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  • 101.
    Carlsson, Katrin E
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Molecular Biology (Faculty of Science and Technology).
    Liu, Junfa
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Molecular Biology (Faculty of Science and Technology).
    Edqvist, Petra J
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Molecular Biology (Faculty of Medicine).
    Francis, Matthew S
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Molecular Biology (Faculty of Science and Technology). Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Umeå Centre for Microbial Research (UCMR).
    Influence of the Cpx extracytoplasmic-stress-responsive pathway on Yersinia sp.-eukaryotic cell contact.2007In: Infect Immun, ISSN 0019-9567, Vol. 75, no 9, p. 4386-99Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The extracytoplasmic-stress-responsive CpxRA two-component signal transduction pathway allows bacteria to adapt to growth in extreme environments. It controls the production of periplasmic protein folding and degradation factors, which aids in the biogenesis of multicomponent virulence determinants that span the bacterial envelope. This is true of the Yersinia pseudotuberculosis Ysc-Yop type III secretion system. However, despite using a second-site suppressor mutation to restore Yop effector secretion by yersiniae defective in the CpxA sensor kinase, these bacteria poorly translocated Yops into target eukaryotic cells. Investigation of this phenotype herein revealed that the expression of genes which encode several surface-located adhesins is also influenced by the Cpx pathway. In particular, the expression and surface localization of invasin, an adhesin that engages beta1-integrins on the eukaryotic cell surface, are severely restricted by the removal of CpxA. This reduces bacterial association with eukaryotic cells, which could be suppressed by the ectopic production of CpxA, invasin, or RovA, a positive activator of inv expression. In turn, these infected eukaryotic cells then became susceptible to intoxication by translocated Yop effectors. In contrast, bacteria harboring an in-frame deletion of cpxR, which encodes the cognate response regulator, displayed an enhanced ability to interact with cell monolayers, as well as elevated inv and rovA transcription. This phenotype could be drastically suppressed by providing a wild-type copy of cpxR in trans. We propose a mechanism of inv regulation influenced by the direct negative effects of phosphorylated CpxR on inv and rovA transcription. In this fashion, sensing of extracytoplasmic stress by CpxAR contributes to productive Yersinia sp.-eukaryotic cell interactions.

  • 102.
    Carlsson, Lennart
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Molecular Biology (Faculty of Medicine).
    Ruuth, Kristina
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Department of Molecular Biology (Faculty of Science and Technology).
    Lundgren, Erik
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Molecular Biology (Faculty of Medicine).
    IFN-alpha induced proliferation of human primary B-lymphocytesManuscript (preprint) (Other academic)
  • 103.
    Chand, Damini
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Molecular Biology (Faculty of Medicine).
    Yamazaki, Yasuo
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Department of Molecular Biology (Faculty of Science and Technology).
    Ruuth, Kristina
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Molecular Biology (Faculty of Medicine).
    Schönherr, Christina
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Molecular Biology (Faculty of Medicine).
    Martinsson, Tommy
    Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Kogner, Per
    Stockholm, Sweden.
    Attiyeh, Edward F
    Philadelphia, PA 19104, USA .
    Maris, John
    Philadelphia, PA 19104, USA .
    Morozova, Olena
    Vancouver, British Columbia V5Z 4S6, Canada .
    Marra, Marco A
    Vancouver, British Columbia V5Z 4S6, Canada .
    Ohira, Miki
    Chiba 260-8717, Japan.
    Nakagawara, Akira
    Chiba 260-8717, Japan.
    Sandström, Per-Erik
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Clinical Sciences, Paediatrics.
    Palmer, Ruth H
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Molecular Biology (Faculty of Medicine).
    Hallberg, Bengt
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Molecular Biology (Faculty of Medicine).
    Cell culture and Drosophila model systems define three classes of anaplastic lymphoma kinase mutations in neuroblastoma2013In: Disease Models and Mechanisms, ISSN 1754-8403, E-ISSN 1754-8411, Vol. 6, no 2, p. 373-382Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Neuroblastoma is a childhood extracranial solid tumor which is associated with a number of genetic changes. Included in these genetic alterations are mutations in the kinase domain of the Anaplastic Lymphoma Kinase (ALK) receptor tyrosine kinase (RTK), which have been found in both somatic and familial neuroblastoma. In order to treat patients accordingly required characterisation of these mutations in terms of their response to ALK tyrosine kinase inhibitors (TKIs). Here, we report the identification and characterisation of two novel neuroblastoma ALK mutations (A1099T and 1464STOP) which we have investigated together with several previously reported but uncharacterised ALK mutations (T1087I, D1091N, T1151M, M1166R, F1174I and A1234T). In order to understand the potential role of these ALK mutations in neuroblastoma progression we have employed cell culture based systems together with the model organism Drosophila as a readout for ligand-independent activity. Mutation of ALK at position F1174I generates a gain-of-function receptor capable of activating intracellular targets, such as ERK (extracellular signal regulated kinase) and STAT3 (signal transducer and activator of transcription 3) in a ligand independent manner. Analysis of these previously uncharacterised ALK mutants and comparison with ALK(F1174) mutants suggests that ALK mutations observed in neuroblastoma fall into three classes. These are: (i) gain-of-function ligand independent mutations such as ALK(F1174), (ii) kinase-dead ALK mutants, e.g. ALK(I1250T)(Schonherr et al 2011a) or (iii) ALK mutations which are ligand-dependent in nature. Irrespective of the nature of the observed ALK mutants, in every case the activity of the mutant ALK receptors could be abrogated by the ALK inhibitor crizotinib (PF-02341066, Xalkori), albeit with differing levels of sensitivity.

  • 104.
    Chapman, K B
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Microbiology. Department of Molecular Biology and Genetics, Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine, 725 North Wolfe Street, Baltimore, MD.
    Byström, Anders S
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Department of Molecular Biology (Faculty of Science and Technology).
    Boeke, J D
    Initiator methionine tRNA is essential for Ty1 transposition in yeast1992In: Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences of the United States of America, ISSN 0027-8424, E-ISSN 1091-6490, Vol. 89, no 8, p. 3236-3240Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The yeast retrotransposon Ty1 transposes through an RNA intermediate by a mechanism similar to that of retroviral reverse transcription and integration. Ty1 RNA contains a putative minus strand primer binding site (-PBS) that is complementary to the 3' acceptor stem of the initiator methionine tRNA (tRNA(iMet)). Here we demonstrate that the tRNA(iMet) is used as a primer for Ty1 reverse transcription. Mutations in the Ty1 element that alter 5 of 10 nucleotides that are complementary to the tRNA(iMet) abolish Ty1 transposition, even though they are silent with regard to Ty1 protein coding. We have constructed a yeast strain lacking wild-type tRNA(iMet) that is dependent on a mutant derivative of tRNA(iMet) that has an altered acceptor stem sequence, engineered to restore homology with the Ty1 -PBS mutant. The compensatory mutations made in the tRNA(iMet) alleviate the transposition defect of the Ty1 -PBS mutant. The mutant and wild-type tRNA(iMet) are enriched within Ty1 virus-like particles irrespective of complementarity to the Ty1 -PBS. Thus, complementarity between the Ty1 -PBS and tRNA(iMet) is essential for transposition but is not necessary for packaging of the tRNA inside virus-like particles.

  • 105.
    Chen, Changchun
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Department of Molecular Biology (Faculty of Science and Technology).
    The role of Elongator complex in Saccharomyces cerevisiae and Caenorhabditis elegans2011Doctoral thesis, comprehensive summary (Other academic)
  • 106.
    Chen, Changchun
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Department of Molecular Biology (Faculty of Science and Technology).
    Huang, Bo
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Department of Molecular Biology (Faculty of Science and Technology).
    Anderson, James T
    Byström, Anders S
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Department of Molecular Biology (Faculty of Science and Technology).
    Unexpected accumulation of ncm5U and ncm5s2U in a trm9 mutant suggests an additional step in the synthesis of mcm5U and mcm5s2U.2011In: PLoS ONE, ISSN 1932-6203, E-ISSN 1932-6203, Vol. 6, no 6, p. e20783-Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    BACKGROUND: Transfer RNAs are synthesized as a primary transcript that is processed to produce a mature tRNA. As part of the maturation process, a subset of the nucleosides are modified. Modifications in the anticodon region often modulate the decoding ability of the tRNA. At position 34, the majority of yeast cytosolic tRNA species that have a uridine are modified to 5-carbamoylmethyluridine (ncm(5)U), 5-carbamoylmethyl-2'-O-methyluridine (ncm(5)Um), 5-methoxycarbonylmethyl-uridine (mcm(5)U) or 5-methoxycarbonylmethyl-2-thiouridine (mcm(5)s(2)U). The formation of mcm(5) and ncm(5) side chains involves a complex pathway, where the last step in formation of mcm(5) is a methyl esterification of cm(5) dependent on the Trm9 and Trm112 proteins.

    METHODOLOGY AND PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: Both Trm9 and Trm112 are required for the last step in formation of mcm(5) side chains at wobble uridines. By co-expressing a histidine-tagged Trm9p together with a native Trm112p in E. coli, these two proteins purified as a complex. The presence of Trm112p dramatically improves the methyltransferase activity of Trm9p in vitro. Single tRNA species that normally contain mcm(5)U or mcm(5)s(2)U nucleosides were isolated from trm9Δ or trm112Δ mutants and the presence of modified nucleosides was analyzed by HPLC. In both mutants, mcm(5)U and mcm(5)s(2)U nucleosides are absent in tRNAs and the major intermediates accumulating were ncm(5)U and ncm(5)s(2)U, not the expected cm(5)U and cm(5)s(2)U.

    CONCLUSIONS: Trm9p and Trm112p function together at the final step in formation of mcm(5)U in tRNA by using the intermediate cm(5)U as a substrate. In tRNA isolated from trm9Δ and trm112Δ strains, ncm(5)U and ncm(5)s(2)U nucleosides accumulate, questioning the order of nucleoside intermediate formation of the mcm(5) side chain. We propose two alternative explanations for this observation. One is that the intermediate cm(5)U is generated from ncm(5)U by a yet unknown mechanism and the other is that cm(5)U is formed before ncm(5)U and mcm(5)U.

  • 107.
    Chen, Changchun
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Department of Molecular Biology (Faculty of Science and Technology).
    Huang, Bo
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Department of Molecular Biology (Faculty of Science and Technology).
    Eliasson, Mattias
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Department of Chemistry.
    Rydén, Patrik
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Department of Mathematics and Mathematical Statistics.
    Byström, Anders S
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Department of Molecular Biology (Faculty of Science and Technology).
    Elongator Complex Influences Telomeric Gene Silencing and DNA Damage Response by Its Role in Wobble Uridine tRNA Modification2011In: PLoS genetics, ISSN 1553-7404, Vol. 7, no 9, p. e1002258-Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Elongator complex is required for formation of the side chains at position 5 of modified nucleosides 5-carbamoylmethyluridine (ncm(5)U(34)), 5-methoxycarbonylmethyluridine (mcm(5)U(34)), and 5-methoxycarbonylmethyl-2-thiouridine (mcm(5)s(2)U(34)) at wobble position in tRNA. These modified nucleosides are important for efficient decoding during translation. In a recent publication, Elongator complex was implicated to participate in telomeric gene silencing and DNA damage response by interacting with proliferating cell nuclear antigen (PCNA). Here we show that elevated levels of tRNA(Lys) (s(2) ) (UUU), tRNA(Gln) (s(2) ) (UUG), and tRNA(Glu) (s(2) ) (UUC), which in a wild-type background contain the mcm(5)s(2)U nucleoside at position 34, suppress the defects in telomeric gene silencing and DNA damage response observed in the Elongator mutants. We also found that the reported differences in telomeric gene silencing and DNA damage response of various elp3 alleles correlated with the levels of modified nucleosides at U(34). Defects in telomeric gene silencing and DNA damage response are also observed in strains with the tuc2Δ mutation, which abolish the formation of the 2-thio group of the mcm(5)s(2)U nucleoside in tRNA(Lys) (mcm(5) (s(2) ) (UUU) ), tRNA(Gln) (mcm(5) (s(2) ) (UUG) ), and tRNA(Glu) (mcm(5) (s(2) ) (UUC) ). These observations show that Elongator complex does not directly participate in telomeric gene silencing and DNA damage response, but rather that modified nucleosides at U(34) are important for efficient expression of gene products involved in these processes. Consistent with this notion, we found that expression of Sir4, a silent information regulator required for assembly of silent chromatin at telomeres, was decreased in the elp3Δ mutants.

  • 108.
    Chen, Changchun
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Department of Molecular Biology (Faculty of Science and Technology).
    Tuck, Simon
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Umeå Centre for Molecular Medicine (UCMM).
    Byström, Anders S
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Molecular Biology (Faculty of Medicine).
    Defects in tRNA modification associated with neurological and developmental dysfunctions in Caenorhabditis elegans elongator mutants2009In: PLoS genetics, ISSN 1553-7404, Vol. 5, no 7, p. e1000561-Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Elongator is a six subunit protein complex, conserved from yeast to humans. Mutations in the human Elongator homologue, hELP1, are associated with the neurological disease familial dysautonomia. However, how Elongator functions in metazoans, and how the human mutations affect neural functions is incompletely understood. Here we show that in Caenorhabditis elegans, ELPC-1 and ELPC-3, components of the Elongator complex, are required for the formation of the 5-carbamoylmethyl and 5-methylcarboxymethyl side chains of wobble uridines in tRNA. The lack of these modifications leads to defects in translation in C. elegans. ELPC-1::GFP and ELPC-3::GFP reporters are strongly expressed in a subset of chemosensory neurons required for salt chemotaxis learning. elpc-1 or elpc-3 gene inactivation causes a defect in this process, associated with a posttranscriptional reduction of neuropeptide and a decreased accumulation of acetylcholine in the synaptic cleft. elpc-1 and elpc-3 mutations are synthetic lethal together with those in tuc-1, which is required for thiolation of tRNAs having the 5'methylcarboxymethyl side chain. elpc-1; tuc-1 and elpc-3; tuc-1 double mutants display developmental defects. Our results suggest that, by its effect on tRNA modification, Elongator promotes both neural function and development.

  • 109.
    Chen, Peng
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Department of Molecular Biology (Faculty of Science and Technology).
    Function of wobble nucleoside modifications in tRNAs of Salmonella enterica Serovar Typhimurium2004Doctoral thesis, comprehensive summary (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Transfer RNA from all organisms has modified nucleosides and position 34 (the wobble position) is one of the most extensively modified positions. Some wobble nucleoside modifications restrict codon choice (e.g. 5-methylaminomethyl-2-thiouridine, mnm5s2U) while some extend the decoding capacity (e.g. uridine-5-oxyacetic acid, cmo5U). In this thesis the influence of wobble nucleoside modification on cell physiology and translation efficiency and accuracy is described.

    A mutant proL tRNA (proL207) was isolated that had an unmodified adenosine in the wobble position. Surprisingly, the proL207 mutant grows normally and is efficiently selected at the non-complementary CCC codon. The explanation of how an A34 containing tRNA can read CCC codon could be that a protonated A can form a base pair with C.

    cmo5U (uridine-5-oxyacetic acid) is present in the wobble position of five tRNA species in S.enterica. Two genes (cmoA and cmoB) have been identified that are involved in the synthetic pathway of cmo5U. Mutants were constructed in alanine, valine, proline, and threonine codon boxes which left only a cmo5U containing tRNA present in the cell. The influence of cmo5U on growth or on A site selection rates of the ternary complex was found to be tRNA dependent.

    During the study of the frameshift suppressor sufY of the hisC3737 frameshift mutation, a dominant mutation was found in YbbB protein, a selenouridine synthetase. The frameshifting occurs at CCC-CAA codon contexts and is specific for CAA codons, which are read by tRNAGlncmnm5s2UUG . The sufY204 mutation is a dominant mutation resulting in a change from Gly67 to Glu67 in the YbbB protein, and mediates the synthesis of several novel modified nucleosides/nucleotides (UKs) with unknown structure. The synthesis of these UKs is connected to the synthesis of cmnm5s2U34. The presence of UK on tRNAGlnU*UG reduced aminoacylation and therefore might account for the slow entry at CAA codons which could result in +1 frameshifting by P site tRNA. The selenourdine synthetase activity is not required for the synthesis of UKs. We hypothesize that an intrinsic activity that is low in the wild type protein has been elevated by the single amino acid substitution and results in the synthesis of UKs.

  • 110.
    Chen, Peng
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Molecular Biology (Faculty of Science and Technology).
    Crain, Pamela F
    Näsvall, Joakim
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Molecular Biology (Faculty of Science and Technology).
    Pomerantz, Steven C
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Molecular Biology (Faculty of Science and Technology).
    Björk, Glenn
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Molecular Biology (Faculty of Science and Technology).
    A "gain of function" mutation in a protein mediates production of novel modified nucleosides.2005In: EMBO Journal, ISSN 0261-4189, E-ISSN 1460-2075, Vol. 24, no 10, p. 1842-1851Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The mutation sufY204 mediates suppression of a +1 frameshift mutation in the histidine operon of Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium and synthesis of two novel modified nucleosides in tRNA. The sufY204 mutation, which results in an amino-acid substitution in a protein, is, surprisingly, dominant over its wild-type allele and thus it is a "gain of function" mutation. One of the new nucleosides is 5-methylaminomethyl-2-thiouridine (mnm(5)s(2)U34) modified by addition of a C(10)H(17) side chain of unknown structure. Increased amounts of both nucleosides in tRNA are correlated to gene dosage of the sufY204 allele, to an increased efficiency of frameshift suppression, and to a decreased amount of the wobble nucleoside mnm(5)s(2)U34 in tRNA. Purified tRNA(Gln)(cmnm(5)s(2)UUG) in the mutant strain contains a modified nucleoside similar to the novel nucleosides and the level of aminoacylation of tRNA(Gln)(cmnm(5)s(2)UUG) was reduced to 26% compared to that found in the wild type (86%). The results are discussed in relation to the mechanism of reading frame maintenance and the evolution of modified nucleosides in tRNA.

  • 111. Chen, Peng
    et al.
    Jäger, Gunilla
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Department of Molecular Biology (Faculty of Science and Technology).
    Zheng, Bo
    Transfer RNA modifications and genes for modifying enzymes in Arabidopsis thaliana2010In: BMC Plant Biology, ISSN 1471-2229, E-ISSN 1471-2229, Vol. 10, article id 201Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: In all domains of life, transfer RNA (tRNA) molecules contain modified nucleosides. Modifications to tRNAs affect their coding capacity and influence codon-anticodon interactions. Nucleoside modification deficiencies have a diverse range of effects, from decreased virulence in bacteria, neural system disease in human, and gene expression and stress response changes in plants. The purpose of this study was to identify genes involved in tRNA modification in the model plant Arabidopsis thaliana, to understand the function of nucleoside modifications in plant growth and development. Results: In this study, we established a method for analyzing modified nucleosides in tRNAs from the model plant species, Arabidopsis thaliana and hybrid aspen (Populus tremula x tremuloides). 21 modified nucleosides in tRNAs were identified in both species. To identify the genes responsible for the plant tRNA modifications, we performed global analysis of the Arabidopsis genome for candidate genes. Based on the conserved domains of homologs in Sacccharomyces cerevisiae and Escherichia coli, more than 90 genes were predicted to encode tRNA modifying enzymes in the Arabidopsis genome. Transcript accumulation patterns for the genes in Arabidopsis and the phylogenetic distribution of the genes among different plant species were investigated. Transcripts for the majority of the Arabidopsis candidate genes were found to be most abundant in rosette leaves and shoot apices. Whereas most of the tRNA modifying gene families identified in the Arabidopsis genome was found to be present in other plant species, there was a big variation in the number of genes present for each family. Through a loss of function mutagenesis study, we identified five tRNA modification genes (AtTRM10, AtTRM11, AtTRM82, AtKTI12 and AtELP1) responsible for four specific modified nucleosides (m1G, m2G, m7G and ncm5U), respectively (two genes: AtKTI12 and AtELP1 identified for ncm5U modification). The AtTRM11 mutant exhibited an early-flowering phenotype, and the AtELP1 mutant had narrow leaves, reduced root growth, an aberrant silique shape and defects in the generation of secondary shoots. Conclusions: Using a reverse genetics approach, we successfully isolated and identified five tRNA modification genes in Arabidopsis thaliana. We conclude that the method established in this study will facilitate the identification of tRNA modification genes in a wide variety of plant species.

  • 112.
    Chen, Peng
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Department of Molecular Biology (Faculty of Science and Technology).
    Näsvall, S. Joakim
    Björk, Glenn R.
    Uridine-5-oxyacetic acid (cmo5U) present in the wobble position of a subset of tRNAs in Salmonella enterica Serovar Typhimurium has a tRNA dependent influence on coding capacity and cell physiologyManuscript (Other academic)
  • 113.
    Chen, Peng
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Department of Molecular Biology (Faculty of Science and Technology).
    Qian, Qiang
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Department of Molecular Biology (Faculty of Science and Technology).
    Zhao, Shaoping
    Isaksson, Leif A.
    Björk, Glenn R
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Department of Molecular Biology (Faculty of Science and Technology).
    A cytosolic tRNA with an unmodified adenosine in the wobble position reads a codon ending with the non-complementary nucleoside cytidine2002In: Journal of Molecular Biology, ISSN 0022-2836, E-ISSN 1089-8638, Vol. 317, no 4, p. 481-492Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Out of more than 500 sequenced cytosolic tRNAs, there is only one with an unmodified adenosine in the wobble position (position 34). The reason for this rare occurrence of A34 is that it is mostly deaminated to inosine-34 (I34). I34 is a common constituent in the wobble position of tRNAs and has a decoding capacity different from that of A34. We have isolated a mutant (proL207) of Salmonella typhimurium, in which the wobble nucleoside G34 has been replaced by an unmodified A in tRNA(Pro)(GGG), which is the only tRNA that normally reads the CCC codon. Thus, this mutant apparently has no tRNA that is considered cognate for the codon CCC. Despite this, the mutant grows normally. As expected, Pro-tRNA selection at the CCC codon in the A-site in a mutant deleted for the proL gene, which encodes the tRNA(Pro)(GGG), was severely reduced. However, in comparison this rate of selection was only slightly reduced in the proL207 mutant with its A34 containing tRNA(Pro)(AGG) suggesting that this tRNA reads CCC. Moreover, measurements of the interference by a tRNA residing in the P-site on the apparent termination efficiency at the A-site indicated that indeed the A34 containing tRNA reads the CCC codon. We conclude that A34 in a cytosolic tRNA is not detrimental to the cell and that the mutant tRNA(Pro)(AGG) is able to read the CCC codon like its wild-type counterpart tRNA(Pro)(GGG). We suggest that the decoding of the CCC codon by a 5'-AGG-3' anticodon occurs by a wobble base-pair between a protonated A34 and a C in the mRNA. Copyright 2002 Elsevier Science Ltd.

  • 114.
    Chen, Sa
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Molecular Biology (Faculty of Science and Technology).
    Expression and function of Suppressor of zeste 12 in Drosophila melanogaster2009Doctoral thesis, comprehensive summary (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    The development of animals and plants needs a higher order of regulation of gene expression to maintain proper cell state. The mechanisms that control what, when and where a gene should (or should not) be expressed are essential for correct organism development. The Polycomb group (PcG) is a family of genes responsible for maintaining gene silencing and Suppressor of zeste 12 (Su(z)12) is one of the core components in the PcG. The gene is highly conserved in organisms ranging from plants to humans, however, the specific function is not well known. The main tasks of this thesis was to investigate the function of Su(z)12 and its expression at different stages of Drosophila development.

    In polytene chromosomes of larval salivary glands, Su(z)12 binds to about 90 specific euchromatic sites. The binding along the chromosome arms is mostly in interbands, which are the most DNA de-condensed regions. The binding sites of Su(z)12 in polytene chromosomes correlate precisely with those of the Enhancer-of-zeste (E(z)) protein, indicating that Su(z)12 mainly exists within the Polycomb Repressive Complex 2 (PRC2). However, the binding pattern does not overlap well with Histone 3 lysine 27 tri-methylations (H3K27me3), the specific chromatin mark created by PRC2. The Su(z)12 binding to chromatin is dynamically regulated during mitotic and meiotic cell division. The two different Su(z)12 isoforms: Su(z)12-A and Su(z)12-B (resulting from alternative RNA splicing), have very different expression patterns during development. Functional analyses indicate that they also have different functions he Su(z)12-B form is the main mediator of silencing. Furthermore, a neuron specific localization pattern in larval brain and a giant larval phenotype in transgenic lines reveal a potential function of Su(z)12-A in neuron development.  In some aspects the isoforms seem to be able to substitute for each other.

    The histone methyltransferase activity of PRC2 is due to the E(z) protein. However, Su(z)12 is also necessary for H3K27me3 methylation in vivo, and it is thus a core component of PRC2. Clonal over-expression of Su(z)12 in imaginal wing discs results in an increased H3K27me3 activity, indicating that Su(z)12 is a limiting factor for silencing. When PcG function is lost, target genes normally become de-repressed. The segment polarity gene engrailed, encoding a transcription factor, is a target for PRC2 silencing. However, we found that it was not activated when PRC2 function was deleted. We show that the Ultrabithorax protein, encoded by another PcG target gene, also acts as an inhibitor of engrailed and that de-regulation of this gene causes a continued repression of engrailed. The conclusion is that a gene can have several negative regulators working in parallel and that secondary effects have to be taken into consideration, when analyzing effects of mutants.

    PcG silencing affects very many cellular processes and a large quantity of knowledge is gathered on the overall mechanisms of PcG regulation. However, little is known about how individual genes are silenced and how cells “remember” their fate through cell generations.

  • 115.
    Chen, Sa
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Department of Molecular Biology (Faculty of Science and Technology).
    Birve, Anna
    Rasmuson-Lestander, Åsa
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Department of Molecular Biology (Faculty of Science and Technology).
    In vivo analysis of Drosophila SU(Z)12 function2007In: Molecular Genetics and Genomics, ISSN 1617-4615, E-ISSN 1617-4623, Vol. 279, no 2, p. 159-170Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Polycomb group (PcG) proteins are required to maintain a stable repression of the homeotic genes during Drosophila development. Mutants in the PcG gene Supressor of zeste 12 (Su(z)12) exhibit strong homeotic transformations caused by widespread misexpression of several homeotic genes in embryos and larvae. Su(z)12 has also been suggested to be involved in position effect variegation and in regulation of the white gene expression in combination with zeste. To elucidate whether SU(Z)12 has any such direct functions we investigated the binding pattern to polytene chromosomes and compared the localization to other proteins. We found that SU(Z)12 binds to about 90 specific eukaryotic sites, however, not the white locus. We also find staining at the chromocenter and the nucleolus. The binding along chromosome arms is mostly in interbands and these sites correlate precisely with those of Enhancer-of-zeste and other components of the PRC2 silencing complex. This implies that SU(Z)12 mainly exists in complex with PRC2. Comparisons with other PcG protein-binding patterns reveal extensive overlap. However, SU(Z)12 binding sites and histone 3 trimethylated lysine 27 residues (3meK27 H3) do not correlate that well. Still, we show that Su(z)12 is essential for tri-methylation of the lysine 27 residue of histone H3 in vivo, and that overexpression of SU(Z)12 in somatic clones results in higher levels of histone methylation, indicating that SU(Z)12 is rate limiting for the enzymatic activity of PRC2. In addition, we analyzed the binding pattern of Heterochromatin Protein 1 (HP1) and found that SU(Z)12 and HP1 do not co-localize.

  • 116.
    Chen, Sa
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Department of Molecular Biology (Faculty of Science and Technology).
    Larsson, Anna L.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Molecular Biology (Faculty of Medicine).
    Tegeling, Erik
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Department of Molecular Biology (Faculty of Science and Technology).
    Birve, Anna
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Biosciences.
    Rasmuson Lestander, Asa
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Department of Molecular Biology (Faculty of Science and Technology).
    In vivo analysis of Suppressor of zeste 12´s different isoformsManuscript (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Polycomb Group (PcG) genes are known to encode a large chromatin-associated family of proteins which are involved in genomic regulation of many cellular processes. Su(z)12 is a key component in PcG silencing. It is needed for three levels of methylation of histone 3 lysine 27 in vivo in Drosophila. Here, we report that Su(z)12 may exist in different isoforms and that these isoforms are spatially and temporally regulated. The biological function of the Su(z)12-A and -B isoforms seems to be very different. For instance the transgenic Su(z)12-B and the human homolog SUZ12, but not Su(z)12-A, rescue Su(z)12 mutants. Furthermore, transgenic flies over-expressing Su(z)12-B show typical homeotic transformation phenotypes, while over-expression of Su(z)12-A does not. However, the two isoforms appears to be able to substitute for each other in some aspects. During larval and pupal stages, Su(z)12-A seems to play the main role. 

  • 117.
    Chen, Sa
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Department of Molecular Biology (Faculty of Science and Technology).
    Rasmuson-Lestander, Åsa
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Department of Molecular Biology (Faculty of Science and Technology).
    Regulation of the Drosophila engrailed gene by Polycomb repressor complex 22009In: Mechanisms of Development, ISSN 0925-4773, E-ISSN 1872-6356, Vol. 126, no 5-6, p. 443-448Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Suppressor-of-zeste-12 (Su(z)12) is a core component of the Polycomb repressive complex 2 (PRC2), which has a methyltransferase activity directed towards lysine residues of histone 3. Mutations in Polycomb group (PcG) genes cause de-repression of homeotic genes and subsequent homeotic transformations. Another target for Polycomb silencing is the engrailed gene, which encodes a key regulator of segmentation in the early Drosophila embryo. In close proximity to the en gene is a Polycomb Response Element, but whether en is regulated by Su(z)12 is not known. In this report, we show that en is not de-repressed in Su(z)12 or Enhancer-of-zeste mutant clones in the anterior compartment of wing discs. Instead, we find that en expression is down-regulated in the posterior portion of wing discs, indicating that the PRC2 complex acts as an activator of en. Our results indicate that this is due to secondary effects, probably caused by ectopic expression of Ubx and Abd-B.

  • 118.
    Chen, Sa
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Department of Molecular Biology (Faculty of Science and Technology).
    Rasmuson-Lestander, Åsa
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Department of Molecular Biology (Faculty of Science and Technology).
    The role of Suppressor of zeste 12 in cell cycle regulationManuscript (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Polycomb group (PcG) proteins control a large amount of target genes and are essential for genomic programming and differentiation. Many members in the PcG family have been shown to be upregulated in different types of cancers. Suppressor of zeste 12 (Su(z)12) is an essential component in PcG silencing and is necessary for histone 3 lysine 27 tri-methylation in vivo. To unravel a possible role of Su(z)12 in cell cycle regulation, we first investigate the localization pattern of Su(z)12 in Drosophila wildtype testes and embryos by immunohistochemical staining. We found that Su(z)12 was dynamically regulated during cell division. Further investigation of the function of Su(z)12 in cell division was done by cell number counting, apoptosis and proliferation marker staining in Su(z)12 somatic knockout clones in wing discs. The conclusion from the small wing phenotype in Su(z)12 knockout wing discs is that Su(z)12 may increase apoptosis and decrease cell proliferation rate.

  • 119.
    Chen, Shiyun
    et al.
    Key Laboratory of Special Pathogens and Biosafety, Wuhan Institute of Virology, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Wuhan, China.
    Thompson, Karl
    Department of Microbiology, College of Medicine, Howard University, Washington, DC, USA.
    Francis, Matthew S
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Department of Molecular Biology (Faculty of Science and Technology). Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Umeå Centre for Microbial Research (UCMR).
    Environmental Regulation of Yersinia Pathophysiology2016In: Frontiers in Cellular and Infection Microbiology, E-ISSN 2235-2988, Vol. 6, article id 25Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Hallmarks of Yersinia pathogenesis include the ability to form biofilms on surfaces, the ability to establish close contact with eukaryotic target cells and the ability to hijack eukaryotic cell signaling and take over control of strategic cellular processes. Many of these virulence traits are already well-described. However, of equal importance is knowledge of both confined and global regulatory networks that collaborate together to dictate spatial and temporal control of virulence gene expression. This review has the purpose to incorporate historical observations with new discoveries to provide molecular insight into how some of these regulatory mechanisms respond rapidly to environmental flux to govern tight control of virulence gene expression by pathogenic Yersinia.

  • 120. COCHLAN, William P
    et al.
    Wikner, Johan
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Department of Molecular Biology (Faculty of Science and Technology). Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Umeå Marine Sciences Centre (UMF).
    Steward, Grieg F
    Smith, David C
    Azam, Farooq
    SPATIAL-DISTRIBUTION OF VIRUSES, BACTERIA AND CHLOROPHYLL-A IN NERITIC, OCEANIC AND ESTUARINE ENVIRONMENTS1993In: Marine Ecology Progress Series, ISSN 0171-8630, E-ISSN 1616-1599, Vol. 92, no 1-2, p. 77-87Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The spatial distribution of viruses was investigated in the coastal and oceanic waters of the Southern California Bight, USA, and the brackish waters of the Gulf of Bothnia, Sweden, using the direct harvesting technique and transmission electron microscopy. The vertical and horizontal distributions of viruses were examined in relation to bacterial abundance and chlorophyll a. Total virus abundances ranged from 0.3 to 52 X 10(9) l-1; higher concentrations of viruses were found in the upper 50 m of the water column and in coastal environments. Viruses with capsid diameters less than 60 nm dominated the virus community, were morphologically characterized as bacteriophages and were responsible for most of the observed spatial variability. Bacteria abundance alone explained 67 % of the spatial variability in virus numbers, thereby suggesting that bacteria constituted the major host organisms for viruses in these physically diverse habitats.

  • 121. Coenye, Tom
    et al.
    Van Dijck, Patrick
    Bjarnsholt, Thomas
    Forsberg, Åke
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Department of Molecular Biology (Faculty of Science and Technology).
    Microbial biofilms - the coming of age of a research field2014In: Pathogens and Disease, ISSN 2049-632X, Vol. 70, no 3, p. 203-204Article in journal (Other academic)
  • 122.
    Colucci, Francesco
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Molecular Biology (Faculty of Medicine). Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Department of Molecular Biology (Faculty of Science and Technology).
    Bergman, Marie-Louise
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Molecular Biology (Faculty of Medicine). Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Department of Molecular Biology (Faculty of Science and Technology).
    Penha-Gonçalves, Carlos
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Molecular Biology (Faculty of Medicine). Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Department of Molecular Biology (Faculty of Science and Technology).
    Cilio, Corrado M.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Molecular Biology (Faculty of Medicine). Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Department of Molecular Biology (Faculty of Science and Technology).
    Holmberg, Dan
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Molecular Biology (Faculty of Medicine).
    Apoptosis resistance of nonobese diabetic peripheral lymphocytes linked to the Idd5 diabetes susceptibility region1997In: Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences of the United States of America, ISSN 0027-8424, E-ISSN 1091-6490, Vol. 94, no 16, p. 8670-8674Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Defects in lymphocyte apoptosis may lead to autoimmune disorders and contribute to the pathogenesis of type 1 diabetes. Lymphocytes of nonobese diabetic (NOD) mice, an animal model of autoimmune diabetes, have been found resistant to various apoptosis signals, including the alkylating drug cyclophosphamide. Using an F2 intercross between the apoptosis-resistant NOD mouse and the apoptosis-susceptible C57BL/6 mouse, we define a major locus controlling the apoptosis-resistance phenotype and demonstrate its linkage (logarithm of odds score = 3.9) to a group of medial markers on chromosome 1. The newly defined gene cannot be dissociated from Ctla4 and Cd28 and in fact marks a 20-centimorgan region encompassing Idd5, a previously postulated diabetes susceptibility locus. Interestingly, we find that the CTLA-4 (cytotoxic T lymphocyte-associated antigen 4) and the CD28 costimulatory molecules are defectively expressed in NOD mice, suggesting that one or both of these molecules may be involved in the control of apoptosis resistance and, in turn, in diabetes susceptibility.

  • 123.
    Costa, Tiago
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Department of Molecular Biology (Faculty of Science and Technology). Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Umeå Centre for Microbial Research (UCMR).
    Amer, Ayad
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Department of Molecular Biology (Faculty of Science and Technology). Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Umeå Centre for Microbial Research (UCMR).
    Farag, Salah
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Department of Molecular Biology (Faculty of Science and Technology). Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Umeå Centre for Microbial Research (UCMR).
    Wolf-Watz, Hans
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Department of Molecular Biology (Faculty of Science and Technology). Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Umeå Centre for Microbial Research (UCMR). Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Molecular Infection Medicine Sweden (MIMS).
    Fällman, Maria
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Molecular Biology (Faculty of Medicine). Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Umeå Centre for Microbial Research (UCMR). Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Molecular Infection Medicine Sweden (MIMS).
    Fahlgren, Anna
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Molecular Biology (Faculty of Medicine). Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Umeå Centre for Microbial Research (UCMR).
    Edgren, Tomas
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Department of Molecular Biology (Faculty of Science and Technology). Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Umeå Centre for Microbial Research (UCMR).
    Francis, Matthew
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Department of Molecular Biology (Faculty of Science and Technology). Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Umeå Centre for Microbial Research (UCMR).
    Type III secretion translocon assemblies that attenuate Yersinia virulence2013In: Cellular Microbiology, ISSN 1462-5814, E-ISSN 1462-5822, Vol. 15, no 7, p. 1088-1110Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Type III secretion enables bacteria to intoxicate eukaryotic cells with anti-host effectors. A class of secreted cargo are the two hydrophobic translocators that form a translocon pore in the host cell plasma membrane through which the translocated effectors may gain cellular entry. In pathogenic Yersinia, YopB and YopD shape this translocon pore. Here, four in cis yopD mutations were constructed to disrupt a predicted α-helix motif at the C-terminus. Mutants YopD(I262P) and YopD(K267P) poorly localized Yop effectors into target eukaryotic cells and failed to resist uptake and killing by immune cells. These defects were due to deficiencies in host-membrane insertion of the YopD-YopB translocon. Mutants YopD(A263P) and YopD(A270P) had no measurable in vitro translocation defect, even though they formed smaller translocon pores in erythrocyte membranes. Despite this, all four mutants were attenuated in a mouse infection model. Hence, YopD variants have been generated that can spawn translocons capable of targeting effectors in vitro, yet were bereft of any lethal effect in vivo. Therefore, Yop translocators may possess other in vivo functions that extend beyond being a portal for effector delivery into host cells.

  • 124.
    Costa, Tiago
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Department of Molecular Biology (Faculty of Science and Technology). Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Umeå Centre for Microbial Research (UCMR). Department of Life Sciences, MRC Centre for Molecular Bacteriology and Infection, Imperial College, London, UK.
    Francis, Monika K.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Department of Molecular Biology (Faculty of Science and Technology). Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Umeå Centre for Microbial Research (UCMR). Region Västerbotten.
    Farag, Salah
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Umeå Centre for Microbial Research (UCMR). Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Department of Molecular Biology (Faculty of Science and Technology).
    Edgren, Tomas
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Department of Molecular Biology (Faculty of Science and Technology). Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Umeå Centre for Microbial Research (UCMR). Department of Medical Biochemistry and Microbiology, Uppsala Biomedical Center, Uppsala University, Uppsala, Sweden.
    Francis, Matthew S
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Department of Molecular Biology (Faculty of Science and Technology). Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Umeå Centre for Microbial Research (UCMR).
    Measurement of Yersinia translocon pore formation in erythrocytes2019In: Pathogenic Yersinia: methods and protocols / [ed] Viveka Vadyvaloo and Matthew B. Lawrenz, New York, NY, U.S.A.: Humana Press, 2019, p. 211-229Chapter in book (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Many Gram-negative pathogens produce a type III secretion system capable of intoxicating eukaryotic cells with immune-modulating effector proteins. Fundamental to this injection process is the prior secretion of two translocator proteins destined for injectisome translocon pore assembly within the host cell plasma membrane. It is through this pore that effectors are believed to travel to gain access to the host cell interior. Yersinia species especially pathogenic to humans and animals assemble this translocon pore utilizing two hydrophobic translocator proteins-YopB and YopD. Although a full molecular understanding of the biogenesis, function and regulation of this translocon pore and subsequent effector delivery into host cells remains elusive, some of what we know about these processes can be attributed to studies of bacterial infections of erythrocytes. Herein we describe the methodology of erythrocyte infections by Yersinia, and how analysis of the resultant contact-dependent hemolysis can serve as a relative measurement of YopB- and YopD-dependent translocon pore formation.

  • 125.
    Costa, Tiago R. D.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Department of Molecular Biology (Faculty of Science and Technology). Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Umeå Centre for Microbial Research (UCMR).
    YopD translocator function in Yersinia pseudotuberculosis type III secretion2012Doctoral thesis, comprehensive summary (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Type III secretion systems (T3SS) are a common feature of Gram-negative bacteria, allowing them to inject anti-host effectors into the interior of infected eukaryotic cells. By this mechanism, these virulence factors help the bacteria to modulate eukaryotic cell function in its favor and subvert host innate immunity. This promotes a less hostile environment in which infecting bacteria can colonize and cause disease.

    In pathogenic Yersinia, a crucial protein in this process is YopD. YopD is a T3S substrate that, together with YopB, forms a translocon pore in the host cell membrane through which the Yop effectors may gain access to the target-cell cytosol. The assembly of the translocator pore in plasma membranes is considered a fundamental feature of all T3SSs. How the pore is formed, what determines the correct size and ultimately the stoichiometry between YopD YopB, is still unknown. Portions of YopD are also observed inside HeLa cells. Moreover, YopD functions together with its T3S chaperone, LcrH, to control Yops synthesis in the bacterial cytoplasm. The multifunctional YopD may influence all these processes by compartmentalizing activities into discrete modular domains along the protein length. Therefore, understanding how particular domains and/or residues within these regions coordinate multiple functions of the protein will provide a platform to improve our knowledge of the molecular mechanisms behind translocation through T3SSs.

    Comprehensive site-directed mutagenesis of the YopD C-terminal amphipathic α-helix domain, pinpointed hydrophobic residues as important for YopD function. Some YopD variants were defective in self-assembly and in the ability to interact with the needle tip protein, LcrV, which were required to facilitate bacterial T3S activity. A similar mutagenesis approach was used to understand the role of the two predicted coiled-coils located at the N-terminal and C-terminal region of YopD. The predicted N-terminal element that occurs solely in the Yersinia YopD translocator family is essential for optimal T3SS and full disease progression. The predicted YopD C-terminal coiled-coil shapes a functional translocon inserted into host cell membranes. This translocon was seen to be a dynamic structure facilitating at least two roles during effectors delivery into cells; one to guarantee translocon pore insertion into target cell membranes and the other to promote targeted activity of internalized effector toxins.

    In Yersinia expression of yop genes and secretion of the corresponding polypeptides is tightly regulated at a transcriptional and post-transcriptional level. If T3S chaperones of the translocator class are known to influence transcriptional output of T3SS genes in other bacteria, we show that in Yersinia the class II T3S chaperone LcrH has no such effect on the LcrF transcriptional activator activity. We also demonstrate that there are possibly additional yop-regulatory roles for the LcrH chaperone besides forming a stable complex with YopD to impose post-transcriptional silencing on Yops synthesis. This mechanism that relies upon an active T3SS, might act independently of both YopD and the regulatory element LcrQ.

    In conclusion, this work has sought to delineate the encrypted functions of the YopD translocator that contribute to Yersinia T3SS-dependent pathogenesis. Contributions of the YopD cognate chaperone LcrH in yop regulatory control are also presented.  

  • 126.
    Costa, Tiago R. D.
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Department of Molecular Biology (Faculty of Science and Technology). Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Umeå Centre for Microbial Research (UCMR).
    Amer, Ayad A. A.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Department of Molecular Biology (Faculty of Science and Technology). Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Umeå Centre for Microbial Research (UCMR).
    Farag, Salah I.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Department of Molecular Biology (Faculty of Science and Technology). Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Umeå Centre for Microbial Research (UCMR).
    Wolf-Watz, Hans
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Department of Molecular Biology (Faculty of Science and Technology). Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Umeå Centre for Microbial Research (UCMR). Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Molecular Infection Medicine Sweden (MIMS).
    Fällman, Maria
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Department of Molecular Biology (Faculty of Science and Technology). Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Umeå Centre for Microbial Research (UCMR).
    Fahlgren, Anna
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Department of Molecular Biology (Faculty of Science and Technology). Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Umeå Centre for Microbial Research (UCMR).
    Edgren, Tomas
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Department of Molecular Biology (Faculty of Science and Technology). Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Umeå Centre for Microbial Research (UCMR).
    Francis, Matthew S.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Department of Molecular Biology (Faculty of Science and Technology). Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Umeå Centre for Microbial Research (UCMR).
    Active type III translocon assemblies that attenuate Yersinia virulenceManuscript (preprint) (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Type III secretion enables bacteria to intoxicate eukaryotic cells with anti-host effectors. A class of secreted cargo are the two hydrophobic translocators that form a translocon pore in the host cell plasma membrane through which the translocated effectors may gain cellular entry. In pathogenic Yersinia, YopB and YopD shape this translocon pore. Here, four in cis yopD mutations were constructed to disrupt a predicted a-helix motif at the C-terminus. Mutants YopDI262P and YopDK267P poorly localised Yop effectors into target eukaryotic cells and failed to resist uptake and killing by immune cells. These defects were due to deficiencies in host-membrane insertion of the YopD-YopB translocon. Mutants YopDA263P and YopDA270P had no measurable in vitro translocation defect, even though they formed smaller translocon pores in erythrocyte membranes. Despite this, all four mutants were attenuated in a mouse infection model. Hence, YopD variants have been generated that can spawn translocons capable of targeting effectors in vitro, yet were bereft of any lethal effect in vivo. It is therefore probable that an active translocon makes a range of contributions during bacteria-host cell contact that extends beyond effector delivery per se.

  • 127.
    Costa, Tiago R. D.
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Department of Molecular Biology (Faculty of Science and Technology). Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Umeå Centre for Microbial Research (UCMR).
    Amer, Ayad A. A.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Department of Molecular Biology (Faculty of Science and Technology). Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Umeå Centre for Microbial Research (UCMR).
    Fällman, Maria
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Molecular Biology (Faculty of Medicine). Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Umeå Centre for Microbial Research (UCMR).
    Fahlgren, Anna
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Molecular Biology (Faculty of Medicine). Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Umeå Centre for Microbial Research (UCMR).
    Francis, Matthew
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Department of Molecular Biology (Faculty of Science and Technology). Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Umeå Centre for Microbial Research (UCMR).
    Coiled-coils in the YopD translocator family: A predicted structure unique to the YopD N-terminus contributes to full virulence of Yersinia pseudotuberculosis2012In: Infection, Genetics and Evolution, ISSN 1567-1348, E-ISSN 1567-7257, Vol. 12, no 8, p. 1729-1742Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Pathogenic Yersinia all harbor a virulence plasmid-encoded Ysc–Yop T3SS. In this system, translocator function is performed by the hydrophobic proteins YopB and YopD. With the goal to better understand how YopD orchestrates yop-regulatory control, translocon pore formation and Yop effector translocation, we performed an in silico prediction of coiled-coil motifs in YopD and YopD-like sequences from other bacteria. Of interest was a predicted N-terminal coiled-coil that occurred solely in Yersinia YopD sequences. To investigate if this unique feature was biologically relevant, two in cis point mutations were generated with a view to disrupting this putative structure. Both mutants maintained full T3SS function in vitro in terms of environmental control of Yops synthesis and secretion, effector toxin translocation and evasion of phagocytosis and killing by cultured immune cells. However, these same mutants were attenuated for virulence in a murine oral-infection model. The cause of this tardy disease progression is unclear. However, these data indicate that any structural flaw in this element unique to the N-terminus will subtly compromise an aspect of YopD biology. Sub-optimal T3SSs are then formed that are unable to fortify Yersinia against attack by the host innate and adaptive immune response.

  • 128.
    Costa, Tiago R. D.
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Department of Molecular Biology (Faculty of Science and Technology). Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Umeå Centre for Microbial Research (UCMR).
    Carlsson, Katrin E.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Department of Molecular Biology (Faculty of Science and Technology). Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Umeå Centre for Microbial Research (UCMR).
    Edqvist, Petra J.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Department of Molecular Biology (Faculty of Science and Technology). Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Umeå Centre for Microbial Research (UCMR).
    Francis, Matthew S.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Department of Molecular Biology (Faculty of Science and Technology). Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Umeå Centre for Microbial Research (UCMR).
    Influence of the LcrH chaperone on type III secretion system regulation in Yersinia pseudotuberculosisManuscript (preprint) (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Human pathogenic Yersiniae share a common virulence plasmid that encodes for the Ysc-Yop type III secretion system (T3SS). Control of yop expression involves several pathways in which their cross-talk is not completely understood. LcrF, an AraC-like transcriptional activator, is required for temperature-dependent yop-transcription. In contrast, a repressive effect of the T3S chaperone LcrH and the cognate translocator substrate YopD occurs through binding to yop mRNA and inhibiting translation; a process that is also thought to involve LcrQ. Several homologous members of the LcrH family of translocator-class of T3S chaperones can act as a cofactor to amplify the activity of transcriptional activators analogous to LcrF. However, we show here in Y. pseudotuberculosis that LcrH does not induce LcrF-dependent transcription of target genes. Moreover, a full length DlcrH null mutant in which YopB and YopD are rapidly degraded is totally de-repressed for Yop synthesis even though the anti-activator LcrQ is forced to accumulate in the cytoplasm through rendering the Ysc-Yop T3SS non-functional or ectopically producing LcrQ in trans. Typically, this mutant cannot grow at 37°C. Thus, in all respects, the DlcrH null mutant mirrors the regulatory defects established for Yersinia lacking the translocator and anti-activator YopD. On the other hand, Y. pseudotuberculosis producing the LcrHE30G point mutant that is defective for YscY chaperone binding exhibits a mild regulatory defect that permits some growth at 37°C, but is blind to the cytoplasmic accumulation of LcrQ. Critically however, this mutant still responds to repression caused by YopD accumulation, which is stably produced and efficiently secreted by this strain. Thus, our work with LcrHE30G indicates an additional regulatory function of this versatile T3S chaperone that is independent of the LcrF transcription factor and the YopD anti-activator.

     

  • 129.
    Costa, Tiago R D
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Department of Molecular Biology (Faculty of Science and Technology). Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Umeå Centre for Microbial Research (UCMR).
    Edqvist, Petra J
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Department of Molecular Biology (Faculty of Science and Technology). Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Umeå Centre for Microbial Research (UCMR).
    Bröms, Jeanette E
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Umeå Centre for Microbial Research (UCMR). Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Clinical Microbiology, Clinical Bacteriology.
    Åhlund, Monika K
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Department of Molecular Biology (Faculty of Science and Technology). Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Umeå Centre for Microbial Research (UCMR).
    Forsberg, Åke
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Umeå Centre for Microbial Research (UCMR). Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Molecular Infection Medicine Sweden (MIMS). Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Department of Molecular Biology (Faculty of Science and Technology).
    Francis, Matthew S
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Umeå Centre for Microbial Research (UCMR). Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Department of Molecular Biology (Faculty of Science and Technology).
    YopD self-assembly and binding to LcrV facilitate type III secretion activity by Yersinia pseudotuberculosis2010In: Journal of Biological Chemistry, ISSN 0021-9258, E-ISSN 1083-351X, Vol. 285, no 33, p. 25269-25284Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    YopD-like translocator proteins encoded by several Gram-negative bacteria are important for type III secretion-dependent delivery of anti-host effectors into eukaryotic cells. This probably depends on their ability to form pores in the infected cell plasma membrane, through which effectors may gain access to the cell interior. In addition, Yersinia YopD is a negative regulator essential for the control of effector synthesis and secretion. As a prerequisite for this functional duality, YopD may need to establish molecular interactions with other key T3S components. A putative coiled-coil domain and an alpha-helical amphipathic domain, both situated in the YopD C terminus, may represent key protein-protein interaction domains. Therefore, residues within the YopD C terminus were systematically mutagenized. All 68 mutant bacteria were first screened in a variety of assays designed to identify individual residues essential for YopD function, possibly by providing the interaction interface for the docking of other T3S proteins. Mirroring the effect of a full-length yopD gene deletion, five mutant bacteria were defective for both yop regulatory control and effector delivery. Interestingly, all mutations clustered to hydrophobic amino acids of the amphipathic domain. Also situated within this domain, two additional mutants rendered YopD primarily defective in the control of Yop synthesis and secretion. Significantly, protein-protein interaction studies revealed that functionally compromised YopD variants were also defective in self-oligomerization and in the ability to engage another translocator protein, LcrV. Thus, the YopD amphipathic domain facilitates the formation of YopD/YopD and YopD/LcrV interactions, two critical events in the type III secretion process.

  • 130.
    Crona, Filip
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Wenner-Gren Institute, Developmental Biology, Arrhenius laboratories E3, Stockholm SE-10691, Sweden.
    Dahlberg, Olle
    Stockholm University, Wenner-Gren Institute, Developmental Biology, Arrhenius laboratories E3, Stockholm SE-10691, Sweden.
    Lundberg, Lina E
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Department of Molecular Biology (Faculty of Science and Technology).
    Larsson, Jan
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Department of Molecular Biology (Faculty of Science and Technology).
    Mannervik, Mattias
    Stockholm University, Wenner-Gren Institute, Developmental Biology, Arrhenius laboratories E3, Stockholm SE-10691, Sweden.
    Gene regulation by the lysine demethylase KDM4A in Drosophila2013In: Developmental Biology, ISSN 0012-1606, E-ISSN 1095-564X, Vol. 737, no 2, p. 453-463Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Lysine methylation of histones is associated with both transcriptionally active chromatin and with silent chromatin, depending on what residue is modified. Histone methyltransferases and demethylases ensure that histone methylations are dynamic and can vary depending on cell cycle- or developmental stage. KDM4A demethylates H3K36me3, a modification enriched in the 3' end of active genes. The genomic targets and the role of KDM4 proteins in development remain largely unknown. We therefore generated KDM4A mutant Drosophila, and identified 99 mis-regulated genes in first instar larvae. Around half of these genes were down-regulated and the other half up-regulated in dKDM4A mutants. Although heterochromatin protein 1a (HP1a) can stimulate dKDM4A demethylase activity in vitro, we find that they antagonize each other in control of dKDM4A-regulated genes. Appropriate expression levels for some dKDM4A-regulated genes rely on the demethylase activity of dKDM4A, whereas others do not. Surprisingly, although highly expressed, many demethylase-dependent and independent genes are devoid of H3K36me3 in wild-type as well as in dKDM4A mutant larvae, suggesting that some of the most strongly affected genes in dKDM4A mutant animals are not regulated by H3K36 methylation. By contrast, dKDM4A over-expression results in a global decrease in H3K36me3 levels and male lethality, which might be caused by impaired dosage compensation. Our results show that a modest increase in global H3K36me3 levels is compatible with viability, fertility, and the expression of most genes, whereas decreased H3K36me3 levels are detrimental in males.

  • 131.
    Croxatto, Antony
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Department of Molecular Biology (Faculty of Science and Technology).
    VanT, a central regulator of quorum sensing signalling in Vibrio anguillarum2006Doctoral thesis, comprehensive summary (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Many bacteria produce signal molecules that serve in a cell-to-cell communication system termed quorum sensing. This signalling system allows a bacterial population to co-ordinately regulate functions according to their cell number in a defined environment. As bacterial growth progresses towards the stationary phase, signalling molecules accumulate in the growth medium and, above a certain threshold level, regulate the expression of genes involved in diverse functions. Most of the functions monitored by quorum sensing are most beneficial when they are performed as a population than by single cells, such as virulence factor production, biofilm formation, conjugation and bioluminescence.

    Vibrio anguillarum is a bacterial pathogen that causes terminal hemorrhagic septicaemia in marine fish. V. anguillarum possesses multiple quorum sensing circuits similar to the LuxI/LuxR and the V. harveyi-type systems. In this study, a characterisation of the quorum sensing-regulated transcriptional activator VanT was made. VanT belongs to the V. harveyi LuxR family of transcriptional regulators, which play a central role in quorum sensing signalling in Vibrio species. VanT was shown to regulate serine, metalloprotease, pigment, exopolysaccharide (EPS) and biofilm production. VanT repressed an EPS locus that plays a critical role in bacterial colonization of the fish integument and virulence.

    The V. harveyi-like quorum sensing systems were shown to limit rather than induce vanT expression throughout growth in V. anguillarum. In contrast to homologous proteins in other Vibrio spp., the quorum sensing phosphorelay protein VanU and the response regulator VanO had antagonistic roles in the regulation of vanT expression. Unlike other members of the luxR family, vanT was expressed at low cell density and no significant induction due to quorum sensing regulation was seen.

    Interestingly, VanT expression was induced by the alternative sigma factor RpoS as the cells entered stationary phase. RpoS was shown to regulate VanT expression post-transcriptionally by promoting vanT mRNA stability. VanT and RpoS were important for bacterial survival under stress conditions, indicating that VanT is likely an essential factor of V. anguillarum stress response.

  • 132.
    Croxatto, Antony
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Department of Molecular Biology (Faculty of Science and Technology).
    Chalker, Victoria J
    Lauritz, Johan
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Department of Molecular Biology (Faculty of Science and Technology).
    Jass, Jana
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Department of Molecular Biology (Faculty of Science and Technology).
    Hardman, Andrea
    Williams, Paul
    Cámara, Miguel
    Milton, Debra L
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Department of Molecular Biology (Faculty of Science and Technology).
    VanT, a Homologue of Vibrio harveyi LuxR, Regulates Serine, Metalloprotease, Pigment, and Biofilm Production in Vibrio anguillarum2002In: Journal of Bacteriology, ISSN 0021-9193, E-ISSN 1098-5530, Vol. 184, no 6, p. 1617-1629Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Vibrio anguillarum possesses at least two N-acylhomoserine lactone (AHL) quorum-sensing circuits, one of which is related to the luxMN system of Vibrio harveyi. In this study, we have cloned an additional gene of this circuit, vanT, encoding a V. harveyi LuxR-like transcriptional regulator. A V. anguillarum ΔvanT null mutation resulted in a significant decrease in total protease activity due to loss of expression of the metalloprotease EmpA, but no changes in either AHL production or virulence. Additional genes positively regulated by VanT were identified from a plasmid-based gene library fused to a promoterless lacZ. Three lacZ fusions (serA::lacZhpdA-hgdA::lacZ, and sat-vps73::lacZ) were identified which exhibited decreased expression in the ΔvanT strain. SerA is similar to 3-phosphoglycerate dehydrogenases and catalyzes the first step in the serine-glycine biosynthesis pathway. HgdA has identity with homogentisate dioxygenases, and HpdA is homologous to 4-hydroxyphenylpyruvate dioxygenases (HPPDs) involved in pigment production. V. anguillarum strains require an active VanT to produce high levels of an l-tyrosine-induced brown color via HPPD, suggesting that VanT controls pigment production. Vps73 and Sat are related to Vibrio cholerae proteins encoded within a DNA locus required for biofilm formation. A V. anguillarum ΔvanT mutant and a mutant carrying a polar mutation in the sat-vps73 DNA locus were shown to produce defective biofilms. Hence, a new member of the V. harveyi LuxR transcriptional activator family has been characterized in V. anguillarum that positively regulates serine, metalloprotease, pigment, and biofilm production.

  • 133. Croxatto, Antony
    et al.
    Lauritz, Johan
    Chen, Chang
    Milton, Debra L
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Molecular Biology (Faculty of Science and Technology).
    Vibrio anguillarum colonization of rainbow trout integument requires a DNA locus involved in exopolysaccharide transport and biosynthesis.2007In: Environmental Microbiology, ISSN 1462-2912, E-ISSN 1462-2920, Vol. 9, no 2, p. 370-382Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Vibrio anguillarum, part of the normal flora of the aquatic milieu, causes a fatal haemorrhagic septicaemia in marine fish. In this study, a rainbow trout model was used to characterize the colonization of fish skin by V. anguillarum. Within 5 h after infection, the bacterium penetrated the skin mucosal layer, attached to the scales within 12 h, and formed a biofilm by 24-48 h. Two divergently transcribed putative operons, orf1-wbfD-wbfC-wbfB and wza-wzb-wzc, were shown to play a role in skin colonization and virulence. The first operon encodes proteins of unknown function. The wza-wzb-wzc genes encode a secretin, tyrosine kinase and tyrosine phosphatase, respectively, which are similar to proteins in polysaccharide transport complexes. Compared with the wild type, polar mutations in wza, orf1 and wbfD caused a decrease in exopolysaccharide biosynthesis but not lipopolysaccharide biosynthesis. The wza and orf1 mutants did not attach to fish scales; whereas, the wbfD mutant had a wild-type phenotype. Moreover, the wza and orf1 mutants had decreased exoprotease activity, in particular the extracellular metalloprotease EmpA, as well as mucinase activity suggesting that these mutations also affect exoenzyme secretion. Thus, the exopolysaccharide transport system in V. anguillarum is required for attachment to fish skin, possibly preventing mechanical removal of bacteria via natural sloughing of mucus.

  • 134.
    Croxatto, Antony
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Department of Molecular Biology (Faculty of Science and Technology).
    Pride, John
    Hardman, Andrea
    Williams, Paul
    Cámara, Miguel
    Milton, Debra L.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Department of Molecular Biology (Faculty of Science and Technology).
    A distinctive dual-channel quorum-sensing system operates in Vibrio anguillarum2004In: Molecular Microbiology, ISSN 0950-382X, E-ISSN 1365-2958, Vol. 52, no 6, p. 1677-1689Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Many bacterial cells communicate using diffusible signal molecules to monitor cell population density via a process termed quorum sensing. In marine Vibrio species, the Vibrio harveyi-type LuxR protein is a key player in a quorum-sensing phosphorelay cascade, which controls the expression of virulence, symbiotic and survival genes. Previously, we characterized Vibrio anguillarum homologues of LuxR (VanT) and LuxMN (VanMN) and, in this study, we have identified homologues of LuxPQ (VanPQ) and LuxOU (VanOU). In contrast to other Vibrio species, vanT was expressed at low cell density and showed no significant induction as the cell number increased. In addition, although the loss of VanO increased vanT expression, the loss of VanU, unexpectedly, decreased it. Both VanN and VanQ were required for repression of vanT even in a vanU mutant, suggesting an alternative route for VanNQ signal transduction other than via VanU. VanT negatively regulated its own expression by binding and repressing the vanT promoter and by binding and activating the vanOU promoter. The signal relay results in a cellular response as expression of the metalloprotease, empA, was altered similar to that of vanT in all the mutants. Consequently, the V. anguillarum quorum-sensing phosphorelay systems work differently from those of V. harveyi and may be used to limit rather than induce vanT expression.

  • 135.
    Croxatto, Antony
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Department of Molecular Biology (Faculty of Science and Technology).
    Weber, Barbara
    Chen, Chang
    Milton, Debra L
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Molecular Biology (Faculty of Medicine). Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Umeå Centre for Microbial Research (UCMR). Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Department of Molecular Biology (Faculty of Science and Technology).
    Post-transcriptional regulation of the Vibrio anguillarum quorum-sensing regulator vanT by RpoSManuscript (Other academic)
  • 136. Cámara, Miguel
    et al.
    Hardman, Andrea
    Williams, Paul
    Milton, Debra L
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Department of Molecular Biology (Faculty of Science and Technology).
    Quorum sensing in Vibrio cholerae.2002Other (Refereed)
  • 137.
    Dar, Shabir A
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Department of Molecular Biology (Faculty of Science and Technology).
    Bijmans, Martijn F M
    Dinkla, Inez J T
    Geurkink, Bert
    Lens, Piet N L
    Dopson, Mark
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Department of Molecular Biology (Faculty of Science and Technology).
    Population dynamics of a single-stage sulfidogenic bioreactor treating synthetic zinc-containing waste streams2009In: Microbial Ecology, ISSN 0095-3628, E-ISSN 1432-184X, Vol. 58, no 3, p. 529-537Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Waste streams from industrial processes such as metal smelting or mining contain high concentrations of sulfate and metals with low pH. Dissimilatory sulfate reduction carried out by sulfate-reducing bacteria (SRB) at low pH can combine sulfate reduction with metal-sulfide precipitation and thus open possibilities for selective metal recovery. This study investigates the microbial diversity and population changes of a single-stage sulfidogenic gas-lift bioreactor treating synthetic zinc-rich waste water at pH 5.5 by denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis of 16S rRNA gene fragments and quantitative polymerase chain reaction. The results indicate the presence of a diverse range of phylogenetic groups with the predominant microbial populations belonging to the Desulfovibrionaceae from delta-Proteobacteria. Desulfovibrio desulfuricans-like populations were the most abundant among the SRB during the three stable phases of varying sulfide and zinc concentrations and increased from 13% to 54% of the total bacterial populations over time. The second largest group was Desulfovibrio marrakechensis-like SRB that increased from 1% to about 10% with decreasing sulfide concentrations. Desulfovibrio aminophilus-like populations were the only SRB to decrease in numbers with decreasing sulfide concentrations. However, their population was <1% of the total bacterial population in the reactor at all analyzed time points. The number of dissimilatory sulfate reductase (DsrA) gene copies per number of SRB cells decreased from 3.5 to 2 DsrA copies when the sulfide concentration was reduced, suggesting that the cells' sulfate-reducing capacity was also lowered. This study has identified the species present in a single-stage sulfidogenic bioreactor treating zinc-rich wastewater at low pH and provides insights into the microbial ecology of this biotechnological process.

  • 138. De Lago, Eva
    et al.
    Gustafsson, Sofia B
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Pharmacology and Clinical Neuroscience, Pharmacology.
    Fernández-Ruiz, Javier
    Nilsson, Jonas
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Molecular Biology (Faculty of Science and Technology).
    Jacobsson, Stig O P
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Pharmacology and Clinical Neuroscience, Pharmacology.
    Fowler, Christopher J
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Pharmacology and Clinical Neuroscience, Pharmacology.
    Acyl-based anandamide uptake inhibitors cause rapid toxicity to C6 glioma cells at pharmacologically relevant concentrations.2006In: J Neurochem, ISSN 0022-3042, Vol. 99, no 2, p. 677-88Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Compounds blocking the uptake of the endogenous cannabinoid anandamide (AEA) have been used to explore the functions of the endogenous cannabinoid system in the CNS both in vivo and in vitro. In this study, the effects of four commonly used acyl-based uptake inhibitors [N-(4-hydroxyphenyl)arachidonylamide (AM404), N-(4-hydroxy-2-methylphenyl) arachidonoyl amide (VDM11), (5Z,8Z,11Z,14Z)-N-(3-furanylmethyl)-5,8,11,14-eicosatetraenamide (UCM707) and (9Z)-N-[1-((R)-4-hydroxybenzyl)-2-hydroxyethyl]-9-octadecen-amide (OMDM2)] and the related compound arvanil on C6 glioma cell viability were investigated. All five compounds reduced the ability of the cells to accumulate calcein, reduced the total nucleic acid content and increased the activity of lactate dehydrogenase recovered in the cell medium. AM404 (10 microm) and VDM11 (10 microm) acted rapidly, reducing cell viability after 3 h of exposure when cell densities of 5,000 per well were used. In contrast, UCM707 (30 microm), OMDM2 (10 microm) and the related compound arvanil (10 microm) produced a more slowly developing effect on cell viability, although robust effects were seen after 6-9 h of exposure. At higher cell densities, the toxicities of AM404 and UCM707 were reduced. Comparison of the compounds with arachidonic acid, arachidonic acid methyl ester, AEA, arachidonoyl glycine and oleic acid suggested that the toxicity of the arachidonoyl-based compounds was related primarily to the acyl side-chain rather than the head group. A variety of pre-treatments blocking possible metabolic pathways and receptor targets were tested, but the only consistent protective treatment against the effects of these compounds was the antioxidant N-acetyl-L-cysteine. It is concluded that AM404, VDM11, UCM707 and OMDM2 produce a rapid loss of C6 glioma cell viability over the same concentration range as is required for the inhibition of AEA uptake in vitro, albeit with a longer latency. Such effects should be kept in mind when acyl-derived compounds are used to probe the function of the endocannabinoid system in the CNS, particularly in chronic administration protocols.

  • 139. del Peso-Santos, Teresa
    et al.
    Bartolomé-Martín, David
    Fernández, Cristina
    Alonso, Sergio
    García, José Luis
    Díaz, Eduardo
    Shingler, Victoria
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Molecular Biology (Faculty of Science and Technology).
    Perera, Julián
    Coregulation by phenylacetyl-coenzyme A-responsive PaaX integrates control of the upper and lower pathways for catabolism of styrene by Pseudomonas sp. strain Y2.2006In: J Bacteriol, ISSN 0021-9193, Vol. 188, no 13, p. 4812-21Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The P(styA) promoter of Pseudomonas sp. strain Y2 controls expression of the styABCD genes, which are required for the conversion of styrene to phenylacetate, which is further catabolized by the products of two paa gene clusters. Two PaaX repressor proteins (PaaX1 and PaaX2) regulate transcription of the paa gene clusters of this strain. In silico analysis of the P(styA) promoter region revealed a sequence located just within styA that is similar to the reported PaaX binding sites of Escherichia coli and the proposed PaaX binding sites of the paa genes of Pseudomonas species. Here we show that protein extracts from some Pseudomonas strains that have paaX genes, but not from a paaX mutant strain, can bind and retard the migration of a P(styA) specific probe. Purified maltose-binding protein (MBP)-PaaX1 fusion protein specifically binds the P(styA) promoter proximal PaaX site, and this binding is eliminated by the addition of phenylacetyl-coenzyme A. The sequence protected by MBP-PaaX1 binding was defined by DNase I footprinting. Moreover, MBP-PaaX1 represses transcription from the P(styA) promoter in a phenylacetyl-coenzyme A-dependent manner in vitro. Finally, the inactivation of both paaX gene copies of Pseudomonas sp. strain Y2 leads to a higher level of transcription from the P(styA) promoter, while heterologous expression of the PaaX1 in E. coli greatly decreases transcription from the P(styA) promoter. These findings reveal a control mechanism that integrates regulation of styrene catabolism by coordinating the expression of the styrene upper catabolic operon to that of the paa-encoded central pathway and support a role for PaaX as a major regulatory protein in the phenylacetyl-coenzyme A catabolon through its response to the levels of this central metabolite.

  • 140.
    Del Peso-Santos, Teresa
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Department of Molecular Biology (Faculty of Science and Technology).
    Bernardo, Lisandro M D
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Department of Molecular Biology (Faculty of Science and Technology).
    Skärfstad, Eleonore
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Department of Molecular Biology (Faculty of Science and Technology).
    Holmfeldt, Linda
    Togneri, Peter
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Department of Molecular Biology (Faculty of Science and Technology).
    Shingler, Victoria
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Department of Molecular Biology (Faculty of Science and Technology).
    A hyper-mutant of the unusual σ70-Pr promoter bypasses synergistic ppGpp/DksA co-stimulation2011In: Nucleic Acids Research, ISSN 0305-1048, E-ISSN 1362-4962, Vol. 39, no 14, p. 5853-5865Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The activities of promoters can be temporally and conditionally regulated by mechanisms other than classical DNA-binding repressors and activators. One example is the inherently weak σ70-dependent Pr promoter that ultimately controls catabolism of phenolic compounds. The activity of Pr is up-regulated through the joint action of ppGpp and DksA that enhance the performance of RNA polymerase at this promoter. Here, we report a mutagenesis analysis that revealed substantial differences between Pr and other ppGpp/DksA co-stimulated promoters. In vitro transcription and RNA polymerase binding assays show that it is the T at the −11 position of the extremely suboptimal −10 element of Pr that underlies both poor binding of σ70-RNAP and a slow rate of open complex formation—the process that is accelerated by ppGpp and DksA. Our findings support the idea that collaborative action of ppGpp and DksA lowers the rate-limiting transition energy required for conversion between intermediates on the road to open complex formation.

  • 141.
    Del Peso-Santos, Teresa
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Department of Molecular Biology (Faculty of Science and Technology).
    Landfors, Mattias
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Department of Mathematics and Mathematical Statistics.
    Skärfstad, Eleonore
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Department of Molecular Biology (Faculty of Science and Technology).
    Ryden, Patrik
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Department of Mathematics and Mathematical Statistics.
    Shingler, Victoria
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Department of Molecular Biology (Faculty of Science and Technology).
    Pr is a member of a restricted class of σ70-dependent promoters that lack a recognizable -10 element2012In: Nucleic Acids Research, ISSN 0305-1048, E-ISSN 1362-4962, Vol. 40, no 22, p. 11308-11320Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The Pr promoter is the first verified member of a class of bacterial σ(70)-promoters that only possess a single match to consensus within its -10 element. In its native context, the activity of this promoter determines the ability of Pseudomonas putida CF600 to degrade phenolic compounds, which provides proof-of-principle for the significance of such promoters. Lack of identity within the -10 element leads to non-detection of Pr-like promoters by current search engines, because of their bias for detection of the -10 motif. Here, we report a mutagenesis analysis of Pr that reveals strict sequence requirements for its activity that includes an essential -15 element and preservation of non-consensus bases within its -35 and -10 elements. We found that highly similar promoters control plasmid- and chromosomally- encoded phenol degradative systems in various Pseudomonads. However, using a purpose-designed promoter-search algorithm and activity analysis of potential candidate promoters, no bona fide Pr-like promoter could be found in the entire genome of P. putida KT2440. Hence, Pr-like σ(70)-promoters, which have the potential to be a widely distributed class of previously unrecognized promoters, are in fact highly restricted and remain in a class of their own.

  • 142.
    del Peso-Santos, Teresa
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Department of Molecular Biology (Faculty of Science and Technology).
    Shingler, Victoria
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Department of Molecular Biology (Faculty of Science and Technology).
    Inter-sigmulon communication through topological promoter coupling2016In: Nucleic Acids Research, ISSN 0305-1048, E-ISSN 1362-4962, Vol. 44, no 20, p. 9638-9649Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Divergent transcription from within bacterial intergenic regions frequently involves promoters dependent on alternative sigma-factors. This is the case for the non-overlapping sigma(70)- and sigma(54)-dependent promoters that control production of the substrate-responsive regulator and enzymes for (methyl) phenol catabolism. Here, using an array of in vivo and in vitro assays, we identify transcription-driven supercoiling arising from the sigma(54)-promoter as the mechanism underlying inter-promoter communication that results in stimulation of the activity of the sigma(70)-promoter. The non-overlapping 'back-to-back' configuration of a powerful sigma(54)-promoter and weak sigma(70)-promoter within this system offers a previously unknown means of inter-sigmulon communication that renders the sigma(70)-promoter subservient to signals that elicit sigma(54)-dependent transcription without it possessing a cognate binding site for the sigma(54)-RNA polymerase holoenzyme. This mode of control has the potential to be a prevalent, but hitherto unappreciated, mechanism by which bacteria adjust promoter activity to gain appropriate transcriptional control.

  • 143.
    del Peso-Santos, Teresa
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Molecular Biology (Faculty of Science and Technology).
    Shingler, Victoria
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Molecular Biology (Faculty of Science and Technology).
    Perera, Julián
    The styrene-responsive StyS/StyR regulation system controls expression of an auxiliary phenylacetyl-coenzyme A ligase: implications for rapid metabolic coupling of the styrene upper- and lower-degradative pathways.2008In: Molecular microbiology, ISSN 1365-2958, Vol. 69, no 2, p. 317-30Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Pseudomonas sp. strain Y2 degrades styrene through oxidation to phenylacetic acid via the styABCD operon-encoded enzymes, whose expression is induced in response to styrene by the StyS/StyR two-component regulatory system. Further transformation of phenylacetic acid to tricarboxylic acid cycle intermediates is mediated by the enzymes of paa catabolic genes, whose expression is regulated by the PaaX repressor. The first step of this paa degradation pathway is catalysed by paaF-encoded phenylacetyl-coenzyme A ligases that produce phenylacetyl-coenzyme A. This metabolic intermediate, upon being bound by PaaX, inactivates PaaX-mediated repression of both the paa genes and the styABCD operon. Strain Y2 is unique in having three paaF genes located within two complete copies of the paa gene clusters. Expression of both paaF and paaF3 is controlled by the PaaX repressor. Here we use specific mutants in combination with in vivo and in vitro assays to demonstrate that paaF2, adjacent to the StyS/StyR regulatory genes, belongs to the StyR regulon and is not subject to repression by PaaX. We propose that this unexpected styrene-responsive regulatory strategy for the otherwise metabolically redundant PaaF2 auxiliary enzyme provides a system for rapid co-ordinate de-repression of the two sets of catabolic genes required for styrene degradation.

  • 144.
    Deleuil, Fabienne
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Department of Molecular Biology (Faculty of Science and Technology). Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Molecular Biology (Faculty of Medicine).
    Mogemark, Lena
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Molecular Biology (Faculty of Medicine). Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Department of Molecular Biology (Faculty of Science and Technology).
    Francis, Matthew S
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Department of Molecular Biology (Faculty of Science and Technology).
    Wolf-Watz, Hans
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Department of Molecular Biology (Faculty of Science and Technology).
    Fällman, Maria
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Molecular Biology (Faculty of Medicine).
    Interaction between the Yersinia protein tyrosine phosphatase YopH and eukaryotic Cas/Fyb is an important virulence mechanism2003In: Cellular Microbiology, ISSN 1462-5814, E-ISSN 1462-5822, Vol. 5, no 1, p. 53-64Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The tyrosine phosphatase YopH is an essential virulence factor produced by pathogenic Yersinia species. YopH is translocated into host cells via a type III secretion system and its dephosphorylating activity causes disruption of focal complex structures and blockage of the phagocytic process. Among the host cell targets of YopH are the focal adhesion proteins Crk-associated substrate (p130Cas) and focal adhesion kinase (FAK) in epithelial cells, and p130Cas and Fyn-binding protein (Fyb) in macrophages. Previous studies have shown that the N-terminal domain of YopH acts as a substrate-binding domain. In this study, the mechanism and biological importance of the targeting of YopH to focal complexes relative to its interaction with p130Cas/Fyb was elucidated. Mutants of YopH that were defective in p130Cas/Fyb binding but otherwise indistinguishable from wild type were constructed. Mutants unable to bind p130Cas did not localize to focal complex structures in infected cells, indicating that the association with p130Cas is critical for appropriate subcellular localization of YopH. These yopH mutants were also clearly attenuated in virulence, showing that binding to p130Cas and/or Fyb is biologically relevant in Yersinia infections.

  • 145. den Hollander, J
    et al.
    Rimpi, Sara
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Department of Molecular Biology (Faculty of Science and Technology).
    Doherty, JR
    Rudelius, M
    Buck, A
    Hoellein, A
    Kremer, M
    Graf, N
    Scheerer, M
    Hall, MA
    Goga, A
    von Bubnoff, N
    Duyster, J
    Peschel, C
    Cleveland, JL
    Nilsson, Jonas A
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Department of Molecular Biology (Faculty of Science and Technology).
    Keller, U
    Aurora kinases A and B are up-regulated by Myc and are essential for maintenance of the malignant state2010In: Blood, ISSN 0006-4971, E-ISSN 1528-0020, Vol. 116, no 9, p. 1498-1505Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Myc oncoproteins promote continuous cell growth, in part by controlling the transcription of key cell cycle regulators. Here, we report that c-Myc regulates the expression of Aurora A and B kinases (Aurka and Aurkb), and that Aurka and Aurkb transcripts and protein levels are highly elevated in Myc-driven B-cell lymphomas in both mice and humans. The induction of Aurka by Myc is transcriptional and is directly mediated via E-boxes, whereas Aurkb is regulated indirectly. Blocking Aurka/b kinase activity with a selective Aurora kinase inhibitor triggers transient mitotic arrest, polyploidization, and apoptosis of Myc-induced lymphomas. These phenotypes are selectively bypassed by a kinase inhibitor-resistant-Aurkb mutant, demonstrating that Aurkb is the primary therapeutic target in the context of Myc. Importantly, apoptosis provoked by Aurk inhibition was p53 independent, suggesting that Aurka/Aurkb inhibitors will show efficacy in treating primary or relapsed malignancies having Myc involvement and/or loss of p53 function. (Blood. 2010;116(9):1498-1505)

  • 146.
    den Hollander, Jürgen
    et al.
    III. Medical Department, Technische Universität München, Munich, Germany.
    Rimpi, Sara
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Molecular Biology (Faculty of Science and Technology).
    Doherty, Joanne R
    Department of Cancer Biology, The Scripps Research Institute, Scripps Florida, Jupiter, Florida, USA.
    Rudelius, Martina
    Department of Pathology, Technische Universität München, Munich, Germany.
    Buck, Andreas
    Department of Nuclear Medicine, Technische Universität München, Munich, Germany.
    Kremer, Marcus
    Department of Pathology, Technische Universität München, Munich, Germany.
    Graf, Nikolas
    III. Medical Department, Technische Universität München, Munich, Germany.
    Scheerer, Markus
    III. Medical Department, Technische Universität München, Munich, Germany.
    Hall, Mark
    Department of Cancer Biology, The Scripps Research Institute, Scripps Florida, Jupiter, Florida, USA.
    von Bubnoff, Nikolas
    III. Medical Department, Technische Universität München, Munich, Germany.
    Duyster, Justus
    III. Medical Department, Technische Universität München, Munich, Germany.
    Peschel, Christian
    III. Medical Department, Technische Universität München, Munich, Germany.
    Cleveland, John L
    Department of Cancer Biology, The Scripps Research Institute, Scripps Florida, Jupiter, Florida, USA.
    Nilsson, Jonas A
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Molecular Biology (Faculty of Science and Technology).
    Keller, Ulrich
    III. Medical Department, Technische Universität München, Munich, Germany.
    Aurora kinases A and B are Myc targets essential for maintenance of the malignant stateManuscript (preprint) (Other academic)
  • 147. Doherty, Joanne
    et al.
    Nilsson, Lisa
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Molecular Biology (Faculty of Science and Technology).
    Kuliyev, Emin
    Cleveland, John
    Roussel, Martine
    Mead, Paul
    The Xenopus cyclin-dependent kinase inhibitor Ink4d is functionally conserved with murine p19Ink4d and is required for neural crest developmentArticle in journal (Refereed)
  • 148. Domingo-Almenara, Xavier
    et al.
    Montenegro-Burke, J. Rafael
    Ivanisevic, Julijana
    Thomas, Aurelien
    Sidibé, Jonathan
    Teav, Tony
    Guijas, Carlos
    Aisporna, Aries E.
    Rinehart, Duane
    Hoang, Linh
    Nordström, Anders
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Department of Molecular Biology (Faculty of Science and Technology).
    Gómez-Romero, Maria
    Whiley, Luke
    Lewis, Matthew R.
    Nicholson, Jeremy K.
    Benton, H. Paul
    Siuzdak, Gary
    CMS-MRM and METLIN-MRM: a cloud library and public resource for targeted analysis of small molecules2018In: Nature Methods, ISSN 1548-7091, E-ISSN 1548-7105, Vol. 15, no 9, p. 681-+Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    We report XCMS-MRM and METLIN-MRM (http://xcmsonline-mrm.scripps.edu/ and http://metlin.scripps.edu/), a cloud-based data-analysis platform and a public multiple-reaction monitoring (MRM) transition repository for small-molecule quantitative tandem mass spectrometry. This platform provides MRM transitions for more than 15,500 molecules and facilitates data sharing across different instruments and laboratories.

  • 149.
    Dopson, Mark
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Molecular Biology (Faculty of Science and Technology).
    Baker-Austin, Craig
    Bond, Philip
    Towards determining details of anaerobic growth coupled to ferric iron reduction by the acidophilic archaeon 'Ferroplasma acidarmanus' Fer1.2007In: Extremophiles, ISSN 1431-0651, Vol. 11, no 1, p. 159-68Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Elucidation of the different growth states of Ferroplasma species is crucial in understanding the cycling of iron in acid leaching sites. Therefore, a proteomic and biochemical study of anaerobic growth in 'Ferroplasma acidarmanus' Fer1 has been carried out. Anaerobic growth in Ferroplasma spp. occurred by coupling oxidation of organic carbon with the reduction of Fe(3+); but sulfate, nitrate, sulfite, thiosulfate, and arsenate were not utilized as electron acceptors. Rates of Fe(3+) reduction were similar to other acidophilic chemoorganotrophs. Analysis of the 'F. acidarmanus' Fer1 proteome by 2-dimensional polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis revealed ten key proteins linked with central metabolic pathways > or =4 fold up-regulated during anaerobic growth. These included proteins putatively identified as associated with the reductive tricarboxylic acid pathway used for anaerobic energy production, and others including a putative flavoprotein involved in electron transport. Inhibition of anaerobic growth and Fe(3+) reduction by inhibitors suggests the involvement of electron transport in Fe(3+)reduction. This study has increased the knowledge of anaerobic growth in this biotechnologically and environmentally important acidophilic archaeon.

  • 150.
    Dopson, Mark
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Molecular Biology (Faculty of Science and Technology).
    Baker-Austin, Craig
    Bond, Philip L
    Analysis of differential protein expression during growth states of Ferroplasma strains and insights into electron transport for iron oxidation.2005In: Microbiology, ISSN 1350-0872, Vol. 151, no Pt 12, p. 4127-37Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    To investigate the metabolic biochemistry of iron-oxidizing extreme acidophiles, a proteomic analysis of chemomixotrophic and chemo-organotrophic growth, as well as protein expression in the absence of organic carbon, was carried out in Ferroplasma species. Electron transport chain inhibitor studies, spectrophotometric analysis and proteomic results suggest that oxidation of ferrous iron may be mediated by the blue copper-haem protein sulfocyanin and the derived electron passes to a cbb3 terminal electron acceptor. Despite previous suggestions of a putative carbon dioxide fixation pathway, no up-regulation of proteins typically associated with carbon dioxide fixation was evident during incubation in the absence of organic carbon. Although a lack of known carbon dioxide fixation proteins does not constitute proof, the results suggest that these strains are not autotrophic. Proteins putatively involved in central metabolic pathways, a probable sugar permease and flavoproteins were up-regulated during chemo-organotrophic growth in comparison to the protein complement during chemomixotrophic growth. These results reflect a higher energy demand to be derived from the organic carbon during chemo-organotrophic growth. Proteins with suggested function as central metabolic enzymes were expressed at higher levels during chemomixotrophic growth by Ferroplasma acidiphilum Y(T) compared to 'Ferroplasma acidarmanus' Fer1. This study addresses some of the biochemical and bioenergetic questions fundamental for survival of these organisms in extreme acid-leaching environments.

1234567 101 - 150 of 788
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