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  • 151.
    Markkula, Tove
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Umeå Institute of Design.
    Patientnära tester närmare patienten: Ett säkert och användarvänligt produktkoncept för kapillär blodprovstagning i hemmet2014Independent thesis Basic level (degree of Bachelor), 10 credits / 15 HE creditsStudent thesis
    Abstract [en]

    Today’s research in medical technology opens up opportunities to cheap and easy analyzation of capillary blood samples. This, combined with an increased need for healthcare and a strained economy has led to a debate in our society about home diagnostics role in a future healthcare platform. 

    The goal of this project has been to create a concept for capillary blood sampling that will work within a system where the patient has greater influence and insight into their own health. To achieve this the student has examined the role of the interface between users and technology in a kontext where reliable results and safe use is crucial. 

    The end result is a product koncept that minimise the risk of injury and stress in a scenario of first time use, simultaneously as it helps the user to carry out the activity in a way that increases the possibility to achieve reliable test results.

  • 152.
    Marner, Anders
    Umeå University, Faculty of Arts, Department of Creative Studies (Teacher Education).
    Ett designperspektiv på slöjden och ett kulturperspektiv på skolan2005In: Slöjdforum, ISSN 0346-0509, no 5, p. 50-53Article in journal (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
  • 153.
    Marteliusson, Karl
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Umeå Institute of Design.
    LYNK&CO CIRC: WHAT IF THE AUTOMOTIVE BUSINESS EMBRACED A CIRCULAR MINDSET?2018Independent thesis Advanced level (degree of Master (Two Years)), 20 credits / 30 HE creditsStudent thesis
    Abstract [en]

    This project is questioning our modern way of life. With the current capitalistic economy we are draining the world on resources and creating inequality among people. It is often said the the capitalistic system is lifting people out of poverty and there is no better way. However, it is proven to be negative for our ecology and it is important that we find new ways of develop mobility. So our future generations can enjoy the freedom that we today have become so ac-customed to. What can we do to consume less and respect the world we are living by. Is it a matter of consuming green. Or do we need a fundamental change in how we create things. A bright light in these questions is maybe to head into a circular economy. This project therefore explores how a automotive interior would look like when designed with a circular mindset. Could a Universal Basic Income reduce extraction and what is the role of A.I and automation in the development for better mobility.

    For this project an in depth literature research was carried out to gather information about our economic system and social factors. The research about digitalisation and automatisation have been gathered from highly regard-ed magazines and web news papers. Second part of the research is also web based, and about sustainable materials that could be used in this interior concept. The design phase started with creation of a user in a chinese context, based from the trend analyzer firm Stylus. China was chosen because it’s a rapid growing economy and it’s the main market for the Chinese-owned car brand Lynk & Co. The collaboration partner for this thesis. The design phase followed with sketching to quickly visualize early ideas. These were then brought into a CAID program to fit the chosen package of a small city car. The design was created around a male mannequin to ensure usability. A full-size mockup was built to test functions and validate design around a large male and the smallest female percentile. 

    The project resulted in a strategic concept of how a new business model would push for a greener development using a circular mindset. From that perspective a interior was created using sustainable materials. The overall struc-ture is covered in a hard cover manufactured in recycled plastic. The seating and dashboard were design with the highly efficient material Abroform in mind. Abroform is based of Lignin which is a byproduct of the paper indus-try. Therefore no additional extraction is needed making it sustainable. Further it had all the positive design charac-teristics from conventional plastics. The soft seat cushions and the front dash was designed with compressed felt, manufactured from organic wool. These parts created a friendly and soft interior and are easy changeable for maintaining purposes. Overall the interior focused on providing smart storage solutions using few materials with an “bolt-on aesthetic”. The design language is using a friendly surface treatment and to include users make the journey pleasant.

  • 154.
    Marti, Patrizia
    et al.
    University of Siena.
    Peeters, Jeroen
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Informatics. Interactive Institute Swedish ICT.
    Trotto, Ambra
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Umeå School of Architecture. Interactive Institute Swedish ICT.
    Ethics and aesthetics: experiencing women rights2015In: Design and semantics of form and movement: Proceedings of the 9th International Conference on Design and Semantics of Form and Movement, 2015, p. 339-341Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In this paper, we describe an interactive exhibition entitled Ballade of Women that explored perspectives on women’s rights. The installation was designed as an immersive experience aimed at engaging visitors to trigger meaningful and personal reflections on women’s rights. Visitors moved through a dynamic environment, where they experienced three themes: violence, emancipation and self-determination, represented by three artworks. Digital representations of the three paintings were fragmented in moving panels. The movement of the panels was determined by the movement and presence of visitors as well as by the input received by online communities discussing the topic of the exhibition. The installation created awareness, and stimulated reflection through a bodily involvement, demonstrating how complex and controversial taking a position on such topics can be. The experience concurred in stimulating and reinforcing a reflection on their relevance, complexity and universality.

  • 155.
    Marti, Patrizia
    et al.
    University of Siena.
    Trotto, Ambra
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Umeå School of Architecture. Interactive Institute Swedish ICT.
    Peeters, Jeroen
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Informatics. Interactive Institute Swedish ICT.
    Hummels, Caroline
    Eindhoven University of Technology.
    Instilling cultural values throgh bodily engagement with human rights2013In: Proceedings of Conference of Human Computer Interaction Italy, 2013Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The paper presents vision, approach and outcomes of “Light through Culture”, an international design school that aims at weaving, through design, innovative technologies and culture into a new canvas for making and thinking [6]. In this paper we present the second edition of the school that explored the theme of human rights and designed ways of eliciting the experience of their violation, with the realization of an experiential path through five interactive spaces, in an exhibition called “Experiencing Human Rights”. The students built this interactive path to elicit a rich experience and unfold new opportunities for meaning to be elaborated by visitors. Story telling was used, as a way of creating a holistic experience that was not just based on the narration of facts but also exploited feelings and deep cultural values through embodied interaction. Based on the student’s craftsmanship and their different cultural and educational backgrounds, they opened up a reflection on human rights, both in their own process, as well as for the visitors during the exhibition. The students’ learning activity held Making in its core, and students were encouraged, through cycles of reflection-on-action, to develop their personal point-of-view, take responsibility for it and present the designed exhibition to the visitors, to invite them to be bodily engaged, reflect and take their own point-of-view. 

  • 156.
    Martikainene, Janne
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Umeå Institute of Design.
    HLR-hjälp för hemmiljö2014Independent thesis Basic level (degree of Bachelor), 10 credits / 15 HE creditsStudent thesis
    Abstract [en]

    Sudden cardiac arrest is still today one of the most common cause of death. In Sweden there is around 10 000 victims of sudden cardiac arrest each year. AED’s (Automatic external defibrillators) are becoming more and more common each year, but these AED’s are placed on public spaces and workplaces. But how can the concept a public AED be applied in a home environment. This project explores those possibilities aimed at sparsely populated areas where it can take longer for ambulance to arrive.

    During the project I talked to both professional's within emergency healthcare, heart patients and other people otherwise engaged in this particular topic or product to gain valuable information. During my research it became clear that CPR is far more important when it comes to saving lives. By performing CPR before defibrillation you gain a wider time frame and increase the chance of survival.

    The result is a more compact and more aesthetically pleasing in both form and colour in order for it to fit the home environment. It also takes into account the importance of CPR by making the AED teach CPR visually for the user. Since the survival rate increases if you perform CPR before defibrillator. The result is also integrated with a service called SMS lifesavers in order to promote awareness and a community for saving lives during sudden cardiac arrest.

  • 157.
    Mauk, Tais
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Umeå Institute of Design.
    Code Roads: Teaching Kids Coding Fundamentals With Tangible Interaction2016Independent thesis Advanced level (degree of Master (Two Years)), 20 credits / 30 HE creditsStudent thesis
    Abstract [en]

    What if a computer wasn’t necessarily the best place for kids to learn the fundamentals of coding? A new wave of digital coding teaching tools has been ushered into America, with the country progressively gaining more interest in having kids learn code. 

    The goal of this project has been to propose an alternative teaching method, one focused and tailored to students who learn best through kinesthetic and visual means. 

    The approach has been to combine tangible interaction principles to help make the introductory stages of learning code as approachable and intuitive as possible. 

    The final result of this thesis is a modular toy system which gradually introduces kids to the fundamentals of coding independent of a computer, prompting exploration and problem solving.

  • 158. Mazé, Ramia
    et al.
    Olausson, LisaPlöjel, MatildaRedström, JohanUmeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Umeå Institute of Design.Zetterlund, Christina
    Share this book: critical perspectives and dialogues about design and sustainability2013Collection (editor) (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    This is a critical time in design. Concepts and practices of design are changing in response to historical developments in the modes of industrial design production and consumption. Indeed, the imperative of more sustainable development requires profound reconsideration of design today. Theoretical foundations and professional definitions are at stake, with consequences for institutions such as museums and universities as well as for future practitioners. This is ‘critical’ on many levels, from the urgent need to address societal and environmental issues to the reflexivity required to think and do design differently.

  • 159.
    Mazé, Ramia
    et al.
    Aalto University.
    Redström, Johan
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Umeå Institute of Design.
    Schwierige Formen2018Book (Refereed)
    Abstract [de]

    Design findet an einem ambivalenten Ort statt und pendelt zwischen den Anliegen det Kultur und des Kapitals. Als eine Art Kritik von innen erforscht kritisches Design, worum es im Design geht – wie es sich zum Markt verhält, was unter "gutem Design" verstanden wird und wie Gestaltung und die Entwicklung von Technologie funktionieren. Schwierige Formen diskutiert die operativen und intellektuellen Grundlagen einer erneuarten kritischen Praxis.

  • 160.
    McIntyre, James
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Umeå Institute of Design.
    Expressive Input2016Independent thesis Advanced level (degree of Master (Two Years)), 20 HE creditsStudent thesis
    Abstract [en]

    Expressive input is the culmination of 18 weeks of prototyping, ideation and research conducted as my degree project at Umeå Institute of Design. The project presents three design provocations which aim to raise questions about the potential opportunity to create a dialogue with the physical controls we interact with. 

    While words like “smart” or “connected” get thrown around quite often, this work aims to show that there is a role for expression within the relationship we have with our devices. 

    Expression within this context is defined as how we can make user interfaces that leverage the advances in sensors and feedback in order to feel more human. 

    The work presents three scenarios that might exist within an Automotive context, and demonstrates solutions that encourage users to maintain visual attention on the task of driving. 

    The project was conducted by running a series of short sprints that were focused on specific problems, the intention of this approach was to identify unique opportunities for future design work to explore.

  • 161.
    McLellan, Shelagh
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Umeå Institute of Design.
    Precision Medicine: The Future of Data-driven Healthcare2014Independent thesis Advanced level (degree of Master (Two Years)), 20 credits / 30 HE creditsStudent thesis
    Abstract [en]

    Precision Medicine: the future of data-driven healthcare is an interaction design master’s thesis project aimed at presenting a vision of how genomic and quantified data might be integrated into the Swedish public healthcare system.

    This thesis focuses on a user-centered design process, examining patient health needs and desires. It also looks at the rise of genomic data and precision medicine. Ethnographic research has been conducted with people in the different Scandinavian countries, hearing their health stories first hand, both in relation to genomic data, quantified self data and overall health. Commonly used service design methods such as customer journey mappings, blueprinting and business model mapping have played a large role in shaping the experience of the concept

  • 162. Medeisis, Lukas
    LAND ROVER MELRAKKI2017Independent thesis Advanced level (degree of Master (Two Years)), 20 credits / 30 HE creditsStudent thesis
    Abstract [en]

    The automotive industry is blooming with new interpretations of what future cars will be in the future. Progressive technologies, environmental awareness and people’s behavioral change o er new opportunities for creating more sustainable vehicles. While these are primarily being developed to solve problems in urban environments, similar developments should be aimed to preserve our natural surroundings.

    During this project I traveled to Iceland to explore the country and learn how we can improve the experience of travel. I used my research, observations and the Land Rover heritage to look for opportunities in an autonomous o -road scenario. Furthermore I wanted to explore of how renewable energy sources can be used to benefit vehicle development and usage.

    Project outcome is Land Rover Melrakki, a vehicle developed to explore Iceland while sustaining main traveller needs in a downscaled solution.

  • 163.
    Mejia, Hector
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Umeå Institute of Design.
    Emplant - Designing for a human experience in the  transhumanist era.2017Independent thesis Advanced level (degree of Master (Two Years)), 20 credits / 30 HE creditsStudent thesis
    Abstract [en]

    Ludwig Wittgenstein, austrian-born philosopher, wrote that “the limits of my language mean the limits of my world. All I know is what I have words for”. We tend to think so highly of our language because we think so highly about ourselves. Yet imagine be- ing able to communicate emotions without words. Words can’t express the visceral nature of our emotions. Words aren’t enough.

    How can we experience our emotional world, and others, in a more visceral, primitive way?

    This project proposes the creation of a new sense, using embodied technology, to allow human beings to have a different experience of each other’s emotions, through the study of the long distance relationship scenario. In this human augmentation scenario, design, and specially speculative design have an inherent power to create discussion, awareness and bring attention to how the new developed technologies could affect our existence.

    This project is meant to ask questions rather than nd a solution. It is meant for ev- eryone who is ready to think about the future of human beings and our evolution as a species.

    This document presents an overview of the ve (5) months project while detailing the extension of the work and exploration of the product proposed for emotional human augmentation. 

  • 164.
    Merkel, Pontus
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Umeå Institute of Design.
    Efficient city logistics: Can travel patterns of goods and people be intertwined?2015Independent thesis Basic level (degree of Bachelor), 10 credits / 15 HE creditsStudent thesis
    Abstract [en]

    Optimizing city logistics is a topic of great importance for big cities today. Even though the environmental- and economical consequences of the increasing goods transportation fleet has been present for quite some time, actions from affected stakeholders has not been taken until just recently. 

    In this brief 9 week project the aim has been to,  from a design point-of-view, in this complex topic, give a suggestion and raise a discussion onto how goods transportation in cities can be made in the future. 

    The basic idea is to get the consignments as close to the consignees and their travel patterns as possible. Public transportation networks are an existing grid where people are moving around and can potentially be used for combined transport of goods and people.

    The outcome of this concept is focusing on light parcel delivery towards private consignees, due to the increasing e-commerce trend. By using small transporter vehicles connected to buses, light parcels can be distributed throughout a city and easily accessible for consignees at the bus stops. 

    The transporter vehicle developed through this project aims to conceptualize connectivity and integration between mobility and parcel delivery services, to ease the every day life of urban citizens as well as decrease the environmental- and economical impacts which the distribution vehicle-fleet of today entails. 

    The design of the transporter vehicle is an interpretation of how a autonomous distribution vehicle can look like in a future city environment where the integration of public-utility-vehicles is of greater importance.

  • 165. Michelfelder, Diane P.
    et al.
    Wellner, Galit
    Wiltse, Heather
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Umeå Institute of Design.
    Designing differently: toward a methodology for an ethics of feminist technology design2017In: The ethics of technology: methods and approaches / [ed] Sven Ove Hansson, London: Rowman & Littlefield International, 2017, p. 193-218Chapter in book (Refereed)
  • 166.
    Mohamad, Irfendy
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Umeå Institute of Design.
    Asean future mobility: Design a compatible future vehicle for pursuing of ASEAN´s ambition2016Independent thesis Advanced level (degree of Master (Two Years)), 20 credits / 30 HE creditsStudent thesis
    Abstract [en]

    Starting a thesis with intention and ambitious to invent a future mobility for Southeast Asia region, one of the fastest growing region in the world. I was so passionate about what is the future mobility that very compatible to South-East Asia consumer that face a hot weather and humidity climate in whole year. Recently, the car that we produce whether in local manufacturing or imported car are not very compatible for the current environment since the climate is change dramatically in kind of temperature which massive impact in material usage in the vehicle and our daily life. By this platform, my main priority is to find a best solution by doing a research and problem´s analysis about the real situation and for a long period of time.

    Then, I was began the project by summarize the concept based on the research analysis. Design research, brand and background analysis, ideation sketches, studying an overall form by using clay and 3D digital modelling and also advanced visualization were the main methods that implemented during this project.

    The result is GEMILANG Concept, designed a future vehicle which have semi-autonomous drive mode for ASEAN ambition and actual need throughout in developing countries. The concept is considered between a climate change in this region and proposes a highly efficient in how to implement the best use of natural resources that able to stand in extreme climate particularly in this region and innovative solution between tradition, need and technology.

  • 167.
    Mood, Gustav
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Umeå Institute of Design.
    Ökad medvetenhet under jakt i skog och mark2012Independent thesis Basic level (degree of Bachelor), 10 credits / 15 HE creditsStudent thesis
    Abstract [en]

    This reportcommunicates the processes and results of my degree work in industrial design at candidate level at Umeå Institute of Design.

    During my degree work I had a cooperation with Svenska Jägareförbundet (Swedish Hunters Assosiation).

    The aim for my project has been to explore how I could make hunting a safer hobby and undertaking. Every year people get seriously injured and in average 2 people a year dies  due to hunting accidents. My goal is to identify problems within the hunters communication and approach. Through a creative design process I will find a valid  nd realistic solution to these problems. My project will be presented as a conceptual solution  hat will be based on currently existing technology. The degree work was carried out in the  pring semester 2012 with a presentation the tenth week and resulted in a full scale visual model, and oral presentation, discussion, argumentation and this report.

  • 168.
    Morin, Alexis
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Umeå Institute of Design.
    Lin'guage: Self-Directed In-Country Language Learning for Cultural Integration2013Independent thesis Advanced level (degree of Master (Two Years)), 80 credits / 120 HE creditsStudent thesis
    Abstract [en]

    There are more than 175 million migrant workers around the world. For example, 25% of the population of Singapore is comprised of migrants. As a result, social alienation arises from the language gap needing to be bridged. This gap oftentimes causes high (and unnecessary) levels of stress in the lives of these migrants.Mentally preparing for such a migration is but one of the steps which can help alleviate the stress cause by acculturation. Learning the local language and cultural mannerisms can help migrants better prepare for moving to a different country.

    Inspired by an immigrant mother who has learned French in order to adapt to her surroundings and many friends in similar situations, much background research was also performed in order to properly frame such broad language learning service. Testing over 28 existing language learning solutions, performing over 15 interviews and observing many learners in the wild contributed to the construction of many functional language learning prototypes. [Language Acquisition Projects], [Guided Conversation], [Social Profiler], [Lockscreen Flashcards] and even more prototypes were built as quickly as possible and tested with potential learners in order to validate their effectiveness, effectiveness for retention and fun factor.

    These prototypes were refined and packaged into the lin’guage service, a tool comprised of mobile software, a personal dictionary and language-specific branded objects; all of which could be used anywhere in the world to learn the local language wherever migrants move. The software is made for busy people, presenting fun learning challenges tailor-picked for learners which only take between 1 and 5 minutes to complete. Designed as a framework, lin’guage can be used to learn any language from any language. (A German speaker could learn Korean, or a Swedish speaker could learn Chinese).

  • 169.
    Moussette, Camille
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Umeå Institute of Design.
    Feeling it: sketching haptic interfaces2009In: Flirting with the Future: Proceedings of the fifth Student Interaction Design Research Conference / [ed] Ivo Wouters, Floris Kimman, Rob Tieben, Serge Offermans & Hugo Nagtzaam, 2009, p. 63-65Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This article discusses some challenges of prototyping haptic (touch) interfaces early on in the design process. It also show- cases examples of prototyping activities for haptic interfaces that have strong “sketching qualities”.

  • 170.
    Moussette, Camille
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Umeå Institute of Design.
    HAPI: haptic interaction for mobile devices2007Independent thesis Advanced level (degree of Master (Two Years)), 20 credits / 30 HE creditsStudent thesis
    Abstract [en]

    For the past decades, the repertoire of input and output forms used in mobile devices has been generally limited to the traditional buttons-display paradigm, inherited from their telecommunication or computing origin. 

    HAPI aims at exploring and developing new sensorial interaction techniques for mobile devices based on the touch sense. This research-oriented degree project focuses on hardware sketching to evolve new ideas and possibilities. The goals are to explore how haptic interfaces and techniques could enhance mobile interaction to fully exploit and embrace users’ capabilities for richer, more intuitive and enjoyable experiences.

    This project has been carried out in collaboration with Nokia Design, Insight and Innovation.

  • 171.
    Moussette, Camille
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Umeå Institute of Design.
    Simple haptics: Sketching perspectives for the design of haptic interactions2012Doctoral thesis, monograph (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Historically, haptics—all different aspects of the sense of touch and its study—has developed around very technical and scientific inquiries. Despite considerable haptic research advances and the obviousness of haptics in everyday life, this modality remains mostly foreign and unfamiliar to designers. The guiding motif of this research relates to a desire to reverse the situation and have designers designing for and with the haptic sense, for human use and looking beyond technical advances. Consequently, this thesis aims to nurture the development of haptics from a designerly perspective, leading to a new field of activities labeled haptic interaction design. It advances that haptic attributes and characteristics are increasingly part of the qualities that make up the interactions and the experiences we have with objects and the interfaces that surround us, and that these considerations can and ought to be knowingly and explicitly designed by designers.

    The book encompasses an annotated research through design exploration of the developing field of haptic interaction design, building on a considerable account of self-initiated individual design activities and empirical-style group activities with others. This extensive investigation of designing haptic interactions leads to the Simple Haptics proposition, an approach to ease the discovery and appropriation of haptics by designers. Simple Haptics consists in a simplistic, rustic approach to the design of haptic interactions, and advocates an effervescence of direct perceptual experiences in lieu of technical reverence. Simple Haptics boils down to three main traits: 1) a reliance on sketching in hardware to engage with haptics; 2) a fondness for basic, uncomplicated, and accessible tools and materials for the design of haptic interactions; and 3) a strong focus on experiential and directly experiencable perceptual qualities of haptics. 

    Ultimately, this thesis offers contributions related to the design of haptic interactions. The main knowledge contribution relates to the massification of haptics, i.e. the intentional realization and appropriation of haptics—with its dimensions and qualities—as a non-visual interaction design material. Methodologically, this work suggests a mixed longitudinal approach to haptics in a form of a well-grounded interplay between personal inquiries and external perspectives. The book also presents design contributions as ways to practically, physically and tangibly access, realize and explore haptic interactions. Globally these contributions help make haptics concrete, graspable, sensible and approachable for designers. The hope is to inspire design researchers, students and practitioners to discover and value haptics as a core component of any interaction design activities.

  • 172.
    Moussette, Camille
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Umeå Institute of Design.
    Banks, Richard
    Microsoft Research.
    Designing through making: exploring the simple haptic design space2011In: Proceedings of the fifth international conference on Tangible, embedded, and embodied interaction (TEI '11), New York: ACM Press, 2011, p. 279-282Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In this paper we describe the development and realization of basic haptic design tools. A series of devices or setups allow designers and other stakeholders to adopt a hands-on approach to haptics, and ultimately develop a greater sensitivity and understanding of haptic concepts. By offering tangible manifestations that are relatively abstract and modular, designers can relate to, explore and discuss haptic interfaces and possible variations with greater ease and confidence.

    The five Simple Haptics devices that we built offer a basic platform to play and experiment with haptic interfaces. Each setup starts with a simple haptic idea and provides a graspable and experienceable unit to support discussion and variation related the haptic design activities.

  • 173.
    Moussette, Camille
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Umeå Institute of Design.
    Dore, Fabricio
    IDEO.
    Sketching in hardware and building interaction design: Tools, toolkits and an attitude for interaction designers2010In: Proceedings of Design Research Society, 2010Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In this paper, we present a Sketching in Hardware perspective to Interaction Design (IxD) education and practice. We start our discussion by highlighting the differences between Prototypes and Sketches, and explaining why we believe the term Sketching in Hardware is suitable and appropriate to the IxD practice. We introduce a short history of the term and its origins before relating it to Experience Prototyping activities and other related design processes/methodologies.

    Our main discourse consists of observations and a critical analysis of academic activities and professional work suggesting that Sketching in Hardware remains quite challenging despite the recent progress in the development of new tools and toolkits. The low barrier to entry and the explosion of tools and toolkits are very welcome, but this democratization can also be misleading. The learning curve is still steep in many ways. The current sketching tools seem to have leapfrogged our design skills and our ability to deal with that avalanche of technical capabilities. Designers regularly loose a critical perspective on their sketching and prototyping activities. We noted that students and designers alike spend a lot of time mastering intricate tools and debugging technical issues when they should be developing, evolving and fine-tuning interesting experiences or sketches informing their design process.

    We close our discussion with a review of various toolkits and building blocks currently available to interaction designers for designing new technology and future concepts. We ultimately suggest five guiding principles to be taken into account in the design of new toolkits or upgrading of existing ones. These same principles and qualities not only can, but should also radiate in the experiential qualities, well beyond the built material artifacts. Sketching in Hardware is not just playing with electronics; it has serious implications and repercussions in the way we design stuff.

  • 174.
    Moussette, Camille
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Umeå Institute of Design.
    Fällman, Daniel
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Umeå Institute of Design.
    Designing for touch: Creating and building meaningful haptic interfaces2009In: IASDR 2009, Seoul, Korea, 2009Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 175.
    Moussette, Camille
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Umeå Institute of Design.
    Kuenen, Christoffel
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Umeå Institute of Design.
    Israr, Ali
    Designing haptics2012In: Proceedings of the Sixth International Conference on Tangible, Embedded and Embodied Interaction, New York: ACM Press, 2012, p. 351-354Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This studio proposes to tangibly explore the world of haptics to develop a greater understanding and sensitivity to this emerging field. The first part of the studio focuses on general knowledge about haptics, haptic and multimodal perception in humans, and key advances in actuator and sensor technologies to develop haptic interfaces. Numerous demos and testing platforms will be available to relate discussions with real haptic sensations. The second part of the studio aims to explore the various challenges and difficulties in designing haptic interfaces by directly building and sketching in hardware haptic interfaces. Participants will be invited to build their own haptic interfaces from various actuators, sensors and other building blocks. The studio aims to bridge the fields of haptics and design, and investigate various prototyping tools and approaches that can best support haptic design activities.

  • 176.
    Mullaney, Tara
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Umeå Institute of Design.
    Emotional wellbeing and radiotherapy: a methodological approach to improving the patient experience2011In: Procedings of the Second Conference on Creativity and Innovation in Design, 2011, p. 435-436Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Medical technological advances have been instrumental in improving the physical health of many individuals over the past 50 years. However, the impact that a patient’s care experience has on their emotional health has just begun to be explored. Using quantitative, qualitative, and design research methods, I am researching stress, anxiety, and perceptions of care in cancer patients undergoing radiation therapy. This 3-tiered methodological approach allows me to create a holistic understanding of the patient experience. Based upon insights gained from this data, I am implementing design interventions within this environment to evaluate their ability to improve the patient experience.

  • 177.
    Mullaney, Tara
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Umeå Institute of Design.
    Suspending Reality: A disruptive approach to designing tranformative experiences2015In: Experience Design: Concepts and Case Studies / [ed] Peter Benz, New York, NY: Bloomsbury Academic, 2015, 1, p. 151-158Chapter in book (Other academic)
  • 178.
    Mullaney, Tara
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Umeå Institute of Design.
    Thinking beyond the Cure: a constructive design research investigation into the patient experience of radiotherapy2016Doctoral thesis, monograph (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    This constructive design research dissertation aims to understand how design can be used as part of a composite research approach to generate knowledge about how complex phenomena are composed through their interactions and relationships with various actors, both human and non-human. It has done this by investigating a single phenomenon, the patient experience of radiotherapy.

    Through the purposeful selection and application of methods, theories, and existing research from design, nursing, and STS, this thesis utilizes a mixed-method approach comprised of qualitative, quantitative methods, and design experimentation, across multiple research sites and patient populations, in three research projects – PERT, DUMBO, and POIS – to generate rich and layered knowledge of the patient experience. Experience prototypes are used to challenge, through intervention or provocation, the relationships between the various radiotherapy actors identified through the empirical methods. Together, the research generated in PERT, DUMBO, and POIS construct a map of the networked, interdependent actors which shape the patient’s emotional experience of radiotherapy: the staff, technology, information, environment, and institutions. It also calls attention to the problematic relationship between radiotherapy patients and the technologies used to treat them, which can lead to anxiety, worry, and fear.

    This thesis offers contributions related to both improving patient experience and designing for complex social issues. First, this research suggests that individuals, other than primary users, need to be acknowledged in the design of medical technologies. It proposes calling attention to patients by naming them as interactors in their relationships with the aforementioned technologies, removing them from the role of implicated actor. Second, this thesis problematizes treating the actors within a network as independent entities, which medical research and user-centered design often does, and calls for a new type of design practice which attends to these networked relationships. Third, this thesis suggests two ways in which design research practice should be shifted methodologically if it wants to engage with and design for complex social issues like patient experience; widening the researcher’s perspective on the issue through the use of a composite methodology, and having the researcher maintain this scope by remaining closely connected to their research context. The implications of this work concern how design research, design education, and design practice might shift their approaches to fully acknowledge and attend to the complexity of systems like healthcare.

  • 179.
    Mullaney, Tara
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Umeå Institute of Design.
    Nyholm, Tufve
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Radiation Sciences, Radiation Physics.
    Edvardsson, David
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Nursing.
    Wellbeing in healthcare environments: a human-centered design research approach to improving the cancer patient experience during radiation therapy2011In: Proceedings of the 1st European Conference on Design 4 Health 2011 / [ed] Dr Alaster Yoxall, Sheffield Hallam University, Art & Design Research Centre, 2011, p. 255-265Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Healthcare and medical products are often designed with the singular focus of providing the best treatment available to patients. However, research has shown that this treatment-based approach does not result in quality care. There are many factors that play into making a healthcare experience patient-centered, and this paper explores the use of human-centered design research to understand this experience. This paper presents a case-study of a Radiotherapy Department at a University Hospital, where we used patient survey, observational, and narrative data to gain awareness into the patient experience during radiation therapy. Our research shows how the current radiotherapy environment is anxiety provoking to the patient, and how insights gained from the written and visual stories of the patients’ experiences were used to develop a design solution that improves the patient view in the treatment room with the intent to make this space more patient-centered and inviting. In conclusion, this paper argues that designing for the patient experience and their emotional wellbeing is a crucial aspect of any healthcare service.

  • 180.
    Mullaney, Tara
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Umeå Institute of Design.
    Pettersson, Helena
    Umeå University, Faculty of Arts, Department of culture and media studies. Umeå University, Faculty of Arts, Ethnology.
    Nyholm, Tufve
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Radiation Sciences, Radiation Physics. Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Radiation Sciences, Oncology.
    System, site, patient: A three-tiered methodological approach to constructing holistic understanding of the user through design research2012In: Proceedings of the Design Research Society International Conference, 2012Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This paper argues that the methods and methodologies used to conduct user research often provide a singular view of the user. It aims to demonstrate that by combining the strengths of three different research methodologies into a structured, correlative research platform we can create a rich, more holistic understanding of our users. Using a three-tiered methodological approach to research the cancer patient experience, we investigated patient anxiety and the emotional impact that curative radiation therapy has on these individuals. Our methodology, comprised of methods taken from quantitative, qualitative, and design research approaches, was designed to construct a research platform that would allow us to gather quantifiable data about our patient population while also using more qualitative approaches to gain a deeper understanding of the individuals’ patient experience. We used patient questionnaires as our quantitative method, user observations and interviews as our qualitative methods, and design probe kits as our design method. Each method was chosen because of its ability to provide us with a different perspective on the patients’ clinical experience. By structuring these methods around the same shared research question, we were able to find correlative relationships between the data collected from each, despite their different methodological approaches. This paper demonstrates that our three-tiered methodology provides a deep understanding of the user experience, from a systems level view down to that of the patient. In conclusion, this paper argues that it is important for design researches to select methods that build upon each other and provide different perspectives of the user, in order to create a holistic understanding of the user experience.

  • 181.
    Mullaney, Tara
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Umeå Institute of Design.
    Pettersson, Helena
    Umeå University, Faculty of Arts, Department of culture and media studies.
    Nyholm, Tufve
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Radiation Sciences, Radiation Physics. Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Radiation Sciences, Oncology.
    Stolterman, Erik
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Umeå Institute of Design.
    Thinking beyond the cure: a case for human-centered design in cancer care2012In: International Journal of Design, ISSN 1991-3761, E-ISSN 1994-036X, Vol. 6, no 3, p. 27-39Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In this paper we explore how human-centered design can expand the solution space surrounding patient experience in healthcare, looking specifically at patient emotional wellbeing. The findings presented here are taken from our ethnographic research of cancer patients undergoing radiotherapy treatment; we investigated these individuals' emotional experiences during their time in the treatment facility. Building upon previous findings within the field of nursing concerned with the prevalence of anxiety in cancer patients and the importance of person-centered care, we implement a human-centered design research approach to investigate the situational triggers of patient anxiety within the radiotherapy treatment experience. Through 'quick ethnography', we recognize that the fixation technology used within radiotherapy is a key trigger for anxiety in patients. Application of theory from the field of science and technology studies to our analysis of this technologically-mediated anxiety suggests that the fixation device confines the patient to a passive, disempowered role within its interactions due to it being embedded with the socially scripted 'sick role'. Summarizing our insights, we find that human-centered design is capable of looking holistically at patient experience to discover new solutions spaces for mediating and preventing situational anxiety, and turning person-centered care within Radiotherapy into a pre-emptive practice instead of a responsive one.

  • 182.
    Mullaney, Tara
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Umeå Institute of Design.
    Stolterman, Erik
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Umeå Institute of Design. Indiana University, Bloomington.
    Why ‘design research practice’ is not design as we know it2014In: Proceedings of DRS 2014: Design's Big Debates / [ed] Lim, Y.-K., Niedderer, K., Redström, J., Stolterman, E., & Valtonen, A., Umeå: Umeå University , 2014, p. 1039-1048Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Is there a difference between design practice and design research practice? Building on recent discussions within design research about whether the design practice which occurs within design research is distinct and separate from the design practice which occurs within the design profession, this paper presents a case where constructive design practice was employed within a research project, using this example to study the nature of the design process in research. Through a thorough analysis of the designs generated, the motivations behind their development, their use as research tools, and the knowledge they generated, we identified three ways in which the design process was altered when it was imported into the research. First, the degree of development of the designs shifted from fully functional to functional enough. Second, the designs were developed in order to ask questions rather than trying to solve a problem. And finally, the failure of the design was equally able to contribute to generating knowledge as its success. We argue that these shifts in values clearly distinguish design research practice from professional design practice, but come with very real consequences that challenge the core measures we use to assess design.

  • 183.
    Mullaney, Tara
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Umeå Institute of Design.
    Yttergren, Björn
    Stolterman, Erik
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Umeå Institute of Design.
    Positional acts: using a kinect sensor to reconfigure patient roles within radiotherapy treatment2014In: Proceedings of the 8th International Conference on Tangible, Embedded and Embodied Interaction, 2014, p. 93-96Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    With many medical procedures done today, patients are forced to act as passive recipients of care, while nurses and doctors are actively involved in the process of diagnosis or treatment. In this paper, we focus upon patient positioning for radiotherapy treatment, looking at the immobilization and positioning techniques used, and the role of the patient in this process. Our desire to engage patients in the positioning process led to the creation of an experimental positioning system which can enable patients to self-position themselves for treatment. Utilizing the body tracking and skeletal data capabilities of a Kinect™ sensor, our prototype provides visualizations of where an individual's body is in relation to the desired position, and when these two positions have become correctly aligned. Testing demonstrated how our prototype could be used to actively engage patients in the positioning process together with care providers, in a mutually empowering and supportive way.

  • 184.
    Nacsa, Júlia
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Umeå Institute of Design.
    Curious Cuisine: Bringing culinary creativity home2016Independent thesis Advanced level (degree of Master (Two Years)), 20 credits / 30 HE creditsStudent thesis
    Abstract [en]

    How could culinary science and technology educate us about food through engagement and reflection? In this project, I proposed to uncover opportunities for design intervention within our near-future scenarios of cooking and eating in a home environment. My intent has been to use interaction design methodology to form social practices that turn the process of making and eating food more pleasurable and inspiring, while developing one’s individual knowledge, without being didactic and prescriptive.

    The hypothesis has been that culinary science simplified, combined with today’s data-driven technologies, have the potential to foster creativity and experimentation among hobby cooks. The aim has been to discover the consequences of cloud data and connected technologies on experimentation, which is inherently driven by human intuition. My approach has been to explore what behaviors such data-driven systems designed for eliciting creativity could possess, and what kind of inspiration the science of flavor could bring into everyday cooking.

    The result is a set of design principles for how creative cooking explorations can be fostered through tangible and embodied experiences. It is manifested in a concept that creates a ‘culinary safe zone’ by encouraging experimentation, presenting information on demand, but without overshadowing the cook’s intuition. The concept Curious Cuisine allows non-professional cooks to create their own unique dishes; to explore ingredient pairings, preparation techniques, and fine-tuning flavors.

  • 185.
    Nagre, Gaurang
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Umeå Institute of Design.
    Audi Uno: A symbiotic car2016Independent thesis Advanced level (degree of Master (Two Years)), 20 credits / 30 HE creditsStudent thesis
    Abstract [en]

    Abstract

    When we paint a nebulous future of tomorrow based on the research dictated by the available resources, we see a marathon run for the future that instigates new opportunities for the automotive industry with additive manufacturing. Cars of today are a product of subtractive manufacturing; but in future 3D printing would empower us to define a novel architecture that provokes the construction of the interior, exterior and the powertrain in one piece allowing us to celebrate the marriage between all three key components. Project UNO, meaning - ‘one’, exhibits this new architecture through a semi-autonomous concept that exaggerates the feeling of sportiness with a suspended cabin. In the autonomous mode the cabin moves around in the boundary of the exterior to enhance the g-forces by thrusting the cabin forward while accelerating, backward while braking and tilting while cornering. Therefore, the sporty nature of the design can be celebrated actively in both modes.

    Inspiration and Method

    The process was cut up into two palpable routes. The former dealt with a system level approach where the present cardinal building blocks of automotive manufacturing were rearranged with the new cues derived from additive manufacturing techniques to render a new system level solution. The later was aimed at advocating a tangible solution that best delineated this idea. Ten radical themes were generated that helped showcase the marriage between the three key components - exterior, interior and powertrain. The final theme was inspired by the analogy of an egg where the yolk moves freely within the egg white. This metaphor was then applied to the cabin experience in the autonomous mode. The occupant in the manual driven mode can cherish the full potential of the car to procure a sporty experience outside the city. While in the city, the autonomous mode seizes control and instigates the movement of the cabin within the perimeter of the exterior to amplify the g-forces by thrusting the cabin forward while accelerating, backwards while braking and tilting it while cornering.

    Result

    Concept UNO celebrates the marriage between the exterior, the interior and the powertrain that best encapsulates the process of additive manufacturing where cars would be grown and not assembled. The interior tub is reposed inside the exterior shell with the aid of six mechanical joints and is not adhered to the floor of the car. The gap around the cabin exaggerates the feel of a floating island that can shift freely. The cabin is composed of smart glass which renders opaque when an electric current is passed through it and turns transparent when the car is parked gravitating people to yield a glimpse of the interior. The bottom of the cabin is reflected by the gloss finish of the chassis unit that amplifies the floating feeling. A warm white was used to grant the concept a more puristic look while making it seem warm and friendly. The idea was then showcased through a 1:4 scale model printed in one piece using a Selective Laser Sintering (SLM) technique.

  • 186.
    Nelson, Harold
    et al.
    Advanded Design Institute, Seattle, USA.
    Stolterman, Erik
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Umeå Institute of Design. Indiana University, Bloomington, USA.
    Design Judgment -: Decision Making in the "Real" World,2003In: The Design Journal, ISSN 1460-6965, Vol. 6, no 1Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Designis about creating the‘real’ worldaround us. Real life is complex, dynami cand uncertain. Truth is difficult enough to know, even with the best science,but ‘reality’, the domain of human experience, can be overwhelmingly paralysing and beyond comprehensio nor understanding. Careful, accurate description, concomitant with clear explanation, is necessary but not sufficient in the quest for enough understanding to allow wise decisions to be made. The value of judgement is that it allows individuals to overcome their paralysis and engage with the messy complexity of lifeina way that, when done well, can bring function, beauty, and meaning to human existence. In this paper we will examine judgement, particularly design judgement. We argue that a better understanding of judgement is needed if we want to improve our designability in an intentional manner. Judgement is a key dimension in the process of design.The ability to make design judgements is what distinguishes a designer as a designer. The ability to make good design judgements distinguishes good design.

  • 187.
    Nelson, Harold
    et al.
    Advanced Design Institute, Seattle.
    Stolterman, Erik
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Umeå Institute of Design.
    The Case for Design:: Creating a Culture of Intention2000In: Educational Technology, Vol. 40, no 6, p. 29-35Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

     Discusses how design projects can best be encountered through a designer approach that is inclusive of theoretical and practical knowledge as well as the capacity for pragmatic action. Highlights include design cultures and cultures of design; foundations of design; fundamental activities supported upon the foundations of design; and design education.

  • 188.
    Nordmand Andersen, Philip
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Umeå Institute of Design.
    Breakting smart: The future of hand-held demolition2013Independent thesis Advanced level (degree of Master (Two Years)), 20 credits / 30 HE creditsStudent thesis
    Abstract [en]

    This report describes the work method, conclusions and result of my Master Degree in Advanced Product Design at Umeå Institute of Design. The project lasted 17 weeks and took place in spring 2013. The project was carried out in collaboration with Atlas Copco.

    The main purpose of this project is to explore the future of handheld demolition tools and how to carry out this extremely physically demanding work in an ergonomic and effortless way, while keeping productivity high and complexity low.

    I will look into the area of robotics, compact machines, and exoskeletons to get inspiration for supportive structures that could potentially semi- or fully automate some of the strenuous movements of today’s work, while trying to incorporate features to solve some of the other problematic aspects like the hazardous silica and asbestos dust spreading in the air and/or detecting hidden pipes and cables to avoid unnecessary interior damages. The result will be a conceptual product meant for the future market of 2025.6

  • 189.
    Norheim, Øyvind
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Umeå Institute of Design.
    Ett dedikert sportprodukt till klatring for mennesker med amputert arm2012Independent thesis Basic level (degree of Bachelor), 10 credits / 15 HE creditsStudent thesis
  • 190.
    Nylén, Daniel
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Informatics.
    Holmström, Jonny
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Informatics.
    Lyytinen, Kalle
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Informatics. Case Western Reserve Univ, Cleveland, OH 44106 USA.
    Oscillating between four orders of design: the case of digital magazines2014In: Design Issues, ISSN 0747-9360, E-ISSN 1531-4790, Vol. 30, no 3, p. 53-68Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 191.
    Oko Mambo-Matala, Ngatye-Brian
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Umeå Institute of Design.
    Ampiify: Opening oportunities on outdated electronics2012Independent thesis Advanced level (degree of Master (Two Years)), 20 credits / 30 HE creditsStudent thesis
    Abstract [en]

    The disposal of electronic waste is becoming one of the growing problems that the planet is facing. Tons of electronic waste is dumped illegally to 3rd world countries. Consequently the local people in those countries are exposed to levels of toxicity that could cause them serious diseases as well as the degradation on the natural ecosystems. The electronic waste is perceived as useless by our society, and this project aims to challenge that idea by looking at sustainable ways of manipulating electronics.

  • 192.
    Olausson, Hanna
    Umeå University.
    Ergonomisk och användarvänlig släplift anpassad för skidanläggningarnas och fjällturismens utveckling.: Rapport, examensarbete 20122012Independent thesis Basic level (degree of Bachelor), 10 credits / 15 HE creditsStudent thesis
    Abstract [en]

    Surface lift adapted for today’s user 

    Today’s T-bar lift looks almost the same as when it was launched in 1938, even though a lot has happened in the ski and mountain industries. New equipment has developed without any major adjustment to the lift. Snowboard, sit ski and downhill biking are just some examples of the evolution that demands new seating positions. It’s also very common for families to spend their holidays in the mountains nowadays. These are users whit a lot of different needs, for example how to ride with different heights, different gears and different skill level.

    My degree work has focused on developing a new surface lift that is adapted to the different needs of today’s users. A surface lift that makes the ride a nice experience that ends with a big smile and a lot of energy to spend on the way down.

    This report describes in detail how I through the design process and in close contact with users and experts came up with a realistic concept that will satisfy both the manufacturers, producers and the users.

  • 193.
    Osnes, Jan Christian
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Umeå Institute of Design.
    Skoda Respir2013Independent thesis Advanced level (degree of Master (Two Years)), 20 credits / 30 HE creditsStudent thesis
    Abstract [en]

    My project revolves around an idea of implementing a new propulsion technology as a key design element. Batteries have in many ways been a revolution for how we propulsion cars today. It’s one of the best, if not the best, alternative for future power sources in cars. The downside however, is the fact that it dies out after a given range, and as we have learned, a battery takes time to reload. Range anxiety is an issue and IBM is currently trying to solve just that. They will by 2030 launch a new type of battery that will more than double the energy density of some of the most cutting edge lithium ion batteries of today.   The IBM-solution for a new battery is called “Battery 500” and is an open system technology that uses common air as a reagent which upon recharge releases oxygen back to the environment.  The battery would pull in and use oxygen in a similar way to how an internal combustion engine draws in oxygen.

  • 194.
    Papworth, Nigel
    et al.
    Interactive Institute Swedish ICT.
    Marti, Patrizia
    University of Siena.
    Trotto, Ambra
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Umeå School of Architecture. Interactive Institute Swedish ICT.
    Peeters, Jeroen
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Informatics. Interactive Institute Swedish ICT.
    Ballade of women: the expedition2014In: Proceedings of the third International Symposium on Pervasive Displays, 2014Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This video illustrates the exhibition “Ballade of Women” that took places in Siena at the Fondazione Monte de’ Paschi in June 2014. The exhibition is, and elicits, a reflection on women’s rights: self- determination, emancipation and habeas corpus. It is an exploration on how these themes are represented and perceived in a dialogue between materiality and online content. The exhibition contains an interactive installation, which plays with the concept of fragmentation. It shows how complex and articulated such themes are. This it achieves by actively engaging visitors in a dynamic visual and auditory conversation. The video [1] documents the complete experience of the exhibition. 

  • 195.
    Pawar, Aditya
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Umeå Institute of Design.
    Redström, Johan
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Umeå Institute of Design.
    Publics, Participation and the Making of Umeå Pantry2016In: International Journal of Design, ISSN 1991-3761, E-ISSN 1994-036X, Vol. 10, no 1, p. 73-84Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This paper is about the making of Umeå Pantry, a public participatory art festival performance on matters of concern regarding local food production. Participatory projects have been criticized for the way that researchers harness the creative outputs of collaborative work while safeguarding the underlying power structures. In addressing such critique this project focused on design’s relational and socio-political form rather than the value-added object of design. We argue that a public orientation, as in the case of Umeå Pantry, involves a critical enquiry and reflexive approach, which goes beyond participatory design within institutional boundaries and that there is a need for informal tactics to navigate this open public space. Thus, the paper argues that public participatory design needs to rethink its sensibilities and aim for a greater emphasis on the relational and socio-political underpinnings of a project. Articulating notions such as an open program, movement, relational exchanges and infrastructure, we are trying to find out more about what it takes to prototype new participatory design practices engaging with public matters of concern.

  • 196.
    Pawar, Apurba
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Umeå Institute of Design.
    LINK 500- Concept Railtrack Layer: Future of railtrack construction in India and other emerging economies2013Independent thesis Advanced level (degree of Master (Two Years)), 20 credits / 30 HE creditsStudent thesis
    Abstract [en]

    Indian railway which was started in 1853 has grown more than 10-fold between 1951 and 2007, but the rail track length has only grown 1.4 times in this period. In spite of increase in investment in railway infrastructure around the world, in India the construction of new tracks is sluggish and uses the same manual intensive workflows that were used during its conception. A major development has been the introduction of concrete slabs, used as the track base instead of using traditional ballast (stone bed to stabilize and support the track) at some locations. The aim of the this project was to design for the future of railway-track construction in developing countries like India and exploring a new track construction system suitable in this context. This project resulted in the Volvo Link 500, a track laying machine which delivers value in terms of safety, consistency and efficiency of track construction.

  • 197.
    Peeters, Jeroen
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Informatics. Interactive Institute Swedish ICT .
    Kuenen, Christoffel
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Umeå Institute of Design.
    Trotto, Ambra
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Umeå School of Architecture. Interactive Institute Swedish ICT .
    Hummels, Caroline
    Department of Industrial Design at Eindhoven University of Technology, Netherlands.
    Diffract Me!: using a Skills-Based Approach in Design Practice2014In: KEER2014: Proceedings of the 5th Kanesi Engineering and Emotion Research / [ed] Simon Schütte, Pierre Levy, Linköping: Linköping University Electronic Press, 2014, p. 313-328Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The potential of skills in design is intriguing; as skills open up new perceptions of the world they allow meaning to arise as we engage with the world. Several skills-based techniques that leverage this potential have been developed, and integrated into the Designing in Skills framework. The framework builds on personal engagement of designers in their practice, and promotes them to take a first-person perspective, enabling designs to be enriched with meaning. In this paper, we present the most recent workshop based on this approach, which specifically focuses on employing the Designing in Skills framework as a starting point and catalyst for design practice. We briefly introduce the Designing in Skills framework and present the DiffractMe! project in which we built on this approach to explore its potential for design practice. We conclude with reflections on the process and result by the involved designers. These reflections offer insights into the value of this approach for enriching interactive design with experiential qualities. 

  • 198.
    Peeters, Jeroen
    et al.
    RISE Interactive.
    Kuenen, Stoffel
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Umeå Institute of Design.
    Trotto, Ambra
    RISE Interactive.
    Unveiling the Expressivity of Complexity: Drifting in Design Research2017In: Proceedings of the Conference on Design and Semantics of Form and Movement: Sense and Sensitivity, DeSForM 2017 / [ed] Miguel Bruns Alonso and Elif Ozcan, INTECH , 2017, p. 309-324Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Design research is regarded to be a mode of inquiry particularly suited to engage with complex topics. In our work, we are interested in unpacking the complexity at the heart of an embodied aesthetic experience. In this article, through our digital and physical artefacts and a methodological reflection, we illustrate an ongoing design research project that a multi-disciplinary team of interaction designers, professional dancers, software developers, artists and 3D modelling experts are carrying out to develop insights on how to understand this complexity and how to use such insights as inspiration for interaction design-related projects. By embracing combinations of design, new technologies and simple visualisation tools, the project investigates the complex and hidden expressivity embedded in the skills of dancers in a programmatic design research approach. This investigation leads to insights on different levels. Firstly, cycles of formulation, realisation and reflection on design programs express parts of this complexity and this lets new research interests emerge. Secondly, as a body of work, reflecting on these cycles exposes how our “drifting” within this programmatic approach has started to unveil the complexities inherent in our research program. In this article we aim at contributing to the growing understanding of what designerly ways of knowing might be and how a practice aimed at expanding and contributing such knowledge unfolds.

  • 199. Peeters, Jeroen
    et al.
    Papworth, Nigel
    Glaser, Pernilla
    Collevecchio, Carla
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Umeå School of Architecture.
    Betancour, Ana
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Umeå School of Architecture.
    Trotto, Ambra
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Umeå School of Architecture. RISE Interactive.
    No Man is an Island. Situated Design Research and Wicked Impact2017In: Design journal, ISSN 1460-6925, E-ISSN 1756-3062, Vol. 20, p. S3354-S3367Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In this paper, we describe the research-through-design process that led to the realization of the interactive exhibition Charged Utopia that took place in August 2016 at the Norrbyskars Museum. The design leveraged embodiment and active perception: visitors could activate the content by physically engaging with the space. These interactions were intended to trigger personal reflections on social coexistence, its paradoxes and challenges. The paper guides through the research-through- design process, from initial design direction and their theoretical grounding, to the design process and final event. The paper contributes with a reflection on the "wicked impact" of the event, suggesting that it is of relevance for design researchers that deal with societal issues, to discuss and expose the effects of their practice beyond immediate results.

  • 200.
    Peeters, Jeroen
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Informatics. Interactive Institute Swedish ICT.
    Trotto, Ambra
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Umeå School of Architecture. Interactive Institute Swedish ICT.
    Kuenen, Stoffel
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Umeå Institute of Design.
    Mocap tango: traces of complexity2016In: Proceedings of Tenth International Conferencee on Tangible Embodied and Embedded Interaction, New York: Association for Computing Machinery (ACM), 2016, p. 545-550Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In this paper, we report on an ongoing design research project MoCap Tango. Tango is a form of partner dancing in which two bodies sense each other in a dynamic, physical dialogue that is known for its subtle complexities, beauty and intimate experience. In MoCap Tango, we explore how we can use our skills as designers to highlight and unravel these embedded qualities and use them as inspiration in designing interactions. Using an optical Motion Capture System and custom-made passive markers, the movements of two world-class tango dancers are visualized in real- time. We present our motivation for this project, describe the first prototype and conclude with reflections on what this prototype revealed in terms of design opportunities and its relevance for the TEI community. 

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