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  • 151. Blaser, Wilma J.
    et al.
    Sitters, Judith
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Department of Ecology and Environmental Sciences.
    Hart, Simon P.
    Edwards, Peter J.
    Venterink, Harry Olde
    Facilitative or competitive effects of woody plants on understorey vegetation depend on N-fixation, canopy shape and rainfall2013In: Journal of Ecology, ISSN 0022-0477, E-ISSN 1365-2745, Vol. 101, no 6, p. 1598-1603Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    A recent meta-analysis suggested that differences in rainfall are a cause of variation in tree-grass interactions in savannas, with trees facilitating growth of understorey grasses in low-rainfall areas, but competing with them under higher rainfall. We hypothesized that this effect of rainfall upon understorey productivity is modified by differences in the growth form of the woody plants (i.e. the height of the lower canopy) or by their capacity to fix nitrogen. We performed a meta-analysis of the effects of woody plants on understorey productivity, incorporating canopy height and N-fixation, and their interaction with rainfall. N-fixing woody plants enhanced understorey productivity, whereas non-fixers had a neutral or negative effect, depending on high or low canopy, respectively. We found a strong negative correlation between rainfall and the degree to which trees enhanced understorey productivity, but only for trees with a high canopy.Synthesis. The effect of woody plants on understorey productivity depends not only on rainfall, but also on their growth form and their capacity to fix N. Facilitation occurs mostly when woody plants ameliorate both water and nitrogen conditions. However, a low canopy suppresses understorey vegetation by competing for light, regardless of water and nutrient relations.

  • 152. Blenckner, Thorsten
    et al.
    Österblom, Henrik
    Larsson, Per
    Andersson, Agneta
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Department of Ecology and Environmental Sciences.
    Elmgren, Ragnar
    Baltic Sea ecosystem-based management under climate change: Synthesis and future challenges2015In: Ambio, ISSN 0044-7447, E-ISSN 1654-7209, Vol. 44, no Suppl 3, p. S507-S515Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Ecosystem-based management (EBM) has emerged as the generally agreed strategy for managing ecosystems, with humans as integral parts of the managed system. Human activities have substantial effects on marine ecosystems, through overfishing, eutrophication, toxic pollution, habitat destruction, and climate change. It is important to advance the scientific knowledge of the cumulative, integrative, and interacting effects of these diverse activities, to support effective implementation of EBM. Based on contributions to this special issue of AMBIO, we synthesize the scientific findings into four components: pollution and legal frameworks, ecosystem processes, scale-dependent effects, and innovative tools and methods. We conclude with challenges for the future, and identify the next steps needed for successful implementation of EBM in general and specifically for the Baltic Sea.

  • 153.
    Blennow, Kristina
    et al.
    Sveriges lantbruksuniversitet.
    Persson, Johannes
    Lunds Universitet.
    Persson, Erik
    Sveriges lantbruksuniversitet.
    Hanewinkel, Mark
    University of Freiburg.
    Forest Owners' Response to Climate Change: University Education Trumps Value Profile2016In: PLoS ONE, ISSN 1932-6203, E-ISSN 1932-6203, Vol. 11, no 5, article id e0155137Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Do forest owners' levels of education or value profiles explain their responses to climatechange? The cultural cognition thesis (CCT) has cast serious doubt on the familiar andoften criticized "knowledge deficit" model, which says that laypeople are less concernedabout climate change because they lack scientific knowledge. Advocates of CCT maintainthat citizens with the highest degrees of scientific literacy and numeracy are not the mostconcerned about climate change. Rather, this is the group in which cultural polarization isgreatest, and thus individuals with more limited scientific literacy and numeracy are moreconcerned about climate change under certain circumstances than those with higher scientificliteracy and numeracy. The CCT predicts that cultural and other values will trump thepositive effects of education on some forest owners' attitudes to climate change. Here,using survey data collected in 2010 from 766 private forest owners in Sweden and Germany,we provide the first evidence that perceptions of climate change risk are uncorrelatedwith, or sometimes positively correlated with, education level and can be explained withoutreference to cultural or other values. We conclude that the recent claim that advanced scientificliteracy and numeracy polarizes perceptions of climate change risk is unsupported bythe forest owner data. In neither of the two countries was university education found toreduce the perception of risk from climate change. Indeed in most cases university educationincreased the perception of risk. Even more importantly, the effect of university educationwas not dependent on the individuals' value profile.

  • 154.
    Blennow, Kristina
    et al.
    Sveriges lantbruksuniversitet.
    Persson, Johannes
    Lunds universitet.
    Wallin, Annika
    Lunds universitet.
    Vareman, Niklas
    Lunds universitet.
    Persson, Erik
    Sveriges Lantbruksuniversitet.
    Understanding risk in forest ecosystem services: implications for effective risk management, communication and planning2014In: Forestry (London), ISSN 0015-752X, E-ISSN 1464-3626, Vol. 87, p. 219-228Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Uncertainty, insufficient information or information of poor quality, limited cognitive capacity and time, along with value conflicts and ethical considerations, are all aspects that make risk management and risk communication difficult. This paper provides a review of different risk concepts and describes how these influence risk management, communication and planning in relation to forest ecosystem services. Based on the review and results of empirical studies, we suggest that personal assessment of risk is decisive in the management of forest ecosystem services. The results are used together with a review of different principles of the distribution of risk to propose an approach to risk communication that is effective as well as ethically sound. Knowledge of heuristics and mutual information on both beliefs and desires are important in the proposed risk communication approach. Such knowledge provides an opportunity for relevant information exchange, so that gaps in personal knowledge maps can be filled in and effective risk communication can be promoted.

  • 155. Block, Benjamin D.
    et al.
    Denfeld, Blaize A.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Department of Ecology and Environmental Sciences.
    Stockwell, Jason D.
    Flaim, Giovanna
    Grossart, Hans-Peter F.
    Knoll, Lesley B.
    Maier, Dominique B.
    North, Rebecca L.
    Rautio, Milla
    Rusak, James A.
    Sadro, Steve
    Weyhenmeyer, Gesa A.
    Bramburger, Andrew J.
    Branstrator, Donn K.
    Salonen, Kalevi
    Hampton, Stephanie E.
    The unique methodological challenges of winter limnology2019In: Limnology and Oceanography: Methods, ISSN 1541-5856, E-ISSN 1541-5856, Vol. 17, no 1, p. 42-57Article, review/survey (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Winter is an important season for many limnological processes, which can range from biogeochemical transformations to ecological interactions. Interest in the structure and function of lake ecosystems under ice is on the rise. Although limnologists working at polar latitudes have a long history of winter work, the required knowledge to successfully sample under winter conditions is not widely available and relatively few limnologists receive formal training. In particular, the deployment and operation of equipment in below 0 degrees C temperatures pose considerable logistical and methodological challenges, as do the safety risks of sampling during the ice-covered period. Here, we consolidate information on winter lake sampling and describe effective methods to measure physical, chemical, and biological variables in and under ice. We describe variation in snow and ice conditions and discuss implications for sampling logistics and safety. We outline commonly encountered methodological challenges and make recommendations for best practices to maximize safety and efficiency when sampling through ice or deploying instruments in ice-covered lakes. Application of such practices over a broad range of ice-covered lakes will contribute to a better understanding of the factors that regulate lakes during winter and how winter conditions affect the subsequent ice-free period.

  • 156.
    Blum, Kristin
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Department of Chemistry.
    Targeted and untargeted analysis of organic contaminants from on-site sewage treatment facilities: Removal, fate and environmental impact2018Doctoral thesis, comprehensive summary (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    On-site sewage treatment facilities (OSSFs) are widely used all over the world to treat wastewater when large-scale sewage treatment plants (STPs) are not economically feasible. Although there is great awareness that the release of untreated wastewater into the environment can lead to water-related diseases and eutrophication, little is known about organic contaminants and their removal by OSSFs, environmental load and fate. Thus, this PhD thesis aims to improve the knowledge about treatment efficiencies in current OSSFs, the environmental impact and fate of contaminants released from OSSFs, as well as how biochar fortification in sand filter (soil beds) OSSFs might increase removal of these contaminants. State-of-the-art analytical techniques for untargeted and targeted analyses were used and the results evaluated with univariate and multivariate statistics.

    Environmentally-relevant contaminants discharged from OSSFs were identified using untargeted analysis with two-dimensional gas chromatography mass spectrometry (GC×GC-MS) and a MS (NIST) library search in combination with a prioritization strategy based on environmental relevance. A method was successfully developed for the prioritized contaminants using solid phase extraction and GC×GC-MS, and the method was also applicable to untargeted analysis. This method was applied to several studies. The first study compared treatment efficiencies between STP and soil beds and showed that treatment efficiencies are similar or better in soil beds, but the removal among the same type of treatment facilities and contaminants varied considerably. Hydrophilic contaminants were generally inadequately removed in both types of treatment facilities and resulted in effluent levels in the nanogram per liter range.

    Additionally, several prioritized and sometimes badly removed compounds were found to be persistent, mobile, and bioavailable and two additional, untargeted contaminants identified by the NIST library search were potentially mobile. These contaminants were also found far from the main source, a large-scale STP, at Lake Ekoln, which is part of the drinking water reservoir Lake Mälaren, Sweden. The study also showed that two persistent, mobile and bioavailable contaminants were additionally bioaccumulating in perch. Sampling for this study was carried out over several seasons in the catchment of the River Fyris. Parts of this catchment were affected by OSSFs, other parts by STPs. Potential ecotoxicological risks at these sites were similar or higher at those affected by STPs compared to those affected by OSSFs. Mass fluxes per capita were calculated from these levels, which were higher at STP-affected than at OSSF-affected sites in summer and autumn, but not in winter. Possibly, the diffuse OSSF emissions occur at greater average distances from the sampling sites than the STP point emissions, and OSSF-affected sites may consequently be more influenced by fate processes.

    The studies carried out suggested that there is a need to improve current treatment technologies for the removal of hydrophilic contaminants. Thus, the final study of this thesis investigated char-fortified sand filters (soil beds) as potential upgrades for OSSFs using a combination of advanced chemical analysis and quantitative structure-property relationship modeling. Removal efficiencies were calculated from a large variety of contaminants that were identified by untargeted analysis using GC×GC-MS and liquid chromatography ion mobility mass spectrometry as well as library searches (NIST and Agilent libraries). On average, char-fortified sand filters removed contaminants better than sand, partly due to an enhanced removal of several hydrophilic contaminants with heteroatoms. After a two-year runtime, sorption and particularly biodegradation must have contributed to the removal of these compounds.

    Generally, the combination of targeted and untargeted analysis has proven valuable in detecting a large variety of organic contaminants, as well as unexpected ones. The results imply that OSSFs have similar or better removal efficiencies, similar or lower environmental risks and similar or lower mass fluxes per capita, compared to STPs. Biochar fortification can improve the removal of organic contaminants in soil beds, but further research is needed to find technologies that reduce the discharge of all types of organic contaminants.

  • 157.
    Blum, Kristin M.
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Department of Chemistry.
    Andersson, Patrik L.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Department of Chemistry.
    Ahrens, Lutz
    Wiberg, Karin
    Haglund, Peter
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Department of Chemistry.
    Persistence, mobility and bioavailability of emerging organic contaminants discharged from sewage treatment plants2018In: Science of the Total Environment, ISSN 0048-9697, E-ISSN 1879-1026, Vol. 612, p. 1532-1542Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Little is known about the impact of emissions of micropollutants from small and large-scale sewage treatment plants (STPs) on drinking water source areas. We investigated a populated catchment that drains into Lake Malaren, which is the drinking water source for around 2 million people including the inhabitants of Stockholm, Sweden. To assess the persistence, mobility, bioavailability and bioaccumulation of 32 structurally diverse emerging organic contaminants, sediment, integrated passive and grab water samples were collected along the catchment of the River Fyris, Sweden. The samples were complemented with STP effluent and fish samples from one sampling event. Contaminants identified as persistent, mobile, and bioavailable were 4,6,6,7,8,8-hexamethyl-1,3,4,7-tetrahydrocyclopenta[g] isochromene (galaxolide), 2,4,7,9-tetramethyl-5-decyn-4,7-diol, tris(2-chloroethyl) phosphate, tris(1,3-dichloro-2-propyl) phosphate, and tris(1-chloro-2-propyl) phosphate. Galaxolide and 2,4,7,9-tetramethyl-5-decyn-4,7-diol were additionally found to be bioaccumulative, whereas n-butylbenzenesulfonamide was found to be only persistent and mobile. The total median mass flux of the persistent and mobile target analytes from Lake Ekoln into the drinking water source area of Lake Malaren was estimated to be 27 kg per year. Additionally, 10 contaminants were tentatively identified by non-target screening using NIST library searches and manual review. Two of those were confirmed by reference standards and further two contaminants, propylene glycol and rose acetate, were discharged from STPs and travelled far from the source. Attenuation of mass fluxes was highest in the summer and autumn seasons, suggesting the importance of biological degradation and photodegradation for the persistence of the studied compounds.

  • 158.
    Blum, Kristin M.
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Department of Chemistry.
    Andersson, Patrik L.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Department of Chemistry.
    Renman, Gunno
    Ahrens, Lutz
    Gros, Meritxell
    Wiberg, Karin
    Haglund, Peter
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Department of Chemistry.
    Non-target screening and prioritization of potentially persistent, bioaccumulating and toxic domestic wastewater contaminants and their removal in on-site and large-scale sewage treatment plants2017In: Science of the Total Environment, ISSN 0048-9697, E-ISSN 1879-1026, Vol. 575, p. 265-275Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    On-site sewage treatment facilities (OSSFs), which are used to reduce nutrient emissions in rural areas, were screened for anthropogenic compounds with two-dimensional gas chromatography–mass spectrometry (GC × GC–MS). The detected compounds were prioritized based on their persistence, bioaccumulation, ecotoxicity, removal efficiency, and concentrations. This comprehensive prioritization strategy, which was used for the first time on OSSF samples, ranked galaxolide, α-tocopheryl acetate, octocrylene, 2,4,7,9-tetramethyl-5-decyn-4,7-diol, several chlorinated organophosphorus flame retardants and linear alkyl benzenes as the most relevant compounds being emitted from OSSFs. Twenty-six target analytes were then selected for further removal efficiency analysis, including compounds from the priority list along with substances from the same chemical classes, and a few reference compounds. We found significantly better removal of two polar contaminants 2,4,7,9-tetramethyl-5-decyn-4,7-diol (p = 0.0003) and tris(2-butoxyethyl) phosphate (p = 0.005) in soil beds, a common type of OSSF in Sweden, compared with conventional sewage treatment plants. We also report median removal efficiencies in OSSFs for compounds not studied in this context before, viz. α-tocopheryl acetate (96%), benzophenone (83%), 2-(methylthio)benzothiazole (64%), 2,4,7,9-tetramethyl-5-decyn-4,7-diol (33%), and a range of organophosphorus flame retardants (19% to 98%). The environmental load of the top prioritized compounds in soil bed effluents were in the thousands of nanogram per liter range, viz. 2,4,7,9-tetramethyl-5-decyn-4,7-diol (3000 ng L− 1), galaxolide (1400 ng L− 1), octocrylene (1200 ng L− 1), and α-tocopheryl acetate (660 ng L− 1).

  • 159.
    Blum, Kristin M.
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Department of Chemistry.
    Norström, Sara H.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Department of Chemistry.
    Golovko, Oksana
    Grabic, Roman
    Järhult, Josef D.
    Koba, Olga
    Söderström Lindström, Hanna
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Department of Chemistry. Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine, Occupational and Environmental Medicine.
    Removal of 30 active pharmaceutical ingredients in surface water under long-term artificial UV irradiation2017In: Chemosphere, ISSN 0045-6535, E-ISSN 1879-1298, Vol. 176, p. 175-182Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This study investigated the i) kinetics, and ii) proportion of photolysis of 30 relatively stable active pharmaceutical ingredients (APIs) during artificial UV irradiation for 28 d in ammonium acetate buffer, filtered and unfiltered river water. Buffer was included to control removal kinetics under stable pH conditions and without particulate matter. Dark controls were used to determine removal due to other processes than photolysis and calculate the proportion of photolysis of the total removal. The removal of each API in each matrix was determined using online solid phase extraction/liquid chromatography tandem mass spectrometry (online SPE/LC-MS/MS). Most APIs transformed during the 28 d of UV irradiation and the dark controls showed that photolysis was the major removal process for the majority of the APIs studied. The half-lives ranged from 6 h (amitriptyline) in unfiltered river water to 884 h (37 d, carbamazepine) in buffer. In unfiltered river water, the proportion of APIs with short half-lives (<48 h) was much higher (29%) than in the other matrices (4%), probably due to additional organic carbon, which could have promoted indirect photolysis. Furthermore, two APIs, memantine and fluconazole, were stable in all three matrices, while alprazolam was stable in buffer and unfiltered river water and four additional APIs were stable in buffer. Considering the relatively long-term UV-exposure, this study enabled the investigation of environmentally relevant half-lives in natural waters. Many APIs showed high persistence, which is environmentally concerning and emphasizes the importance of further studies on their environmental fate and effects.

  • 160. Blum, Matthias
    et al.
    Ducoing, Cristián
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Geography and Economic History, Economic history.
    McLaughin, Eoin
    A sustainable century: genuine savings in developing and developed countries, 1900-20002017In: National wealth: what is missing, why it matters / [ed] Kirk Hamilton and Cameron Hepburn, Oxford: Oxford University Press, 2017, p. 89-113Chapter in book (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This chapter traces the long-run development of genuine savings (GS) during the twentieth century using a panel of developed countries (Great Britain, Germany, Switzerland, France, the US, and Australia) and resource-abundant countries in Latin America (Argentina, Brazil, Chile, Colombia, and Mexico) representing approximately 50% of the world’s output in terms of GDP by 1950. It includes large economies and small open economies, and resource-rich and resource-scarce countries, allowing comparison of their historical experiences. Components of GS considered include physical and human capital as well as resource extraction and pollution damages. Generally, there is evidence of positive GS over the course of the twentieth century, although the two world wars and the Great Depression left considerable marks, but also striking differences between Latin American and developed countries when total factor productivity is included; this could be a signal of natural resource curse or technological gaps unnoticed in previous works.

  • 161.
    Blume-Werry, Gesche
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Department of Ecology and Environmental Sciences.
    Wilson, Scott D.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Department of Ecology and Environmental Sciences. Department of Biology, University of Regina, Regina, Saskatchewan S4S 0A2 Canada.
    Kreyling, Juergen
    Milbau, Ann
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Department of Ecology and Environmental Sciences. Research Institute for Nature and Forest INBO, Kliniekstraat 25, 1070 Brussels, Belgium.
    The hidden season: growing season is 50% longer below than above ground along an arctic elevation gradient2016In: New Phytologist, ISSN 0028-646X, E-ISSN 1469-8137, Vol. 209, no 3, p. 978-986Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    There is compelling evidence from experiments and observations that climate warming prolongs the growing season in arctic regions. Until now, the start, peak, and end of the growing season, which are used to model influences of vegetation on biogeochemical cycles, were commonly quantified using above-ground phenological data. Yet, over 80% of the plant biomass in arctic regions can be below ground, and the timing of root growth affects biogeochemical processes by influencing plant water and nutrient uptake, soil carbon input and microbial activity. We measured timing of above- and below-ground production in three plant communities along an arctic elevation gradient over two growing seasons. Below-ground production peaked later in the season and was more temporally uniform than above-ground production. Most importantly, the growing season continued c. 50% longer below than above ground. Our results strongly suggest that traditional above-ground estimates of phenology in arctic regions, including remotely sensed information, are not as complete a representation of whole-plant production intensity or duration, as studies that include root phenology. We therefore argue for explicit consideration of root phenology in studies of carbon and nutrient cycling, in terrestrial biosphere models, and scenarios of how arctic ecosystems will respond to climate warming.

  • 162.
    Boes, Xavier
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Department of Ecology and Environmental Sciences.
    Rydberg, Johan
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Department of Ecology and Environmental Sciences.
    Martinez-Cortizas, A.
    Bindler, Richard
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Department of Ecology and Environmental Sciences.
    Renberg, Ingemar
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Department of Ecology and Environmental Sciences.
    Evaluation of conservative lithogenic elements (Ti, Zr, Al, and Rb) to study anthropogenic element enrichments in lake sediments2011In: Journal of Paleolimnology, ISSN 0921-2728, E-ISSN 1573-0417, Vol. 46, no 1, p. 75-87Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In lake sediment investigations of heavy metal pollution history, it has become a common approach to calculate enrichment factors (EFs) by normalizing elemental distributions to a reference lithogenic element. However, this approach requires that the reference element remains stable once it has been deposited to the sediment (it is not affected by diagenetic processes). This is rarely studied in well-controlled field experiments. Here, we test the commonly used reference elements titanium (Ti), zirconium (Zr), aluminum (Al), and rubidium (Rb). We use a unique series of freeze cores collected in different years since 1979 in Lake Nylandssjon in northern Sweden. This lake has sediment with distinct varves (annually laminated deposit). Element concentrations in individual varves were analyzed using X-ray fluorescence (XRF) spectroscopy. By tracking the newly formed surface varve from different cores across this core series, i.e., following the element concentration in a specific varve as it becomes progressively aged, it was possible to assess the potential impact of diagenetic processes on geochemical signatures. Results confirm the conservative character of the studied elements; there was neither an increasing nor a decreasing concentration trend with time during sediment ageing for any of these elements. Secondly, we addressed the question 'which of them is the most appropriate for EFs estimates with the aim of distinguishing anthropogenic from geogenic inputs, for example in pollution studies'. To assess the reliability of the EFs we used lead (Pb) as an example, because anthropogenic Pb in the sediment could be independently calculated using stable Pb isotopes. When anthropogenic Pb concentrations calculated with Pb-EFs were compared to the anthropogenic Pb concentrations derived from stable Pb isotopes, the differences found were 20% for Ti, 10% for Zr, 11% for Al, and 27% for Rb when upper continental crust concentrations were used for the background ratio. Based on the results from Nylandssjon our suggestions are that (1) when using EFs on a single core, which is the normal case in paleolimnology, multiple reference elements should be used together and (2) the results from those should be critically evaluated.

  • 163.
    Bogren, Fredrik
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Department of Ecology and Environmental Sciences.
    LIDAR-analys av flygsanddyner i Västerbottens inland: Har dynmorfologi bildad under tidigare interstadialer bevarats i landskapet?2015Independent thesis Basic level (degree of Bachelor), 10 credits / 15 HE creditsStudent thesis
    Abstract [en]

    The aim of this study was to map the prevalence of aeolian sand dunes in Västerbotten, northern Sweden to find dunes formed during earlier deglaciation phases, which was then preserved in cold-based conditions during the youngest stadial of the Weichselian glaciation. These preserved dunes were expected to be covered by a layer of till and have a rather faint morphology compared to dunes formed during the Holocene. Consequently, high resolution LIDAR-derived images from the Swedish mapping, cadastral and land registration authority (Lantmäteriet) was used to detect the dunes throughout an area covering most of Västerbotten, above the highest coastline and below the mountain range. The analysis resulted in several new findings of aeolian dunes compared to the findings in the quaternary soil map created by the Geological Survey of Sweden. Despite the fact some of the dunes at the LIDAR-derived image had a strange faint appearance, it was quickly evident during the fieldwork that the aeolian sand was not covered by till on any of the dunes visited. The common view during the last decades has been that cold-based ice will not erode or alter the morphology of the landscape beneath the ice. However, this study suggests that hypothesis may not be entirely correct, and therefore it can be hard to use geomorphological implications to reconstruct past glacial environments. Thus, it can be concluded that even under cold-based conditions, preservation of aeolian sand dunes in Västerbotten is probably not very common.

  • 164. Bohdalkova, Leona
    et al.
    Novak, Martin
    Buzek, Frantisek
    Kreisinger, Jakub
    Bindler, Richard
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Department of Ecology and Environmental Sciences.
    Pazderu, Katerina
    Pacherova, Petra
    The response of a mid- and high latitude peat bog to predicted climate change: methane production in a 12-month peat incubation2014In: Mitigation and Adaptation Strategies for Global Change, ISSN 1381-2386, E-ISSN 1573-1596, Vol. 19, no 7, p. 997-1010Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    There are fears that global warming will lead to degradation of peatlands, higher emissions of greenhouse gases from peat, and accelerated warming. Anaerobic decomposition of organic soils produces methane (CH4), a potent greenhouse gas. Two peat bogs differing in mean annual temperature, Velke Darko (VD, Czech Republic, 7.2 A degrees C), and Stor myran (SA, Sweden, 4.0 A degrees C), were selected for a comparative study of how organic soils in different climatic zones will respond to warmer and drier conditions. Twenty peat cores from each bog were incubated in growth chambers. Under present-day summer conditions, VD produced 14 times more CH4 than SA. Two different warming scenarios were used. Peat-core replicates were kept at temperatures of 11 versus 16 A degrees C, and 11 versus 22 A degrees C. From 11 to 16 A degrees C, the CH4 production slightly decreased at SA, and slightly increased at VD. From 11 to 22 A degrees C, the CH4 production increased 9 times at SA, but slightly decreased at VD. After an 8-month incubation, peat cores under drying conditions (water table at -14 cm) were compared to samples with original water table (-2 cm). Drying conditions led to a steeper reduction in CH4 production at VD, compared to SA. The CH4 production decreased more than 100 times at VD. Then, the combined effect of simultaneous warming and drying at 11 and 22 A degrees C was studied. We did not find any significant effect of interactions between increasing temperature and decreasing water table level. Overall, the warmer site VD responded more strongly to the simulated climate change than the colder site SA.

  • 165. Bokhorst, Stef
    et al.
    Huiskes, Ad
    Aerts, Rien
    Convey, Peter
    Cooper, Elisabeth J
    Dalen, Linda
    Erschbamer, Brigitta
    Gudmundsson, Jon
    Hofgaard, Annika
    Hollister, Robert D
    Johnstone, Jill
    Jonsdottir, Ingibjorg S
    Lebouvier, Marc
    Van De Vijver, Bart
    Wahren, Carl-Henrik
    Dorrepaal, Ellen
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Department of Ecology and Environmental Sciences.
    Variable temperature effects of Open Top Chambers at polar and alpine sites explained by irradiance and snow depth2013In: Global Change Biology, ISSN 1354-1013, E-ISSN 1365-2486, Vol. 19, no 1, p. 64-74Article, review/survey (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Environmental manipulation studies are integral to determining biological consequences of climate warming. Open Top Chambers (OTCs) have been widely used to assess summer warming effects on terrestrial biota, with their effects during other seasons normally being given less attention even though chambers are often deployed year-round. In addition, their effects on temperature extremes and freeze-thaw events are poorly documented. To provide robust documentation of the microclimatic influences of OTCs throughout the year, we analysed temperature data from 20 studies distributed across polar and alpine regions. The effects of OTCs on mean temperature showed a large range (-0.9 to 2.1 degrees C) throughout the year, but did not differ significantly between studies. Increases in mean monthly and diurnal temperature were strongly related (R-2 = 0.70) with irradiance, indicating that PAR can be used to predict the mean warming effect of OTCs. Deeper snow trapped in OTCs also induced higher temperatures at soil/vegetation level. OTC-induced changes in the frequency of freeze-thaw events included an increase in autumn and decreases in spring and summer. Frequency of high-temperature events in OTCs increased in spring, summer and autumn compared with non-manipulated control plots. Frequency of low-temperature events was reduced by deeper snow accumulation and higher mean temperatures. The strong interactions identified between aspects of ambient environmental conditions and effects of OTCs suggest that a detailed knowledge of snow depth, temperature and irradiance levels enables us to predict how OTCs will modify the microclimate at a particular site and season. Such predictive power allows a better mechanistic understanding of observed biotic response to experimental warming studies and for more informed design of future experiments. However, a need remains to quantify OTC effects on water availability and wind speed (affecting, for example, drying rates and water stress) in combination with microclimate measurements at organism level.

  • 166.
    Bokma, Folmer
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Department of Ecology and Environmental Sciences.
    Why do species go extinct?2014In: Thule: Kungl. Skytteanska samfundets årsbok 2014 / [ed] Roger Jacobsson, Umeå: Kungl. Skytteanska samfundet , 2014, p. 61-74Chapter in book (Other academic)
  • 167. Bolnick, Daniel I
    et al.
    Svanbäck, Richard
    Araújo, Márcio S.
    Persson, Lennart
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Department of Ecology and Environmental Sciences.
    Comparative support for the niche variation hypothesis that more generalized populations also are more heterogeneous2007In: Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences, Vol. 104, no 24, p. 10075-10079Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    There is extensive evidence that some species of ecological generalists, which use a wide diversity of resources, are in fact heterogeneous collections of relatively specialized individuals. This within-population variation, or "individual specialization," is a key requirement for frequency-dependent interactions that may drive a variety of types of evolutionary diversification and may influence the population dynamics and ecological interactions of species. Consequently, it is important to understand when individual specialization is likely to be strong or weak. The niche variation hypothesis (NVH) suggests that populations tend to become more generalized when they are released from interspecific competition. This niche expansion was proposed to arise via increased variation among individuals rather than increased individual niche breadth. Consequently, we expect ecological generalists to exhibit stronger individual specialization, but this correlation has been repeatedly rejected by empiricists. The drawback with previous empirical tests of the NVH is that they use morphological variation as a proxy for niche variation, ignoring the role of behavior and complex phenotype–function relationships. Here, we used diet data to directly estimate niche variation among individuals. Consistent with the NVH, we show that more generalized populations also exhibit more niche variation. This trend is quite general, appearing in all five case studies examined: three-spine stickleback, Eurasian perch, Anolis lizards, intertidal gastropods, and a community of neotropical frogs. Our results suggest that generalist populations may tend to be more ecologically variable. Whether this translates into greater genetic variation, evolvability, or ecological stability remains to be determined.

  • 168. Bolnick, Daniel
    et al.
    Svanbäck, Richard
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Ecology and Environmental Science.
    Fordyce, James
    Yang, Louie
    Davis, Jeremy
    Hulsey, Darrin
    Forister, Matthew
    The ecology of individuals: incidence and implications of individual specialization2003In: American Naturalist, Vol. 161, p. 1-28Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 169. Bonk, Alicja
    et al.
    Kinder, Małgorzata
    Enters, Dirk
    Grosjean, Martin
    Meyer-Jacob, Carsten
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Department of Ecology and Environmental Sciences.
    Tylmann, Wojciech
    Sedimentological and geochemical responses of Lake Żabińskie (north-eastern Poland) to erosion changes during the last millennium2016In: Journal of Paleolimnology, ISSN 0921-2728, E-ISSN 1573-0417, Vol. 56, no 2-3, p. 239-252Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Increased erosion triggered by land-use changes is a major process that influences lake sedimentation. We explored the record of erosion intensity in annually laminated sediments of Lake Żabińskie, northeast Poland. A 1000-year-long, annually resolved suite of sedimentological (varve thickness, sediment accumulation rate) and geochemical data (scanning XRF, loss on ignition, biogenic silica) was analyzed with multivariate statistics. PCA indicated erosion was a major process responsible for changes in the chemical composition of the sediments. Analysis of sedimentary facies enabled identification of major phases of erosion that influenced lake sedimentation. These phases are consistent with the history of land use, inferred from pollen analysis. From AD 1000 to 1610, conditions around and in Lake Żabińskie were relatively stable, with low erosion intensity in the catchment and a dominance of carbonate sedimentation. Between AD 1610 and 1740, higher lake productivity and increased delivery of minerogenic material were caused by development of settlements in the region and widespread deforestation. The most prominent changes were observed between AD 1740 and 1880, when further land clearance and increased agricultural activity caused intensified soil erosion and higher lake productivity. Landscape clearance also created better conditions for water column mixing, which led to changes in redox conditions in the hypolimnion. The most recent period (AD 1880–2010) was characterized by partial reforestation and a gradual decrease in the intensity of erosional processes.

  • 170.
    Bonnedahl, Karl Johan
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Umeå School of Business and Economics (USBE), Business Administration.
    Heikkurinen, PasiUniversity of Leeds.
    Strongly sustainable societies: organising human activities on a hot and full Earth2018Collection (editor) (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    The response of the international community to the pressing socio-ecological problems has been framed around the concept of 'sustainable development'. The ecological pressure, however, has continued to rise and mainstream sustainability discourse has proven to be problematic. It contains an instrumental view of the world, a strong focus on technological solutions, and the premise that natural and human-made 'capitals' are substitutable. This trajectory, which is referred to as 'weak sustainability', reproduces inequalities, denies intrinsic values in nature, and jeopardises the wellbeing of humans as well as other beings.

    Based on the assumptions of strong sustainability, this edited book presents practical and theoretical alternatives to today's unsustainable societies. It investigates and advances pathways for humanity that are ecologically realistic, ethically inclusive, and receptive to the task's magnitude and urgency. The book challenges the traditional anthropocentric ethos and ontology, economic growth-dogma, and programmes of ecological modernisation. It discusses options with examples on different levels of analysis, from the individual to the global, addressing the economic system, key sectors of society, alternative lifestyles, and experiences of local communities.

    Examining key topics including human–nature relations and wealth and justice, this book will be of great interest to students and scholars of environmental and development studies, ecological economics, environmental governance and policy, sustainable business, and sustainability science.

  • 171.
    Bonnedahl, Karl Johan
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Umeå School of Business and Economics (USBE), Business Administration.
    Heikkurinen, Pasi
    University of Leeds.
    The case for strong sustainability2018In: Strongly sustainable societies: organising human activities on a hot and full Earth / [ed] Karl Johan Bonnedahl and Pasi Heikkurinen, Abingdon: Routledge, 2018, p. 1-20Chapter in book (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    This book is written after three decades of global policy and discourse on sustainable development (SD). Regrettably, these decades did not meet the iconic Brundtland Report's call to display 'environmental strategies for achieving sustainable development by the year 2000 and beyond' (WCED, 1987: Chairman's foreword). Instead, humanity's combined efforts have made an already strained Earth even hotter and fuller.

  • 172. Bonsdorff, Erik
    et al.
    Andersson, Agneta
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Department of Ecology and Environmental Sciences.
    Elmgren, Ragnar
    Baltic Sea ecosystem-based management under climate change: Integrating social and ecological perspectives2015In: Ambio, ISSN 0044-7447, E-ISSN 1654-7209, Vol. 44, no Suppl 3, p. S333-S334Article in journal (Other academic)
  • 173.
    Borgström, Sara
    et al.
    Stockholm Resilience Centre, Stockholm University, SE 10691 Stockholm, Sweden.
    Zachrisson, Anna
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Political Science.
    Eckerberg, Katarina
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Political Science.
    Funding ecological restoration policy in practice: patterns of short-termism and regional biases2016In: Land use policy, ISSN 0264-8377, E-ISSN 1873-5754, Vol. 52, p. 439-453Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    With continuous degradation of ecosystems combined with the recognition of human dependence on functioning ecosystems, global interest in ecological restoration (ER) has intensified. From being merely a nature conservation measure, it is today advanced as a way to improve ecosystem functions, mitigate biodiversity loss and climate change, as well as renew human–nature relationships. However, ER is a contested and diversified term used in research, policy and practice. Substantive public funding is allocated towards this end worldwide, but little is known about its concrete purpose and coverage, as well as what decides its allocation. With inspiration from environmental funding literature we analyze the case of Sweden to provide the first national overview of public ER funding. The understudied political context of ER is thus addressed but also regional variation in funding allocation. A database of all national government funding programs between 1995 and 2011 that included projects and sub-programs aiming at practical ER measures was created. Results show that ER activities counted for 11% (130 million USD) of the total government nature conservation funding. Water environments were highly prioritized, which can be explained by economic and recreational motives behind ER. The ER funding was unevenly distributed geographically, not related to either environmental need or population size, but rather to regional administrative capacity. It was also found to be small scale and short term, and hence part of a general trend of "project proliferation" of public administration which runs contrary to ecosystem based management. As ER is not yet a long-term investment in Sweden, commonly seen as an environmental lead state, we expect even less and more short-term ER funding in other countries.

  • 174. Bostedt, Göran
    et al.
    Widmark, Camilla
    Andersson, Mats
    Sandström, Camilla
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Political Science.
    Measuring Transaction Costs for Pastoralists in Multiple Land Use Situations: Reindeer Husbandry in Northern Sweden2015In: Land Economics, ISSN 0023-7639, E-ISSN 1543-8325, Vol. 91, no 4, p. 704-722Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Analysis of transaction costs in multiple land use situations is helpful in policymaking and land use management, especially in natural resource management situations where interdependence prevails. By using reindeer herding forestry land use management as an example, the aim of this study is to analyze transaction costs among stakeholders in a comanagement situation. The results demonstrate that a key variable driving transaction costs is the presence of a "land use plan for reindeer husbandry," which is an interesting paradox as reindeer herders pursue the development of these land use plans even though this drives their transaction costs.

  • 175. Bostian, Moriah
    et al.
    Färe, Rolf
    Grosskopf, Shawna
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Center for Environmental and Resource Economics (CERE). Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Umeå School of Business and Economics (USBE), Economics. Department of Economics, Oregon State University, USA.
    Lundgren, Tommy
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Center for Environmental and Resource Economics (CERE). Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Umeå School of Business and Economics (USBE), Economics.
    Network Representations of Pollution-Generating Technologies2017In: International Review of Environmental and Resource Economics, ISSN 1932-1465, E-ISSN 1932-1473, Vol. 11, no 3, p. 193-231Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    We update developments on modeling technology including unintended outputs and show how these can, at least to a large extent, be incorporated in a network model framework. Recently there have been efforts to specify more detailed models which include multiple functions to separately capture intended and unintended products. Yet another recent strand of the recent literature has also explicitly tried to include a material balance condition in the model. We see this general evolution as beginning with what might be called a black box technology, with inputs entering the box, and good and bad outputs exiting the box. The more sophisticated models can be thought of as filling in the black box with the more detailed processes involved with production, prevention and abatement, with production accompanied by undesirable byproducts subject to legal regulations and laws of nature. This can be modeled as a network within the black box.

  • 176. Bouchard, Frederic
    et al.
    Sansoulet, Julie
    Fritz, Michael
    Malenfant-Lepage, Julie
    Nieuwendam, Alexandre
    Paquette, Michel
    Rudy, Ashley C. A.
    Siewert, Matthias B.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Department of Ecology and Environmental Sciences.
    Sjöberg, Ylva
    Tanski, George
    Habeck, J. Otto
    Harbor, Jon
    "Frozen-Ground Cartoons": Permafrost comics as an innovative tool for polar outreach, education, and engagement2018In: Polar Record, ISSN 0032-2474, E-ISSN 1475-3057, Vol. 54, no 5-6, p. 366-372Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Permafrost occupies 20 million square kilometres of Earth's high-latitude and high-altitude landscapes. These regions are sensitive to climate change and human activities; hence, permafrost research is of considerable scientific and societal importance. However, the results of this research are generally not known by the general public. Communicating scientific concepts is an increasingly important task in the research world. Different ways to engage learners and incorporate narratives in teaching materials exist, yet they are generally underused. Here we report on an international scientific outreach project called "Frozen-Ground Cartoons", which aims at making permafrost science accessible and fun for students, teachers, and parents through the creation of comic strips. We present the context in which the project was initiated, as well as recent education and outreach activities. The future phases of the project primarily involve a series of augmented reality materials, such as maps, photos, videos, and 3D drawings. With this project we aim to foster understanding of permafrost research among broader audiences, inspire future permafrost researchers, and raise public and science community awareness of polar science, education, outreach, and engagement.

  • 177.
    Bourdeau, Paul E.
    et al.
    Michigan State Univ, Dept Fisheries & Wildlife, E Lansing, MI 48824 USA.
    Johansson, Frank
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Department of Ecology and Environmental Sciences.
    Predator-induced morphological defences as by-products of prey behaviour: a review and prospectus2012In: Oikos, ISSN 0030-1299, E-ISSN 1600-0706, Vol. 121, no 8, p. 1175-1190Article, review/survey (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Predator-induced morphological defences (PIMDs) are ubiquitous. Many PIMDs may be mediated by prey behaviour rather than directly cued by predators. A survey of 92 studies indicated 40 that quantified prey behaviour, all of which document positive associations between defence production and activity reduction. Thus, PIMDs are associated with changes in prey activity, which could have caused the morphological change. We propose two possible mechanisms: 1) decreased activity reduces feeding rate, resulting in lower growth and morphological change; and 2) activity reduction conserves energy, which is reallocated for growth, subsequently changing morphology. Resource availability also causes similar morphological change to predator presence, suggesting confounding effects of resources and predators with current methodology. Future studies should estimate food ingestion, assimilation efficiency, and growth rate in the presence and absence of predators, crossing predator presence with resource levels. Not all PIMDs will be behaviourally-mediated, but consideration of causal linkages between prey behaviour and PIMDs is warranted.

  • 178.
    Bouzarovski, Stefan
    et al.
    School of Geography, Earth and Environmental Sciences, University of Birmingham, Edgbaston, Birmingham.
    Salukvadze, Joseph
    Department of Human Geography, Tbilisi State University, Faculty of Social and Political Studies.
    Gentile, Michael
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Social and Economic Geography.
    A socially resilient urban transition?: The contested landscapes of apartment building extensions in two post-communist cities2011In: Urban Studies, ISSN 0042-0980, E-ISSN 1360-063X, Vol. 48, no 13, p. 2689-2714Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Even though social processes across the globe are increasingly being theorised through a resilience lens, this has rarely been the case within the domain of everyday life in the city. The resilience debate also remains highly geographically selective, as regions that have undergone far-reaching systemic change over the past 20 years-including the post-communist states of the former Soviet Union and eastern and central Europe (ECE)-generally remain omitted from it. In order to address such knowledge gaps, an investigation is made of the relationships between social resilience and micro-level socio-spatial change in the built environment of the post-communist city, by focusing on the institutional, spatial and economic underpinnings of apartment building extensions (ABEs) on multistorey residential buildings in the Macedonian capital of Skopje and the Georgian capital of Tbilisi. Both cities contain a wide variety of ABEs, whose reinforced concrete frame constructions often rival the host buildings in terms of size and function. By exploring the architectural and social landscapes created by the extensions, it is hoped to highlight their embeddedness in a set of policy decisions and coping strategies, as well as their controversial implications on the present and future use of urban space.

  • 179. Bravo, Andrea G.
    et al.
    Kothawala, Dolly N.
    Attermeyer, Katrin
    Tessier, Emmanuel
    Bodmer, Pascal
    Ledesma, Jose U.
    Audet, Joachim
    Pere Casas-Ruiz, Joan
    Catalan, Nuria
    Cauvy-Fraunie, Sophie
    Colls, Miriam
    Deininger, Anne
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Department of Ecology and Environmental Sciences.
    Evtimova, Vesela V.
    Fonvielle, Jeremy A.
    Fuss, Thomas
    Gilbert, Peter
    Ortega, Sonia Herrero
    Liu, Liu
    Mendoza-Lera, Clara
    Monteiro, Juliana
    Mor, Jordi-Rene
    Nagler, Magdalena
    Niedrist, Georg H.
    Nydahl, Anna C.
    Pastor, Ada
    Pegg, Josephine
    Roberts, Catherine Gutmann
    Pilotto, Francesca
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Department of Ecology and Environmental Sciences.
    Portela, Ana Paula
    Gonzalez-Quijano, Clara Romero
    Romero, Ferran
    Rulik, Martin
    Amouroux, David
    The interplay between total mercury, methylmercury and dissolved organic matter in fluvial systems: A latitudinal study across Europe2018In: Water Research, ISSN 0043-1354, E-ISSN 1879-2448, Vol. 144, p. 172-182Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Large-scale studies are needed to identify the drivers of total mercury (THg) and monomethyl-mercury (MeHg) concentrations in aquatic ecosystems. Studies attempting to link dissolved organic matter (DOM) to levels of THg or MeHg are few and geographically constrained. Additionally, stream and river systems have been understudied as compared to lakes. Hence, the aim of this study was to examine the influence of DOM concentration and composition, morphological descriptors, land uses and water chemistry on THg and MeHg concentrations and the percentage of THg as MeHg (%MeHg) in 29 streams across Europe spanning from 41°N to 64°N. THg concentrations (0.06–2.78 ng L−1) were highest in streams characterized by DOM with a high terrestrial soil signature and low nutrient content. MeHg concentrations (7.8–159 pg L−1) varied non-systematically across systems. Relationships between DOM bulk characteristics and THg and MeHg suggest that while soil derived DOM inputs control THg concentrations, autochthonous DOM (aquatically produced) and the availability of electron acceptors for Hg methylating microorganisms (e.g. sulfate) drive %MeHg and potentially MeHg concentration. Overall, these results highlight the large spatial variability in THg and MeHg concentrations at the European scale, and underscore the importance of DOM composition on mercury cycling in fluvial systems.

  • 180.
    Brenerová, Petra
    et al.
    Department of Chemistry and Toxicology, Veterinary Research Institute.
    Hamers, Timo
    Institute for Environmental Studies, VU University Amsterdam.
    Kamstra, Jorke H.
    Institute for Environmental Studies, VU University Amsterdam.
    Vondracek, Jan
    Department of Cytokinetics, Institute of Biophysics, Academy of Sciences of the Czech Republic.
    Strapacova, Simona
    Department of Chemistry and Toxicology, Veterinary Research Institute.
    Andersson, Patrik
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Department of Chemistry.
    Machala, Miroslav
    Department of Chemistry and Toxicology, Veterinary Research Institute.
    Pure non-dioxin-like PCB congeners suppress induction of AhR-dependent endpoints in rat liver cells2016In: Environmental science and pollution research international, ISSN 0944-1344, E-ISSN 1614-7499, Vol. 23, no 3, p. 2099-2107Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The relative potencies of non-ortho-substituted coplanar polychlorinated biphenyl (PCB) congeners to activate the aryl hydrocarbon receptor (AhR) and to cause the AhR-dependent toxic events are essential for their risk assessment. Since some studies suggested that abundant non-dioxin-like PCB congeners (NDL-PCBs) may alter the AhR activation by PCB mixtures and possibly cause non-additive effects, we evaluated potential suppressive effects of NDL-PCBs on AhR activation, using a series of 24 highly purified NDL-PCBs. We investigated their impact on the model AhR agonist-induced luciferase reporter gene expression in rat hepatoma cells and on induction of CYP1A1/1B1 mRNAs and deregulation of AhR-dependent cell proliferation in rat liver epithelial cells. PCBs 128, 138, and 170 significantly suppressed AhR activation (with IC50 values from 1.4 to 5.6 mu M), followed by PCBs 28, 47, 52, and 180; additionally, PCBs 122, 153, and 168 showed low but still significant potency to reduce luciferase activity. Detection of CYP1A1 mRNA levels in liver epithelial cells largely confirmed these results for the most abundant NDL-PCBs, whereas the other AhR-dependent events (CYP1B1 mRNA expression, induction of cell proliferation in confluent cells) were less sensitive to NDL-PCBs, thus indicating a more complex regulation of these endpoints. The present data suggest that some NDL-PCBs could modulate overall dioxin-like effects in complex mixtures.

  • 181. Brett, Michael T.
    et al.
    Bunn, Stuart E.
    Chandra, Sudeep
    Galloway, Aaron W. E.
    Guo, Fen
    Kainz, Martin J.
    Kankaala, Paula
    Lau, Danny C. P.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Department of Ecology and Environmental Sciences.
    Moulton, Timothy P.
    Power, Mary E.
    Rasmussen, Joseph B.
    Taipale, Sami J.
    Thorp, James H.
    Wehr, John D.
    How important are terrestrial organic carbon inputs for secondary production in freshwater ecosystems?2017In: Freshwater Biology, ISSN 0046-5070, E-ISSN 1365-2427, Vol. 62, no 5, p. 833-853Article, review/survey (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    1. Many freshwater systems receive substantial inputs of terrestrial organic matter. Terrestrially derived dissolved organic carbon (t-DOC) inputs can modify light availability, the spatial distribution of primary production, heat, and oxygen in aquatic systems, as well as inorganic nutrient bioavailability. It is also well-established that some terrestrial inputs (such as invertebrates and fruits) provide high-quality food resources for consumers in some systems. 2. In small to moderate-sized streams, leaf litter inputs average approximately three times greater than the autochthonous production. Conversely, in oligo/mesotrophic lakes algal production is typically five times greater than the available flux of allochthonous basal resources. 3. Terrestrial particulate organic carbon (t-POC) inputs to lakes and rivers are comprised of 80%-90% biochemically recalcitrant lignocellulose, which is highly resistant to enzymatic breakdown by animal consumers. Further, t-POC and heterotrophic bacteria lack essential biochemical compounds that are critical for rapid growth and reproduction in aquatic invertebrates and fishes. Several studies have directly shown that these resources have very low food quality for herbivorous zooplankton and benthic invertebrates 4. Much of the nitrogen assimilated by stream consumers is probably of algal origin, even in systems where there appears to be a significant terrestrial carbon contribution. Amino acid stable isotope analyses for large river food webs indicate that most upper trophic level essential amino acids are derived from algae. Similarly, profiles of essential fatty acids in consumers show a strong dependence on the algal food resources. 5. Primary production to respiration ratios are not a meaningful index to assess consumer allochthony because respiration represents an oxidised carbon flux that cannot be utilised by animal consumers. Rather, the relative importance of allochthonous subsidies for upper trophic level production should be addressed by considering the rates at which terrestrial and autochthonous resources are consumed and the growth efficiency supported by this food. 6. Ultimately, the biochemical composition of a particular basal resource, and not just its quantity or origin, determines how readily this material is incorporated into upper trophic level consumers. Because of its highly favourable biochemical composition and greater availability, we conclude that microalgal production supports most animal production in freshwater ecosystems.

  • 182. Brigham-Grette, Julie
    et al.
    Melles, Martin
    Minyuk, Pavel
    Andreev, Andrei
    Tarasov, Pavel
    DeConto, Robert
    Koenig, Sebastian
    Nowaczyk, Norbert
    Wennrich, Volker
    Rosén, Peter
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Department of Ecology and Environmental Sciences.
    Haltia, Eeva
    Cook, Tim
    Gebhardt, Catalina
    Meyer-Jacob, Carsten
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Department of Ecology and Environmental Sciences.
    Snyder, Jeff
    Herzschuh, Ulrike
    Pliocene warmth, polar amplification, and stepped pleistocene cooling recorded in NE arctic russia2013In: Science, ISSN 0036-8075, E-ISSN 1095-9203, Vol. 340, no 6139, p. 1421-1427Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Understanding the evolution of Arctic polar climate from the protracted warmth of the middle Pliocene into the earliest glacial cycles in the Northern Hemisphere has been hindered by the lack of continuous, highly resolved Arctic time series. Evidence from Lake El'gygytgyn, in northeast (NE) Arctic Russia, shows that 3.6 to 3.4 million years ago, summer temperatures were similar to 8 degrees C warmer than today, when the partial pressure of CO2 was similar to 400 parts per million. Multiproxy evidence suggests extreme warmth and polar amplification during the middle Pliocene, sudden stepped cooling events during the Pliocene-Pleistocene transition, and warmer than present Arctic summers until similar to 2.2 million years ago, after the onset of Northern Hemispheric glaciation. Our data are consistent with sea-level records and other proxies indicating that Arctic cooling was insufficient to support large-scale ice sheets until the early Pleistocene.

  • 183.
    Brodin, Tomas
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Department of Ecology and Environmental Sciences.
    Drotz, Marcus K.
    Lake Vänern Museum Nat & Cultural Hist, S-53154 Linköping, Sweden.
    Individual variation in dispersal associated behavioral traits of the invasive Chinese mitten crab (Eriocheir sinensis, H. Milne Edwards, 1854) during initial invasion of Lake Vänern, Sweden2014In: Current Zoology, ISSN 1674-5507, Vol. 60, no 3, p. 410-416Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Understanding and predicting species range-expansions and biological invasions is an important challenge in modern ecology because of rapidly changing environments. Recent studies have revealed that consistent within-species variation in behavior (i.e. animal personality) can be imperative for dispersal success, a key stage in the invasion process. Here we investigate the composition and correlation of two important personality traits associated with invasion success, activity and boldness, and how they are connected to sex and individual size in a newly colonised population of the Chinese mitten crab Eriocheir sinensis in Lake Vanern, Sweden. We found no effect of sex or size on behavioral expressions of E. sinensis but a clear positive correlation between boldness and activity. In addition, this study generates important baseline data for monitoring behavioral development, and thereby changing ecological impact, of an invading population over time. This has implications for predicting ecological effects of invasive species as well as for managing ecological invasions.

  • 184.
    Brodin, Tomas
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Department of Ecology and Environmental Sciences.
    Fick, Jerker
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Department of Chemistry.
    Jonsson, Micael
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Department of Ecology and Environmental Sciences.
    Klaminder, Jonatan
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Department of Ecology and Environmental Sciences.
    Dilute concentrations of a psychiatric drug alter behavior of fish from natural populations2013In: Science, ISSN 0036-8075, E-ISSN 1095-9203, Vol. 339, no 6121, p. 814-815Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Environmental pollution by pharmaceuticals is increasingly recognized as a major threat to aquatic ecosystems worldwide. A variety of pharmaceuticals enter waterways by way of treated wastewater effluents and remain biochemically active in aquatic systems. Several ecotoxicological studies have been done, but generally, little is known about the ecological effects of pharmaceuticals. Here we show that a benzodiazepine anxiolytic drug (oxazepam) alters behavior and feeding rate of wild European perch (Perca fluviatilis) at concentrations encountered in effluent-influenced surface waters. Individuals exposed to water with dilute drug concentrations (1.8 micrograms liter–1) exhibited increased activity, reduced sociality, and higher feeding rate. As such, our results show that anxiolytic drugs in surface waters alter animal behaviors that are known to have ecological and evolutionary consequences.

  • 185.
    Brodin, Tomas
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Department of Ecology and Environmental Sciences.
    Nordling, Johanna
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Department of Ecology and Environmental Sciences.
    Lagesson, Annelie
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Department of Ecology and Environmental Sciences.
    Klaminder, Jonatan
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Department of Ecology and Environmental Sciences.
    Hellström, Gustav
    Christensen, Bent
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Department of Ecology and Environmental Sciences.
    Fick, Jerker
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Department of Chemistry.
    Environmental relevant levels of a benzodiazepine (oxazepam) alters important behavioral traits in a common planktivorous fish, (Rutilus rutilus)2017In: Journal of Toxicology and Environmental Health, ISSN 1528-7394, E-ISSN 1087-2620, Vol. 80, no 16–18, p. 963-970Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Environmental pollution by pharmaceuticals is increasingly recognized as a major threat to aquatic ecosystems worldwide. A complex mix of pharmaceuticals enters waterways via treated wastewater effluent and many remain biochemically active after the drugs reach aquatic systems. However, to date little is known regarding the ecological effects that might arise following pharmaceutical contamination of aquatic environments. One group of particular concern is behaviorally modifying pharmaceuticals as seemingly minor changes in behavior may initiate marked ecological consequences. The aim of this study was to examine the influence of a benzodiazepine anxiolytic drug (oxazepam) on key behavioral traits in wild roach (Rutilus rutilus) at concentrations similar to those encountered in effluent surface waters. Roach exposed to water with high concentrations of oxazepam (280 mu g/L) exhibited increased boldness, while roach at low treatment (0.84 mu g/L) became bolder and more active compared to control fish. Our results reinforce the notion that anxiolytic drugs may be affecting fish behavior in natural systems, emphasizing the need for further research on ecological impacts of pharmaceuticals in aquatic systems and development of new tools to incorporate ecologically relevant behavioral endpoints into ecotoxicological risk assessment.

  • 186.
    Brook, Barry
    et al.
    Faculty of Science, Engineering & Technology, University of Tasmania, Hobart, Australia.
    Edney, Kingsley
    School of Politics & International Studies, University of Leeds, Leeds, UK.
    Hillerbrand, Rafaela
    Ethics & Philosophy of Technology, TU Delft, Delft, The Netherlands.
    Karlsson, Rasmus
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Political Science.
    Symons, Jonathan
    Department of Modern History, Politics & International Relations, Macquarie University, Sydney, Australia.
    Energy research within the UNFCCC: a proposal to guard against ongoing climate-deadlock2016In: Climate Policy, ISSN 1469-3062, E-ISSN 1752-7457, Vol. 16, no 6, p. 803-813Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    We propose that an international ‘Low-Emissions Technology Commitment’ should be incorporated into the United Nations Framework Convention on Climate Change (UNFCCC) negotiation process in order to promote innovation that will enable deepdecarbonization. The goal is to accelerate research, development, and demonstration of safe, scalable, and affordable lowemissions energy technologies. Such a commitment should be based on three elements. First, it should operate within existing UNFCCC negotiations so as to encourage developed states to offer directed funding for energy research as part of their national contributions. Second, pledges should be binding, verifiable, and coordinated within an international energy-research plan.Third, expert scientific networks and participating governments should collaborate to design a coordinated global research and technology-demonstration strategy and oversee national research efforts. To this end an Intergovernmental Panel on Low-Emissions Technology Research might be established. This proposal offers some insurance against the risk that the political impasse in international negotiations cannot be overcome. The higher costs associated with low-emissions alternatives to fossil fuels currently creates significant economic and political resistance to their widespread adoption. To breach this impasse, amechanism supporting accelerated energy research is needed that seeks to reduce future abatement costs, share experienceand ‘learning-by-doing’ in first-of-a-kind demonstrations, and thus facilitate future widespread deployments. These actions will also assist in addressing inequalities in energy access.

  • 187. Bruno, Daniel
    et al.
    Gutierrez-Canovas, Cayetano
    Sanchez-Fernandez, David
    Velasco, Josefa
    Nilsson, Christer
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Department of Ecology and Environmental Sciences.
    Impacts of environmental filters on functional redundancy in riparian vegetation2016In: Journal of Applied Ecology, ISSN 0021-8901, E-ISSN 1365-2664, Vol. 53, no 3, p. 846-855Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    1. Understanding and predicting ecosystem responses to multiple environmental pressures is a long-standing interest in ecology and environmental management. However, few studies have examined how the functional features of freshwater biological communities vary along multiple gradients of environmental stress. Furthermore, modelling these functional features for a whole river network constitutes a strong potential basis to improve ecosystem management. 2. We explored how functional redundancy of biological communities (FR, a functional feature related to the stability, resistance and resilience of ecosystems) responds to single and multiple environmental filters. We compared these responses with those of functional richness, evenness and divergence. We used riparian vegetation of a Mediterranean basin, and three of the main environmental filters affecting freshwater communities in such regions, that is drought, flow regulation and agricultural intensity, thus considering the potential effect of natural environmental variability. We also assessed the predictability of FR and estimated it for the entire river network. 3. We found that all functional measures decreased with increasing environmental filter intensity. However, FR was more sensitive to single and multiple environmental filters compared to other functional measures. The best-fitting model explained 59% of the FR variability and included agriculture, drought and flow regulation and the pairwise interactions of agriculture with drought and flow regulation. The parameters of the FR models differed from null model expectations reflecting a non-random decline along stress gradients. 4. Synthesis and applications. We found non-random detrimental effects along environmental filters' gradients for riparian functional redundancy (the most sensitive functional index), meaning that increased stress could jeopardize stability, resistance and resilience of these systems. In general, agriculture caused the greatest impact on functional redundancy and functional diversity measures, being the most important stressor for riparian functionality in the study area. Temporary streams flowing through an agricultural, regulated basin had reduced values of functional redundancy, whereas the free-flowing medium-sized, perennial water courses flowing through unaltered sub-basins displayed higher values of functional redundancy and potentially greater stability against human impacts. All these findings along with the predicted basin-wide variation of functional redundancy can assist environmental managers in improving monitoring and ecosystem management.

  • 188.
    Brännlund, Niklas
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Department of Physics.
    Modeling and implementation of dense gas effects in a Lagrangian dispersion model2015Independent thesis Advanced level (degree of Master (Two Years)), 20 credits / 30 HE creditsStudent thesis
    Abstract [en]

    The use of hazardous toxic substances is very common in the industrial sector. The substances are often stored in tanks in storage compartments or transported between industrial premises. In case of an accident involving these substances, severe harm can affect both population and the environment. This leaves a demand for an accurate prediction of the substance concentration distribution to mitigate the risks as much as possible and in advance create suitable safety measures. Toxic gases and vapors are often denser than air making it affected by negative buoyancy forces. This will make the gas descend and spread horizontally when reaching the ground.

    Swedish Defence Research Agency (FOI) carries today a model called LillPello for simulating the dispersion of gases, yet it does not account for the specific case of a dense gas. Therefore, this thesis aims to implement the necessary effects needed to accurately simulate the dispersion of a dense gas. These effects were implemented in Fortran 90 by solving five conservation equations for energy, momentum (vertical and horizontal) and mass. The model was compared against experimental data of a leak of ammonia (NH3).

    By analyzing the result of the simulations in this thesis, we can conclude that the overall result is satisfactory. We can notice a small concentration underestimation at all measurement points and the model produced a concentration power law coefficient which lands inside the expected range. Two out of the three statistical quantities Geometric Mean (MG), Geometric Variance (VG) and Factor of 2 (FA2) produced values within the ranges of acceptable values. The drawback of the model as it is implemented today is its efficiency, so the main priority for the future of this thesis is to improve this. The model should also be analyzed on more experiments to further validate its accuracy.

  • 189.
    Brännlund, Runar
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Center for Environmental and Resource Economics (CERE). Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Umeå School of Business and Economics (USBE), Economics.
    Karimu, Amin
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Umeå School of Business and Economics (USBE). Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Center for Environmental and Resource Economics (CERE). University of Ghana Business School, Legon, Ghana.
    Convergence in global environmental performance: assessing heterogeneity2018In: Environmental Economics and Policy Studies, ISSN 1432-847X, E-ISSN 1867-383X, Vol. 20, no 3, p. 503-526Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This paper examines convergence in environmental/carbon performance by constructing a measure based on production theory, where production processes explicitly result in the production of two outputs; a good output (GDP) and a bad output (CO2). We use the derived measure to test the beta-convergence hypothesis for a panel of 94 countries. The results reveal evidence in support of beta-convergence in environmental, or carbon performance for the entire (global) sample and each of the sub-samples. The evidence points to a slower convergence rate for the high-income countries relative to low-income countries. Moreover, the rate of convergence does not vary with capital in the global sample, but does vary in the high-income sample, possibly reflecting differences in abatement cost induced by differences in the stringency of environmental regulation and enforcement. Additionally, we find evidence of a negative relation between environmental performance and fossil fuel share, both at the global level as well as at the middle and high sub-samples, which tend to vary with capital intensity. As such, the results conform to the results from studies on the dynamics of per capita emissions.

  • 190.
    Brännlund, Runar
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Center for Environmental and Resource Economics (CERE).
    Lundgren, Tommy
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Center for Environmental and Resource Economics (CERE). wedish University of Agricultural Sciences, Umeå.
    Effekter för den elintensiva industrin av att dessa branscher i olika grad omfattas av kvotplikt inom elcertifikatsystemet2011Report (Other academic)
  • 191.
    Brännlund, Runar
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Center for Environmental and Resource Economics (CERE).
    Lundgren, Tommy
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Center for Environmental and Resource Economics (CERE). Swedish University of Agricultural Sciences, Umeå.
    Marklund, Per-Olov
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Center for Environmental and Resource Economics (CERE). Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Centre for Regional Science (CERUM).
    Carbon intensity in production and the effects of climate policy – evidence from Swedish industry2014In: Energy Policy, ISSN 0301-4215, E-ISSN 1873-6777, Vol. 67, p. 844-857Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    We analyze carbon intensity performance at firm level and the effectiveness of the Swedish CO2 tax. Carbon intensity performance is derived from a production technology and measured as changes in the CO2 emission-output production ratio. As one of the first countries to introduce a CO2 tax in 1991, Sweden serves as an appropriate "test bench" for analyzing the effectiveness of climate policy in general. Firm level data from Swedish manufacturing spanning over the period 1990-2004 is used for the analysis. Results show that EP has improved in all the sectors and there is an evidence of decoupling of output production growth and CO2 emissions. Firms' carbon intensity performance responds both to changes in the CO2 tax and fossil fuel price, but is more sensitive to the tax.

  • 192.
    Brännvall, Evelina
    et al.
    Luleå Tekniska Universitet.
    Nilsson, Malin
    Luleå Tekniska Universitet.
    Sjöblom, Rolf
    Luleå Tekniska Universitet.
    Skoglund, Nils
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Department of Applied Physics and Electronics.
    Kumpiene, Jurate
    Luleå Tekniska Universitet.
    Effect of residue combinations on plant uptake of nutrients and potentially toxic elements2014In: Journal of Environmental Management, ISSN 0301-4797, E-ISSN 1095-8630, Vol. 132, p. 287-295Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The aim of the plant pot experiment was to evaluate potential environmental impacts of combined industrial residues to be used as soil fertilisers by analysing i) element availability in fly ash and biosolids mixed with soil both individual and in combination, ii) changes in element phytoavailability in soil fertilised with these materials and iii) impact of the fertilisers on plant growth and element uptake.

    Plant pot experiments were carried out, using soil to which fresh residue mixtures had been added. The results showed that element availability did not correlate with plant growth in the fertilised soil with. The largest concentrations of K (3534 mg/l), Mg (184 mg/l), P (1.8 mg/l), S (760 mg/l), Cu (0.39 mg/l) and Zn (0.58 mg/l) in soil pore water were found in the soil mixture with biosolids and MSWI fly ashes; however plants did not grow at all in mixtures containing the latter, most likely due to the high concentration of chlorides (82 g/kg in the leachate) in this ash. It is known that high salinity of soil can reduce germination by e.g. limiting water absorption by the seeds. The concentrations of As, Cd and Pb in grown plants were negligible in most of the soils and were below the instrument detection limit values.

    The proportions of biofuel fly ash and biosolids can be adjusted in order to balance the amount and availability of macronutrients, while the possible increase of potentially toxic elements in biomass is negligible seeing as the plant uptake of such elements was low.

  • 193. Buckland, Paul C.
    et al.
    Buckland, Philip
    Umeå University, Faculty of Arts, Archaeology and Sami Studies.
    Hughes, Damian
    Palaeoecological evidence for the Vera hypothesis?2005In: Large herbivores in the wildwood and modern naturalistic grazing systems, English Nature , 2005, p. 62-116Chapter in book (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    This report stems from work commissioned by English Nature into the role of largeherbivores in the post-glacial landscape of Britain and the potential for using free-ranginggrazing animals to create and maintain diverse landscape mosaics in modern conditions.Some aspects may be disputed or considered controversial; it is an active field of research.Therefore we stress that the views expressed are those of the authors at the current time.Subsequent research may confirm our views or lead us to modify them.We hope they will be useful in future discussions, both within English Nature and inconservation land-management circles more generally.

  • 194. Buckland, Paul C.
    et al.
    Buckland, Philip I.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Arts, Archaeology and Sami Studies, Environmental Archaeology Lab.
    Insect Remains from GUS: an interim report1998In: Man, Culture and Environment in Ancient Greenland / [ed] J. Arneborg & H.C. Gulløv, Copenhagen: Danish Polar Center, Copenhagen , 1998, p. 74-79Chapter in book (Other academic)
  • 195. Buckland, Paul C.
    et al.
    Buckland, Philip I.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Arts, Department of historical, philosophical and religious studies, Environmental Archaeology Lab.
    The Alder Leaf Beetle Agelastica alni (L.) (Col.: Chrysomelidae) in the Dearne Valley. Climate change or poor quarantine.2014In: Sorby Record, ISSN 0260-2245, no 50, p. 2-6Article in journal (Other academic)
  • 196. Buckland, Paul C.
    et al.
    Buckland, Philip I.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Arts, Department of historical, philosophical and religious studies, Environmental Archaeology Lab.
    Panagiotakopulu, Eva
    Department of Geography, School of Geosciences, University of Edinburgh.
    Caught in a trap: landscape and climate implications of the insect fauna from a Roman well in Sherwood Forest2018In: Archaeological and Anthropological Sciences, ISSN 1866-9557, E-ISSN 1866-9565, Vol. 10, no 1, p. 125-140Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Sherwood Forest in Nottinghamshire is often considered a well preserved ancient landscape, subsequently having survived by way of centuries of management as a hunting preserve. Archaeological evidence suggests otherwise, with an enclosed landscape beginning in the pre-Roman Iron Age and continuing through the Romanperiod. Due to the nature of the region's soils, however, there is little empirical, palaeoecological evidence on its environmental history prior to the medieval period. This paper presents an insect fauna from a Roman well in a small enclosure in north Nottinghamshire, on the edge of Sherwood Forest, and its interpretation in terms of contemporary land use. Wells and small pools act as large pitfall traps and mayeffectively sample aspects of the local and regional insect fauna. The Wild Goose Cottage fauna and its environmental implications are also compared with a number of archaeologically and geographically similar contexts.

  • 197. Buckland, Paul C.
    et al.
    Panagiotakopulu, Eva
    Buckland, Philip I.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Arts, Department of historical, philosophical and religious studies, Environmental Archaeology Lab.
    Fossil insects and the Neolithic: methods and potencial2004In: ANTAEUS 27: Annals of the Archaeological Instititute of the Hungarian Academy of Sciences, 2004, p. 235-252Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 198. Buckland, Paul C.
    et al.
    Panagiotakopulu, Eva
    Buckland, Philip I.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Arts, Archaeology and Sami Studies.
    What's eating Halvdan the Black?: Fossil insects and the study of a burial mound in its landscape context2004In: Halvdanshaugen: arkeologi, historie og naturvetenskap / [ed] Jan Henning Larsen og Perry Rolfsen, Oslo: University Museum of Cultural Heritage , 2004, 1, p. 353-375Chapter in book (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Although the earliest work with insects from archaeological contexts dates back to was work on Egyptian mummies in the early nineteenth century, they were not widely used in archaeological interpretation until an effective technique for concentrating their remains was developed during the 1960s by Coope and Osborne at the University of Birmingham in England. Whilst most of their research centred upon climate and environment during the Late Quaternary, Osborne in particular began to examine assemblages from archaeological sites, and his work was expanded by Kenward, initially concentrating upon Roman and early medieval deposits in the city of York and later by Robinson at Oxford, whose main interest is in the late Holocene history of the Thames valley. Funding from the Leverhulme Trust in the UK allowed Buckland to examine the origins of the insect faunas of the Atlantic islands and this work has continued until recently. Initially research was concentrated upon the Coleoptera (beetles), but Kenward added identifications of Hemiptera (true bugs), and Skidmore and Panagiotakopulu Diptera (true flies). Panagiotakopulu has also worked closely with ectoparasite remains from archaeological sites. Although identification work still relies heavily upon the availability of extensive reference collections, the development of an extensive computer-based database, BUGS, of habitat, distribution and the fossil record of Quaternary insects has made interpretation considerably easier. In Scandinavia, early work was pioneered by Henriksen and later Lindroth. More recently Lemdahl has worked extensively on Lateglacial into Holocene natural assemblages and, in association with Hellqvist, has also examined archaeological contexts. Apart from Ponel’s work in France, there has been little recent research elsewhere in Europe, and most published work concerns natural assemblages. Similarly apart from Bain’s work on post-Columbian assemblages in the eastern US and Canada, and some work by Elias in the mid-West, insects have rarely been utilised in site interpretation in the Americas and, apart from Egypt, Africa, Asia and Australasia have fared even worse. Part of the reason behind this is the scattered nature of published results, and the frequent failure of archaeologists to cost scientific aspects of work upon their sites into project design. This paper attempts to outline some of the evidence which has been obtained from the study of insect remains, as well as to outline the methods used to concentrate the fossils. The fairly extensive bibliography allows access to the published literature, particularly that relevant to the Scandinavian World.

  • 199.
    Buckland, Paul C.
    et al.
    University of Sheffield, UK.
    Panagiotakopulu, Eva
    Edinburgh University, Scotland.
    Buckland, Philip I.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Arts, Archaeology and Sami Studies, Environmental Archaeology Lab.
    Perdikaris, Sophia
    Skidmore, Peter
    Insect faunas from Medieval Langenes in Arctic Norway2006In: Proceedings from the VIII Nordic Conference on the Application of Scientific Methods In Archaeology, Umeå, Sweden, 2001. / [ed] Engelmark, Roger & Linderholm, Johan, 2006, p. 17-32Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Cultural sediments containing significant amounts of fish bone at Langenesværet, Vesterålen, Northern Norway provide an opportunity to characterise activity during and prior to the establishment of a late medieval commercial fishing station (fiskevaer). Radiometric and AMS dating techniques are used to establish a chronology for the deposits, while activities associated with the sediments are characterised fossil insect faunas. The results highlight a series of problems with the dating of the heavily disturbed organic deposits of many archaeological sites, and the need for greater care in sample selection and interpretation.

  • 200. Buckland, Paul C.
    et al.
    Panagiotakopulu, Eva
    University of Edinburgh, Scotland.
    Skidmore, Peter
    Snæsdóttir, Mjöll
    Institute of Archaeology, Iceland.
    Buckland, Philip I.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Arts, Archaeology and Sami Studies, Environmental Archaeology Lab.
    Insect faunas from Stóraborg, a farm mound in Southern Iceland2004Report (Other academic)
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