appeared that the pupils were less inclined to discuss assumptions about the persons in the pictures; instead they chose to discuss the historical context in question. The pictures in this study did not seem to trigger the pupils to fabricate anachronistic reasoning about history; when they did produce lengthy reasoning, it was contextual, structural and metahistorical. In this context, the pupils who belonged to the group with the highest average of credits showed some signs of reflection on the basis of historical context and some criticism about the historical sources. On no occasion did any of the pupils choose a picture as a concrete expression of injustice.

    One of the questions this study aimed to explore was whether a lack of historical context affects how pictures trigger emotions and reasoning on the basis of moral aspects. Some of the pupils displayed moral standpoints, primarily the degree of morals concerning injustice. One possible interpretation could be that the feeling of being unfairly treated and subjected to insulting behaviour and social injustice was something the pupils could relate to. The group of pupils who had not yet studied history at upper secondary school, the control group, generally made reflections using this sort of reasoning when they discussed the historical aspects of the pictures.

  • 121.
    Brandehav, Cecilia
    Umeå University, Faculty of Arts, Department of culture and media studies.
    Hur ska vi läsa?: En kvalitativ textanalys av litteraturens funktion i tre läromedel för svenska i gymnasieskolan.2017Independent thesis Advanced level (professional degree), 20 credits / 30 HE creditsStudent thesis
    Abstract [en]

    This study uses a text analysis and an interpretive approach to examine literatures function in three teaching materials for the subject Swedish in upper secondary school and the abilities that reading literature will develop. The analysis has been done on the primary texts, secondary texts and teaching primary texts to determine which readings that are rewarded, which subjectconceptions that occur and how the teaching materials legitimizes reading literature. The results showed that “the action-oriented reading” was rewarded which means that the reading is aimed at sorting out the course of action that is expressed explicitly in the text. It was not possible to derive only one subjectconception. You can see the tendency for everyone and their scope vary. Reading literature and its function legitimized evident in the material's preface with explicit references to the curriculum. The reading will lead to the understanding of the relationship between fiction and social development, writing, and be a tool to develop self-awareness and understanding of other people's experiences, thoughts and imaginary worlds.

  • 122.
    Brodin, Andreas
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Mathematics and Mathematical Statistics.
    Kreativitet: En studie av matematikuppgifterna i PISA 20032009Independent thesis Advanced level (professional degree), 20 credits / 30 HE creditsStudent thesis
    Abstract [sv]

    Forskning har visat att uppgifter i prov inverkar på vad elever lär sig genom deras förväntningar på vad testet ska innehålla (Virta, 2004). Boesen (2006b) konstaterar att uppgifter i nationella prov påverkar lärares undervisning vilket indirekt också bör inverka på vad elever lär sig. Lithner (2008) menar att det finns risk att en elev som använder ett imitativt resonemang i alltför hög grad vid lösning av matematikuppgifter får sämre matematikkunskaper. Genom att som lärare förse eleven med uppgifter som kräver ett kreativt resonemang, i vilka det inte är möjligt för eleven att använda ett imitativt resonemang, bör en sådan utveckling hindras. Syftet med detta examensarbete är att med ett klassificeringsverktyg tidigare använt av bland andra Boesen, Lithner och Palm (2005) och Bergqvist (2007) undersöka alla 85 matematikuppgifter i PISA 2003 med avseende på vilken grad av matematiskt kreativt resonemang som krävs för att lösa dem. Klassificeringen av uppgifterna visar att endast 9% är möjliga att lösa med ett imitativt resonemang medan resten av uppgifterna kräver ett kreativt resonemang. Några egenskaper typiska för uppgifterna i PISA jämfört med uppgifter i läroboken Matte Direkt har också noterats. Dessa egenskaper har även omformulerats till konkreta tips riktade till lärare vilka önskar konstruera uppgifter som kräver ett matematiskt kreativt resonemang.

  • 123.
    Broman, Karolina
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Department of Science and Mathematics Education.
    Addressing Critical Features of Context-Based Science Curricula2014In: NARST 2014: Annual International Conference Abstracts, 2014Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 124.
    Broman, Karolina
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Department of Science and Mathematics Education.
    Chemistry: content, context and choices: towards students' higher order problem solving in upper secondary school2015Doctoral thesis, comprehensive summary (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Chemistry is often claimed to be difficult, irrelevant, and uninteresting to school students. Even students who enjoy doing science often have problems seeing themselves as being scientists. This thesis explores and challenges the negative perception of chemistry by investigating upper secondary students’ views on the subject. Based on students’ ideas for improving chemistry education to make the subject more interesting and meaningful, new learning approaches rooted in context-based learning (CBL) are presented. CBL approaches are applied in several countries to enhance interest, de-emphasise rote learning, and improve students’ higher order thinking.

    Students’ views on upper secondary school chemistry classes in combination with their problem- solving strategies and application of chemistry content knowledge when solving context-based chemistry tasks were investigated using a mixed methods approach. Questionnaire responses, written solutions to chemistry problems, classroom observations, and think-aloud interviews with upper secondary students at the Natural Science Programme and with experts working on context- based chemistry tasks were analysed to obtain a general overview and explore specific issues in detail.

    Several students were identified who had positive feelings about chemistry, found it interesting, and chose to continue with it beyond the compulsory level, mainly with the aim of future university studies or simply because they enjoyed it. Their suggestions for improving school chemistry by connecting it to everyday life prompted an exploration of CBL approaches. Studies on the cognitive learning outcomes arising from the students’ work on context-based tasks revealed that school chemistry heavily emphasises the recall of memorised facts. However, there is evidence of higher order thinking when students’ problem-solving processes are scaffolded using hints based on the Model of Hierarchical Complexity in Chemistry (MHC-C). In addition, the contextualisation of problems is identified as something that supports learning rather than distracting students.

    To conclude, the students in this thesis are interested in chemistry and enjoy chemistry education, and their motives for choosing to study chemistry at the post-compulsory level are related to their aspirations; students’ identity formation is important for their choices. Because students are accustomed to recalling facts and solving chemistry problems that have “one single correct answer”, they find more open problems that demand higher order thinking (e.g. knowledge transfer) unfamiliar and complex, suggesting that such processes should be practiced more often in school chemistry. 

  • 125.
    Broman, Karolina
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Department of Science and Mathematics Education.
    Chemistry: context, content and choices: Is school chemistry in crisis?2015In: Kemivärlden Biotech med Kemisk Tidskrift, ISSN 1653-5596, no 1, p. 33-34Article in journal (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
  • 126.
    Broman, Karolina
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Department of Science and Mathematics Education.
    Chemistry Teachers' Development of Relevant and Interesting Context-Based Open-Ended Problems2019In: ESERA 2019: 2019 ESERA conference in Bologna, Italy, August 26-30, 2019, 2019Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Context-based learning (CBL) approaches have become popular in several parts of the world. The intentions with this more unconventional teaching and learning approach are to frame content knowledge into interesting and relevant contexts and to engage students to higher interest, and thereby, hopefully, increased learning. An educational challenge has been to design suitable tasks adapted to both affective and cognitive aspects. To assess students’ chemistry content knowledge, tasks possible to use in class need to be developed, and to make the tasks interesting and relevant to the students, the teachers are central. In this project, chemistry teachers attending two different teacher conferences have worked together with a chemistry education researcher to develop context-based everyday-life open-ended chemistry problems. In this presentation, the process of the development of the context-based problems will be explored, and the ongoing work where the problems are applied in class where students have worked together solving the problems will be discussed.

  • 127.
    Broman, Karolina
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Department of Science and Mathematics Education.
    Collaboration between university and school – how do we make use of each other’s competencies?2017Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 128.
    Broman, Karolina
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Department of Science and Mathematics Education.
    Finding and elaborating frameworks for analysing context-based chemistry problems2016In: Narratives of doctoral studies in science education: making the transition from educational practitioner to researcher / [ed] Shirley Simon, Christina Ottander, and Ilka Parchmann, Routledge, 2016, p. 128-139Chapter in book (Refereed)
  • 129.
    Broman, Karolina
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Department of Science and Mathematics Education.
    Kjemi i krise?2011In: Naturfag, ISSN 1504-4564, no 1, p. 74-77Article in journal (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
  • 130.
    Broman, Karolina
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Department of Science and Mathematics Education.
    Läsecirklar - ett sätt att arbeta med kollegialt lärande kring naturvetenskapernas didaktik2018Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 131.
    Broman, Karolina
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Department of Science and Mathematics Education.
    Role models affecting students’ secondary and tertiary educational choices2017Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Interest and identity are perspectives often explored when discussing students' educational choices. In Sweden, students have the possibility to choose (or not to choose) a STEM-focused education both at secondary level between grade 9 and 10, and towards university level after grade 12. In this study, interviews have been made with students in the end of grade 12 to investigate which aspects they highlight as important in their choices, both how they already have chosen between lower and upper secondary and how they plan to choose for tertiary level. The study analyses students' perceived interest as well as identity perspectives. Moreover, role models have in previous research been stated as fundamental for influencing students in their educational choices. Therefore, interest, identity and role models are in focus of this study where Eccles et al.´s (1983) expectancy-value model is used as a theoretical lens to further elaborate students' own ideas on educational choices towards STEM in general, and the career of medical doctors and engineers in specific.

  • 132.
    Broman, Karolina
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Department of Science and Mathematics Education.
    Bernholt, Sascha
    IPN Leibniz Institute for Science and Mathematics Education, Kiel university, Germany.
    A Mature Examination of Juvenile Technologies in Science Education2019In: ESERA 2019, 2019Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The Digital Era has influenced education for quite some time, and after the hype that technology is “everything”, digitalisation of education needs to be scrutinised in a sensible and mature way. In several countries, a top-down approach from politicians and stakeholders state that digital tools must be implemented to improve students’ learning. Since there are several available types of digital tools, often developed by people with explicit competence in technology and perhaps not a chemistry competence, we find it important to explore and examine how these tools are helpful for students in their learning processes. In this symposium, we want to discuss how juvenile technologies influence students’ cognitive and affective learning and which aspects an implementation of these technologies need to take into account in order to enhance students’ learning.

  • 133.
    Broman, Karolina
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Department of Science and Mathematics Education.
    Bernholt, Sascha
    Interest and relevance as aspects of context-based chemistry problems2017Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    To make students interested and engaged in science, several new teaching approaches have been developed aiming for higher order thinking. Context-based learning approaches emanates from an idea that science content knowledge should be presented in a, for students, relevant context to improve their learning outcomes as well as making them more interested in science. Previous research has shown positive results; however, researchers and teachers need to consider which aspects of the contextual settings young students perceive as interesting and relevant. In this presentation, the notions of ‘interest’ and ‘relevance’ will be elaborated further to discuss which aspects of open-ended chemistry problems students prefer. Both qualitative interview data and quantitative survey data will be explored in relation to interest frameworks to discuss students’ perceived interest and relevance.

  • 134.
    Broman, Karolina
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Department of Science and Mathematics Education.
    Bernholt, Sascha
    Relevance or interest? Students’ affective responses towards contextual settings in chemistry problems2017In: NFSUN: Nordiske Forskersymposium om Undervisning i Naturfag. Abstracts / [ed] Astrid Johansen, John Magne Grindeland, 2017, p. 23-23Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    To make students interested and engaged in science, several new teaching approaches have been developed aiming for higher order thinking. Context-based learning approaches emanates from an idea that science content knowledge should be presented in a, for students, relevant context to improve their learning outcomes as well as making them more interested in science. Previous research has shown positive results; however, researchers and teachers need to consider which aspects of the contextual settings young students perceive as interesting and relevant. In this presentation, the notions of ‘interest’ and ‘relevance’ will be elaborated further to discuss which aspects of open-ended chemistry problems students prefer.

  • 135.
    Broman, Karolina
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Department of Science and Mathematics Education.
    Bernholt, Sascha
    IPN Leibniz Institute for Science and Mathematics Education, University of Kiel, Germany.
    Parchmann, Ilka
    IPN Leibniz Institute for Science and Mathematics Education, University of Kiel, Germany.
    Analysing Task Design and Students’ Responses to Context-Based Problems Through Different Analytical Frameworks2015In: Research in Science & Technological Education, ISSN 0263-5143, E-ISSN 1470-1138, Vol. 33, no 2, p. 143-161Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: Context-based learning approaches are used to enhance students’ interest in, and knowledge about, science. According to different empirical stud- ies, students’ interest is improved by applying these more non-conventional approaches, while effects on learning outcomes are less coherent. Hence, further insights are needed into the structure of context-based problems in comparison to traditional problems, and into students’ problem-solving strategies. Therefore, a suitable framework is necessary, both for the analysis of tasks and strategies. Purpose: The aim of this paper is to explore traditional and context-based tasks as well as students’ responses to exemplary tasks to identify a suitable frame- work for future design and analyses of context-based problems. The paper dis- cusses different established frameworks and applies the Higher-Order Cognitive Skills/Lower-Order Cognitive Skills (HOCS/LOCS) taxonomy and the Model of Hierarchical Complexity in Chemistry (MHC-C) to analyse traditional tasks and students’ responses. Sample: Upper secondary students (n=236) at the Natural Science Programme, i.e. possible future scientists, are investigated to explore learning outcomes when they solve chemistry tasks, both more conventional as well as context-based chemistry problems. Design and methods: A typical chemistry examination test has been analysed, first the test items in themselves (n=36), and thereafter 236 students’ responses to one representative context-based problem. Content analysis using HOCS/ LOCS and MHC-C frameworks has been applied to analyse both quantitative and qualitative data, allowing us to describe different problem-solving strategies. Results: The empirical results show that both frameworks are suitable to identify students’ strategies, mainly focusing on recall of memorized facts when solving chemistry test items. Almost all test items were also assessing lower order think- ing. The combination of frameworks with the chemistry syllabus has been found successful to analyse both the test items as well as students’ responses in a sys- tematic way. The framework can therefore be applied in the design of new tasks, the analysis and assessment of students’ responses, and as a tool for teachers to scaffold students in their problem-solving process. Conclusions: This paper gives implications for practice and for future research to both develop new context-based problems in a structured way, as well as pro- viding analytical tools for investigating students’ higher order thinking in their responses to these tasks.

  • 136.
    Broman, Karolina
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Department of Science and Mathematics Education.
    Bernholt, Sascha
    IPN Leibniz Institute for Science and Mathematics Education, University of Kiel, Germany.
    Parchmann, Ilka
    IPN Leibniz Institute for Science and Mathematics Education, University of Kiel, Germany.
    Context and content: Upper secondary students’ strategies when solving context-based chemistry problems2015Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Context-based learning (CBL) approaches are applied in several countries to enhance interest, de-emphasise rote learning, and improve students’ higher order thinking. One way to develop higher order thinking is through the use of meaningful tasks, in this study perceived as context-based chemistry tasks. To explore students’ problem-solving strategies when approaching these tasks, both students’ responses as well as scaffolding from the interviewer using the Model of Hierarchical Complexity (MHC-C) have been analysed. Through think-aloud interviews with 20 upper secondary students who solved context-based chemistry tasks, results show that students are used to lower order thinking and stating “the correct answer” by memorising factual knowledge. Two different groups of problem-solving strategies will be presented in the presentation, one group of students who only gave responses through recall of factual knowledge, and one group who gave responses not only by stating facts but instead also could explain structure-property relationships on their own. However, both groups of students could develop their responses and improve their problem solving through scaffolding from the interviewer’s use of MHC-C operators (i.e. name, describe, and explain). If students are going to solve problems not only through recall of facts, the process of problem-solving has to be practiced and emphasised in school;; not only the task’s response in itself is important if we want students to learn chemistry in a meaningful way. Teachers can develop their students’ problem-solving strategies by scaffolding using suitable frameworks, such as the MHC-C. Besides making students aware of higher ordering thinking, one way to practice such skills is through reasoning and argumentation;; when students develop their argumentation skills, they also challenge their thinking. For argumentation to be rewarding, it must rely on both facts and higher order cognitive skills as transfer, critical thinking and asking questions. 

  • 137.
    Broman, Karolina
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Department of Science and Mathematics Education.
    Bernholt, Sascha
    IPN Leibniz Institute for Science and Mathematics Education, University of Kiel, Germany.
    Parchmann, Ilka
    IPN Leibniz Institute for Science and Mathematics Education, University of Kiel, Germany.
    Context and Topic: Which Aspects of Context-Based Chemistry Problems Do Upper Secondary Students Perceive Most Relevant and Interesting?2016Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 138.
    Broman, Karolina
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Department of Science and Mathematics Education.
    Bernholt, Sascha
    Parchmann, Ilka
    Using Model-based Scaffolds to Support Students Solving Context-based Chemistry Problems2018In: International Journal of Science Education, ISSN 0950-0693, E-ISSN 1464-5289, Vol. 40, no 10, p. 1176-1197Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Context-based learning aims to make learning more meaningful by raising meaningful problems. However, these types of problems often require reflection and thinking processes that are more complex and thus more difficult for students, putting high demands on students’ problem-solving capabilities. In this paper, students’ approaches when solving context-based chemistry problems and effects of systematic scaffolds are analysed based on the Model of Hierarchical Complexity. Most answers were initially assigned to the lowest level of the model; higher levels were reached without scaffolds only by few students and by most students with scaffolds. The results are discussed with regard to practical implications in terms of how teachers could make use of context-based tasks and aligned scaffolds to help students in this activity.

  • 139.
    Broman, Karolina
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Department of Science and Mathematics Education.
    Christensson, Camilla
    Katedralskolan, Lund.
    Kemin satt i sammanhang: hur gör vi ämnet relevant för elever?2019In: Kemi för alla: bidrag från konferensen i Stockholm 1-2 oktober 2018 i Stockholm arrangerad av Kemilärarnas resurscentrum / [ed] Karin Stolpe och Gunnar Höst, Linköping: Linköping University Electronic Press, 2019, p. 25-41Chapter in book (Other academic)
    Abstract [sv]

    För att öka intresset för kemi hos elever och visa på ämnets relevans, har det visat sig viktigt att eleverna får chans att se att kemin finns i vardagen och inte enbart i klassrummet. Detta kan göras genom sammanhang, så kallade kontexter. Kontextbaserad undervisning i de naturvetenskapliga ämnena används i flera länder; i Nederländerna har man till exempel valt att helt skriva om styrdokumenten för att undervisningen ska bli kontextbaserad. Lärare och forskare har där tillsammans utvecklat kontextbaserade undervisningsmaterial. Men hur vet vi vad elever uppfattar som intressant och relevant? Vilka sammanhang kan användas för att både öka elevernas intresse samtidigt som de får lära sig viktiga kemikunskaper? Ett av ledorden för kontextbaserad undervisning är "need-to-know", vad behöver jag kunna/veta för att till exempel förstå varför någonting luktar? I denna artikel diskuterar vi utifrån forskningsperspektiv och konkreta undervisningsexempel hur gymnasiekemin kan sättas i intressanta och relevanta sammanhang. Fastän exemplen kommer från gymnasiet kan idéerna med fördel användas även på högstadiet.

  • 140.
    Broman, Karolina
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Department of Science and Mathematics Education.
    Ekborg, Margareta
    School of Education, Malmö university.
    Johnels, Dan
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Department of Chemistry.
    Chemistry in crisis?: Perspectives on teaching and learning chemistry in Swedish upper secondary schools2011In: NorDiNa: Nordic Studies in Science Education, ISSN 1504-4556, E-ISSN 1894-1257, Vol. 7, no 1, p. 43-60Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Explanations for a decline in the number of students studying chemistry at advanced level all over the world have been sought for quite some time. Many students do not find chemistry relevant and meaningful and there have been difficulties in developing school chemistry courses that engage students sufficiently and tempt them to further studies in the field. In this study, Swedish upper secondary school students (Ns=372) and their teachers (Nt=18) answered a questionnaire on their experiences of the content and the working methods of their chemistry course. They were also given the opportunity to express ideas on how to make chemistry courses more interesting and meaningful. The results point out some subject areas as both easy and interesting, e.g. atomic structure; while other areas are hard to understand but still interesting, e.g. biochemistry. The students find chemistry lessons teacher-centred, something they appreciate. When teachers and students gave suggestions on how to improve the relevance of chemistry education at upper secondary level, more laboratory work and connections to everyday life were the most common proposals. But on the whole, these students seem quite satisfied with their chemistry courses.

  • 141.
    Broman, Karolina
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Department of Science and Mathematics Education.
    Johnels, Dan
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Department of Chemistry.
    Engineering students going “flipped” – a new teaching approach in organic chemistry to increase students’ perceived interest and value2019In: 7:e utvecklingskonferensen för Sveriges ingenjörsutbildningar, 2019Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This paper presents a longitudinal design-based research study where a university organic chemistry course has changed teaching and learning focus, from more conventional teaching into flipped teaching. Engineering students have been followed with surveys, observations, interviews and analysis of how the teaching material was used; results on students’ perceived interest and value are discussed. The project shows that flipped learning with peer instruction is an applicable way to increase students’ interest in organic chemistry and perceived value of the problem-solving process and peer instruction when learning chemistry. Moreover, the paper also discusses the design-based aspect, and how researchers and practitioners can collaborate to develop university teaching with an aim to enhance students’ higher-order thinking and deep learning.

  • 142.
    Broman, Karolina
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Department of Science and Mathematics Education.
    Johnels, Dan
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Department of Chemistry.
    Flipped Learning as a New Approach for University Organic Chemistry2018Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 143.
    Broman, Karolina
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Department of Science and Mathematics Education.
    Johnels, Dan
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Department of Chemistry.
    Flipping the class: University chemistry students' experiences from a new teaching and learning approach2019In: Chemistry Teacher International, ISSN 2569-3263, Vol. 1, no 1, article id 20180004Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    University chemistry courses have for a long time had a similar conventional approach to teaching, with chem- istry professors lecturing in a traditional manner. Today, flipped learning approaches have found their ways into higher education with positive results. In particular, US innovations in this area have made positive im- pressions on Swedish university chemistry educators, resulting in an interest and curiosity in integrating a flipped model into the course curricula. The rationale behind flipped learning is to incorporate an active learn- ing approach into lecture, thereby increasing both student engagement and learning outcomes. In this paper, an implementation project where an organic chemistry course has changed focus from traditional teaching to flipped learning, will be presented. The focus in this mixed-methods study will be on students’ cognitive and affective responses when meeting a new teaching and learning approach. Through following a project where a conventional approach to an organic chemistry course is changed into a more student-active focus, we elaborate on implications for course development of chemistry curricula.

  • 144.
    Broman, Karolina
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Department of Science and Mathematics Education.
    Johnels, Dan
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Department of Chemistry.
    Flipping the class: university chemistry students' experiences from a new teaching approach2017Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    University chemistry courses have for a long time had a similar approach to teaching, with chemistry professors lecturing in a traditional manner. Today, flipped learning approaches have found their ways into higher education and positive results from for example the US have been spread and made Swedish university chemistry teachers interested and curious to develop their courses. The rationale of flipped learning is to incorporate an active learning approach in the lecture halls and thereby hopefully both increase student engagement and learning outcomes. In this study, an implementation project where an organic chemistry course has changed focus from traditional teaching to flipped learning will be presented. The focus will be on students’ experiences when meeting a new teaching and learning approach. 

  • 145.
    Broman, Karolina
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Department of Science and Mathematics Education.
    Johnels, Dan
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Department of Chemistry.
    Organic chemistry going ‘flipped’ – university students’ perceptions of a new teaching and learning approach2019In: European Variety In Chemistry Education 2019: Abstract Booklet, 2019, p. 32-32Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 146.
    Broman, Karolina
    et al.
    Umeå University.
    Johnels, Dan
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Department of Chemistry.
    To flip or not to flip: Students’ use of the learning material in a flipped university organic chemistry course2017Conference paper (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    University chemistry courses have had a similar approach to teaching for a long time, with chemistry professors lecturing in a traditional manner. Today, flipped learning approaches have found their ways into higher education and positive results from for example the US have been spread and made Swedish university chemistry teachers interested and curious to develop their courses. The rationale of flipped learning is to incorporate an active learning approach in the lecture halls and thereby hopefully both increase student engagement and learning outcomes. In this presentation, an implementation project where an organic chemistry course has changed focus from traditional teaching to flipped learning will be presented.

  • 147.
    Broman, Karolina
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Department of Science and Mathematics Education.
    Mårell-Olsson, Eva
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of applied educational science, Interactive Media and Learning (IML).
    Application of Digital Tools in Chemistry Education: Virtual Reality, Augmented Reality and Gamification2019In: 2019 ESERA, 2019Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In a politician-decided top-down implementation of digital tools into the school curricula, chemistry education researchers and teacher educators try to develop relevant and meaningful digital tools possible to use to increase students’ learning. To exemplify and explore the impact of digital tools on students’ learning processes, two chemistry education projects are discussed in this presentation. When are digital tools applicable to enhance learning and how should teachers embed and frame this application of the digital tools? The projects present how Virtual Reality (VR), Augmented Reality (AR) and gamification can be used to enhance students’ perceived interest and value.

  • 148.
    Broman, Karolina
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Department of Science and Mathematics Education.
    Mårell-Olsson, Eva
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of applied educational science, Interactive Media and Learning (IML).
    Digital Tools in Chemistry Education - Virtual/Augmented Reality & Gamification2018Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 149.
    Broman, Karolina
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Department of Science and Mathematics Education.
    Mårell-Olsson, Eva
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of applied educational science.
    Virtual reality i kemiundervisningen: hur kan man arbeta med digitalisering?2018Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 150.
    Broman, Karolina
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Department of Science and Mathematics Education.
    Mårell-Olsson, Eva
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of applied educational science, Interactive Media and Learning (IML).
    Johnels, Dan
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Department of Chemistry.
    Virtual and augmented reality – a way to develop university students; spatial ability in organic chemistry2019In: European Variety In Chemistry Education 2019: Abstract Booklet, 2019, p. 24-24Conference paper (Refereed)
1234567 101 - 150 of 761
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