umu.sePublikasjoner
Endre søk
Begrens søket
1234567 101 - 150 of 775
RefereraExporteraLink til resultatlisten
Permanent link
Referera
Referensformat
  • apa
  • ieee
  • modern-language-association-8th-edition
  • vancouver
  • Annet format
Fler format
Språk
  • de-DE
  • en-GB
  • en-US
  • fi-FI
  • nn-NO
  • nn-NB
  • sv-SE
  • Annet språk
Fler språk
Utmatningsformat
  • html
  • text
  • asciidoc
  • rtf
Treff pr side
  • 5
  • 10
  • 20
  • 50
  • 100
  • 250
Sortering
  • Standard (Relevans)
  • Forfatter A-Ø
  • Forfatter Ø-A
  • Tittel A-Ø
  • Tittel Ø-A
  • Type publikasjon A-Ø
  • Type publikasjon Ø-A
  • Eldste først
  • Nyeste først
  • Skapad (Eldste først)
  • Skapad (Nyeste først)
  • Senast uppdaterad (Eldste først)
  • Senast uppdaterad (Nyeste først)
  • Disputationsdatum (tidligste først)
  • Disputationsdatum (siste først)
  • Standard (Relevans)
  • Forfatter A-Ø
  • Forfatter Ø-A
  • Tittel A-Ø
  • Tittel Ø-A
  • Type publikasjon A-Ø
  • Type publikasjon Ø-A
  • Eldste først
  • Nyeste først
  • Skapad (Eldste først)
  • Skapad (Nyeste først)
  • Senast uppdaterad (Eldste først)
  • Senast uppdaterad (Nyeste først)
  • Disputationsdatum (tidligste først)
  • Disputationsdatum (siste først)
Merk
Maxantalet träffar du kan exportera från sökgränssnittet är 250. Vid större uttag använd dig av utsökningar.
  • 101.
    Carson, Dean
    et al.
    Charles Darwin University, Australia.
    Cartan, Greg
    Touring routes - types, successes and failures: an international review2011Inngår i: Drive tourism: trends and emerging markets / [ed] Bruce Prideaux and Dean Carson, Abingdon: Routledge , 2011, s. 296-310Kapittel i bok, del av antologi (Fagfellevurdert)
  • 102. Carson, Dean
    et al.
    Cleary, Jen
    Virtual realities: How remote dwelling populations become more remote over time despite technological improvements2010Inngår i: Sustainability, ISSN 2071-1050, E-ISSN 2071-1050, Vol. 2, nr 5, s. 1282-1296Artikkel i tidsskrift (Fagfellevurdert)
  • 103.
    Carson, Dean
    et al.
    School for Social and Policy Research, Charles Darwin University, Darwin, Australia.
    Coe, Kristal
    Zander, Kerstin
    Garnett, Stephen
    Does the type of job matter?: Recruitment to Australia's Northern Territory2010Inngår i: Employee relations, ISSN 0142-5455, E-ISSN 1758-7069, Vol. 32, nr 2, s. 121-137Artikkel i tidsskrift (Fagfellevurdert)
    Abstract [en]

    Purpose – The aim of this paper is to synthesise three separate but similar studies into the motivations of accountants, engineers, and nurses to come to Australia’s Northern Territory. Gordon’s job structures model and the labour force development implications of staples thesis are to be used to provide a view of the differences between types of jobs.

    Design/methodology/approach – Separate surveys of accountants, engineers and nurses registered in the Northern Territory were conducted in 2006 and 2007. Similarities in design between the studies allowed comparisons to be made regarding responses to questions about motives to move to the Northern Territory. Comparisons between the job groups were made on the basis of responses to individual motives, and a principal components analysis was used to identify groups of motives.

    Findings – Nurses were more likely than engineers to be motivated to work with indigenous people and by their own family and social issues. Accountants were similar to engineers with regards to working with indigenous people, and similar to nurses with regards to family and social migration motives.

    Practical implications – Growing the professional workforce in the Northern Territory is a prominent government policy objective. This study shows that different approaches to recruitment need to be taken with workers in different professions.

    Originality/value – One of the weaknesses in existing academic literature on recruitment and retention of professionals in rural and remote areas is a lack of studies comparing rural migration motives of labour employed in different types of jobs. This study covers those aspects of the field.

  • 104.
    Carson, Dean
    et al.
    Charles Darwin University, Australia.
    Ensign, Prescott C
    Rasmussen, Rasmus Ole
    Taylor, Andrew
    Perspectives on 'demography at the edge'2011Inngår i: Demography at the edge: remote human populations in developed nations / [ed] Dean Carson, Rasmus Ole Rasmussen, Prescott Ensign, Lee Huskey, Andrew Taylor, Farnham: Ashgate, 2011, s. 3-20Kapittel i bok, del av antologi (Fagfellevurdert)
  • 105.
    Carson, Dean
    et al.
    Flinders University School of Medicine & The Northern Institute, Charles Darwin University, Flinders University, Nuriootpa, South Australia.
    Koster, Rhonda
    Addressing the problem of Indigenous disadvantage in remote areas of developed nations: a plea for more comparative research2012Inngår i: Journal of Rural and Community Development, ISSN 1712-8277, E-ISSN 1712-8277, Vol. 7, nr 1, s. 110-125Artikkel i tidsskrift (Fagfellevurdert)
    Abstract [en]

    It has been well documented that Indigenous populations in developed ‘postcolonial’ nations (such as Australia, New Zealand, Canada, and the United States) experience disadvantage in a number of areas when compared with their non-Indigenous counterparts. Despite (or perhaps because of) a range of policy initiatives and political approaches to addressing disadvantage, there continues to be poor understandings of what 'works' and under what conditions. There is a body of literature which compares conditions, political ideas and policy initiatives across the jurisdictions, but the bases for comparison are poorly described; there is insufficient linking of research into ‘ideas’ with research into initiatives and their outcomes, and there is insufficient engagement of Indigenous people in the research. This paper proposes a more rigorous approach to comparative research that is based on principals of partnership with and participation of Indigenous people. We conclude that well designed participatory comparative research can not only provide new insights to old problems, but can improve Indigenous people's access to global knowledge systems.

  • 106.
    Carson, Dean
    et al.
    School of Medicine, Flinders University, Nuriootpa, South Australia; The Northern Institute,Charles Darwin University, Darwin, Northern Territory, Australia.
    McConnel, Fred
    Indigenous health and community services employment in remote Northern Territory: a baseline examination of 2006 and 2011 Census data2011Inngår i: The Australian journal of rural health, ISSN 1038-5282, E-ISSN 1440-1584, Vol. 19, nr 5, s. 255-258Artikkel i tidsskrift (Fagfellevurdert)
    Abstract [en]

    Objective: To establish a baseline of levels of Indigenous professional engagement in the health and community services sector in remote Northern Territory.

    Design: Analysis of data from 2001 and 2006 Census.

    Setting: Northern Territory – Balance Statistical Division.

    Participants: Persons employed in health and community services sector in 2006.

    Main outcome measures: Indigenous status, level of education, current education status, occupation type and residential mobility.

    Results: Indigenous employment grew by 137% between 2001 and 2006. In 2006, 42% of Indigenous employees were labourers and 9% professionals, in contrast to non‐Indigenous workers of whom 41% were professionals and 5% labourers. Over 50% of workers who moved into the region between 2001 and 2006 were professionals, compared with 20% of those who had remained in the region. Indigenous in‐migrants were twice as likely as Indigenous people who had stayed in the region to be professionals. Indigenous workers were much less likely to have post‐school educational qualifications than non‐Indigenous workers. Indigenous workers were also less likely to be studying for a post‐school qualification. Indigenous in‐migrants were three times as likely to have post‐school qualifications than Indigenous people who had remained in the region and were also more likely to be enrolled in post‐school education.

    Conclusions: The baseline is low Indigenous engagement as professional labour, and low Indigenous engagement in formal education. Mobile Indigenous people have higher levels of engagement. The situation might be addressed by increased formal education in remote areas and increased mobility of Indigenous health labour.

  • 107.
    Carson, Dean
    et al.
    Charles Darwin University, Australia.
    Prideaux, Bruce
    What now?: Concluding remarks2011Inngår i: Drive tourism: trends and emerging markets / [ed] Bruce Prideaux and Dean Carson, Abingdon: Routledge , 2011, s. 369-373Kapittel i bok, del av antologi (Fagfellevurdert)
  • 108.
    Carson, Dean
    et al.
    Charles Darwin University, Australia.
    Schmallegger, Doris
    James Cook University, Australia.
    Drive tourism: a view from the road2011Inngår i: Drive tourism: trends and emerging markets / [ed] Bruce Prideaux and Dean Carson, Abingdon: Routledge , 2011, s. 358-368Kapittel i bok, del av antologi (Fagfellevurdert)
  • 109.
    Carson, Dean
    et al.
    Charles Darwin University, Australia.
    Schmallegger, Doris
    James Cook University, Australia.
    Harwood, Sharon
    Charles Darwin University, Australia.
    A City for the Temporary?: Political Economy and Urban Planning in Darwin, Australia2010Inngår i: Urban Policy and Research, ISSN 0811-1146, E-ISSN 1476-7244, Vol. 28, nr 3, s. 293-310Artikkel i tidsskrift (Fagfellevurdert)
    Abstract [en]

    Darwin, in Australia’s Northern Territory, faces urban planning challenges consistent with those reported in ‘resource peripheries’ around the world. The city has recently experienced strong population growth associated with resources and construction projects, and an increase in public sector workers sent to address the challenges faced by remote (particularly Indigenous) populations. The Northern Territory Government is determined to foster further growth, and promotes ‘major projects’ in urban development as the key. Analysis of the public debates about two recent major projects (the Waterfront Development and the Lyons residential development) reveal a planning process consistent with the clientelism observed by Rayner and Howlett (2009) in resource peripheries in Canada. The risks of clientelism are both the marginalisation of important internal publics and the institutionalisation of ‘temporariness’ as the driver of growth. Shifting to a more consultative planning process might help stimulate internal development, but could also put at risk the relationships that the Northern Territory Government has established with external investors.

  • 110.
    Carson, Dean
    et al.
    Charles Darwin University, Australia; Flinders University, Australia.
    Stehlik, Daniela
    Temporary guides and long term policy challenges: the view from remote Australia2012Inngår i: Sustainability and short-term policies: improving governance in spatial policy interventions / [ed] Stefan Sjöblom, Kjell Andersson, Terry Marsden, Sarah Skerratt, Farnham: Ashgate, 2012, s. 81-100Kapittel i bok, del av antologi (Fagfellevurdert)
  • 111.
    Carson, Dean
    et al.
    Charles Darwin University, Australia.
    Waldhoer, Klemens
    Realising the value of self-drive day trips to Lower Austria2011Inngår i: Drive tourism: trends and emerging markets / [ed] Bruce Prideaux and Dean Carson, Abingdon: Routledge , 2011, s. 61-70Kapittel i bok, del av antologi (Fagfellevurdert)
  • 112.
    Carson, Doris A.
    et al.
    Umeå universitet, Samhällsvetenskapliga fakulteten, Institutionen för geografi och ekonomisk historia, Kulturgeografi.
    Carson, Dean B.
    Charles Darwin University, Australia.
    Path Dependence in Remote Area Tourism Development: Why institutional legacies matter2017Inngår i: Tourism Destination Evolution / [ed] Patrick Brouder, Salvador Anton Clavé, Allison Gill, Dimitri Ioannides, Milton Park: Routledge, 2017, s. 103-122Kapittel i bok, del av antologi (Fagfellevurdert)
  • 113.
    Carson, Doris A
    et al.
    Umeå universitet, Samhällsvetenskapliga fakulteten, Institutionen för geografi och ekonomisk historia.
    Carson, Dean BUmeå universitet, Arktiskt centrum vid Umeå universitet (Arcum).Lundmark, LindaUmeå universitet, Samhällsvetenskapliga fakulteten, Institutionen för geografi och ekonomisk historia.
    Tourism, mobilities, and development in sparsely populated areas2016Collection/Antologi (Fagfellevurdert)
    Abstract [en]

    Tourism 'mobilities' are not restricted to the movement of tourists between places of origin and destinations. Particularly in more peripheral, remote, or sparsely populated destinations, workers and residents are also likely to be frequently moving between locations. Such destinations attract seasonal or temporary residents, sometimes with only loose ties to the tourism industry. These flows of mobile populations are accompanied by flows of other resources – money, knowledge, ideas and innovations – which can be used to help the economic and social development of the destination. This book examines key aspects of the human mobilities associated with tourism in sparsely populated areas, and investigates how new mobility patterns inspired by technological, economic, political, and social change provide both opportunities and risks for those areas. Examples are drawn from the northern peripheries of Europe and the north of Australia, and the book provides a framework for continuing research into the role that tourism and 'new mobilities' can play in regional development in these locations.

  • 114.
    Carson, Doris A.
    et al.
    Umeå universitet, Samhällsvetenskapliga fakulteten, Institutionen för geografi och ekonomisk historia.
    Cleary, Jen
    University of Adelaide, Australia.
    de la Barre, Suzanne
    Vancouver Island University, Canada.
    Eimermann, Marco
    Umeå universitet, Samhällsvetenskapliga fakulteten, Institutionen för geografi och ekonomisk historia.
    Marjavaara, Roger
    Umeå universitet, Samhällsvetenskapliga fakulteten, Institutionen för geografi och ekonomisk historia.
    New Mobilities - New Economies?: Temporary populations and local innovation capacity in sparsely populated areas2016Inngår i: Settlements at the Edge: Remote human settlements in developed nations / [ed] Andrew Taylor, Dean B. Carson, Prescott C. Ensign, Lee Huskey, Rasmus O. Rasmussen, Gertrude Saxinger, Cheltenham: Edward Elgar Publishing, 2016, s. 178-206Kapittel i bok, del av antologi (Fagfellevurdert)
    Abstract [en]

    Temporary population mobilities – including short-term labour, residential and recreational mobilities – have long been a prominent feature of human geography in sparsely populated areas. Such mobilities are often considered from a problem-centric perspective, with both academic and public discourses focusing extensively on the negative impacts that temporary populations have on local communities. Yet, temporary mobilities may also have a range of positive impacts, as they bring new people, ideas, skills, knowledge and network connections to remote communities, and thus potentially contribute to processes of local innovation. This chapter examines how different types of temporary populations contribute to local innovation capacity and new socio-economic development in remote communities. We propose a framework for analysing how different mobile populations with their particular temporal, spatial, motivational and interactional mobility characteristics impact on various forms of community capital, and subsequent innovation outcomes through the mobilisation of such capital. We then apply the framework to review five common examples of temporary mobilities in northern Scandinavia and Outback Australia, ranging from voluntary international lifestyle migrants to displaced refugee migrants, from seasonal second home-owners to short-term transit tourists, and from service to leisure-oriented Indigenous travellers. The review suggests that temporary populations offer substantial potential to boost innovation and new socio-economic development in remote communities, but that communities and institutional structures often fail to recognise and capitalise on such potential.

  • 115.
    Carson, Doris A.
    et al.
    Umeå universitet, Samhällsvetenskapliga fakulteten, Institutionen för geografi och ekonomisk historia.
    Koster, Rhonda L.
    Lakehead University, Canada.
    Theoretical perspectives on rural tourism development2015Inngår i: Demystifying theories in tourism research / [ed] Kelly S. Bricker; Holly Donohoe, Wallingford: CABI Publishing, 2015, s. 46-63Kapittel i bok, del av antologi (Fagfellevurdert)
  • 116.
    Carson, Doris Anna
    et al.
    Umeå universitet, Samhällsvetenskapliga fakulteten, Institutionen för geografi och ekonomisk historia. University of South Australia, Australia.
    Carson, Dean Bradley
    Umeå universitet, Arktiskt centrum vid Umeå universitet (Arcum). Charles Darwin University, Australia; Flinders University, Australia.
    Mobilities and path dependence: challenges for tourism and "attractive" industry development in a remote company town2016Inngår i: Tourism, mobilities and development in sparsely populated areas / [ed] Doris Carson, Dean B. Carson, Linda Lundmark, Routledge, 2016, s. 108-127Kapittel i bok, del av antologi (Fagfellevurdert)
  • 117.
    Carson, Doris Anna
    et al.
    Umeå universitet, Samhällsvetenskapliga fakulteten, Institutionen för geografi och ekonomisk historia. The Northern Institute, Charles Darwin University, Darwin, Australia.
    Carson, Dean Bradley
    Umeå universitet, Arktiskt centrum vid Umeå universitet (Arcum). The Northern Institute, Charles Darwin University, Darwin, Australia.
    Eimermann, Marco
    Umeå universitet, Samhällsvetenskapliga fakulteten, Institutionen för geografi och ekonomisk historia.
    International winter tourism entrepreneurs in northern Sweden: understanding migration, lifestyle, and business motivations2018Inngår i: Scandinavian Journal of Hospitality and Tourism, ISSN 1502-2250, E-ISSN 1502-2269, Vol. 18, nr 2, s. 183-198Artikkel i tidsskrift (Fagfellevurdert)
    Abstract [en]

    This paper examines the migration, lifestyle and business motivations of international winter tourism entrepreneurs who have moved to a “low-amenity” rural area in northern Sweden. Low-amenity areas are characterised by economic decline, outmigration and limited tourism development. Based on qualitative interviews, the research applied a multi-dimensional framework to the study of migrant tourism entrepreneurship, considering personal migration drivers, the value of location-specific amenities, desired consumptive experiences, previous familiarity with the destination, business-related goals, as well as temporal and technological dimensions of mobility and self-employment. The findings suggest that the northern winter and the undeveloped low-amenity character of the place were key factors in migration choices. Consumptive lifestyle interests around counter-urban living and winter outdoor hobbies were prominent, yet there was diversity in terms of business aspirations and considerable seasonal lifestyle-business balancing. Despite noticeable contributions to winter tourism development in the low-amenity north, the study also identified a sense of temporariness and expected onward migration among migrants, raising questions about the longevity of this development.

  • 118.
    Carson, Doris Anna
    et al.
    Centre for Regional Engagement, University of South Australia, Whyalla, Australia.
    Carson, Dean Bradley
    Flinders University Rural Clinical School, Burra, Australia.
    Hodge, Heidi
    Understanding local innovation systems in peripheral tourism destinations2015Inngår i: Managing and adapting to global change in tourism places / [ed] Alan A. Lew, New York: Routledge, 2015, s. 115-131Kapittel i bok, del av antologi (Fagfellevurdert)
  • 119.
    Carson, Doris Anna
    et al.
    Umeå universitet, Samhällsvetenskapliga fakulteten, Institutionen för geografi och ekonomisk historia. University of South Australia, Australia.
    Carson, Dean Bradley
    Umeå universitet, Arktiskt centrum vid Umeå universitet (Arcum). Charles Darwin University, Darwin, Australia; Flinders University, Burra, Australia.
    Lundmark, Linda
    Umeå universitet, Samhällsvetenskapliga fakulteten, Institutionen för geografi och ekonomisk historia.
    Tourism and mobilities in sparsely populated areas: towards a framework and research agenda2016Inngår i: Tourism, mobilities and development in sparsely populated areas / [ed] Doris Carson, Dean B. Carson, Linda Lundmark, Routledge, 2016, s. 1-12Kapittel i bok, del av antologi (Fagfellevurdert)
  • 120. Cartan, Greg
    et al.
    Carson, Dean
    Charles Darwin University .
    Organising tourism providers on remote tracks as geographically dispersed teams2011Inngår i: Journal of Contemporary Issues in Business and Government, ISSN 1323-6903, Vol. 17, nr 1, s. 69-85Artikkel i tidsskrift (Fagfellevurdert)
    Abstract [en]

    The Australian outback is a popular tourism destination. Iconic four wheel drive touring tracks are particularly attractive. This study considers how tourism providers are organised in remote touring tracks (RTTs) through a case study of the Oodnadatta Track. A framework developed from the geographically dispersed teams’ (GDTs) literature provided the analytical lens for the study. This framework produced a useful description and explanation of the contemporary context and also a tentative improvement agenda. Particularly noteworthy was the question of leadership, which emerged as an influential and pervasive factor.

  • 121.
    Caspary, Emma
    Umeå universitet, Samhällsvetenskapliga fakulteten, Institutionen för geografi och ekonomisk historia, Kulturgeografi.
    En bild säger mer än tusen ord: En bildanalys av Visit Umeås Instagramkonto ur ett genus- och destinationsperspektiv.2016Independent thesis Basic level (degree of Bachelor), 10 poäng / 15 hpOppgave
    Abstract [en]

    It is important for a destination to be aware of the image that they communicate towards a potential visitor. The way marketing is conducted has been transformed during the last decade through the digital evolution. This study aims to review and analyze the image of the Swedish city Umeå through a combination of visual semiotic analysis and content analysis. The results show that the image that is being projected is not equal to the real destination. It is very well represented as far as equality in relation to gender but not as much when it comes to physical disabilities and skin color. Although it is apparent that they are aware of the gender equality there are still signs of women as more nurturing and men as sportier. For future research it would be interesting to compare the portrayal among different destinations.

  • 122.
    Chabala, Mwila
    Umeå universitet, Samhällsvetenskapliga fakulteten, Institutionen för geografi och ekonomisk historia, Kulturgeografi.
    Privatization of State Owned Enterprises: An Analysis of Impact on Regional Migration Patterns in Zambia Between 1990-20002014Independent thesis Advanced level (degree of Master (Two Years)), 20 poäng / 30 hpOppgave
    Abstract [en]

    Throughout history, migration has been an ongoing phenomenon driven by various factors ranging from social, political, economic and environmental situations. Zambia is not immune to migration and has seen a considerable share of its population engage in both internal and external migratory activities. Recognising the important role that migration plays in any economy and how it is influenced by circumstances prevailing at different points in time, this thesis seeks to analyse migration flows between Zambia's regions and the impact that privatisation of state owned enterprises had on migration patterns between 1990 and 2000. Because of challenges in gathering statistics to conduct a thorough quantitative analysis, the study employs a descriptive methodology using statistics collected from the Central Statistics Office online data catalogue and institutions such as the World Bank. The statistics are organised, calculated and analysed using Microsoft Excel and GIS Arcmap. The results indicate that soon after privatisation began in 1991, there was a sharp reduction in employment figures and a reduction in the proportion of urban population. The proportion of rural destined migrants was 2.3 times higher than that of urban destined migrants during the period of privatisation, an indication that people were leaving urban areas for rural areas. Return migration also rose, however, the country experienced both urbanisation and counter urbanisation during the period 1990-2000. Findings of this study show similarities to Beauchemin & Schoumaker's (2006) findings in Burkina Faso were changes in migration patterns were observed after the economy underwent structural change in the 1980's.

  • 123.
    Chen, Yang
    Umeå universitet, Samhällsvetenskapliga fakulteten, Institutionen för geografi och ekonomisk historia, Kulturgeografi.
    Thai migration flows to Sweden2016Independent thesis Advanced level (degree of Master (Two Years)), 20 poäng / 30 hpOppgave
    Abstract [en]

    Along with the increasing economic and trade links, cultural exchange and tourism activities between the two countries, migration from Thailand to Sweden has been rapidly growing over the last decade (Webster & Haandrikman, 2014). There are manifold reasons that contribute to the migration to Sweden by many Thais, the most common and significant ones are marriage migration and berry picking (labour migration) (Hedberg, 2015).  

    The aim of the study is to identify and analyse the marriage migration and berry picking migration in order to provide a better understanding of these two Thai migrant groups in Sweden and how they relate to each other. Due to the time limit and the difficulty in accessing formal employed berry pickers during the research period, the paper will only focus on the informal Thai berry pickers who have the relationship with their settled relatives in Sweden. 

  • 124.
    Christofel, Aditya Billy
    Umeå universitet, Samhällsvetenskapliga fakulteten, Institutionen för geografi.
    OOPS! THEY BUILD IT AGAIN: A suitability analysis for future wind farm location in Sweden2019Independent thesis Advanced level (degree of Master (Two Years)), 20 poäng / 30 hpOppgave
    Abstract [en]

    The world energy needs increasing in a significant number and currently it is mainly sourced from the finite fossil fuel. Other than that, fossil fuel is the main source of CO2 emissions that leads to the increasing rate of global warming that will ultimately change the earth's climate. Thus, researcher began to look for alternative energy that is renewable and has the least impact to the world's climate; one example is wind energy.

    Sweden has experienced a significant increase in wind energy generation, where the wind production constantly grows in the double-digit rates since 2010. However, developing a wind energy requires a significant research and feasibility study in order to provide an economically sustainable operation. Wind farm needs to be located in areas with a good wind potential, however there are several technical and economic limitation on where the wind farm should be located. On top of that, social rejection might also hinder the development of wind energy. Audio-visual obstruction and disturbance to the natural state of the environment are the main arguments that were used to challenge the development of wind farm. Therefore, a multi-disciplinary study needs to be conducted in order to find the perfect balance; which is exactly what this study is all about.

    The result of this study shows that despite the threat of climate change, wind farm in Sweden could thrive due to the increasing wind speed across the country. It was also discovered that around 30% of the country is suitable, from the social, technical, and economic point of view, as a new location for wind farms. This study also reveals that most of the canceled / rejected wind farms were probably caused by the social rejection due to their proximity to population center or conservation areas. This study also discussed the concept of place attachment and identity that leads to the NIMBY attitude and reflects the concept of the social acceptance issue that happened in Sweden and on how to localize the wind farm concept to the local residence.

  • 125.
    Cooper, Eleanor
    Umeå universitet, Samhällsvetenskapliga fakulteten, Institutionen för geografi och ekonomisk historia, Kulturgeografi.
    Strategies for reducing disaster risks and building urban resilience: A study of informal settlements in Metro Manila, Philippines2016Independent thesis Advanced level (degree of Master (One Year)), 10 poäng / 15 hpOppgave
  • 126.
    Costamagna, Federico
    et al.
    Umeå universitet, Samhällsvetenskapliga fakulteten, Institutionen för geografi och ekonomisk historia.
    Lind, Rebecka
    Umeå universitet, Samhällsvetenskapliga fakulteten, Institutionen för geografi och ekonomisk historia.
    Stjernström, Olof
    Umeå universitet, Samhällsvetenskapliga fakulteten, Institutionen för geografi och ekonomisk historia. Faculty of Social Sciences, Nord University, Steinkjer, Norway.
    Livability of Urban Public Spaces in Northern Swedish Cities: The Case of Umeå2019Inngår i: Planning practice + research, ISSN 0269-7459, E-ISSN 1360-0583, Vol. 34, nr 2, s. 131-148Artikkel i tidsskrift (Fagfellevurdert)
    Abstract [en]

    This study explores how winter conditions are taken into accountin urban planning in the city of Umea in northern Sweden. Snow and harsh winter conditions are to some extent considered inurban planning in most northern towns in Sweden. Besides that, snow and ice could also be elements in the city attracting people and contribute to the design of public spaces. Current plans and interviews with planners were complemented with participatory observations. The results show that public spaces designed for both winter and summer seasons are preferred.

  • 127.
    Danley, Therese
    Umeå universitet, Samhällsvetenskapliga fakulteten, Institutionen för geografi och ekonomisk historia, Kulturgeografi.
    Social mobility and circular moves: Residential mobility in Stockholm, Sweden2015Independent thesis Advanced level (degree of Master (Two Years)), 20 poäng / 30 hpOppgave
    Abstract [en]

    This study explores the process of middle-class leakage and neighborhood circulation in the departure of individuals from relatively low-income neighborhoods in Stockholm, Sweden. Utilizing event history analysis, the study follows a cohort of individuals who moved out of a low-income neighborhood in 2001 to determine their probability of returning to a low-income neighborhood. It was found that one-third of the cohort had returned to a low-income neighborhood by 2010, and most individuals who returned did so within the first few years of leaving. Selective mobility characteristics among those who return is marked by lower income, lower education, higher rates of mobility, and being an immigrant from the Global South. Two effects from income are detected. The first is that income not only acts as a significant factor in the odds of returning to a low-income neighborhood, but the individuals who return start off with lower incomes compared to others in the cohort who remain in higher-income neighborhoods. And the second is that the income growth of individuals who return rises faster than the average income of the low-income neighborhoods, suggesting the circular moves are part of a larger mobility history and not necessarily a low-income trap. Incorporating duration and repeated events in residential mobility and neighborhood studies is important for research on the effects of neighborhood characteristics, and also for those steering urban policy to better understanding the individual mobility decisions of residents. 

  • 128. David, Inês
    et al.
    Eimermann, Marco
    Umeå universitet, Samhällsvetenskapliga fakulteten, Institutionen för geografi och ekonomisk historia, Kulturgeografi.
    Åkerlund, Ulrika
    Umeå universitet, Samhällsvetenskapliga fakulteten, Institutionen för geografi och ekonomisk historia, Kulturgeografi.
    An exploration of a lifestyle migration industry2015Inngår i: Practising the Good Life: Lifestyle Migration in Practices / [ed] Kate Torkington, Inês David, João Sardinha, Newcastle Upon Tyne: Cambridge Scholars Publishing, 2015, s. 138-160Kapittel i bok, del av antologi (Fagfellevurdert)
    Abstract [en]

    The mobility to second homes, sometimes referred to as residential tourism, can be conceptually framed within the emerging concept of lifestyle mobilities. Although related, it differs from tourism in that it refers to relatively permanent movement which entails the intention and material efforts to create a home and a living in the destination context. Tourism mobility is facilitated by agents offering services and products enabling experiences of novelty, difference, authenticity, quality of life and the like. Lifestyle mobilities in many ways taps into this production system but also include products and services related to housing, furbishing and to making a living in place. On an international level the production system is further complicated. In migration studies, the concept of a migration industry refers to the amalgam of agents making a profit out of catering to the needs of migrants. This study is a joint reflection on the production dimension of lifestyle mobilities in the European context. We explore the agents brokering lifestyle for Swedes in Malta; Swedish rural municipalities' place marketing in the Netherlands; and the role of lifestyle media in the Algarve, Portugal. We aim to answer the question: “how (if at all) could the concept of a migration industry be applied to lifestyle mobilities?”.

  • 129. De Geer, Erik
    Migration in the World 1846-1996.: The Main Trends with Particular Reference to Europe and Sweden. A Cartographic Approach2001Inngår i: Nordic Demography in History and Present-Day Society / [ed] Lars-Göran Tedebrand and Peter Sköld, Umeå: Umeå universitet , 2001, s. 347-366Kapittel i bok, del av antologi (Annet vitenskapelig)
  • 130.
    Dohee, Kim
    Umeå universitet, Samhällsvetenskapliga fakulteten, Institutionen för geografi och ekonomisk historia, Kulturgeografi.
    Causes, Experiences, and Consequences of Ethnic Food Consumption: A Case Study of Korean Restaurants in Sweden2018Independent thesis Advanced level (degree of Master (Two Years)), 20 poäng / 30 hpOppgave
    Abstract [en]

    This study aims to investigate relations among causes, experiences, and consequences of consuming Korean food at Korean restaurants in Sweden. With a specific focus on Korean food in Stockholm, where most of the Korean restaurants in Sweden are located in, this study identifies significant push and pull factors regarding ethnic food experience at ethnic restaurants and consequences affected by actual customer experience. Based on knowledge and insights from related studies in the mobility, hospitality and tourism literature, food consumption and sociological research, 21 push and pull factors are identified and the levels of expectation and satisfaction are measured. Relations between customer satisfaction and the consequences of Korean food experience at Korean restaurants are also examined. A survey designed for those who have been to Korean restaurants in Stockholm was distributed via online communities. The findings identify perceptions, satisfaction and future behavior intention of consumers at Korean restaurants in Stockholm. Also, the findings present significant relationships among causes, experiences, and consequences of consuming Korean food. It suggests that food and service are important factors to attract customers to Korean restaurants and that Korean restaurants need to improve food and service attributes for better customer satisfaction, which can result in the positive future behavioral intention of customers. Also, the relationship between Korean food experience and intention to travel to Korea, in general terms, food-induced tourism, need to be further studies, as it can be useful for Korean tourism organizations and destination marketers to make strategies in order to attract more tourists from Sweden.

  • 131. Dubois, Alexandre
    et al.
    Carson, Dean B.
    Umeå universitet, Arktiskt centrum vid Umeå universitet (Arcum).
    Die hard: On the persistence of Swedish upland farming2019Inngår i: Journal of Rural Studies, ISSN 0743-0167, E-ISSN 1873-1392, Vol. 69, s. 41-52Artikkel i tidsskrift (Fagfellevurdert)
    Abstract [en]

    Using an inductive quantitative approach, this article examines empirically the main characteristics of upland farming in the northern periphery of Sweden. This approach allows us to stepwise 'reconstruct' upland farming in its north Swedish manifestation. The data features farm-level and aggregated data from four municipalities stretching from the Bothnian Golf to the Norwegian border. The combination of GIS and advanced statistical analysis (clustering and regression) provides a robust evidence-base characterising upland farming at the nexus of multiple dimensions: territoriality (e.g. remote location, harsh climate, scattered settlement structure), style (e.g. labour extensive, small-scale, mixed fanning) and livelihood (e.g. plurlactive, diversification, subsidy dependent). The article emphasizes the potentially central role of upland farming in bringing into coherent policy initiatives promoting sustainable community development in the periphery. The study also looks ahead and urges scholars to adopt more systematically mixed methods in future upland farming studies in order to render the complexity of this socio-spatial phenomenon.

  • 132.
    Edelheim, Johan R.
    et al.
    The Norwegian School of Hotel Management, University of Stavanger, Norway; Multidimensional Tourism Institute, University of Lapland, Finland.
    Thomas, Kimberly
    School of Hospitality, Food and Tourism Management, University of Guelph, Guelph, OT, Canada.
    Åberg, Kajsa G.
    Umeå universitet, Samhällsvetenskapliga fakulteten, Institutionen för geografi och ekonomisk historia.
    Phi, Giang
    Department of Culture and Global Studies, Aalborg University, Denmark.
    What do conferences do?: What is academics' intangible return of investment (ROI) from attending an academic conference?2018Inngår i: Journal of Teaching in Travel & Tourism, ISSN 1531-3220, E-ISSN 1531-3239, Vol. 18, nr 1, s. 94-107Artikkel i tidsskrift (Fagfellevurdert)
    Abstract [en]

    Conferences are funny events. They are self-evident elements of our lives as academics: meetings that occur, often annually; take place in various locations; and involve (hopefully) like-minded people, aiming to share their latest research findings. Conferences are actually so selfevident that very little research exists analysing what takes place at conferences, why people attend them in the first place, and essentially what the conference does to delegates as participants. This article is, on one hand, a reflective report from an academic conference: TEFI 9 —Celebrating the Disruptive Power of Caring in Tourism Education. But it is also simultaneously an analysis of the implicit and explicit rationale and return on investment for attending academic conferences, in the words of three, at that time, PhD candidate rapporteurs and one professor rapporteur, who acts as this article's narrator.

  • 133.
    Edholm, Emma
    Umeå universitet, Samhällsvetenskapliga fakulteten, Institutionen för geografi och ekonomisk historia, Kulturgeografi.
    Marknadsföring av en destination efter en kris: Tunisien efter terrorattackerna 20152018Independent thesis Basic level (degree of Bachelor), 10 poäng / 15 hpOppgave
    Abstract [en]

    This study aims to reveal what marketing strategies Tunisia has used to alter their place image for the better after the terror attacks that occurred in the country 2015. These terror attacks had a negative effect on Tunisia’s tourism industry; the annual GDP brought by the tourist industry decreased by 19,73%. By using “the multi-step model for altering place image” developed by Eli Avraham and Eran Ketter, this study contains a thematic analysis on qualitative content such as news reports, advertising campaigns and press interviews to uncover what marketing strategies were used by Tunisian official tourism marketers and officials to restore the destinations positive place image and bring back tourist after the terror attacks. The result shows that Tunisia has used strategies from all three categories of strategies; source, audience and message. Furthermore, this study contributes to a better understanding on what marketing strategies a destination could use to alter their place image after gone through a crisis. 

  • 134.
    Edholm, Emma
    Umeå universitet, Samhällsvetenskapliga fakulteten, Institutionen för geografi.
    Property Crime in The City and County of San Francisco 2016 - 2017: Applying GIS to Crime Pattern Theory2019Independent thesis Advanced level (degree of Master (One Year)), 10 poäng / 15 hpOppgave
    Abstract [en]

    This study’s aim is to reveal statistically significant hot spots and temporal patterns of property crime in the City and County of San Francisco and to also analyse the relationship between property crimes and the environment in which these crimes occur by using Geographic Information System (GIS). Crime pattern theory was used as the framework for the analysis of environmental surroundings and occurrence of crime. This theory indicates that certain places can be crime generators and attractors. The result showed that there are hot spots of crime in the north-eastern part of San Francisco, and that crime in these high-risk areas are intensifying. Then, by visual examination of density maps of property crime and facilities, such as shopping centres, pubs/bars/nightclubs and Bay Area Rapid Transit stations, it is shown that these facilities can explain concentrations of crime in certain areas. Furthermore, this study shows GIS can be a practical tool to utilize when presenting data of crime when used in combination with social theories which focuses on the causes of crime occurrence. 

  • 135.
    Edler, Jonathan
    Umeå universitet, Samhällsvetenskapliga fakulteten, Institutionen för geografi och ekonomisk historia, Kulturgeografi.
    Cyklisters preferenser för val av cykelväg: En studie om vägval och preferenser vid cykling genom Öst på stan i Umeå2017Independent thesis Basic level (degree of Bachelor), 10 poäng / 15 hpOppgave
    Abstract [sv]

    Denna studie berör studenters preferenser när det gäller transporter som görs med cykel. Studien begränsas till området Öst på stan med universitetsområdet och centrum som start och målpunkt inom Umeå kommun. Studien bygger på en fallstudie där ett 70-tal studenters resonemang och åsikter behandlas utifrån vad som är mer och mindre attraktiva inslag rörande cykelvägars utformning. Samt om det finns andra beståndsdelar som är viktiga vid val av cykelväg förutom utformningen. Deras åsikter preciseras både genom en kvantitativ enkätundersökning samt en kvalitativ gruppintervju. Vidare genomfördes en tematisering för att strukturera den data som framkommit från respondenterna.

     

    Respondenterna utrycker att cykelvägarna bör erbjuda god framkomlighet och standard för att dessa ska anses värda att användas. Exempel på positiv utformning är: God sikt, underhåll av vägens hårda ytor samt hantering av snö och vatten. Även vägbredd och separering är attraktiva inslag för god utformning. Utöver utformning är kopplingar mellan målpunkter viktigt för att vägen ska anses användarvänlig. De slutsatser som dras inom studien är att Öst på stans fyra cykelvägar erbjuder olika standard sinsemellan. Kvalitén på vägarna anses ändå så pass bra att detta inte inverkar i valet av färdväg. Vad som spelar in i valet av färdväg för respondenterna är istället den upplevda kopplingen mellan de två målpunkter som behandlas för denna fallstudie. Samt den upplevda tid det tar att nyttja en väg. Den upplevda kopplingen är i sin tur baserad på den lokalkännedom som studenterna har om platsen. Detta innebär således att valet av cykelväg grundas främst på den kännedom studenter har om möjliga vägar och i andra hand vilka punkter dessa vägar kopplar samman för detta studieområde.

  • 136.
    Edlund, Lars-Erik
    Umeå universitet, Humanistisk fakultet, Litteraturvetenskap och nordiska språk.
    Kartor: - mentala och andra2006Inngår i: Gränslöst: - Forskning i Sverige och i världen [Festkrift tillägnad Dan Brändström], Natur och Kultur, Stockholm , 2006, s. 175-191 + 12 kartorKapittel i bok, del av antologi (Annet vitenskapelig)
  • 137.
    Edlund, Lars-Erik
    Umeå universitet, Humanistiska fakulteten, Institutionen för språkstudier.
    Some reflections on mental maps2018Inngår i: Journal of Cultural Geography, ISSN 0887-3631, E-ISSN 1940-6320, Vol. 35, nr 2, s. 274-285Artikkel i tidsskrift (Fagfellevurdert)
    Abstract [en]

    The point of departure for this essay is a map drawn in 1963 by the writer’s maternal grandfather. It represents the village of Berg, located in northern Sweden, and depicts his activities as a farmer and hunter. But it is also based on grandfather’s collective knowledge of the village. In what follows I will examine mental maps of microspaces that reflect what is important to an individual or to the members of a community. One shows how Aivilik Inuits perceive their local environment; another set of urban maps from Los Angeles, California, are based on the views of residents in different areas. The social divides become strikingly apparent on these mental maps. Among the conspicuous features of my grandfather’s map are the images he drew to supplement the various geographical locations he laid out. In this respect one might compare medieval mappae mundi that is, maps of the world representing compendiums of all things worth knowing. I also consider the appearance of mysterious gaps on grandfather’s map, that is, “the silences”. Many general perspectives on mental mapping are suggested by a consideration of the map my grandfather drew.

  • 138.
    Ednarsson, Marcus
    Umeå universitet, Samhällsvetenskapliga fakulteten, Kulturgeografiska institutionen.
    Svensk samhällsvetenskaplig viltforskning - en kunskapsöversikt2010Rapport (Annet vitenskapelig)
    Abstract [en]

    The present review addresses the Swedish social science game research, but outlooks are made to both the Norwegian qualitative research about the large carnivore conflicts and when it has been appropriate, looks are also taken towards more international research. The review concerns mainly two major areas of research. The first area deals with research related to hunting and game, in which such research on the economic importance of hunting is analyzed. Here we also find the relatively comprehensive environmental economic research on people’s willingness to pay for different species. The second major area of research concerns the social science research conducted in Sweden (and Norway) around the large carnivores. The conflict surrounding large carnivores naturally dominates among the reviewed studies. But even studies about the media coverage of large carnivores and large carnivore-based wildlife tourism are also covered in this review.

  • 139.
    Eerbeek, van, Peter
    Umeå universitet, Samhällsvetenskapliga fakulteten, Institutionen för geografi.
    Thai local brokers in the Swedish berry industry: Roles and positions across time and space2019Independent thesis Advanced level (degree of Master (Two Years)), 20 poäng / 30 hpOppgave
    Abstract [en]

    Over the last decade, each year 2500 - 6000 Thai go to Sweden to work as berry pickers during the berry season via a regulated system of temporary work permits. Bangkok-based staffing agencies rely on the networks of local brokers to recruit workers in Thailand’s more peripheral northeastern Isan region, as part of the larger migration industry in Thailand. During the berry season, these local brokers also travel to Sweden and are part of the division of labour. Next to picking berries, their jobs can be cook, camp leader, and driver. Key concerns raised in relation to this seasonal work are precarity and vulnerability to exploitation, resulting from to the need to pay high fees to staffing agencies and a piece-rate wage-system.

    This thesis aims to analyze roles and positions across time and space of local Thai brokers. It does so by examining how they have come to occupy their current positions, and what their roles are in the recruitment process in Thailand and during the during the berry season in Sweden. Moreover, it investigates the interlinkages between these two roles, and how differences in remuneration and payments of fees shape precarity at the micro-scale.

    Based on the analysis of semi-structured interviews conducted in the Kaeng Khro district in Thailand in March 2019, this study suggests that the local brokers are industry veterans. Moreover, is suggests a large degree of variation in size and scope of local brokerage. During the berry season in Sweden, the local brokers tend to occupy positions above the regular berry pickers. Moreover, it is suggested that there is a differentiated precarity within the group of brokers, resulting from differences in the payment of wages and the need to pay fees to staffing agencies.

  • 140.
    Egerbladh, Inez
    et al.
    Umeå universitet, Samhällsvetenskapliga fakulteten, Demografiska databasen.
    Bittles, AH
    Socioeconomic, demographic and legal influences on consanguinity and kinship in northern coastal Sweden 1780-18992011Inngår i: Journal of Biosocial Science, ISSN 0021-9320, E-ISSN 1469-7599, Vol. 43, nr 4, s. 413-435Artikkel i tidsskrift (Fagfellevurdert)
    Abstract [en]

    Most studies on consanguinity have been conducted on contemporary populations and have focused on the prevalence and types of preferred intra-familial marriage. With its comprehensive birth, marriage and deaths records dating back to the late 17th century, and the legal bar on first cousin marriage removed in the mid-19th century, Sweden offers unique opportunities to examine the factors that determine by whom, where and why consanguineous marriages were contracted. The present study covers the period 1780-1899 and presents a detailed portrait of cousin and sibling exchange marriages in the Skelleftea region of northern coastal Sweden. The combined prevalence of first, second and third cousin marriage increased from 2.3% in 1790-1810 to 8.8% in 1880-1899, and multi-generation consanguinity also increased significantly over the study period. The distribution and prevalence of first cousin marriages was strikingly non-random, with a significantly greater propensity for consanguinity among land-owning families, especially involving first-born sons, within specific pedigrees, and in a number of more remote inland communities. Additional factors associated with a greater likelihood of consanguineous marriage included physical or mental disability among males, and among females the prior birth of an illegitimate child. Besides the inherent interest in the social and demographic structure of this region of northern Sweden during the course of the 19th century, in future studies it will be important to determine the degree to which the observed patterns of consanguineous and sibling exchange marriages in these past generations could have influenced present-day genetic structure.

  • 141.
    Ehrström, Peter
    et al.
    Åbo Akademi.
    Eriksson, MadeleineUmeå universitet, Samhällsvetenskapliga fakulteten, Institutionen för geografi och ekonomisk historia.
    Bottniska trästäder2015Collection/Antologi (Fagfellevurdert)
    Abstract [sv]

    Det är mycket mera som förenar än åtskiljer bottniska trästäder från varandra. Denna antologi samlar artiklar från flera städer kring Bottniska viken, från Norrbotten, Västerbotten och Österbotten. Gemensamt är bland annat att det på 1960- och 1970-talen revs värdefulla trähusmiljöer som ersattes med moderna byggnader. De städer och stadsdelar som ingår i Bottniska trästäder delar också likartade erfarenheter av att utgöra geografisk periferi och står på 2010-talet inför likartade utmaningar vad gäller det byggda kulturarvets framtid. Fyra av artiklarna behandlar vad som hänt sedan 1970-talet med den gamla trähusbebyggelsen i Skellefteå, Piteå, Öjebyn och Luleå. Det finländska materialet uppvisar en större tidsmässig, geografisk och tematisk spännvidd. Kaskö exemplifierar en trästad som i praktiken har bevarats intakt medan Neristan i Karleby utgör en bevarad trähusmiljö i staden. Brändö i Vasa uppvisar enbart en delvis bevarad trähusstadsdel, där byggnadsskyddet återigen utmanas. Bottniska trästäder hoppas väcka intresse för, och diskussion om, stadsomvandling och vikten av att värna det byggda kulturarvet.

  • 142.
    Eichholz, Anne
    Umeå universitet, Samhällsvetenskapliga fakulteten, Institutionen för geografi och ekonomisk historia, Kulturgeografi.
    ’Leisure time of German business travelers in Örnsköldsvik during business trips?’2018Independent thesis Basic level (degree of Bachelor), 10 poäng / 15 hpOppgave
  • 143.
    Eimermann, Marco
    Umeå universitet, Samhällsvetenskapliga fakulteten, Institutionen för geografi och ekonomisk historia, Kulturgeografi.
    Ambivalent Dutch lifestyle migrants in rural Sweden2014Inngår i: AEMI Journal, ISSN 1729-3561, Vol. 12, s. 48-57Artikkel i tidsskrift (Annet (populærvitenskap, debatt, mm))
    Abstract [en]

    This paper focuses on Dutch families who moved to Hällefors municipality (rural Sweden) in the early 21st century. It discusses ambivalent discourses comparing pre-migration to post-migration life. As studied in this text, the direction of the move (north), the destination (a deprived municipality) and the structure for the decision process (a municipality and an agency deliberately attracting incomers) are novel aspects to existing studies of lifestyle migration. The paper aims to examine the migration process of Dutch lifestyle migrants in Hällefors and their ambivalent attitudes towards returning. The main question addressed enhances our understanding of the motivations for a possible move away from Hällefors. This question is addressed through a qualitative study, conducted in 2011. The findings suggest that spontaneous movers are more ambivalent than long-term planning migrants. This leads to the conclusion that the permanent-temporary binary of movement is less valuable for conceptualising this group of migrants.

  • 144.
    Eimermann, Marco
    Umeå universitet, Samhällsvetenskapliga fakulteten, Institutionen för geografi och ekonomisk historia, Kulturgeografi.
    Flying dutchmen?: return reasoning among dutch lifestyle migrants in rural Sweden2017Inngår i: Mobilities, ISSN 1745-0101, E-ISSN 1745-011X, Vol. 12, nr 1, s. 116-135Artikkel i tidsskrift (Fagfellevurdert)
    Abstract [en]

    This article aims to examine return reasoning among Dutch lifestyle migrant families in Hällefors, rural Sweden. It addresses two questions: after migrating to Hällefors, what influences return reasoning among Dutch families? What does this imply for return migration and transnationalism within lifestyle migration research? The questions are addressed through analysis of Dutch migrant families’ narratives, collected in 2011 and subsequent years. The findings are related to issues of transnationalism and return migration within lifestyle migration research. As many of these intra-EU urban–rural migrants are seriously considering returning, this study draws attention to temporary lifestyle migration over longer periods.

  • 145.
    Eimermann, Marco
    Umeå universitet, Samhällsvetenskapliga fakulteten, Institutionen för geografi och ekonomisk historia, Kulturgeografi. Örebro universitet.
    Holländska livsstilsmigranter i Bergslagen2014Inngår i: PLAN - Planering av stad och land, ISSN 0032-0560, nr 2, s. 36-38Artikkel i tidsskrift (Annet (populærvitenskap, debatt, mm))
  • 146.
    Eimermann, Marco
    Örebro universitet.
    "I felt confined": Narratives of ambivalence among Dutch lifestyle migrants in rural Sweden.2015Inngår i: Place and Identity: A new landscape of Social and Political change in Sweden / [ed] Marco Eimermann & Anders Trumberg, Stockholm: Santérus Academic Press Sweden, 2015, s. 31-56Kapittel i bok, del av antologi (Fagfellevurdert)
    Abstract [en]

    In the contemporary era of globalisation and time-space compression (Janelle 1991), many rural areas in Sweden and Europe have experienced international urban-to-rural migration (Hedberg & Do Carmo 2011). For instance, Müller (1999) studies German second-home owners in Småland. Among population geographers in Sweden, the county of Värmland is well-known for its large Dutch population (Andersen & Engström 2005, Eriksson Robertson 2010). However, rural municipalities such as Hällefors have not been studied in the context of Dutch lifestyle migration to the Swedish countryside.

  • 147.
    Eimermann, Marco
    Umeå universitet, Samhällsvetenskapliga fakulteten, Institutionen för geografi och ekonomisk historia, Kulturgeografi.
    Lifestyle Migration beyond Consumption – Production Binaries: Dutch Migrants and Multifunctional Rural Land Use in Sweden2015Inngår i: Dve Domovini / Two Homelands, ISSN 0353-6777, E-ISSN 1581-1212, nr 42, s. 81-96Artikkel i tidsskrift (Fagfellevurdert)
    Abstract [en]

    Lifestyle migration literature often focuses on lifestyle migrants as consumers. However, this paper shows how various modes of production are involved in everyday migrant lives as they seek to pro-duce the lifestyles sought. The paper’s aim is twofold: to explore issues of production in lifestyle mi-grants’ everyday lives, and to examine these migrants’ potential contributions to local rural develop-ment in lagging rural areas such as Swedish Bergslagen. This aim is addressed through two in-depth interview studies. The findings suggest that the respondents combine lifestyle-led motivations with seeking labour opportunities. Hence, studying these migrants is useful for investigating newcomers’ multifunctional rural land use and examining how their engagements with local rural development increases our understanding of their post-migration lives in lagging rural areas.

  • 148.
    Eimermann, Marco
    Centre for Urban and Regional Studies, Örebro University, Sweden.
    Lifestyle Migration to the North: dutch Families and the Decision to Move to Rural Sweden2015Inngår i: Population, Space and Place, ISSN 1544-8444, E-ISSN 1544-8452, Vol. 21, nr 1, s. 68-85Artikkel i tidsskrift (Fagfellevurdert)
    Abstract [en]

    Lifestyle migration is part of an ongoing quest for a better way of life. More or less affluent migrants moving to a destination with a perceived better climate are studied in the context of social rather than economic motivations. This paper focuses on Dutch families and their decision to move to the rural municipality of Hällefors in the Bergslagen area, Sweden. Such a Nordic destination, actively attracting migrants, has not previously been investigated in the context of lifestyle migration. The purpose of the paper is to examine what factors contribute to the decision to move. The research questions are the following: what are the socio-demographic characteristics of the migrating families? What meanings do the migrants attach to their work environments and places of residence prior to moving? What motivations and expectations have shaped the decision to move? These questions are addressed through an interview study. Results show that the adult family members were mainly born in the late 1950s or in the 1960s. The children were born in the 1990s and early 21st century. According to most respondents, effects of overpopulation and rapid urbanisation, both felt on the work floor and in the living environment, became a serious trigger to leave the Netherlands. Differences between the families consider the character of occupations (within or outside the creative industries) and the length of the decision process. In contrast to some other lifestyle migrant populations, families in this study considered returning as part of their ongoing quest.

  • 149.
    Eimermann, Marco
    Örebro universitet.
    Promoting Swedish countryside in the Netherlands: international rural place marketing to attract new residents2015Inngår i: European Urban and Regional Studies, ISSN 0969-7764, E-ISSN 1461-7145, Vol. 22, nr 4, s. 398-415Artikkel i tidsskrift (Fagfellevurdert)
    Abstract [en]

    Urban-to-rural consumption-led mobility contributes to restructuring stagnating rural areas in Europe. Against this background, this article explores international rural place-marketing efforts by Swedish municipalities towards affluent western European migrants, exemplified by campaigns in the Netherlands. The analysis is based on the concepts of rural place marketing and lifestyle migration. Research methods employed in this article are observation and a survey during migration information meetings, followed by interviews with both stakeholders and migrants. The results suggest that rural municipalities with less favourable or unfavourable geographic conditions are the most actively engaged in international place-marketing efforts. Participation in migration information meetings and the Internet are the most commonly used communication strategies. The engaged municipalities are selective in their consideration of target groups. Attracting even a few of the 'right type' of migrants (i.e. families and entrepreneurs from affluent countries) over the course of some years contributes considerably to maintaining a small municipality's population and economic viability. However, although stakeholders claim that the marketing efforts have been effective and statistics point out that the number of Dutch migrants has increased, it is hard to distinguish the effect of rural place-marketing campaigns from the myriad possibilities for migrants to gather information about potential destination areas. Therefore, regional policy makers may consider shifting their focus to actively receiving potential migrants who are in the final stage of their decision process.

  • 150.
    Eimermann, Marco
    Umeå universitet, Samhällsvetenskapliga fakulteten, Institutionen för geografi och ekonomisk historia. Centre for Urban and Regional Studies (CUReS), Örebro universitet.
    Two sides of the same coin: Dutch rural tourism entrepreneurs and countryside capital in Sweden2016Inngår i: Rural Society, ISSN 1037-1656, Vol. 25, nr 1, s. 55-73Artikkel i tidsskrift (Fagfellevurdert)
    Abstract [en]

    This article contrasts Sweden’s tourism policy considering sustainable growth and increased employment with experiences and evaluations of Dutch rural tourism entrepreneurs in Sweden. The study employs notions of countryside capital, investigating the effects on Dutch rural tourism entrepreneurs of experiences with Swedish national tourism policy aims and local populations. A tourism-migration nexus occurs where the entrepreneurs are attracted by countryside capital before migration and use this capital in their firms to attract new tourists after migration. Interviewees tell of experiences which frustrate optimal utilization of countryside capital. In combination with flexible attitudes conceptualized as multi-local living and strategic switching, this results in the risk of losing the entrepreneurs’ socio-economic impetus for lagging rural areas. The article relates this loss to incomers’ rural tourism business transfers after the initial start-up phase and questions the alleged transition from countrysides of production to countrysides of consumption.

1234567 101 - 150 of 775
RefereraExporteraLink til resultatlisten
Permanent link
Referera
Referensformat
  • apa
  • ieee
  • modern-language-association-8th-edition
  • vancouver
  • Annet format
Fler format
Språk
  • de-DE
  • en-GB
  • en-US
  • fi-FI
  • nn-NO
  • nn-NB
  • sv-SE
  • Annet språk
Fler språk
Utmatningsformat
  • html
  • text
  • asciidoc
  • rtf