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  • 101.
    Janlert, Lars-Erik
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Department of Computing Science.
    Stolterman, Erik
    Indiana University, Bloomington.
    Faceless Interaction - A Conceptual Examination of the Notion of Interface: past, present and future2015In: Human-Computer Interaction, ISSN 0737-0024, E-ISSN 1532-7051, Vol. 30, no 6, p. 507-539Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In the middle of the present struggle to keep interaction complexity in check as artifact complexity continues to rise and the technical possibilities to interact multiply, the notion of interface is scrutinized. First, a limited number of previous interpretations or thought styles of the notion are identified and discussed. This serves as a framework for an analysis of the current situation with regard to complexity, control, and interaction, leading to a realization of the crucial role of surface in contemporary understanding of interaction. The potential of faceless interaction, interaction that transcends traditional reliance on surfaces, is then examined and discussed, liberating possibilities as well as complicating effects and dangers are pointed out, ending with a sketch of a possibly emerging new thought style.

  • 102.
    Janlert, Lars-Erik
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Department of Computing Science.
    Stolterman, Erik
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Informatics.
    The character of things1997In: Design Studies, ISSN 0142-694X, E-ISSN 1872-6909, Vol. 18, no 3, p. 297-314Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    People, as well as things, appear to have character--high-level attributes that help us understand and relate to them. A character is a coherent set of characteristics and attributes that apply to appearance and behaviour alike, cutting across different functions, situations and value systems--esthetical, technical, ethical--providing support for anticipation, interpretation and interaction. Consistency in character may become more important than ever in the increasingly complex artifacts of our computer-supported future.

  • 103.
    Janlert, Lars-Erik
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Department of Computing Science.
    Stolterman, Erik
    School of Informatics and Computing, Indiana University Bloomington.
    Things that keep us busy: the elements of interaction2017Book (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    We are surrounded by interactive devices, artifacts, and systems. The general assumption is that interactivity is good -- that it is a positive feature associated with being modern, efficient, fast, flexible, and in control. Yet there is no very precise idea of what interaction is and what interactivity means. In this book, Lars-Erik Janlert and Erik Stolterman investigate the elements of interaction and how they can be defined and measured. They focus on interaction with digital artifacts and systems but draw inspiration from the broader, everyday sense of the word.

    Viewing the topic from a design perspective, Janlert and Stolterman take as their starting point the interface, which is designed to implement the interaction. They explore how the interface has changed over time, from a surface with knobs and dials to clickable symbols to gestures to the absence of anything visible. Janlert and Stolterman examine properties and qualities of designed artifacts and systems, primarily those that are open for manipulation by designers, considering such topics as complexity, clutter, control, and the emergence of an expressive-impressive style of interaction. They argue that only when we understand the basic concepts and terms of interactivity and interaction will we be able to discuss seriously its possible futures.

  • 104.
    Jansson, Daniel
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Umeå Institute of Design.
    nuSense: Wearable technology to prototype and create new senses2015Independent thesis Advanced level (degree of Master (Two Years)), 20 credits / 30 HE creditsStudent thesis
    Abstract [en]

    nuSense is the result of a degree work on master level at Umeå Institute of Design exploring why wearable technology oftentimes tread a rather narrow path, with many different companies releasing essentially the same product with a new shell, and innovation being slow. Through research, interviews and user research, hardware prototyping and testing it became clear that developing for wearable technology is a very complicated task, for many reasons. Being able to build quick exploratory prototypes was nigh impossible if you do not have a grasp of hardware developing platforms and programming. Further, those outside the industry who just want to explore wearable technology lack a platform to do so easily, aside from buying ready-made solutions made to do one single prepackaged thing. Based on this a concept was developed to provide a platform to explore wearable technology, through modular building-blocks and an easy to grasp interface.

  • 105.
    Jesper, Målsten
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Umeå Institute of Design.
    Vad är en digital shaker?2013Independent thesis Basic level (degree of Bachelor), 10 credits / 15 HE creditsStudent thesis
    Abstract [sv]

    Projektet i denna rapport har fokuserat på hur man kan förbättra den visuella och taktila upplevelsen av digitala slagverk. Målet var att utveckla en digital version av moderna percussionisters shakers, som tilltalar användarna inte bara med sina funktioner och digitala möjligheter utan även som ett musikinstrument.Processen och utveckling av instrumentimagen för digital percussion kan appliceras på alla digitala instrument, men resultatet av detta projekt illustreras genom ett koncept på en digital shaker.

  • 106.
    Jia, Haoyue
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Umeå Institute of Design.
    2030 Volvo Compact Concept2019Independent thesis Advanced level (degree of Master (Two Years)), 20 credits / 30 HE creditsStudent thesis
    Abstract [en]

    The project is a vision from the author for future autonomous vehicles in 2030, designed for Volvo. Volvo is one of the pioneering automotive companies for autonomous driving, concerning safety as a priority and taking sustainable responsibility for a better living condition. 

    In the not too distant future, the author sees people’s perception of mobility will gradually change from traditional private ownership to the ability to move freely. What if a mobility service, coming along with the district you chose to live in, satisfies individual usage needs vary with daily commuting to outdoor trips or moving plans? This type of mobility solution will be ubiquitous, changing the nature of the way people choose to live and move.

    During the design exploration, the tools varied from ideation sketches, rough package test, photoshop rendering, clay sketching, 3D modelling and experimental display graphic illustrations. This project has been strongly inspired by Scandinavian design and Volvo design principle. Also, the author expressed her vision for Volvo and materials thoughts for components and interior functions.

    The project outcome is 2030 Volvo Compact Concept, an autonomous sharing and subscription service provided by the residential community.

  • 107.
    Johansson, Siri
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Umeå Institute of Design.
    BookNode - Tactics for the Library in the Augmented City2014Independent thesis Advanced level (degree of Master (Two Years)), 20 credits / 30 HE creditsStudent thesis
    Abstract [en]

    In this project, the challenges facing public libraries and the emerging trend of involving users in library development have been combined with inspiration from the field of urban media design. The aim has been to explore what behaviors public media surfaces designed for culture and exchange could possess, and to argue for the benefits of integrating the library in the urban fabric.

    The result is a proposed set of tactics for how the library can consciously work with allowing patrons to leave and follow traces. It is manifested in a concept that creates a narrative around each library book, print as well as ebook, and makes its journey tangible by visualizing its digital patina. The system also allows patrons to leave ebooks at designated nodes around the city, thus influencing which books are made available where.

  • 108.
    Jonsson, Klara
    Umeå University, Faculty of Arts, Department of Creative Studies (Teacher Education).
    Visuella grepp för filmduken: En studie i filmdesign – filmfotografen Hoyte van Hoytemas anslag i tre filmer2015Independent thesis Basic level (degree of Bachelor), 10 credits / 15 HE creditsStudent thesis
    Abstract [en]

    Visual techniques such as mise-en-scène, cinematography and film editing may be used in order to strengthen a story and create the right atmosphere in which the story is told. This study examines film design, with the aim to raise the knowledge and understanding of how motion pictures are designed in order to achieve a strengthened story and the right atmosphere. The visual techniques are studied with three methods; semiotics, compositional interpretation and my own interpretation. One of the most important roles for a cinematographer is deciding how a film will be presented visually, that is why this study analyses and interprets three films by the cinematographer Hoye van Hoytema with this following question – In which ways has the cinematographer worked with the visual techniques in the opening of the three chosen films? The study also examines how you can work with the visual techniques in one’s own interpretation. Therefore the study includes four short films I have produced. The result of the analyses of the films is summarised and presented in a table and my interpretation was displayed during an exhibition on the 15th January 2016 at Umeå University. The visual techniques show both similarities and differences in how they have been used. They are used in combination to enable creation of the atmosphere in the story in all of the chosen films. The importance of how to relate separate techniques to the story as a whole in order to draw conclusions on what the techniques might imply, is shown. 

  • 109.
    Jung, Heekyoung
    et al.
    University of Cincinnati, USA.
    Bradzell, Shaowen
    Indiana University, Bloomington, USA.
    Blevis, Eli
    Indiana University, Bloomington, USA.
    Pierce, James
    Carnegie Mellon University, USA.
    Stolterman, Erik
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Umeå Institute of Design. Indiana University, Bloomington, USA.
    How Deep Is Your Love: Deep Narratives of Ensoulment and Heirloom Status2011In: International Journal of Design, ISSN 1991-3761, E-ISSN 1994-036X, Vol. 5, no 1, p. 59-71Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This paper describes our ongoing research about what it takes to design things that can be ensouled or can achieve heirloom status as a matter related to sustainable design. This paper draws on research on fifteen deep narratives that we collected to uncover detailed accounts of relationships between each participant and a single particular loved artifact or collection of a single type. Three themes emerged from our analysis of the narratives: (i) intimacy accumulated as an association with an object over time, (ii) investment of effort to learn and control functionality, and (iii) implicit values related to the patterns of collection of artifacts. In conceptualizing these three themes as an analytical frame, we arrived at two unifying notions that generally apply across many of the narratives and that serve as catalysts to design principles, namely the notion of rarity of an object, and the notion of aficionado-appeal of an object. We conclude by considering how these unifying notions can be used reflectively and judiciously to prompt design principles for interaction designers at least, and possibly as design principles in-and-of-themselves.

  • 110. Jung, Heekyoung
    et al.
    Wiltse, Heather
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Umeå Institute of Design.
    Wiberg, Mikael
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Informatics.
    Stolterman, Erik
    School of Informatics and Computing, Indiana University, USA.
    Metaphors, materialities, and affordances: hybrid morphologies in the design of interactive artifacts2017In: Design Studies, ISSN 0142-694X, E-ISSN 1872-6909, Vol. 53, p. 24-46Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    As materiality of interactive artifacts is diversified with integrated physical and digital materials, metaphoric design approaches in Human–Computer Interaction (HCI) go beyond resembling the appearance of physical objects, exploring novel materials and forms of interactive artifacts. The hybrid materialities and forms of artifacts influence how interactivity is perceived, reframing the concept of affordances according to its evolving relationship to metaphors and materialities. By conceptualizing interactive forms in their surface, behavioral and systemic aspects, we examine multifaceted roles of metaphors in HCI from concealing and revealing a formal system to expanding and reifying its meaning; and propose a morphologic perspective on affordances as an invitation for making variations of interactive forms by compositing multiple design resources.

  • 111.
    Jørgensen, Finn Arne
    Umeå University, Faculty of Arts, Department of historical, philosophical and religious studies.
    Designing a Hole in the Wall: The Reverse Vending Machine as Socio-Technical System and Environmental Infrastructure2012In: Scandinavian Design: Alternative Histories / [ed] Kjetil Fallan, Berg Publishers, 2012, 1Chapter in book (Refereed)
  • 112.
    Karimi, Arash
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Umeå Institute of Design.
    Switch2016Independent thesis Advanced level (degree of Master (Two Years)), 20 credits / 30 HE creditsStudent thesis
    Abstract [en]

    Having been looking in to the subject of future truck interior environment, the first intention was to be inspired of the extreme environment of long haul-age truck driving and improving the user needs. By looking in to the human factors in truck interiors. I wanted to show the benefits of the truck architecture possibilities and recreate it for a new future truck user.

    By using the main design tools like design research, sketching, full scale projection and quick user testing I could get a quick look into the complexity of current truck driver environment and proceed with developing it further.

    The final result is a semi-autonomous truck interior that is suited for a new type of future driver. The interior is focused on the user needs and tasks such as; autonomous management of logistics, operating routes with other truck drivers and units, enjoying spare time while not driving and also the possibility to actively taking over the control manually in case of emergency.

    By separating and dividing the truck interior in different divisions and user modes, such as Operational, Tactical and Strategic, that divides the specific functions above, the architecture can maintain a clear separation between work and leisure for the driver when he or she is driving or not. This way the driver could easily switch between the modes to reduce the cognitive impact of increasing future information cognitive impact, without losing the sense of control and create a safe and comfortable work environment for herself.

    The concept is based on the knowledge of a flexible future context that is facing the automotive industry by reducing ergonomic impact for the drivers and improving it further through the flexibility to switch between modes.

  • 113.
    Katsura-Gordon, Shigeo
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Umeå Institute of Design.
    Democratizing Our Data: Finding Balance Living In A World Of Data Control2018Independent thesis Advanced level (degree of Master (Two Years)), 20 credits / 30 HE creditsStudent thesis
    Abstract [en]

    The 2018 scandal where Cambridge Analytica tampered with U.S. elections using targeted ad campaigns driven by illicitly collected Facebook data has shown us that there consequences of living in a world of technology driven by data. Mark Zuckerberg recently took part in a congressional hearing making the topic of controlling data an important discussion at even the highest level of the government. Alternatively we can also recognize the benefits that data has in terms of technology and services that are highly personalized because of data.There’s nothing better than a targeted ad that appears at just the right time when you need to make a purchase or when Spotify provides you with the perfect playlist for a Friday night. This leaves us torn between opposites; To reject data and abandon our technology returning to the proverbial stone age, or to accept being online all the time monitored by a vast network of sensors that feed data into algorithms that may know more about our habits then we do. It is the friction of these polar opposites that will lead us on a journey to find balance between the benefits and negatives of having data as part of our everyday lives.To help explore the negatives and positives that will occur on this journey I developed Data Control Box, a product that ask the question “How would you live in a world where you can control your data?” Found in homes and workplaces, it allows individuals or groups of people to control their data by placing their mobile devices into it’s 14x22.5x15 cm acrylic container.Where the General Data Protect Act (GDPR) regulates and controls data after it has been produced by enforcing how “business processes that handle personal data must be built with data protection by design and by default, meaning that personal data must be stored using pseudonymisation or full anonymisation, and use the highest-possible privacy settings by default, so that the data is not available publicly without explicit consent, and cannot be used to identify a subject without additional information stored separately” (Wikipedia, 2018),Data Control Box limits personal data production through a physical barrier to it’s user prior to it’s creation. This physical embodiment of data control disrupts everyday habits when using a mobile device, which in turn of a creates the opportunity for reflection and questioning on what control of data is and how it works. For example a person using Data Control Box can still create data using a personal computer despite having placed their mobile device inside Data ControlBox. Being faced with this realization reveals aspects of the larger systems that might not have been as apparent without Data Control Box and can serve as a starting point to answering the question “How would you live in a world where you can control your data.” To further build on this discussion people using DataControl Box are encouraged to share their reflections by tweeting to the hashtag#DataControlBox. These tweets are displayed through Data Control Box’s 1.5 inchOLED breakout board connected to an Arduino micro-controller. Data ControlBox can interface with any network connected computer using a usb cord which also serves as a power source. The connected feature of Data Control Box allows units found around the world to become nodes in a real time discussion about the balance of data as a part of everyday life, but also serves as a collection of discussions that took place over time starting May of 2018.As a designer, the deployment of Data Control Box allowed me to probe the lives of real people and to see how they might interact with Data Control Box but also their data in a day to day setting. A total of fifteen people interacted with DataControl Box following a single protocol that was read aloud to them beforehand.A number of different contexts for the deployment of Data Control Box we’re explored such as at home, on a desk at school and during a two hour human computer lecture. I collected a variety of qualitative research in the form of photos and informal video interviews during these deployments which I synthesized into the following insights that can be used by designers when considering how to design for the control of data but also how to design for complex subjects like data. This paper retraces my arrival at this final prototype sharing the findings of my initial research collected during desk research, initial participant activities, and creation of my initial prototype Data Box /01. It then closes with a deeper dive into the design rationale and process when building my final prototype Data ControlBox and summarizes in greater detail insights I’ve learned from it’s deployment through results discussion and creative reflection.

  • 114.
    Kennedy, André
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Umeå Institute of Design.
    Finance for all: Envisioning inclusive financial systems2018Independent thesis Advanced level (degree of Master (Two Years)), 80 credits / 120 HE creditsStudent thesis
    Abstract [en]

    One of the more pressing long-term concerns for parents of children with a neurodevelopmental disorder (NDD), such as autism, is financial management (Abbott & Marriott, 2012). Few of these people ever manage to attain a level of financial literacy that allows them to become fully independent. Value, in it’s current form, is just too abstract for many (Cheak-Zamora, et al. 2017). This problem is augmented by our financial institutions, who have neglected to offer these groups any form of accessible financial products, rendering any aspirations of becoming “financially independent” by these groups, as unattainable. This is detrimental to their well-being and sense of self. (Abbott & Marriott, 2012).

    With this in light, this thesis will firstly highlight the obstacles faced by these groups in achieving financial independence, secondly, it will present a new paradigm through which to look at value. A paradigm that understands that money isn’t about a number, but rather the complex social interactions that that govern our liberties as members of society. Finally, this thesis will present an example of a new breed of fiancial system, Olive. Making use of emerging distributed technologies, Olive presents a system that enables us to produce products that recognises the spectrum of needs and abilities our community contains.

  • 115.
    Kerzic, Borut
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Umeå Institute of Design.
    Experiencing the moment: Enhancing surroundig awareness when walking2019Independent thesis Advanced level (degree of Master (Two Years)), 20 credits / 30 HE creditsStudent thesis
    Abstract [en]

    Todays technology provides the ability for people to interact with devices at all time, but it also makes them gaze down and loose touch with their surrounding while doing so. 

    This project explored alternatives to the current way of providing guidance while walking by designing in the context, rather than design for the context. This led to several iterations of prototypes that were tested with people in the context.

    The findings are showcased in a form of a multi modal guidance system called UP, that provides reassurance in all steps of the way without having to look down at the screen.

  • 116.
    Kettner, Marlene
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Umeå Institute of Design.
    Interactive histories: How might interactive exhibtion elements improve the understanding of Islamicate history?2013Independent thesis Advanced level (degree of Master (Two Years)), 20 credits / 30 HE creditsStudent thesis
    Abstract [en]

    What if the objects in the Museum of Islamic Art in Berlin could talk?All the artefacts are there for a reason. But especially in a historic exhibition on another culture those reason can be extremely difficult to see. Why look at a shagged old carpet?

    More than 4 million Muslims live in Germany today. Most people have very little background knowledge in Islamic art or history - but Islam is a regular topic of heated debate. People come to the Museum of Islamic Art with today´s questions, ideas and expectations. In today´s exhibition, visitors are flooded with impressions and information, but without background knowledge, it is difficult to relate things. 

    What are engaging, and information-rich, but not overwhelming formats to access deeper information on particular objects? How to explore their specific contexts as well as their relation to other objects?My final design - ‘Storytellers’ are guides. They are small tokens that represent objects from the museum. Each object has its own character, topic and relationships to other objects. It will show you through the exhibition on its` individual tour. There are tours with stories for children, families, different levels of background knowledge and interests.

  • 117.
    Kim, Yujin
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Umeå Institute of Design.
    Quart: Urban Micro Commuter2013Independent thesis Advanced level (degree of Master (Two Years)), 20 credits / 30 HE creditsStudent thesis
    Abstract [en]

    Nowadays, one of strong trends is globalization all over the world.That is not a surprising issue anymore and still going on. Furthermore, since many of people are gathering in cities to get jobs and live in convenience, the urban areas are growing wider and more crowded constantly. This fact automatically makes transportation usages and buildings increase. In this environment, the city offers some of publictransportations and infrastructures to make citizen transport efficiently.

    But, lots of people are still driving by private cars despite rising fuel costs. So, trafic jam, lack of parking space and waste of resource are getting serious. If we look around a city, there are many drivers going to work alone by a big commuter. It is a crucial cause of these issues. It aims to create a suitable personal commuter for primarily single drivers, with fascinating look despite its compact size. That will catch the eyes of people, and then make them desire it.

  • 118.
    Kreiser, Kilian
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Umeå Institute of Design.
    SPAN (Special Protection Area Network): A platform to protect bird protection areas2013Independent thesis Advanced level (degree of Master (Two Years)), 20 credits / 30 HE creditsStudent thesis
    Abstract [en]

    Background

    The foundation for life on our planet are all the resources we can draw upon: sunlight, clean water, fresh air and many more. But one existential resource a lot of people are not aware of, is the rich variety of life forms on earth. Biodiversity surrounds us every day: It is in the clothes we wear, the food we eat and the medicine we take. It is also an important driver for tourism, economy and technology: Various technological innovations are directly inspired by nature.But biodiversity is degrading rapidly caused by the rising land consumption in many countries. In Germany, this pressure is exceedingly high: 70% of natural habitats are endangered, 40% of animal species are on the IUCN red list and every second bird species is threatened.Using scientific methods and inventive technology, SPAN helps to monitor bird protection areas in Germany and to collect data as a basis to enforce conservation supported by European legislation.

  • 119.
    Krug, Dominik
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Umeå Institute of Design.
    Far Above Far Beyond2017Independent thesis Advanced level (degree of Master (Two Years)), 20 credits / 30 HE creditsStudent thesis
    Abstract [en]

    This project aims to explore what the brand Land Rover could stand for in the future. The brands rich history of exploring unconquered terrain earned it admiration and desirability all around the world. Further extending it's reach onto new worlds is within reach. In the 2030s the first manned missions to Mars are planned. The first arrivers will have exploration vehicles, that are limited in range and capability. To really explore the planet, vehicles with greater off-road capability and range will be needed. The vehicles also need to allow the expedition crews to stay in the vehicle for longer periods comfortably and also offer extended life support on multi-week long journeys.With this project I am exploring possible answers to face the harsh conditions on Mars. Furthermore, the vehicle and it's features project a vision of what a future off-road driving experience could be.

  • 120.
    Kuenen, Christoffel
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Umeå Institute of Design.
    Mediating group experiences: designing the in-between2015In: TEI '15 Proceedings of the Ninth International Conference on Tangible, Embedded, and Embodied Interaction, New York: ACM Digital Library, 2015, p. 441-4444Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In this paper I present ongoing design research that explores mediating group experiences. The objective of the paper is to introduce subject matter and design research approach, to provide material for an in depth discussion of challenges.

    Several research designs are presented that yield insight in theoretical and conceptual aspects of remote group interactions. Themes emerging from them concern the concept of embodiment, in particular regarding the conceptualization and expression of groups through the mediating system, as well as embodiment of the system for the individual, in the sense of both incorporation and extension of action-perception capacities. To further articulate and express such themes, ongoing and proposed research is presented. Difficulty is brought forward in bringing the various research designs together as one body of work, particularly in relation to theoretical framework, related work and ultimately articulating contributions.

  • 121.
    Kuenen, Christoffel
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Umeå Institute of Design.
    The Practice Of Constructive Design Research2014In: Design's big debates pushing the boundaries of design research, DRS 2014, Umeå, Sweden: Umeå Institute of Design, Umeå University , 2014, p. 87-Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    People practicing constructive/experimental/ practice-led/etc. design research come from a range of different academic traditions, which leads us to argue in certain ways, look for support in different places, and format and disseminate our work towards particular audiences. Such contextual factors might be the cause of some of the issues we struggle with in our work, while at the same time they obfuscate the ‘real’ foundational issues in the kind of design research we practice. When we look to current discourse concerning constructive design research, much attention seems to be given to positioning and justifying of the work in various contexts. What seems to be less exposed are foundational issues relating to how the practice unfolds, the kinds of issues that are tackled and by what means this is done. In this debate, four design researchers from various backgrounds will lead the discussion to uncover some of these issues. The debate will be fueled and framed with short video quotes from well and lesser known design research practitioners.

    http://www.drs2014.org/en/presentations/the-practice-of-constructive-design-research/

  • 122.
    Kuenen, Christoffel
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Umeå Institute of Design. Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Umeå Institute of Design.
    Transformatie gedreven door Techniek2013In: Nederlands Tijdschrift voor Geneeskunde, ISSN 0028-2162, no 157, article id A7063Article in journal (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
    Abstract [nl]

    De bionische mens vertegenwoordigt onze droom van bovenmenselijke krachten.

    Delen van die droom worden op dit moment al verwezenlijkt door kunstmatige systemen die ons motorische of zintui- gelijke vermogen ondersteunen, vergroten of verrijken.

    De aansluiting van die systemen op het lichaam verschillen in invasiviteit.

    De ontwikkeling van prothesen en orthesen wordt gedreven vanuit wetenschap maar met name ook vanuit de mili- taire industrie, en heeft een overwegend technische benadering. 

  • 123.
    Kuenen, Christoffel
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Umeå Institute of Design.
    Redström, Johan
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Umeå Institute of Design.
    The wickedness of design research practices: Methodological issues in bringing knowledge to expression through design2013In: Proceedings of the 5th International Association of Societies of Design Research Conference 2013, IASDR'13: “Consilience and Innovation in Design”, 2013Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In this paper we review existing literature in design research to see to what extent it provides a basis for meeting the methodological challenges that we encounter in our own practice- based design research. Seemingly, much attention is given to describing the results and types of knowledge that design research may provide, the purposes those may serve and by what yardsticks those results may be evaluated. Another focal area seems to be the form(-ats) in which the results of design research are presented and disseminated. What is often missing, however, are detailed accounts of the roles that design practice plays that can be picked up and used by others doing design research. This is unfortunate, as it is often such methodological structures that we struggle with. The emergence of ‘design research practices’ entails something more than mere combinations of design practice and academic research. Research typically has the objective of knowledge production; practice has the objective of creating the right thing by solving a set of problems. Considered a ‘new’ kind of design practice, design research practice seems to be more about problem finding through the design and creation of things that bring knowledge to expression. Thus, the process by which it achieves this must be uncovered and articulated. 

  • 124.
    Kuenen, Stoffel
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Umeå Institute of Design.
    Aesthetics of being together2018Doctoral thesis, monograph (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Design deals with matters of aesthetics. Historically, aesthetics in industrial design refers to the designed artifact: aesthetics of objects. When designed artifacts include digital technologies, aesthetics in design refers to what happens between people and artifacts as well: aesthetics of interaction. Now that these artifacts increasingly mediate our social lives, what aesthetics in design quite obviously also refers to, is what happens between people.

    This dissertation proposes an aesthetic of being together, as a necessary addition to current notions of aesthetics in interaction design practice, when it engages with digital systems that are part of people’s social life. It does not answer the question what Aesthetics is in general, instead it examines the work that particular notions of aesthetics do in interaction design practice.

    The practice based design research assembled in this dissertation starts from current notions of aesthetics in interaction design to explore the social experiences that mediated interactions between groups of people offer. What I found, through designing digital systems, is that current notions of aesthetics in interaction design are not conducive to addressing the kind of social experience people have with such systems. On the contrary, current notions actually inhibit interaction design to approach any experiences that cannot in the first place be conceived of as useful in terms of instrumental task performance. Yet, being social is hardly like performing a task or using other people in that sense.

    An aesthetic of being together is a proposition of a different fundament for interaction design practice. In addition to referring to properties of things and qualities of interacting with things, it refers to the kind of relations that come to expression between people interacting with each other with these things. Consequently, interaction design needs to resolve basic issues in what it considers and brings to expression, i.e. people’s relations with things and people at the same time. This requires (re-) considering what the designed thing is, what interaction is about and what the role of design is in bringing those to expression.

    My work contributes to the field of interaction design research an example of how, through practice, fundamental issues can be addressed. By orienting one set of concepts, ways of working and objectives into a different design situation, tensions built up that exposed foundational issues with that frame of reference, while pointing to the different fundaments needed to enable design practice to engage such situations.

    The results of the practical experimentation led to the articulation of a series of structural mechanisms of mediating systems.  These mechanisms provide material handles for interaction designers on how experiences of being present with others take shape. They configure the relations of artifacts and people in different ways than current notions of aesthetics afford. This theoretical investigation is then synthesised in the form of a new logic of expression for interaction design practice: an aesthetic of being together.

  • 125.
    Kuklo, Piotr
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Umeå Institute of Design.
    The future of podcasting: Envisioning an audio stories community for listeners and creators, where they connect through similar interests and share inspiring content.2018Independent thesis Advanced level (degree of Master (Two Years)), 20 credits / 30 HE creditsStudent thesis
    Abstract [en]

    This project explores the future of podcasting as a digital audio media format for stories. As podcasts continue to grow in popularity the medium becomes more and more influential amongst all age groups. Unfortunately, existing solutions do not give enough attention to all possible aspects of the medium. Podcasts carry an untapped potential as they are often treated similarly to music files. This project consists of a platform, Cast3, with two separate products directed to listeners and creators of audio stories. The platform gives users a possibility to connect with similar minded people around specific topics through clubs.

    Inspiration and Method

    To understand the needs of listeners and creators of the stories, I immersed myself with the storytelling world and conducted a thorough research with conversations with both users groups, opportunities evaluations and concepts testing. The insights gathered during the research brought the conclusion that both listeners and creators tend to want more involvement and have stronger community gathered around audio stories. That is why the project’s goal is to form an audio story community for listeners and creators, where they connect through similar interests and share inspiring content.

    Result

    The final outcome of the project consists of a platform Cast3 that has 2 separate products directed to listeners and creators of audio stories. The platform gives users a possibility to connect with similar minded people around specific topics through clubs. The clubs are the spaces where listeners can exchange information, discover new content through a word of mouth and bond with the creators through live shows. The creators’ needs are supported through specialised tools that help to record stories and help to learn more about the listeners. The users of the platform can interact with audio stories through a redefined media format called freecasting. The new format improves a listening experience and respond to presently existing needs of listeners as well as creators.

  • 126.
    Laiho, Sami
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Umeå Institute of Design.
    Project Heliotrope: Exploring the Future of Vehicle Ownership2018Independent thesis Advanced level (degree of Master (Two Years)), 20 credits / 30 HE creditsStudent thesis
    Abstract [en]

    In year 2030 approximately six out of every ten people will live on the urban area. This movement is especially strong in Asias mega cities like for example Tokyo, Delhi, Mumbai and Shanghai. Accelerating globalization is driving us towards the situation where each little peace of transportation must be optimized to gain space, time and efficiency to reduce the greenhouse effect. Personal transportation is a sector which will inexorably face major changes. It might not be as acceptable as it is nowadays. It is simple. Cars are unefficient the way they appear at the moment. To be able to accept them as a part of the future traffic, they need to be designed differently. Future personal transportation must be able to multitasking outside of traffic. It is important that the usage ratio would be improved considerably compared to the current one. When autonomous driving technology enter the market, a big step towards expanding the scope of the vehicles will be taken. It is still consequential to undestand that improving efficiency will not only require Cutting-Edge technology. With re-designed constructions and the creation of new ideas and preferences, one can also go far. While the vehicles are being redesigned, it is also necessary to renew the way people perceive it. If users adopt a new kind of vehicle ideology, it will lead to a positive development curve.

    The used design process was rather traditional. The research phase was started in January being followed by an ideation phase. After ideation the project moved in to the refinement phase and ultimately to the execution of the design in form of 3D-model and at the end physical model. Measurements and proportions were tested in Virtual Reality and in 2D 1:1 scale so that the correct size of the scale was secured since the project incorporates a space intended for living and longer stays.

    The Final Result is a new type of vehicle construction that appears in two main piece. It is designed to be more efficient and to serve the user in another dimension as well. Project Heliotrope combines future transportation with temporary living by transforming the vehicle's cabin into a part of your housing while tarveling. The secondary function will in fact become firstrate importance in the optimal situation, when traveling time will be shorter in relation to living time. This is the way that future transportation should be seen and designed. Driving becomes the seconday function. The Lexus Heliotrope styling is audacious and different. It does not obey the proportions or main lines of existing sedans. One of the main goals of the design has been to show the vehicle's duality, which is an important part of the concept. The architecture coprises two side-forming panels, the interposed capsule forming the vehicle cab. The design respects Lexus's traditional front graphics giving it the familiar softness from the past, instead of current murderous sharpness. The center of the visual balance is closer to the rear axle that is well known Lexus trademark. The top view introduces a beautifully flowing design that also shows the typical organic nature of the brand. A long, streamlined body can be seen as a very long lasting design.

  • 127.
    Laukkanen, Antti
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Umeå Institute of Design.
    Volkswagen V-Trek: The Rise of Mental Transportation2018Independent thesis Advanced level (degree of Master (Two Years)), 20 credits / 30 HE creditsStudent thesis
    Abstract [en]

    I started this project with a mindset that I want to design something for younger generations living in the future megacities. After a while, trying to figure out their urban mobility needs, I came to this conclusion: Already today we have so many different options for urban com- muting as well as several different car sharing services. I couldn’t find a way to create some- thing new. I changed my approach and I started thinking; what is it that they don’t have? I pret- ty soon understood it. They have no nature.

    By the year 2040, 70% of world’s population is expected to live in urban areas. This, in turn, is diminishing the natural environments around the globe. Needless to say, that people are becoming more and more disconnected from nature. In my research I quoted George Monbiot from The Guardian: “If Children lose contact with nature, they won’t fight for it.” This de- scribes the problem to the core. Coming gen- erations need to know where all that we have comes from. This is why I decided to create a way, people in megacities can connect to nature instantly.

    Volkswagen V-Trek offers an instant escape to nature from megacities to conservation areas around the world. With an immersive full-body experience, V-Trek engages people with nature, as well as with Volkswagen as a brand. The concept is demonstrated in a visual story. The scenario of the events was created based on predictions and possible events in the future.

    Most of the time in my process I used for research about VR and other technologies related to the topic. As the physical movement is an important part of the concept, and because I wanted to enhance it on the platform, I spent time trying to figure it out. When things started to get together, I began to shape quick mockups in 3D for development of the form and archi- tecture. Later on in the process, it was easy to transform those mockups into sketch models and for testing in VR.

    The most important part of the project was the story and scenario, which justifies and ex- plains the whole concept. I started planning the scenario and the details early on which made it easier for me to visualize it in finalization phase.

    This project also raises a question: What comes next in the field of transportation and mobil- ity? For years’ cars and transportation have remained the same. We move from place A to B, this is what I call: Physical transportation. Right now we are living times of change as autono- mous technology is finally breaking through. However, cars have always been about the driv- ing experience and in autonomous future; trav- eling experience. Because of the changing atti- tudes towards cars amongst youth, cars are not seen as a pleasant experience anymore. Rather as a necessity. Experiences engage users with brands, whether it is a smartphone or a car, and this is what young users appreciate. When Physical transportation is no longer delivering that experience, car brands need to figure out a way to engage the users. This is where Mental Transportation changes the game.

    Mental Transportation is a term I came up with along the process and as the name suggests, it enables users to travel in their mind. With the idea of mental transportation, I want to chal- lenge everyone to think differently and with an open mind about the future of mobility and transportation.

  • 128.
    Lee, Benjamin
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Umeå Institute of Design.
    From Curb to Launch: Explore the pre-launch, ground experience for space tourism in 20402018Independent thesis Advanced level (degree of Master (Two Years)), 20 HE creditsStudent thesis
    Abstract [en]

    We are at the dawn of the next chapter of manned space flight, and space travel will soon be within reach for the majority of the humanity, not just the elite. The imminent launch of Virgin Galactic's first commercial service this year, soon to be followed by companies such as SpaceX and Blue Origin, means that space tourism will quickly go from one individual every few years to dozens, perhaps hundreds of new space tourists annually. Everyday civilians going to space for the purpose of tourism will have fundamentally different needs than professional astronauts going up to space for days or month at a times for work and research. To make space travel within reach of the masses, space tourist will need a different and simplified process compared to traditional astronauts.

    This thesis created a user-centered service that allows companies to handle the increasing number of private individuals going to space. The service not only prepares the customer for the space flight, but also provides an experience that will last a lifetime, that will be shared with others, and in the process perhaps inspire a new generation of human progress and collaboration.

    The result is a snapshot of the overall service, illustrate the user experience in an immersive, virtual environment. As part of the exploration, an immersive and very effective new method of user experience testing is developed as contribution to the field of Interaction Design.

  • 129.
    Lee, John
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Umeå Institute of Design.
    Specimen Sample Transportation in Lesotho2012Independent thesis Advanced level (degree of Master (Two Years)), 20 credits / 30 HE creditsStudent thesis
    Abstract [en]

    Sample Transport Riders in Lesotho delivers up to 2000 blood and sputum samples per week as well as the results by riding on motorcycles for HIV and TB diagnosis and monitoring for patients. They have critical role in medical eco system of Lesotho thus riding 4-5days per week whether snowing or raining as long as the roads are safe to ride on. This degree project explored various design opportunities around the everyday life of sample transportation riders. Based on 12 days of qualitative research in Lesotho, the clear need for new sample transportation backpack and system was identified and became a focus of this degree project.

  • 130.
    Leijon, Markus
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Umeå Institute of Design.
    du&jag - The car seat for you and me2013Independent thesis Basic level (degree of Bachelor), 10 credits / 15 HE creditsStudent thesis
    Abstract [en]

     Car seats for smaller children, offers very good protection incase of a collision. Unfortunately for the parents’ sake , these car seats is heavy to handle outside the car. For example back and forth home and short errands around town. In other words, all those times when you decide to just take out the car seat and carry it instead of place the baby in a baby carrier. By analyzing where and how the car seat is being used. How best to carry heavier loads up to about 15 kg as a car seat with the child can weigh and by taking into account the child ’s and the parents anatomy. This work led to a concept on how this problem can be solved. Various technical principle solutions have been developed and evaluated. The chosen solution has then been further developed by various design approaches where form and expression has been the important part. The main body of the new solution is a softer inner which you lifts out when you leave the car. The baby sits in a carrier that the parent carries in front of their body. Remaining in the car is a chair-like base with ”click” fasteners that lock the softer part in place when it´s placed in the car, with the baby in it. The major benefits of solving it this way is that the baby is carried in front of the body without oblique loaded lifting on the spine. While the solution also itself weighs several pounds less than the current car seats. It also frees the parents both hands by carrying the child this way. All this leads to a gentler living for the parents.

  • 131.
    Leong, Eric
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Umeå Institute of Design.
    Audi Elite: Re-establishing vehicle controllability into something new and desirable2012Independent thesis Advanced level (degree of Master (Two Years)), 20 credits / 30 HE creditsStudent thesis
    Abstract [en]

    Imagine changing the dynamics of driving capability between man and machine, a seamless meshing between capability and usability…what would that be? The world of autonomous driving is on the rise. What kind of opportunity does the rise in this form of technology create? Can we use this rise of change in mobility to spawn a new form of product which can re-establish our vehicle controllability for maneuvering into some new and desirable? This vehicle is an advanced platform with a new form of vehicle controls for maneuvering which turns driving into something which empowers the user to a greater degree. The vehicle will adapt itself to the user by allowing them to control the vehicle in ways which he or she desires unlike restricting vehicle controls we see today. It will also set out to bring capability of the vehicle to the user through an advanced learning platform; intertwining man and machine.

  • 132.
    Lindberg, Simon
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Umeå Institute of Design.
    Motorcykelhjälm: Underlätta avtagandet efter en olycka2014Independent thesis Basic level (degree of Bachelor), 10 credits / 15 HE creditsStudent thesis
    Abstract [en]

    In my degree project I have focused on how to make it easier for ambulance personnel to remove a motorcycle helmet after an accident. During my research I have interviewed ambulance personnel from different cities and a trauma surgeon to get a better understanding of how they work today and the problems they experience. Some of the problem areas are that you need a lot of force to remove the helmet, that the padding catches the ears and that the chin guard catches the face. Since ambulance personnel always assume that there is a neck injury after an accident, all these problems make it difficult to remove the helmet safely.

    The result is a motorcycle helmet with a focus on safe removal after an accident, to reduce the risk of worsening a neck injury. The solution suggested is that a small part of the back of the helmet is detachable, to make the opening larger. With that part, some of the padding is released to avoid friction. The padding is inflatable to make the helmet fit a variety of head shapes, and when the back piece is released, the padding deflates to make more room in the helmet.

  • 133.
    Lindenau, Maja
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Umeå Institute of Design.
    How can safety be improved and facilitate work at height?2015Independent thesis Basic level (degree of Bachelor), 10 credits / 15 HE creditsStudent thesis
    Abstract [en]

    In recent years accidents caused by falling from heights has increased. Typical risc group, operators, construction worker usually fall from machines scaffoldings and roofs.

    The Flex-lift concept could increase the safety during work on heights as well provide the operator a more correct work position. Given the equipment that could fulfill its purpose, the user might not take the easiest short cut, and expose themself into any danger.

    The concept provides the operator with a flexibility to place and adjust it for its purpose, the opportunity to add docks and the concept can work as a modular system, controlled by a remote control. 

  • 134.
    Lindh Karlsson, Monica
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Umeå Institute of Design.
    Aditya, Pawar
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Umeå Institute of Design.
    Rosenbak, Søren
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Umeå Institute of Design.
    Shifting Perspectives of Aesthetics2018Report (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The aim of this Conversation is to inquire taken-for-granted foundations for design aesthetics, often informed by semantics and the social order established around the privileged designer. Hence, the Conversation is set up to disrupt former social orders and support a shared Conversation about the nature of the questions we need to ask in order to respond to the shift in design aesthetics. The session is structured around group work, with each group’s discussion revolving around a given disruption: capitalism, the anthropocene, and technocentrism. Key to the Conversation will be conversation-triggers in form of media and creation of ‘narratives’ that represent what kind of questions can be asked and what kind of answers we aim for. The purpose is to inspire diverse discussions around ways we can push for the kinds of aesthetics that align with democratic meaning-making, beyond the idea of universal modernist functionality.

  • 135.
    Lindh Karlsson, Monica
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Umeå Institute of Design.
    Redström, Johan
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Umeå Institute of Design.
    Design Togetherness2015In: Nordes, ISSN 1604-9705, no 6, p. 1-10Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    While science typically approaches complexity through analysis, that is, by unpacking a complex whole into distinct and more manageable parts, the challenge of design is typically to do the opposite; to resolve often contradictory issues and bring together a meaningful whole. We think that there are more to forms of doing design together than our current terminology allows us to articulate. In particular, we want to explore if there are forms of design doing that open up for a kind of bringing together that is qualitatively different from collaboration, in the same way as the meaningful whole design deals with is something qualitatively different than a combination of parts coming out of an analysis. To learn more about doing design together in design education, we have done a series of experiments with multi disciplinary teams. Analysing the results using Arendt’s distinctionbetween work and action, we suggest that there is a difference between collaborative design where people come together as what they are, and a kind of design togetherness where people come together as who they are. In conclusion, we argue that design education might need to revisit its artistic and methodological foundations with respect to participation.

  • 136.
    Lindh Karlsson, Monica
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Umeå Institute of Design.
    Redström, Johan
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Umeå Institute of Design.
    Design Togetherness, Pluralism and Convergence2016In: Proceedings of DRS 2016: Design + Research + Society : Future-Focused Thinking / [ed] Peter Lloyd and Eric Bohemia, London: Design Research Society , 2016, Vol. 10, p. 4029-4044Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    We describe an inquiry into how we relate to each other in design, as we design. In particular, we are interested in to what extent, and in what ways, we acknowledge diversity in knowledge, experience, and skill. We have conducted a series of project courses within design education to make students explore different ways of doing design together. Our findings point to two main tendencies: towards cultures of pluralism, of coming together as who we are; and cultures of representation, of coming together as what we are. This points to important issues related to how methodology and process structure the way we perceive and relate to each other. Indeed, in a disciplinary methodological framework ultimately oriented towards convergence and the making of a final design, how do we evolve and engage with that which must not converge to a single point but where difference and diversity must be acknowledged?

  • 137.
    Lindström, Kristina
    et al.
    Malmö University.
    Ståhl, Åsa
    Umeå University.
    Becoming Response-able Stakeholders: Participatory Design in Times of Uncertainties2016In: PDC '16 - Proceedings of the 14th Participatory Design Conference: Short Papers, Interactive Exhibitions, Workshops - Volume 2, ACM Digital Library, 2016, Vol. 2, p. 41-44Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This paper connects with recent movements within participatory design that move beyond democracy at work and into public engagements with matters where stakes and stakeholders are uncertain. This is thus a shift from earlier participatory design projects where identifiable stakeholders were a pre-condition. To enable the becoming of stakes and stakeholders that are response-able, this paper argues for a new design space within participatory design: to enable material participation in yet unarticulated issues connected to socio-material entanglements. This becoming of stakeholder is not necessarily about solving a problem but to sensitize oneself to one's entanglements, response-ability and agency in relation to potential issues. The proposal is discussed through a design experiment centred on co-living and the messy practices of composting plastic waste in domestic settings.

  • 138.
    Lindström, Kristina
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Umeå Institute of Design.
    Ståhl, Åsa
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Umeå Institute of Design.
    Plastic Imaginaries: Becoming Response-able Stakeholders?2016Other (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This piece in the interactive exhibition shows a prototype of a domestic plastic composting kit. More specifically it's a repurposed glass jar with a lid that has been cut open and replaced by a metal net. Inside it common mealworms are biodegrading styrofoam. A democratic design experiment, where similar prototypes were distributed to explore how it is to live with it, will be present in this exhibition through photos. A 30-minute workshop builds on this democratic design experiment and explores the becoming of stakeholders when the actors and issues are multiple and uncertain.

  • 139.
    Lindström, Kristina
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Umeå Institute of Design.
    Ståhl, Åsa
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Umeå Institute of Design.
    Politics of inviting: co-articulating issues in designerly public engagement2016In: Design anthropological futures / [ed] Rachel Charlotte Smith, Ton Otto, Kasper Tang Vangkilde, Mette Gislev Kjaersgaard, Joachim Halse and Thomas Binder, London: Bloomsbury Academic, 2016, p. 183-197Chapter in book (Refereed)
  • 140.
    Liu, Kefeng
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Umeå Institute of Design.
    E-PIC2016Independent thesis Advanced level (degree of Master (Two Years)), 20 credits / 30 HE creditsStudent thesis
    Abstract [en]

    For  many  off-road drive   lovers,  planning a journey to  Tibet   is an ultimate dream.  However, the eco-system there  is quite sensitive and fragile. In this project I try to design  a sustainable vehicle that  could make us enjoy  an expedition to Tibet  while  protecting such precious environment.

    Research  about future trends, about the  environmental conditions, about emerging powertrain technologies and the Jeep brand helped me to establish my design  concept. Package  study, ideation sketches and clay modelling were used to develop both styling and functionality aspects of the vehicle. Digital modelling supported the fabrication of a quarter scale model.  Storytelling was used  to  explain the  concept and  the  situations that  Jeep  E-pic  drivers could meet  during their expedition.

    The result  is a self-powered all-terrain vehicle designed to carry  two occupants and their  expedition gear and equipped with various tools to handle  eventual maintenance and rescue  situations.

  • 141.
    Lo, Vivian
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Umeå Institute of Design.
    Pausitive: Designing for digital downtime and reflection in the homespace2013Independent thesis Advanced level (degree of Master (Two Years)), 20 credits / 30 HE creditsStudent thesis
    Abstract [en]

    As we emerge into an age of hyperconnectivity, technology becomes increasingly pervasive in our daily lives. And with this change, our behavior and values progressively shift towards instant access, constant availability and multi-tasking. Recent research studies in cognitive psychology have indicated a change in the wiring of our brain due to these behavior shifts. 

    In this thesis project, technology’s role in our lives was explored, particularly within the context of home, a traditionally restorative environment.  By identifying key problem areas from user research and drawing inspirations from slow technology and other relevant fields of expertise, key concepts were conceptualized. The result is a collection of computer-mediated objects designed to support downtime and reflective behavior, as well as, integrate into our everyday living.

  • 142.
    Loredo, Juan
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Umeå Institute of Design.
    Autonomus Harvester2012Independent thesis Advanced level (degree of Master (Two Years)), 20 credits / 30 HE creditsStudent thesis
    Abstract [en]

    The future of forestry is aproject the start when the Skogtekniska Klustret approached Umea Institute ofDesign looking for a possible collaboration between the cluster companies and studentsat the Advanced Product Design program. Skogtekniska Klustret is a cluster ofSwedish forest companies that have join together in order in order to pushSwedish Forest Industry into a new level and become an example to othercompanies as well as the rest of the world. The result of the study was the design of a small autonomous harvester forthinning, intended for the market in 2030.

  • 143.
    Lundquist, Martin
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Department of Applied Physics and Electronics.
    Autonomous Bus Passenger Experience2018Independent thesis Advanced level (professional degree), 20 credits / 30 HE creditsStudent thesis
    Abstract [en]

    Time keeps on changing our perception of what is possible in our personal life and around us. Over time, jobs such as elevator operator was essential to make the elevator keep its speed, stop parallel to the floor and keep passengers safe in case of emergency. Nowadays elevator passengers just have to enter their destination and wait to be transported there. An operator would be superfluous for this, today, simple procedure.

    This paper aims to create a set of interaction strategies to provide an efficient and pleasurable journey for the passenger traveling with an autonomous bus, as well as evaluate concepts where these strategies have been applied. The strategies and concepts will be developed from an extensive user- and literature research where the situation of today will be analysed and looked upon with the eyes of tomorrow, to find challenges and needs.

    Findings shows that passengers have to trust the vehicle and service. At the same time vehicle and service providers have to provide a reliable and consistent service. Four design directions were created to establish this trust between the user and vehicle and service.

    To enable control and give passengers an efficient journey, passengers have to be provided with adequate and reliable information. The information regarding the bus’s behaviour should be communicated in a transparent way so the bus’s intentions and actions are understandable from a passenger point of view. Also, passengers have to be enabled to stay safe when using the bus, during commuting and emergency, through giving them cues in how an emergency should be handled.

  • 144.
    Lundström, Fredrik
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Arts, Department of Creative Studies (Teacher Education).
    Berg, Theresa
    Umeå University, Faculty of Arts, Department of Creative Studies (Teacher Education).
    Ramar och reflektion: Om designprocessen som didaktiskt alternativ2012Independent thesis Basic level (university diploma), 10 credits / 15 HE creditsStudent thesis
    Abstract [en]

    By studying literature concerning design, didactics and reflection, and complementing those explorations with interviews with experienced design educators, this thesis challenges the idea of aesthetic media education being purely aesthetic in its characteristics. Drawing from their own experiences as a media aesthetics educator and an industrial designer, the two authors argue that the work flow used within most fields of design, commonly known as the design process, might provide a suitable didactic alternative to a field of education lacking relevant methodology. The literature study offers a better understanding of the design process and how it may be defined and viewed within an educational context. The interviews provide a more practical insight into the world of design education. The result shows that the design process as a didactical method theoretically offers both elements of critical thinking as well as direction and frames for students lacking aesthetic and artistic experience. One conclusion is that the design process, given its similarities to John Dewey’s educational theories, shares a fundamental and close relation to the didactics of aesthetic education; suggesting that an implementation of named process into education could be realized without any significant problems.

  • 145.
    Luu, Trieu Vy
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Umeå Institute of Design.
    Revealing The Nature Of Human Characteristics Through Interaction Design2017Independent thesis Advanced level (degree of Master (Two Years)), 20 credits / 30 HE creditsStudent thesis
    Abstract [en]

    Everyday we come up with new solutions for our existing problems. But the solutions of today are tomorrow’s problem. The products we create as designers are often bringing more complexity in our society than it is initially intended for.

    This thesis aims to give a new perspective on the design practice community. Instead of starting with a problem-solving scope, this thesis intent is to find what is truly meaningful for human life, meaning finding, and to propose how we can envision new ways of meaning making within interaction design. The two processes together of meaning finding and meaning making is how we can aim for concrete results that are relevant for our society.

    To better understand what truly matters for human life, I collected 14 stories through ethnographic research. These ethnographic stories reveal the nature of human characteristics when people face and overcome big challenges in life. Some of these ethnographic stories highlights the life of a WWII survivor, war refugee, leukaemia child-patient and a widow. Parallel, to the ethnographic work, I explored how I can evoke a deeper connection between people, by making them listen to each-other’s heartbeat. 

    Inevitably, by exploring the fundamental elements of human life and observing the emotions and behaviour of my interviewees and participants, the thesis find itself often on the playground between philosophy and human life. But by taking a strong interaction design perspective, these insights were manifested in the human design manifesto booklet. This booklet proposes six expressions for designers, with the intention to embrace the fundamental elements of human life when we design: 

    1. Design attitudes, not solutions. 2. Design the medicine of the mind. 3. Design for relationships. 4. Design for our direct senses. 5. Design for the deep human connection. 6. Design the act of kindness 

    Later on, for the meaning making part: one statement from the Human Design Manifesto was selected to explore in depth: Design the act of kindness. For this expression project Hidden Figures was created. Hidden Figures is a design proposal which demonstrates that a design creation can be driven by the fundamental elements of human life. In this case proposing the act of kindness as a vision on how our society could be. 

    In overall, this master’s thesis demonstrates how our design proposals can embody and resonate well between the three levels of design philosophy, a designer’s vision and interaction design practice: How we, as designers, can use meaning-making and meaning-finding to create more relevant impact for our society. Last, I hope this work encourages other designers to think deeply about their own creations and its impact. And help designers reflect on why they create and how they could also alternatively practice design.

  • 146.
    Lévy, Pierre
    et al.
    Eindhoven University of Technology, Industrial Design.
    Kuenen, Christoffel
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Umeå Institute of Design.
    Overbeeke, Kees
    Eindhoven University of Technology, Industrial Design.
    Uchiyama, Toshiaki
    University of Tsukuba, Japan.
    Yamanaka, Toshimasa
    University of Tsukuba, Japan.
    Ohlala: Content-completeness, communication and emotional experience2011In: Diversity and Unity: proceeding of the International Association of Societies of Design Research Conference 2011, IASDR'11 / [ed] N.F.M. Roozenburg, L.L. Chen,P.J. Stappers, 2011Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Among other explorations, the field of telepresence technology has looked at ways to create a feeling of telepresence based on the transfer of minimal information. On this topic, the Cololo project has taken an extreme position by proposing the experience of 1-bit communication.

    Based on the observation of Cololo in use, it is shown that content is not necessary to trigger an emotional experience. This paper introduces a novel dimension to be taken into consideration in communication technology: the content-completeness dimension, ranging from non-content to hyper-content. Furthermore, we built the Ohlala framework, aiming to explore the content-completeness dimension. Based on Ohlala, by way of a research through design, we intend to explore further the relations between this dimension on communication and emotional experience.

  • 147.
    Löf, Anton
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Umeå Institute of Design.
    Generating and Manipulating Sound: Tools for digital music production2017Independent thesis Advanced level (degree of Master (Two Years)), 20 credits / 30 HE creditsStudent thesis
    Abstract [en]

    Music making and technological development has always been connected. The digital revolution has made advanced music production, writing and distribution tools universally accessible. New intelligent tools built on machine learning are entering the market potentially changing how we create music and interact with creative content. 

    The aim of this thesis project has been to find alternatives to existing interaction models manifested in modern DAWs (Digital Audio Workstations). Ideas developed through rough sketches and simple prototypes—the outcome consists of three concept videos proposing changes to three moments in the workflow of songwriters and producers.

    This thesis started with an idea of exploring the borderland between computer generated music and human creativity. Through desk research and interviews I learned that computational creativity exist and that there is a lot of different ways of defining creativity and art. Creating creative computers should not aim to replace humans creative abilities—it is rather about automating and creating tools that enhance our creative abilities. 

    To understand how songwriters and producers work the subject were investigated through semi-structured contextual interviews. The different ways of working and using tools were mapped out and potential opportunity areas were identified. This thesis have been a project that through sketching, mock-ups and simple prototypes questions how we use digital tools in music production. These concepts and sketches were continuously brought back to experts for feedback.

    The outcome consists of three concepts. They are presented through three short videos. These videos are now shared with a bigger audience and will act as an conversation starter for people interested in tools for digital music production. 

    1. Automating parts of the songwriting process and create a collaborative workflow between a you and a computer, through a conversational user interface. 

    2. A pressure sensitive touch surface that let you manipulate sound. It is an adaptive system that automatically detects active controls in your DAW—it maps these active controls from your computer screen down to a touch pad. 

    3. The third concept changes the way you organise and look for sound files. It is a automatised process where a software helps you compare different sounds to each other. It takes away most labels and focuses on mapping sound according to its auditory profile.

  • 148.
    Löf, Anton
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Umeå Institute of Design.
    Gormsson - En symaskin för nybörjare2014Independent thesis Basic level (degree of Bachelor), 10 credits / 15 HE creditsStudent thesis
    Abstract [en]

    We are getting smarter. Our knowledge of the world around us is increasing rapidly and our population spend a big portion of their time in school studying it. But art and craft are moving out to give room for more theoretical subjects. Today many of us can not even fix a torn shirt without help. We buy new ones, they are cheap enough. Sewing used to be a way of self expression. We created out of need and joy. We are losing what used to be common knowledge. So how do you learn a new craft? This project is trying to connect the people, craft knowledge and instructions available online with an aspiring craftsperson through a new sewing machine. The result is a slightly smaller machine where buttons and screen has been removed and all your interaction with the machine, other than sewing, is moved to a mobile device.

    The main challenge with the project have been to identify what people find joyful/frustrating while using sewing machines. By interviewing users, both experienced and beginners, have I i explored what people in different ages like with sewing and craft in general. I have also been trying to teach myself to sew during the project. An online questionnaire gave me a broader picture over what kind of projects people are making, how they store their sewing machines and what they like about them.

    This project focused on changing the perceived problems and keep what the users find joyful. Buttons and screen has been removed from the machine and all your interaction, other than sewing, is moved to a mobile device or computer. This enables a smart interface that adapts to your needs and skill-level. To get feedback on your actions there is a laser projector that gives you a preview of your choices. You select a straight stitch and you get direct visual feedback in physical space. If you then choose to increase the length of the stitches you immediately get a representation of how far it is between two stitches. Other then that is this machine quite similar to a regular sewing machine. Sewing machines have a complex mechanical inside that works surprisingly well. But they are big. This one is slightly smaller.

  • 149. Löwgren, Jonas
    et al.
    Stolterman, Erik
    Developing IT Design Ability Through Repertoires and Contextual Product Semantics1998In: Digital Creativity, ISSN 1462-6268, E-ISSN 1744-3806, Vol. 9, no 4, p. 223-237Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Abstract A rich repertoire of templates and a developed language for design qualities are two essential components of professional design ability. We discuss ?tools? for the individual designers development of a repertoire and a use?quality language. Three examples are presented of how IT artifacts can be described and analysed in a way that is conducive to repertoire development. In our sample analyses, we identify a number of genre?bound, contextual use qualities that represent steps toward a use?quality language for IT design. These qualities are social action space, tight coupling, dynamic Gestalt, autonomy, intrinsic motivation and playability. We discuss how these tentative steps relate to product semantics in more mature design fields, and provide examples of exercises in repertoire and use?quality language development for classroom and individual use.

  • 150.
    Macdonald, Tyler
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Umeå Institute of Design.
    The Aurora: What will space tourism look like in 2040?2018Independent thesis Advanced level (degree of Master (Two Years)), 20 credits / 30 HE creditsStudent thesis
    Abstract [en]

    What is Space Tourism? Space Tourism is when humans venture past 100km above the earth for recreational purposes. It could be for the view or just the thrill, either way space has captured our imaginations ever since we could look up and ask what is beyond our sky. What has happened in the past 10 years in the rocket industry has been amazing. We now have more private companies sending rockets to space at a rate faster than during the space race between the Soviets and Americans. At the current rate we will see the cost of traveling to space drop to a point where more and more people and companies will be able to afford such a flight. And so... it is only a matter of time before we see space tourism as a new industry. Designing something new like a space ship that has no 'standard'. Thus requiring a lot of research in order to contextualize its possibilities. Is it a HTOL (Horizontal Take Off and Landing) or a VTOL (Vertical Take Off and Landing) or Multistaged or Single Stage Rocket? Seemingly endless possibilities are available. As a result the process to create the final design took on the form of a trdional industrial design process, not one that would be similar to the automotive industry. This isnt a project about perfect surfacing or all the proper lead ins. Its something bigger, the beginning of a new discussion. And so, collaborating was a key factor. One with an interaction designer who researched the before launch senario for such a space flight experience. And the other, an aviation geek who loves cool flying machines and finally an aersopace engineer. All allowing for idea bouncing and expansion on strategy and thoughts. Of course what followed was sketching, mood boarding, 3D, and VR and back and forth discussions that such activites provoke. In order to showcase the experience such a product would provide, a small video was finished alongside the final result. In the end this project resulted in 4 products a: Spaceship Exterior, Interior, Helmet and Spacesuit. All connected to each other (quite literally) and thus leading to a complete experience; a solved design. That design is the Aurora. A HTOL SSTO (Horizontal Take-Off and Land, Single Stage To Orbit) Spaceship for the year 2040. A year that will see the beginning of commercial spaceflight for the masses.

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