umu.sePublications
Change search
Refine search result
123 101 - 109 of 109
CiteExportLink to result list
Permanent link
Cite
Citation style
  • apa
  • ieee
  • modern-language-association-8th-edition
  • vancouver
  • Other style
More styles
Language
  • de-DE
  • en-GB
  • en-US
  • fi-FI
  • nn-NO
  • nn-NB
  • sv-SE
  • Other locale
More languages
Output format
  • html
  • text
  • asciidoc
  • rtf
Rows per page
  • 5
  • 10
  • 20
  • 50
  • 100
  • 250
Sort
  • Standard (Relevance)
  • Author A-Ö
  • Author Ö-A
  • Title A-Ö
  • Title Ö-A
  • Publication type A-Ö
  • Publication type Ö-A
  • Issued (Oldest first)
  • Issued (Newest first)
  • Created (Oldest first)
  • Created (Newest first)
  • Last updated (Oldest first)
  • Last updated (Newest first)
  • Disputation date (earliest first)
  • Disputation date (latest first)
  • Standard (Relevance)
  • Author A-Ö
  • Author Ö-A
  • Title A-Ö
  • Title Ö-A
  • Publication type A-Ö
  • Publication type Ö-A
  • Issued (Oldest first)
  • Issued (Newest first)
  • Created (Oldest first)
  • Created (Newest first)
  • Last updated (Oldest first)
  • Last updated (Newest first)
  • Disputation date (earliest first)
  • Disputation date (latest first)
Select
The maximal number of hits you can export is 250. When you want to export more records please use the Create feeds function.
  • 101.
    Wagner, Ryan
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine, Epidemiology and Global Health.
    Kabudula, CW
    Forsgren, Lars
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Pharmacology and Clinical Neuroscience, Clinical Neuroscience.
    Ibinda, F
    Lindholm, Lars
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine, Epidemiology and Global Health.
    Kahn, Kathrine
    Tollman, Stephen
    Newton, CR
    The convulsive epilepsy treatment cascade and its determinants in rural South AfricaArticle in journal (Refereed)
  • 102.
    Wagner, Ryan
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine, Epidemiology and Global Health.
    Norström, Fredrik
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine, Epidemiology and Global Health.
    Bertram, MY
    Tollman, Stephen
    Forsgren, Lars
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Pharmacology and Clinical Neuroscience, Clinical Neuroscience.
    Hofman, Karen
    Newton, CR
    Lindholm, Lars
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine, Epidemiology and Global Health.
    A community health workers to improve adherence to anti-epileptic drugs in rural sub-Saharan Africa: Is it cost-effective?Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 103.
    Wilhelm, Kristina R
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Biochemistry and Biophysics.
    Yanamandra, Kiran
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Biochemistry and Biophysics.
    Gruden, M A
    P.K. Anokhin Institute of Normal Physiology, Russian Academy of Medical Sciences, Moscow, Russia.
    Zamotin, V
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Biochemistry and Biophysics.
    Malisauskas, M
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Biochemistry and Biophysics.
    Casaite, V
    Department of Molecular Microbiology and Biotechnology, Institute of Biochemistry, Vilnius, Lithuania.
    Darinskas, A
    Institute of Immunology, Vilnius University, Vilnius, Lithuania.
    Forsgren, Lars
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Pharmacology and Clinical Neuroscience, Neurology.
    Morozova-Roche, Ludmilla A
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Biochemistry and Biophysics.
    Immune reactivity towards insulin, its amyloid and protein S100B in blood sera of Parkinson's disease patients2007In: European Journal of Neurology, ISSN 1351-5101, E-ISSN 1468-1331, Vol. 14, no 3, p. 327-334Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Peripheral immune responses can be sensitive indicators of disease pathology. We evaluated the autoimmune reactions to endocrine (insulin) and astrocytical (S100B) biomarkers in the blood sera of 26 Parkinson's disease (PD) patients compared with controls by using ELISA. We found a statistically significant increase of the autoimmune responses to both antigens in PD patients compared with controls with a mean increase of 70% and 50% in the autoimmune reactions towards insulin and S100B, respectively. Heterogeneity of the immune responses observed in patients may reflect the modulating effect of multiple variables associated with neurodegeneration and also changes in the basic mechanisms of individual autoimmune reactivity. We did not detect any pronounced immune reactions towards insulin amyloid fibrils and oligomers in PD patients, indicating that an amyloid-specific conformational epitope is not involved in immune recognition of this amyloid type, while sequential epitope of native insulin is hidden within the amyloid structures. Immune reactions towards S100B and insulin may reflect the neurodegenerative brain damaging processes and impaired insulin homeostasis occurring in PD.

  • 104.
    Wu, Junfang
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Department of Chemistry. Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Pharmacology and Clinical Neuroscience, Clinical Neuroscience.
    Wuolikainen, Anna
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Department of Chemistry.
    Trupp, Miles
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Pharmacology and Clinical Neuroscience, Clinical Neuroscience.
    Jonsson, Pär
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Department of Chemistry.
    Marklund, Stefan L.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Biosciences, Clinical chemistry.
    Andersen, Peter M.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Pharmacology and Clinical Neuroscience, Clinical Neuroscience.
    Forsgren, Lars
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Pharmacology and Clinical Neuroscience, Clinical Neuroscience.
    Öhman, Anders
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Pharmacology and Clinical Neuroscience, Clinical Neuroscience.
    NMR analysis of the CSF and plasma metabolome of rigorously matched amyotrophic lateral sclerosis, Parkinson's disease and control subjects2016In: Metabolomics, ISSN 1573-3882, E-ISSN 1573-3890, Vol. 12, no 6, article id 101Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Introduction: Amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS) and Parkinson’s disease (PD) are two severe neurodegenerative disorders for which the disease mechanisms are poorly understood and reliable biomarkers are absent.

    Objectives: To identify metabolite biomarkers for ALS and PD, and to gain insights into which metabolic pathways are involved in disease.

    Methods: Nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) metabolomics was utilized to characterize the metabolite profiles of cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) and plasma from individuals in three age, gender, and sampling-date matched groups, comprising 22 ALS, 22 PD and 28 control subjects.

    Results: Multivariate analysis of NMR data generated robust discriminatory models for separation of ALS from control subjects. ALS patients showed increased concentrations of several metabolites in both CSF and plasma, these are alanine (CSF fold change = 1.22, p = 0.005), creatine (CSF-fc = 1.17, p = 0.001), glucose (CSF-fc = 1.11, p = 0.036), isoleucine (CSF-fc = 1.24, p = 0.002), and valine (CSF-fc = 1.17, p = 0.014). Additional metabolites in CSF (creatinine, dimethylamine and lactic acid) and plasma (acetic acid, glutamic acid, histidine, leucine, pyruvate and tyrosine) were also important for this discrimination. Similarly, panels of CSF-metabolites that discriminate PD from ALS and control subjects were identified.

    Conclusions: The results for the ALS patients suggest an affected creatine/creatinine pathway and an altered branched chain amino acid (BCAA) metabolism, and suggest links to glucose and energy metabolism. Putative metabolic markers specific for ALS (e.g. creatinine and lactic acid) and PD (e.g. 3-hydroxyisovaleric acid and mannose) were identified, while several (e.g. creatine and BCAAs) were shared between ALS and PD, suggesting some overlap in metabolic alterations in these disorders.

  • 105.
    Wuolikainen, Anna
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Department of Chemistry.
    Jonsson, Pär
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Department of Chemistry.
    Ahnlund, Maria
    Antti, Henrik
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Department of Chemistry.
    Marklund, Stefan L.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Biosciences, Clinical chemistry.
    Moritz, Thomas
    Forsgren, Lars
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Pharmacology and Clinical Neuroscience, Clinical Neuroscience.
    Andersen, Peter M.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Pharmacology and Clinical Neuroscience, Clinical Neuroscience.
    Trupp, Miles
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Pharmacology and Clinical Neuroscience, Clinical Neuroscience.
    Multi-platform mass spectrometry analysis of the CSF and plasma metabolomes of rigorously matched amyotrophic lateral sclerosis, Parkinson's disease and control subjects2016In: Molecular Biosystems, ISSN 1742-206X, E-ISSN 1742-2051, Vol. 12, no 4, p. 1287-1298Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS) and Parkinson's disease (PD) are protein-aggregation diseases that lack clear molecular etiologies. Biomarkers could aid in diagnosis, prognosis, planning of care, drug target identification and stratification of patients into clinical trials. We sought to characterize shared and unique metabolite perturbations between ALS and PD and matched controls selected from patients with other diagnoses, including differential diagnoses to ALS or PD that visited our clinic for a lumbar puncture. Cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) and plasma from rigorously age-, sex- and sampling-date matched patients were analyzed on multiple platforms using gas chromatography (GC) and liquid chromatography (LC)-mass spectrometry (MS). We applied constrained randomization of run orders and orthogonal partial least squares projection to latent structure-effect projections (OPLS-EP) to capitalize upon the study design. The combined platforms identified 144 CSF and 196 plasma metabolites with diverse molecular properties. Creatine was found to be increased and creatinine decreased in CSF of ALS patients compared to matched controls. Glucose was increased in CSF of ALS patients and alpha-hydroxybutyrate was increased in CSF and plasma of ALS patients compared to matched controls. Leucine, isoleucine and ketoleucine were increased in CSF of both ALS and PD. Together, these studies, in conjunction with earlier studies, suggest alterations in energy utilization pathways and have identified and further validated perturbed metabolites to be used in panels of biomarkers for the diagnosis of ALS and PD.

  • 106.
    Yanamandra, Kiran
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Biochemistry and Biophysics.
    Gruden, Marina A
    Institute of Normal Physiology, Moscow.
    Casaite, Vida
    Institute of Biochemistry, Vilnius .
    Meskys, Rolandas
    Institute of Biochemistry, Vilnius .
    Forsgren, Lars
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Pharmacology and Clinical Neuroscience, Clinical Neuroscience.
    Morozova-Roche, Ludmilla
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Biochemistry and Biophysics.
    Alpha-Synuclein Reactive Antibodies as Diagnostic Biomarkers in Blood Sera of Parkinson's Disease Patients2011In: PLoS One, ISSN 1932-6203, Vol. 6, no 4, p. e18513-Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background

    Auto-antibodies with specificity to self-antigens have been implicated in a wide variety of neurological diseases, including Parkinson's (PD) and Alzheimer's diseases, being sensitive indicators of neurodegeneration and focus for disease prevention. Of particular interest are the studies focused on the auto-immune responses to amyloidogenic proteins associated with diseases and their applications in therapeutic treatments such as vaccination with amyloid antigens and antibodies in PD, Alzheimer's disease and potentially other neurodegeneration ailments.

    Methodology/Principal Findings

    Generated auto-antibodies towards the major amyloidogenic protein involved in PD Lewy bodies – α-synuclein and its amyloid oligomers and fibrils were measured in the blood sera of early and late PD patients and controls by using ELISA, Western blot and Biacore surface plasmon resonance. We found significantly higher antibody levels towards monomeric α-synuclein in the blood sera of PD patients compared to controls, though the responses decreased with PD progression (P<0.0001). This indicates potential protective role of autoimmunity in maintaining the body homeostasis and clearing protein species whose disbalance may lead to amyloid assembly. There were no noticeable immune responses towards amyloid oligomers, but substantially increased levels of IgGs towards α-synuclein amyloid fibrils both in PD patients and controls, which subsided with the disease progression (P<0.0001). Pooled IgGs from PD patients and controls interacted also with the amyloid fibrils of Aβ (1–40) and hen lysozyme, however the latter were recognized with lower affinity. This suggests that IgGs bind to the generic amyloid conformational epitope, displaying higher specificity towards human amyloid species associated with neurodegeneration.

    Conclusions/Significance

    Our findings may suggest the protective role of autoimmunity in PD and therefore immune reactions towards PD major amyloid protein – α-synuclein can be of value in the development of treatment and diagnostic strategies, especially during the early disease stages.

  • 107. Yang, Fei
    et al.
    Pedersen, Nancy L
    Ye, Weimin
    Liu, Zhiwei
    Norberg, Margareta
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine, Epidemiology and Global Health.
    Forsgren, Lars
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Pharmacology and Clinical Neuroscience, Clinical Neuroscience.
    Trolle Lagerros, Ylva
    Bellocco, Rino
    Alfredsson, Lars
    Knutsson, Anders
    Jansson, Jan-Håkan
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine, Medicine.
    Wennberg, Patrik
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine, Family Medicine.
    Galanti, Maria Rosaria
    Lager, Anton C J
    Araghi, Marzieh
    Lundberg, Michael
    Magnusson, Cecilia
    Wirdefeldt, Karin
    Moist smokeless tobacco (Snus) use and risk of Parkinson's disease2017In: International Journal of Epidemiology, ISSN 0300-5771, E-ISSN 1464-3685, Vol. 46, no 3, p. 872-880Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    BACKGROUND: Cigarette smoking is associated with a lower risk of Parkinson's disease. It is unclear what constituent of tobacco smoke may lower the risk. Use of Swedish moist smokeless tobacco (snus) can serve as a model to disentangle what constituent of tobacco smoke may lower the risk. The aim of this study was to determine whether snus use was associated with a lower risk of Parkinson's disease.

    METHODS: Individual participant data were collected from seven prospective cohort studies, including 348 601 men. We used survival analysis with multivariable Cox regression to estimate study-specific relative risk of Parkinson's disease due to snus use, and random-effects models to pool estimates in a meta-analysis. The primary analyses were restricted to never-smokers to eliminate the potential confounding effect of tobacco smoking.

    RESULTS: During a mean follow-up time of 16.1 years, 1199 incident Parkinson's disease cases were identified. Among men who never smoked, ever-snus users had about 60% lower Parkinson's disease risk compared with never-snus users [pooled hazard ratio (HR) 0.41, 95% confidence interval (CI) 0.28-0.61]. The inverse association between snus use and Parkinson's disease risk was more pronounced in current (pooled HR 0.38, 95% CI 0.23-0.63), moderate-heavy amount (pooled HR 0.41, 95% CI 0.19-0.90) and long-term snus users (pooled HR 0.44, 95% CI 0.24-0.83).

    CONCLUSIONS: Non-smoking men who used snus had a substantially lower risk of Parkinson's disease. Results also indicated an inverse dose-response relationship between snus use and Parkinson's disease risk. Our findings suggest that nicotine or other components of tobacco leaves may influence the development of Parkinson's disease.

  • 108.
    Ådén, Emma
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine, Family Medicine.
    Carlsson, Maine
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Community Medicine and Rehabilitation, Geriatric Medicine.
    Poortvliet, Eric
    Stenlund, Hans
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine, Epidemiology and Global Health.
    Linder, Jan
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Pharmacology and Clinical Neuroscience, Neurology.
    Edström, Mona
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Pharmacology and Clinical Neuroscience, Neurology.
    Forsgren, Lars
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Pharmacology and Clinical Neuroscience, Neurology.
    Håglin, Lena
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine, Family Medicine.
    Dietary intake and olfactory function in patients with newly diagnosed Parkinson's disease: a case-control study.2011In: Nutritional neuroscience, ISSN 1476-8305, Vol. 14, no 1, p. 25-31Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    OBJECTIVE: To evaluate energy and nutrient intake in newly diagnosed Parkinson's disease (PD) patients and association between olfaction and nutrient density of the diet.

    DESIGN: Baseline data from a prospective cohort study.

    SUBJECTS: Eighty-seven patients and 28 age- and sex-matched controls participated in the study.

    METHODS: Dietary intake was assessed by using 3-day dietary records and 24-hour dietary recalls. The Brief Smell Identification Test (B-SIT) was used to test olfaction.

    RESULTS: Patients, compared with controls, had lower intake of polyunsaturated fatty acids (P = 0.024) and a higher intake of carbohydrates (P = 0.027) in energy percent (E%). Lower intake of protein (E%) (P = 0.045), and a low nutrient density of folate (P = 0.022), magnesium (P = 0.012), and phosphorus (P = 0.029) were associated with lower B-SIT score in both patients and controls. PD patients had a lower B-SIT score than controls (P < 0.001).

    CONCLUSION: The results indicate a higher relative contribution of energy from carbohydrates in PD patients. An association between low protein, folate, magnesium, and phosphorus density of the diet and olfaction was seen in the whole population.

  • 109.
    Öhman, Anders
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Pharmacology and Clinical Neuroscience, Clinical Neuroscience.
    Forsgren, Lars
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Pharmacology and Clinical Neuroscience, Clinical Neuroscience.
    NMR metabonomics of cerebrospinal fluid distinguishes between Parkinson's disease and controls2015In: Neuroscience Letters, ISSN 0304-3940, E-ISSN 1872-7972, Vol. 594, p. 36-39Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This study assesses if nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) metabonomics can discriminate between Parkinson's disease (PD) patients and control subjects, and consequently identify metabolic markers for the disease. One-dimensional H-1 NMR spectroscopy was used for quantitative analysis of metabolites in the cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) from 10 PD patients and 10 control individuals, together with uni- and multivariate statistical analysis to discriminate between the groups and to identify significantly altered metabolite concentrations. In total 60 metabolites were identified and of those 38 were quantified in all CSF samples. An overall lowering of metabolite content was observed in PD patients compared to control subjects (fold change of 0.85 +/- 0.30). Multivariate statistics reveal significant changes (vertical bar w*vertical bar>0.2) among nine metabolites (alanine, creatinine, dimethylamine, glucose, lactate, mannose, phenylalanine, 3-hydroxyisobutyric acid and 3-hydroxyisovaleric acid). Three of these (alanine, creatinine and mannose) are identified as significantly changed also by univariate statistics (p < 0.00132, Bonferroni corrected). Panels with all or a selected set of these metabolites were successfully used for discriminating between the two groups. In conclusion, NMR metabonomics can readily determine metabolite concentrations in CSF, identify putative biomarkers that distinguish between the PD patients and control subjects, and thus potentially become a tool for diagnostic purposes.

123 101 - 109 of 109
CiteExportLink to result list
Permanent link
Cite
Citation style
  • apa
  • ieee
  • modern-language-association-8th-edition
  • vancouver
  • Other style
More styles
Language
  • de-DE
  • en-GB
  • en-US
  • fi-FI
  • nn-NO
  • nn-NB
  • sv-SE
  • Other locale
More languages
Output format
  • html
  • text
  • asciidoc
  • rtf