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  • 151. Mosing, M
    et al.
    Johannesson, M
    Madison, G
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Psychology.
    Magnusson, P
    Cesarini, D
    Nakamura, J
    Pedersen,, N. L
    Ullén, F
    Geneticinfluences on flow proneness and its relationship to behavioral inhibition andlocus of control2012Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 152. Mosing, M
    et al.
    Pedersen, N.L
    Madison, G
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Psychology.
    Ullén, F
    Geneticand environmental influences on the relationship between musical discriminationtasks and IQ. Oral presentation2013Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 153. Mostert, K
    et al.
    Cronje, S
    Pienaar, Jaco
    Job resources, work engagement and the mediating role of positive work-home interaction of police officers in the North West Province.2006In: Acta Criminologica, Vol. 19, no 3, p. 64-87Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 154. Mostert, K
    et al.
    Pienaar, Jaco
    Gauché, C
    Jackson, L. T. B.
    Burnout and engagement in university students. A psychometric analysis of the MBI-SS and the UWES-S.2007In: South African Journal of Higher Education, Vol. 21, no 1, p. 147-162Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 155.
    Nilsson, Oskar
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Psychology.
    Hyperacusis, Autonomous Regulation and Executive Functioning: Effects of noise exposure over time2016Independent thesis Basic level (degree of Bachelor), 10 credits / 15 HE creditsStudent thesis
    Abstract [en]

    Hyperacusis is a condition in which sufferers experience everyday sounds in their surroundings as unmanageable and disturbing. The condition is often associated with symptoms such fatigue, headaches, sleep disturbances and difficulties concentrating. Present study aimed to investigate how people are affected when exposed to noise over time. This was operationalized by collecting data from essentially three domains; subjective, physiological and cognitive. Since hyperacusis is largely defined by the individuals’ subjective experience, participants were divided into three groups based on their own subjective reports of discomfort during an exposure to white noise (60db). Cognitive performance was assessed using two well established measurements in the beginning and the end of the exposure session. Contrary to expectations, the groups did not differ significantly in cognitive performance. Heart rate variability was measured during the exposure session and was hypothesized to be lower in participants experiencing higher discomfort. As expected, the groups differed in their expressed variability in the direction of the hypothesis.

  • 156.
    Nilsson, Oskar
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Psychology.
    Quantifying Environmental Intolerance: Digital Reports From Daily Life2018Independent thesis Advanced level (degree of Master (One Year)), 10 credits / 15 HE creditsStudent thesis
    Abstract [en]

    Environmental intolerance (EI) is a condition characterized by low tolerance to environmental stimuli at levels that would not affect most people. EI is an ill-defined condition from which sufferers experience highly individual multisystem symptoms following exposure from specific environmental sources. Subgroups of EI are typically distinguished by the source that cause negative effects. In this study, intolerance attributed to noise and odors was investigated. Most research on EI is conducted using cross sectional approaches and among the instruments used to quantify EI is the Noise Sensitivity Scale (NSS-11) and the Chemical Sensitivity Scale for Sensory Hyperreactivity (CSS-SHR). To fully understand EI, more longitudinal research is needed. The aim of this study was to establish how a recently developed smartphone app, intended for longitudinal research, compares to the NSS-11 and CSS-SHR with regards to its ability to detect EI. 12 participants (mean age 29 years, SD=10.7 years) filled out the NSS-11/CSS-SHR following a period of two weeks using the app. It was hypothesized that individuals scoring high/low on the NSS-11/CSS-SHR would also express high/low levels of EI as measured by reports in the app on the variables discomfort rating, number of unique symptoms reported and number of reports. Although analyses revealed effects in the direction of the hypothesis for all variables, Independent samples t-test analyses yielded no significant associations. Either there are in fact no differences, but speculatively, the lack of significant associations can also be attributed any the following: (1) the groups were to similar (2) the sample was too small (3) the participants used avoidance as coping strategies.

  • 157.
    Nordin, Maria
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Psychology. Stress Research Institute, Stockholm University, Sweden.
    Nordin, Steven
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Psychology.
    Sleep and sleepiness in environmental intolerances: a population-based study2016In: Sleep Medicine, ISSN 1389-9457, E-ISSN 1878-5506, Vol. 24, p. 1-9Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: About one fourth of the general population report environmental intolerance (El) to odorous/pungent chemicals, certain buildings, electromagnetic fields (EMFs), and/or sounds. EI sufferers show various clinical features, of which sleep disturbance is one. Sleep disturbance is common also in the general population, but it is not known whether the disturbance is more prominent in EI sufferers than in individuals who do not experience EI. Therefore, El was compared on various sleep aspects with referents without El. 

    Methods: A population-based sample of 3406 individuals, aged 18-79 years, was recruited from Northern Sweden. Sleep quality, non-restorative sleep, daytime sleepiness, obstructive breathing, and nocturnal insomnia were assessed with the Karolinska Sleep Questionnaire. Single questions assessed time slept, amount of hours of needed sleep, and extent of enough time slept. 

    Results: All four EI groups, compared to the referents, reported significantly poorer sleep quality, more non-restorative sleep, more daytime sleepiness, more obstructive breathing and higher prevalence of nocturnal insomnia than the referents. Nocturnal insomnia was an important factor for El groups attributing their most prevalent symptoms to chemicals and sounds, irrespective of distress and certain syndromes. None of the EI groups differed significantly from the referents on time slept, but reported needing more sleep time (the EMF-intolerance group showing only a tendency), and all four groups reported to perceive enough sleep to a significantly lesser extent. 

    Conclusion: Sleep disturbance and daytime sleepiness are more common in individuals reporting El compared to normal referents. Moreover, nocturnal insomnia is an important symptom in its own right in various types of EI. This evokes the question of whether or not sleep therapy may attenuate the severity of the El.

  • 158.
    Nordin, Maria
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Psychology.
    Pettersson-Strömbäck, Anita
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Psychology.
    Projekt Norräng 2.0 Arbetsmiljö i skolan efter införande av klassmentorer: Delrapport I: Resultat från baslinjemätning, ettårsuppföljning och fokusgruppsintervjuer.2018Report (Other academic)
  • 159.
    Nordin, Sara
    et al.
    Linköpings universitet.
    Carlbring, Per
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Psychology. Linköping University.
    Cuijpers, Pim
    Vrije Universiteit.
    Andersson, Gerhard
    Linköping University and Karolinska Institutet.
    Expanding the limits of bibliotherapy for panic disorder: Randomized trial of self-help without support but with a clear deadline2010In: Behavior Therapy, ISSN 0005-7894, E-ISSN 1878-1888, Vol. 41, no 3, p. 267-276Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Cognitive behavioral bibliotherapy for panic disorder has been found to be less effective without therapist support. In this study, participants were randomized to either unassisted bibliotherapy (n = 20) with a scheduled follow-up telephone interview or to a waiting list control group (n = 19). Following a structured psychiatric interview, participants in the treatment group were sent a self-help book consisting of 10 chapters based on cognitive behavioral strategies for the treatment of panic disorder. No therapist contact of any kind was provided during the treatment phase, which lasted for 10 weeks. Results showed that the treatment group had, in comparison to the control group, improved on all outcome measures at posttreatment and at 3-month follow-up. The tentative conclusion drawn from these results is that pure bibliotherapy with a clear deadline can be effective for people suffering from panic disorder with or without agoraphobia.

  • 160.
    Nordin, Steven
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Psychology.
    Sensory perception of food and ageing2017In: Food for the ageing population / [ed] Monique M. Raats, Lisette C. P. G. M. de Groot, and Dieneke van Asselt, Oxford: Woodhead Publishing Limited, 2017, 2, p. 57-83Chapter in book (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Sensory perception of food is complex and involves, apart from nonchemical skin senses, vision, audition and kinesthesis, the chemosensory modalities of olfaction, gustation, and chemesthesis which underlie flavor perception. This chapter describes the functions of the chemical senses and the role they play for food intake. Furthermore, it reviews age-related changes in chemosensory perception and their possible causes, and presents consequences of these changes for food intake and health and well-being among elderly. Finally, it describes the literature regarding flavor enhancement of food for the elderly population, and suggests future trends in research regarding sensory perception of food and aging.

  • 161.
    Nordin, Steven
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Psychology.
    Tourila, Hely
    Department of Food and Environmental Sciences, University of Helsinki, Finland.
    Loss of smell and taste: Epidemiology and impact on quality of life2014In: Management of smell and taste disorders: A practical guide for clinicians / [ed] Welge-Luessen, A. & Hummel, T., Stuttgart: Thieme Verlag , 2014, p. 1-8Chapter in book (Refereed)
  • 162.
    Nyroos, Mikaela
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Education. Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Umeå Mathematics Education Research Centre (UMERC).
    Korhonen, Johan
    Åbo Akademi, Vaasa.
    Peng, Aihui
    Faculty of Education, Southwest University, China/School of Computer Science, Physics and Mathematics, Linnaeus University, Sweden.
    Linnanmäki, Karin
    Åbo Akademi, Vaasa.
    Svens-Liavåg, Camilla
    Åbo Akademi, Vaasa.
    Bagger, Anette
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Department of Science and Mathematics Education. Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Umeå Mathematics Education Research Centre (UMERC).
    Sjöberg, Gunnar
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Umeå Mathematics Education Research Centre (UMERC). Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Department of Science and Mathematics Education.
    A cross-cultural analysis of test anxiety among Chinese, Finnish and Swedish pupilsManuscript (preprint) (Other academic)
  • 163.
    Nyström, Markus
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Psychology.
    Affect school, Virya yoga, and compassion-focused therapy: A pilot study of an integrative group treatment, depression and anxiety2018In: Journal of Sport & Exercise Psychology (JSEP), ISSN 0895-2779, E-ISSN 1543-2904, Vol. 40, p. S110-S111Article in journal (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    The present study investigated the effectiveness of an eight-week integrative group treatment, consisting of Affect school (AS), Compassion-focused therapy (CFT), and Virya yoga in comparison with treatment as usual (TAU), an eight-week cognitive behavioural group treatment. The sample consisted of patients with mild to moderate mixed depression and anxiety (N = 31) in a primary healthcare centre. Correlations were investigated between treatment outcomes, and amount of yoga practice between sessions in the intervention group (n = 14). Results showed that both treatments were equally effective. Both groups improved significantly on measures of depression and anxiety, with large within-group effect sizes. The intervention also group improved significantly on measures of self-compassion and alexithymia, with large within-group effect sizes. Significant correlations were found between improvement in alexithymia and amount of yoga practice; between increased self-compassion and greater quality of life, as well as between increased self-compassion and reductions in anxiety symptoms. The present study highlights the practice of yoga as a potential means to improve alexithymia, and provides additional support for working with self-compassion in psychological treatments. Future research may further investigate the long-term effects and moderating variables influencing potential benefits of integrating AS, CFT, and Virya yoga in psychological treatments.

  • 164.
    Nyström, Markus B. T.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Psychology.
    Treating depression with activation2018Doctoral thesis, comprehensive summary (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    The aim of this thesis was to evaluate and compare four therapist-supported Internet-administered treatments for depression. Three studies were conducted. The first was a systematic review to determine the most effective mode and dose of physical activity (PA) for treating major depressive disorders (MDDs), and to suggest guidelines and recommendations for clinicians. These recommendations included that the PA needs to be individually customized, performed for at least 30 minutes, preferably under supervision, and with a frequency of at least three times per week to be effective for treating MDDs. Recommendations, however, must be viewed in light of the relatively few studies that match the inclusion criteria. The second study aimed to empirically evaluate and compare the effect of four therapist-supported Internet-administered treatments for mild to moderate depression. Two of the treatments were based on PA and two on behavioural activation (BA). One PA group was provided with a rationale; whereas, the other was not. The treatment in one BA group was based on Lewinsohn’s model and the other on Martell’s model. Results showed that all groups (including the control group) significantly reduced their depressive symptoms. Group comparisons revealed that three of the four treatment groups (all except the PA group that did not receive a rationale) had a significantly greater symptom reduction than the control group. This suggests that some sort of rationale is important for symptom reduction. The third study aimed to examine if a relapse prevention program would affect symptom change during a 24-month follow-up. We also examined if symptom change during the acute phase (AP) treatment period predicted symptom change during the follow-up period. A third and final aim was to examine if the number of symptoms post-AP treatment predicted symptom change during the follow-up period. The initial analysis indicated that the introduction of a relapse prevention program did not affect symptom change during follow-up. The symptom change during AP treatment did predict symptom change during follow-up for three of the four treatment groups (all except one of the BA groups). The number of symptoms post-AP treatment, however, did not predict symptom change during follow-up for any of the treatment groups. The main conclusion from this thesis is that PA seems to be effective for treating and preventing depressive symptoms. PA with a rationale is more effective than without one, and an understanding of the person’s situation is important for a treatment outcome. If a symptom change can be achieved during the acute phase, the likelihood for symptom change during the follow-up increases.

  • 165.
    Nyström, Markus B. T.
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Psychology.
    Neely, Gregory
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Psychology.
    Hassmén, Peter
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Psychology. Faculty of Health, University of Canberra, Canberra, Australia.
    Carlbring, Per
    Department of Psychology, Stockholm University, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Treating Major Depression with Physical Activity: a Systematic Overview with Recommendations2015In: Cognitive Behaviour Therapy, ISSN 1650-6073, E-ISSN 1651-2316, Vol. 44, no 4, p. 341-352Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The purpose of this systematic overview was to determine the most effective mode and doseof physical activity (PA) for treating major depressive disorder (MDD), and to suggest guidelines and recommendations for clinicians. The selection process consisted of a comprehensive search that was conducted up until April 2014 in the following databases: sycINFO, Medline, PubMed and Scopus. The inclusion criteria were: (1) a randomized controlled trial (RCT) design, (2) complete description of intensity, duration and frequency of the PA, (3) the participants had to be diagnosed with MDD according to Diagnostic Statistical Manual 4 th edition (DSM-IV) or International Classification of Disease tenth Revision (ICD-10) criteria (4) if the controls received any treatment, it had to be specified, (5) published after 1990, (6) consist of aerobic or anaerobic treatment PA, and (7) not be a pilotor preliminary study. A quality assessment of each study was conducted independently by two reviewers; this stringent selection process resulted in 12 reviewed studies. Conclusion: individually customized PA, for at least 30 minutes, preferably performed under supervision and with a frequency of at least three times per week is recommended when treating MDD. hese recommendations must be viewed in light of the relatively few studies matching the inclusion criteria.

  • 166.
    Nyström, Markus B. T.
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Psychology.
    Stenling, Andreas
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Psychology.
    Sjöström, Emma
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Psychology.
    Neely, Gregory
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Psychology.
    Lindner, Philip
    Hassmén, Peter
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Psychology. School of Health and Human Sciences, Southern Cross University, Australia.
    Andersson, Gerhard
    Martell, Christopher
    Carlbring, Per
    Behavioral activation versus physical activity via the internet: A randomized controlled trial2017In: Journal of Affective Disorders, ISSN 0165-0327, E-ISSN 1573-2517, Vol. 215, p. 85-93Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: A major problem today is that only about fifty percent of those affected by depression seeks help. One way to reach more sufferers would be by offering easily accessible internet based treatments. The purpose of this study was to compare/evaluate four therapist supported internet administered treatments.

    Method/results: Two hundred eighty six participants were included. The treatment period lasted twelve weeks, consisting of the following treatments: 1) physical activity without treatment rational, 2) physical activity with treatment rational, 3) behavioral activation without treatment rational and 4) behavioral activation with treatment rational. All groups (including a control-group) showed a significant decrease in depressive symptoms. When the treatment groups were pooled and compared to the control group, there were significant differences from pretest to posttest (Hedges gav treatment =1.01, control group =0.47). This held true also when each of the four treatment groups was compared to the control group, with one exception: Physical activity without treatment rationale.

    Limitations: The differences between how many modules the participants completed could indicate that there are other factors than the treatments that caused the symptom reduction, however, the dose-response analysis did not detect any significant differences on account of modules completed.

    Conclusions: The results support the positive effects of internet administered treatments for depression, and highlights the importance of psychoeducation, which tends to affect both the treatment outcome and the probability of remaining in treatment. These aspects need to be considered when developing and conducting new treatments for depression, since they would increase the likelihood of positive treatment outcomes.

  • 167.
    Nyström, Markus
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Psychology. The Graduate School in Population Dynamics and Public Policy, Umeå university.
    Eriksson Sörman, Daniel
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Psychology.
    Kormi-Nouri, Reza
    School of Law, Psychology and Social Work, Örebro University, Örebro, Sweden.
    Rönnlund, Michael
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Psychology.
    To what extent is subjective well-being in late adulthood related to subjective and objective memory functioning?: Five-year cross-lagged panel analyses2019In: Aging & Mental Health, ISSN 1360-7863, E-ISSN 1364-6915, Vol. 23, no 1, p. 92-99Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: Population aging motivated a focus in contemporary research on factors, e.g. cognitive functioning, that contribute to ‘aging well.’ However, something that has been overlooked is relation between memory functioning, determined by objective tests as well as subjective memory ratings, and subjective well-being (SWB).

    Objectives: The aim of the present study was to investigate cross-sectional and longitudinal (cross-lagged) relationships between episodic memory (both subjective and objective) and SWB.

    Method: A total of 586 older individuals (60–90 years) were assessed on multiple measures of the targeted constructs at baseline (Time 1) as part of the Betula cohort study. Five years later (Time 2), 354 of the participants returned for follow-up measurements and were included in cross-lagged panel analyses.

    Results: As expected, objective memory and subjective memory showed a pattern of cross-sectional age deficits and a mean level longitudinal decline was observed for objective memory. By contrast, SWB showed stable mean levels both across age and time. No cross-sectional or cross-lagged associations were observed between SWB and objective memory, whereas subjective memory and SWB showed a cross-sectional association.

    Conclusion: The results underscore that successful aging is a multifaceted construct with no or only weak associations between the investigated components. However, SWB and rate of change at the individual level should be considered to define successful aging.

  • 168.
    Olofsson, Jonas
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Psychology.
    Ericsson, Eva
    Nordin, Steven
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Psychology. Department of Psychology, San Diego State University, San Diego, USA.
    Comparison of chemosensory, auditory and visual event-related potential amplitudes2008In: Scandinavian Journal of Psychology, ISSN 0036-5564, E-ISSN 1467-9450, Vol. 49, p. 2231-237Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    To enhance understanding of neuropsychological processing underlying chemosensory event‐related potentials (CSERPs), the objective of the present study was to compare CSERPs with auditory (AERPs) and visual event‐related potentials (VERPs), and to approach the question of similarities in neuropsychological processing by means of correlation and cluster analyses. A multisensory ERP protocol was used, in which olfactory/chemosomatosensory (pyridine), auditory (1000‐Hz tone) and visual (white circle) stimuli were presented in a pseudo‐randomized sequence to 18 young, healthy adults. The results show (1) a morphological relation between P2 and P3 components that is different for the chemosensory than for the auditory and visual modalities, (2) a relatively weak association between the chemosensory and auditory/visual modalities for P3 in terms of both correlation and cluster, and (3) a P2/P3 cluster for the chemosensory but not auditory or visual modality. This supports the claim that the chemosensory P2 and P3 components reflect similar neuropsychological processes.

  • 169. Olofsson, Jonas K
    et al.
    Josefsson, Maria
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Centre for Demographic and Ageing Research (CEDAR).
    Ekström, Ingrid
    Wilson, Donald
    Nyberg, Lars
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Radiation Sciences.
    Nordin, Steven
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Psychology.
    Nordin Adolfsson, Annelie
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Clinical Sciences, Psychiatry.
    Adolfsson, Rolf
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Clinical Sciences, Psychiatry.
    Nilsson, Lars-Göran
    Larsson, Maria
    Long-term episodic memory decline is associated with olfactory deficits only in carriers of ApoE-є42016In: Neuropsychologia, ISSN 0028-3932, E-ISSN 1873-3514, Vol. 85, p. 1-9Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The ɛ4 allele of the Apolipoprotein E gene is a genetic risk factor for late-onset dementia of the Alzheimers' type (DAT), which is characterized by loss of both episodic memory and olfactory functions. Little is known about the possible role of ɛ4 in the association between ongoing episodic memory decline and olfactory deficits in the general population, but such information is relevant in determining the relevance of olfaction as a marker of DAT risk. The present study was based on a large, population-based sample (n=1087, aged 45-90 years, of which 324 were ɛ4-carriers). Episodic memory change rates were established using data collected every 5 years for a 10-20 year interval leading up to an olfactory assessment using the Scandinavian Odor Identification Test at the last wave of data collection. Participants were classified according to whether or not their episodic memory ability declined more rapidly than the age-typical norm (by > 1SD). Our main result is that only in ɛ4-carriers was episodic memory decline associated with odor identification impairment. In individuals without ɛ4, odor identification was unrelated to episodic memory decline status. Follow-up analyses indicated that this moderation by ɛ4 was due to the olfactory nature of the identification test, and that the effect was not caused by 63 individuals with dementia. Our results suggest that the ɛ4 determines the functional association between ongoing episodic memory decline and olfaction. These findings are consistent with the notion that ɛ4-carriers with DAT, compared to non-carriers, display a cortical atrophy pattern that is more focused on mediotemporal lobe regions supporting olfactory and episodic memory functions. Olfactory and memory assessments might provide complementary information on mediotemporal atrophy prior to clinical dementia onset, but the ɛ4 should be considered when using olfactory assessment as an early-stage indicator.

  • 170.
    Olofsson, Jonas
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Psychology.
    Nordin, Steven
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Psychology.
    Sequeria, Henrique
    Polish, John
    Affective picture processing: An integrative review of ERP findings2008In: Biological Psychology, ISSN 0301-0511, E-ISSN 1873-6246, Vol. 77, p. 247-265Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The review summarizes and integrates findings from 40 years of event-related potential (ERP) studies using pictures that differ in valence (unpleasant-to-pleasant) and arousal (low-to-high) and that are used to elicit emotional processing. Affective stimulus factors primarily modulate ERP component amplitude, with little change in peak latency observed. Arousal effects are consistently obtained, and generally occur at longer latencies. Valence effects are inconsistently reported at several latency ranges, including very early components. Some affective ERP modulations vary with recording methodology, stimulus factors, as well as task-relevance and emotional state. Affective ERPs have been linked theoretically to attention orientation for unpleasant pictures at earlier components (<300 ms). Enhanced stimulus processing has been associated with memory encoding for arousing pictures of assumed intrinsic motivational relevance, with task-induced differences contributing to emotional reactivity at later components (>300 ms). Theoretical issues, stimulus factors, task demands, and individual differences are discussed.

  • 171. Olofsson, Niclas
    et al.
    Lindqvist, Kent
    Danielsson, Ingela
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Clinical Sciences, Obstetrics and Gynaecology. Västernorrland Cty Council, Dept Res & Dev, S-87185 Härnösand, Sundsvall, Sweden.
    Higher Risk of Violence Exposure in Men and Women With Physical or Sensory Disabilities: Results From a Public Health Survey2015In: Journal of Interpersonal Violence, ISSN 0886-2605, E-ISSN 1552-6518, Vol. 30, no 10, p. 1671-1686Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The World Health Organization has declared that violence is a global public health problem. The prevalence of violence exposure among adults with intellectual and unspecific disabilities has been demonstrated in several studies, whereas only a few articles on people with sensory disabilities have been published. The aim of this study was to investigate the prevalence and risk for exposure to physical violence, psychological offence, or threats of violence in people with physical and/or sensory disabilities, compared with people with no such disabilities, controlling for socioeconomic data. Data from a public health survey were analyzed. A nationally representative sample of women and men aged 16 to 84 years had answered a questionnaire. In the present study, the whole sample, comprised of 25,461 women and 21,545 men, was used. Women with auditory disabilities were generally more often violence exposed than non-disabled women, whereas men with physical disabilities were more often violence exposed than non-impaired men. Some age groups among both women and men with visual disabilities had higher prevalence rates than women and men without disabilities. The adjusted odds ratios (ORs) were significantly higher among the auditory impairment group for exposure to physical (OR = 1.4, confidence interval [CI] = [1.1, 1.9]) and psychological (OR = 1.4, CI = [1.1, 1.8]) violence among women. Men with physical disabilities had raised odds ratios for physical violence (OR = 1.7, CI = [1.2, 2.4]) and psychological violence (OR = 1.4, CI = [1.0, 2.0]) compared with the non-disabled group. Both men and women with a physical or sensory disability showed higher odds of being exposed to violence than men and women without a disability. The results indicated that socioeconomic situation, smoking, and hazardous drinking strengthened the association between impairment and violence.

  • 172.
    Olofsson, Åke
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Psychology.
    Phonemic awareness and learning to read: a longitudinal and quasi-experimental study1985Doctoral thesis, comprehensive summary (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Phonemic awareness is the ability to attend to the formal, phonetic or phonemic, aspects of spoken language. Skill in analysis of speech sounds and synthesis of phonetic segments into real words has often been found to correlate with success in reading acquisition. The nature of this relationship was investigated by postulating a causal model for the effect of phonemic awareness in kindergarten on reading and spelling skill in the first school years. The quantitative implications of this model were estimated with path-analysis in a kindergarten - grade 3 passive observational study. In order to experimentally test the effect of phonemic awareness a 8 week training program in kindergarten was evaluated using a quasi- experimental design in field settings. The effects of this program were evaluated in kindergarten, in grade 1 and in grade 2. Methodological problems in evaluation research were discussed. The results from the quasi- experimental study was further elucidated applying structural equation modeling with latent variables (LISREL).

    Clear effects of the training program were found on phonemic awareness tasks in grade 1 and on spelling in grade 2. More subtle effects were found on reading and spelling of simple words in grade 1. No effect was found on rapid silent word decoding. The LISREL analysis was interpreted in favour of a model with phonemic awareness effecting phonological processing which in turn is essential for the early reading development.

    The results were interpreted as supporting an interactive-compensatory limited capacity model of reading. Phonemic awareness helps the child to understand the alphabetical principle and ensures the development of an effective system for representing written language. Trained children find it easier to learn spelling-sound relations.

  • 173.
    Olofsson, Åke
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Psychology.
    Söderberg Juhlander, Pernilla
    Linnéuniversitetet.
    Ord & Bild, Bild & Ord: Gruppscreening av ordavkodning för åk 1 och 22013 (ed. 1)Book (Other academic)
    Abstract [sv]

    Materialet Ord & Bild, Bild & Ord, avses mäta elevernas ordavkodningsförmåga i en tidig fas i läsutvecklingen. Idén är att de två grupptesten ska vara ett lättanvänt och lätträttat screeningmaterial för klassläraren som vill kunna följa elevernas ordavkodningsutveckling på grupp- och individnivå under de första skolåren, samt för att upptäcka elever som kan behöva extra stöd.

  • 174. Olsson, Erik
    et al.
    Held, Claes
    Madison, Guy
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Psychology.
    Wallert, John
    Myocardialinfarction and Google searches on “Stress”2017Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 175. Park, Saengryeol
    et al.
    Ntoumanis, Nikos
    Fenton, Sally A. M.
    Stenling, Andreas
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Psychology. Department of Psychology, University of Gothenburg, Sweden; Department of Psychology, University of Otago, Dunedin, New Zealand.
    van Zanten, Jet J. C. S. Veldhuijzen
    Thogersen-Ntoumani, Cecilie
    A Person-Centered Analysis of Motivation for Physical Activity and Perceived Neighborhood Environment in Residents of Assisted Living Facilities2019In: The International Journal of Aging & Human Development, ISSN 0091-4150, E-ISSN 1541-3535, Vol. 89, no 3, p. 257-278Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This study sought to identify profiles of individual, social, and perceived neighborhood environmental correlates of physical activity (PA) and to explore differences between the identified profiles in PA. Residents of assisted living facilities (N = 87, M age = 77.57 years) were recruited for the cross-sectional study. Participants reported their perceived support from important others for PA, basic psychological need satisfaction and motivation for PA, and perceived neighborhood environment around the assisted living facilities. Engagement in light PA and moderate-to-vigorous PA was measured by accelerometers over 1 week. We identified three profiles using latent profile analysis: 'low self-determined and minimally supported', 'moderately self-determined and supported', and 'highly self-determined and supported'. Results showed participants in the highly self-determined and supported profile engaged in higher levels of light PA and moderate-to-vigorous PA than participants from other profiles. Findings showed perceptions of the neighborhood environment should be taken into account with motivation regarding PA.

  • 176. Park, Saengryeol
    et al.
    Thogersen-Ntoumani, Cecilie
    Ntoumanis, Nikos
    Stenling, Andreas
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Psychology.
    Fenton, Sally A. M.
    van Zanten, Jet J. C. S. Veldhuijzen
    Profiles of Physical Function, Physical Activity, and Sedentary Behavior and their Associations with Mental Health in Residents of Assisted Living Facilities2017In: Applied Psychology: Health and Well-Being, ISSN 1758-0846, E-ISSN 1758-0854, Vol. 9, no 1, p. 60-80Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: The current study used latent profile analyses to identify classes of older participants based on physical health, physical function, light physical activity, moderate-to-vigorous physical activity, and sedentary behavior, and then examined differences in mental health between these classes.

    Methods: Eighty-five residents (= 77.5 years old, SD = 8.2) from assisted living facilities participated. Light physical activity, moderate-to-vigorous physical activity, and sedentary behavior were assessed by accelerometers, physical function was measured using different tasks (mobility, grip strength, and spirometry), and body mass index was calculated. Mental and physical health (i.e. anxiety, depression, fatigue, vitality, and subjective mental and physical health) were assessed by questionnaires.

    Results: Latent profile analyses revealed three classes: “Class 1: Low physical function and physical activity with a highly sedentary lifestyle” (27.1%), “Class 2: Moderate physical function and physical activity with a moderate sedentary lifestyle” (41.2%), “Class 3: High physical function and physical activity with an active lifestyle” (31.8%). The results revealed that the latter class reported better mental health than the other two classes.

    Conclusions: This study suggests that health promotion for older adults might benefit from identifying profiles of movement-related behaviors when examining the links between physical activity and mental health. Future study should test the intervention potential of this profiling approach.

  • 177. Paulin, J
    et al.
    Aasa, U
    Madison, G
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Psychology.
    Musicalproperties affect aerobic exercise performance2012Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 178. Paulin, J
    et al.
    Hellmer, K
    Madison, G
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Psychology.
    Properties of professionaldrum accompaniment performances and their relation to listeners’ groove.2012Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 179. Paulin, J
    et al.
    Schiölde, G
    Madison, G
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Psychology.
    Preference for music as afunction of complexity and repeated listening.2011Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 180.
    Paulin, Johan
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Psychology.
    Nordin, Maria
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Psychology.
    Nyback, Maj-Helen
    Nordin, Steven
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Psychology.
    Associations between hyperacusis and psychosocial work factors in the general population2019In: International Archives of Occupational and Environmental Health, ISSN 0340-0131, E-ISSN 1432-1246, Vol. 92, no 1, p. 59-65Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Purpose: We investigated the association between hyperacusis and aspects of psychosocial work environment in a general population. The objectives were to investigate (1) prevalence and characteristics (among age, sex, access to social support at home, education, smoking, physical exercise, and perceived general health) of hyperacusis in a general working population and (2) associations between hyperacusis and psychosocial factors in the work environment. The psychosocial work aspects included effort, reward, overcommitment, worry, and social and emotional support.

    Methods: Using data from a sample stratified for age and sex from the Österbotten Environmental Health Study in Finland, currently employed participants with self-reported hyperacusis and referents were compared on questionnaire instruments quantifying six aspects of their psychosocial work environment.

    Results: Among 856 currently employed participants, 47 constituted a hyperacusis group and 809 a reference group. The hyperacusis group scored significantly higher than the referents on worry at work, social support at work, and reward at work, but not on emotional support at work, work overcommitment, or effort at work. About 40% of the hyperacusis group scored on the upper quartile of the three former work environment factors, with odds ratios ranging from 1.91 to 2.56.

    Conclusions: The results suggest that worrying about aspects at work, perceiving low social support, and not perceiving being rewarded at work are associated with hyperacusis.

  • 181. Paxling, Björn
    et al.
    Lundgren, Susanne
    Norman, Anita
    Almlov, Jonas
    Carlbring, Per
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Psychology.
    Cuijpers, Pim
    Andersson, Gerhard
    Therapist Behaviours in Internet-Delivered Cognitive Behaviour Therapy: Analyses of E-Mail Correspondence in the Treatment of Generalized Anxiety Disorder2013In: Behavioural and Cognitive Psychotherapy, ISSN 1352-4658, E-ISSN 1469-1833, Vol. 41, no 3, p. 280-289Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: Internet-delivered cognitive behaviour therapy (iCBT) has been found to be an effective way to disseminate psychological treatment, and support given by a therapist seems to be important in order to achieve good outcomes. Little is known about what the therapists actually do when they provide support in iCBT and whether their behaviour influences treatment outcome. Aims: This study addressed the content of therapist e-mails in guided iCBT for generalized anxiety disorder. Method: We examined 490 e-mails from three therapists providing support to 44 patients who participated in a controlled trial on iCBT for generalized anxiety disorder. Results: Through content analysis of the written correspondence, eight distinguishable therapist behaviours were derived: deadline flexibility, task reinforcement, alliance bolstering, task prompting, psychoeducation, self-disclosure, self-efficacy shaping, and empathetic utterances. We found that task reinforcement, task prompting, self-efficacy shaping and empathetic utterances correlated with module completion. Deadline flexibility was negatively associated with outcome and task reinforcement positively correlated with changes on the Penn State Worry Questionnaire. Conclusions: Different types of therapist behaviours can be identified in iCBT, and though many of these behaviours are correlated to each other, different behaviours have an impact on change in symptoms and module completion.

  • 182. Petterson, Inga-Lill
    et al.
    Hertting, Anna
    Hagberg, Lars
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine.
    Theorell, Tores
    Are trends in work and health conditions interrelated? A study of Swedish hospital employees in the 1990s.2005In: Journal of Occupational Health Psychology, ISSN 1076-8998, E-ISSN 1939-1307, Vol. 10, no 2, p. 110-120Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Swedish hospital personnel were followed over an 8-year period, characterized by staff redundancies and restructuring processes. Self-rated and administrative data sets from 1994 to 2001 allowed for studying long-term consequences of organizational instability for staff health and work conditions. The aim was to identify, on a work-unit level, trends in work and health conditions and their interdependence. Regression analysis showed a downward trend in mental health and an upward trend in long-term sick leave. Increasing trends of work demands were accompanied by deteriorating mental health, and decreasing time to plan work showed the strongest association with increasing long-term sick leave. Job satisfaction and support were decreasing. A stable short-term sick leave rate over years related to lack of support.

  • 183. Pienaar, Jaco
    Research ethics in economic and management sciences: A researcher’s resource.2010In: South African Journal of Economic and Management Sciences, Vol. 13, no 2, p. 177-189Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 184. Pienaar, Jaco
    Skeleton key or siren song: Is coping the answer to balancing work and wellbeing?2008In: The individual in the changing working life / [ed] K. Näswall, J. Hellgren & M. Sverke, Cambridge University Press , 2008, p. 235-257Chapter in book (Refereed)
  • 185. Pienaar, Jaco
    et al.
    De Witte, H.
    Work locus of control and sense of coherence as antecedents of job insecurity2016In: South African Journal of Business Management, ISSN 2078-5585, E-ISSN 2078-5976, Vol. 47, no 3, p. 35-43Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Previous research has highlighted various antecedents of job insecurity, both in cross-sectional research and in a recent meta-analysis. A review of this literature indicates that work locus of control actually is the only personality antecedent that has received considerable attention, while sense of coherence may also be an important factor to consider. Data on biographical variables, cognitive and affective job insecurity, work locus of control and sense of coherence were gathered from employees across 3 organisations (N=718), presenting two different sectors (chemical industry and financial services), by means of anonymous surveys. Data were analysed by means of correlations and regression analyses. Results indicate that both work locus of control and sense of coherence play a role in predicting job insecurity, even after controlling for biographical variables. Considering their individual contributions, it is suggested here that sense of coherence may be even more important than work locus of control as a personality antecedent of job insecurity.

  • 186. Pienaar, Jaco
    et al.
    De Witte, H
    Hellgren, J
    Sverke, M
    The cognitive/affective distinction of job insecurity: Validation and differential relations.2013In: Southern African Business Review, Vol. 17, no 2Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 187. Pienaar, Jaco
    et al.
    Rothmann, S
    Coping strategies in the South African Police Service.2003In: South African Journal of Industrial Psycholog, Vol. 29, no 4, p. 81-90Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 188. Pienaar, Jaco
    et al.
    Rothmann, S
    Job stress in the South African Police Service2006In: South African Journal of Industrial Psychology, Vol. 32, no 3, p. 72-78Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 189. Pienaar, Jaco
    et al.
    Rothmann, S
    Occupational stress, personality traits, coping strategies and suicide ideation in the South African Police Services.2007In: Criminal Justice and Behavior, Vol. 34, no 2, p. 246-258Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 190. Pienaar, Jaco
    et al.
    Rothmann, S
    Suicide ideation in the South African Police Service.2005In: South African Journal of Psychology, Vol. 35, no 1, p. 58-72Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 191. Pienaar, Jaco
    et al.
    Rothmann, S
    Rothmann, J.C
    The evaluation of a self-development programme for managers in a corporate pharmacy group.2003In: South African Journal of Economic and Management Sciences, Vol. 6, no 1, p. 50-71Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 192. Pienaar, Jaco
    et al.
    Sieberhagen, C. F
    Mostert, K
    Investigating turnover intentions by role overload, job satisfaction and social support moderation.2007In: South African Journal of Industrial and Organisational Psychology, Vol. 33, no 2, p. 62-67Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 193. Pienaar, Jaco
    et al.
    Van Wyk, D
    Teacher Burnout: Construct equivalence and the role of union membership.2006In: South African Journal of Education, Vol. 26, no 4, p. 541-551Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 194. Pienaar, Jaco
    et al.
    Willemse, S. A.
    Burnout, engagement, coping and general health of service employees in the hospitality industry.2008In: Tourism Management, Vol. 29, p. 1053-1063Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 195.
    Popov, Oleg
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Department of Science and Mathematics Education.
    Outdoor Science in Teacher Education2015In: Contemporary approaches to activity theory: interdisciplinary perspectives on human behavior / [ed] Thomas Hansson, hershey, pa: IGI Global, 2015, p. 128-142Chapter in book (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This is an account of the development of prospective teachers’ competence to conduct outdoor science education. At the Department of Science and Mathematics Education, the students participate in outdoor education courses. They also plan, manage and evaluate outdoor lessons designed as assignments in science education, participation in school practice and summer courses. Many student teachers evaluate and analyse the pedagogical aspects of outdoor science when they carry out research projects in schools for their graduation thesis work. In order to understand the activity of science teaching and learning outdoors, a qualitative study was conducted. It was based on interviews with teacher educators and included studies of students’ examination papers. A Cultural Historical Activity Theory (CHAT) lens was applied to the study. The theoretical framework helped to identify the prospective teachers’ abilities and skills to design, implement and evaluate tasks related to the professional competence of delivering outdoor science activities.

  • 196. Quested, Eleanor
    et al.
    Ntoumanis, Nikos
    Stenling, Andreas
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Psychology.
    Thogersen-Ntoumani, Cecilie
    Hancox, Jennie E.
    The need-relevant instructor behaviors scale: development and initial validation2018In: Journal of Sport & Exercise Psychology (JSEP), ISSN 0895-2779, E-ISSN 1543-2904, Vol. 40, no 5, p. 259-268Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Purpose: This article outlines the development and validation of the Need-Relevant Instructor Behaviors Scale (NIBS). Drawing from self-determination theory, the NIBS is the first observation tool designed to code the frequency and the intensity of autonomy-, competence-, and relatedness-relevant behaviors of exercise instructors. The scale also captures the frequency of need-indifferent behaviors.

    Methods: The behaviors of 27 exercise instructors were coded by trained raters on two occasions, before and after they received training in adaptive motivational communication.

    Results: Findings supported the structural validity and reliability of the scale. The scale's sensitivity to detect changes in frequency and intensity of need-relevant behaviors was also evidenced. Conclusions: The NIBS is a new tool that offers a unique, tripartite assessment of need-relevant behaviors of leaders in the physical activity domain.

  • 197.
    Ramji, Rathi
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Psychology.
    Aasa, Ulrika
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Community Medicine and Rehabilitation, Physiotherapy.
    Paulin, Johan
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Psychology.
    Madison, Guy
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Psychology.
    Musical information increases physical performance for synchronous but not asynchronous running2016In: Psychology of Music, ISSN 0305-7356, E-ISSN 1741-3087, Vol. 44, no 5, p. 984-995Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Given that physical performance is enhanced by listening to music, what information in the music is the active ingredient? Here, we varied the amount of music information in an otherwise identical piece of music, from only the rhythm, through a synthesized and scaled down version, to the full original version. Twenty-two university students (11 males and 11 females) ran for 10 minutes to each of eight conditions, two with white noise, three with music that facilitated synchronization with the running pace, and three with tempi where synchronization was impossible. Dependent variables were distance run and the number of steps, from which stride length was computed. Heart rate and mood (PANAS) were also measured for control purposes. Participants tended to run a greater distance when there was more music information, which was mainly an effect of longer strides rather than a faster stride rate. This effect was stronger in the synchronous conditions. The results suggest that the motivational effects of music information during running is mostly related to richer temporal information conveyed by faster metrical levels, when attempting to synchronize with the beat in the music

  • 198.
    Ring, Jonas
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Psychology.
    Berglund, Maria
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Psychology.
    Effect of Developed Story on Mobile Gamers' Motivation2018Independent thesis Basic level (degree of Bachelor), 10 credits / 15 HE creditsStudent thesis
    Abstract [en]

    Only a decade ago, research was limited regarding enjoyment and player motivation in digital games. The aim of this study was to investigate the effect of a developed story in a mobilepuzzle game. The main research question was if a developed story can affect the motivation to play a mobile puzzle game, and the secondary question was if a developed story can affect players’ overall impression of a mobile puzzle game. The sample size was eight participants (five men, two women, one non-disclosed), who enjoys playing mobile games, and were between 20-28 years old. A semi-controlled field study was performed with a between-group design consisting of experimental group and control group. Participants played freely a mobile puzzle game with a pre-existing or a developed story for a week, then returned for an evaluation interview. Their total playtime was measured with on-screen time trackers and their motivation and overall impression with subjective ratings on a five-level scale, as well as their reasonings to the ratings. The results showed no main difference between the two conditions. However, exploratory analysis found that participants who were interested in a story had lower motivation to continue playing compared to those not interested in a story, possibly due to their player type. This study makes way for future research regarding story and video games, mobile games in particular. In the long run this research could contribute to make mobile games more immersive and enjoying to play for the public.

  • 199.
    Rosén, Elisabet
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Psychology.
    Learning how to learn: Psychology Trainees’ Self-compassion while implementing Deliberate Practice, with FIT at a Psychotherapy Training Clinic2019Independent thesis Advanced level (degree of Master (Two Years)), 10 credits / 15 HE creditsStudent thesis
    Abstract [en]

    The effects of clinical supervision on treatment outcome has been shown to be unclear, and this part of the education to be a challenge for trainees. This pilot study in a naturalistic educational setting, examined how psychology trainees’ (n=12) self-compassion (SC) develop during one year of their clinical training, and whether it covaries with the Feedback-Informed Treatment instruments Outcome Rating Scale, Session Rating Scale, and Lead Alliance Supervision Scale (LASS), with a Deliberate Practice supervision (supervisors, n=2) approach. Regression analysis revealed that the trainees’ SC increased significantly (β=.819), interpreted helping them develop a learning stance. The covariance with supervisors’ SC (β=.694), and LASS (Pearson’s r=.538) were interpreted as the supervisors constituting good models for how to conduct assessments, and receive feedback for further self-reflection. The results indicate that this model has supported the trainees´ development, and the supervisors´ guidance. Further research is needed to examine causal relationships.

  • 200.
    Rönnlund, Michael
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Psychology.
    Carelli, Maria Grazia
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Psychology.
    Time Perspective Biases Are Associated With Poor Sleep Quality, Daytime Sleepiness, and Lower Levels of Subjective Well-Being Among Older Adults2018In: Frontiers in Psychology, ISSN 1664-1078, E-ISSN 1664-1078, Vol. 9, article id 1356Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This study examined the extent to which individual differences in time perspective, i.e., habitual way of relating to the personal past, present, and future, are associated with sleep quality and daytime sleepiness in a sample of older adults. The participants (N = 437, 60-90 years) completed the Karolinska Sleep Questionnaire (KSQ), a the Swedish version of the Zimbardo Time Perspective Inventory (S-ZTPI), and two ratings of subjective well-being (SWB) (life satisfaction, happiness). Based on established relationships between dimension of time perspective and other variables (e.g., depression) and relations between negative retrospection (rumination) and negative prospection (worry) in prior studies, we expected higher scores on Past Negative and Future Negative to be linked to poor sleep quality and (indirectly) increased daytime sleepiness. Moreover, we examined the possibility that variations in perceived sleep and sleepiness during the day mediates the expected association between an aggregate measure of deviations from a so called balanced time perspective (DBTP) and SWB. In regression analyses controlling for demographic factors (age, sex, and work status), higher scores on Past Negative and Future Negative predicted poorer sleep quality and higher levels of daytime sleepiness. Additionally, most of the association between time perspective and daytime sleepiness was accounted for by individual differences in sleep quality. Finally, structural equation modeling yielded results consistent with the hypothesis that variations in sleep mediate part of the negative relationship between DBTP and SWB. Given that good sleep is essential to multiple aspects of health, future studies evaluating relationships between time perspective and adverse health outcomes should consider sleep quality as a potentially contributing factor.

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