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  • 151.
    Hosseinzadeh, Ava
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Molecular Infection Medicine Sweden (MIMS). Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Umeå Centre for Microbial Research (UCMR). Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Clinical Microbiology.
    Stylianou, Marios
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Clinical Microbiology. Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Umeå Centre for Microbial Research (UCMR). Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Molecular Infection Medicine Sweden (MIMS).
    Lopes, Jose Pedro
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Clinical Microbiology, Clinical Bacteriology. Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Molecular Infection Medicine Sweden (MIMS). Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Umeå Centre for Microbial Research (UCMR).
    Müller, Daniel C.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Clinical Microbiology. Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Molecular Infection Medicine Sweden (MIMS). Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Umeå Centre for Microbial Research (UCMR).
    Häggman, André
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Clinical Microbiology. Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Molecular Infection Medicine Sweden (MIMS). Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Umeå Centre for Microbial Research (UCMR).
    Holmberg, Sandra
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Umeå Centre for Microbial Research (UCMR). Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Molecular Infection Medicine Sweden (MIMS). Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Clinical Microbiology.
    Grumaz, Christian
    Johansson, Anders
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Clinical Microbiology. Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Molecular Infection Medicine Sweden (MIMS). Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Umeå Centre for Microbial Research (UCMR).
    Sohn, Kai
    Dieterich, Christoph
    Urban, Constantin F.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Clinical Microbiology. Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Umeå Centre for Microbial Research (UCMR). Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Molecular Infection Medicine Sweden (MIMS).
    Stable Redox-Cycling Nitroxide Tempol has Antifungal and Immune-modulatory Properties2019In: Frontiers in Microbiology, ISSN 1664-302X, E-ISSN 1664-302X, Vol. 10, article id 1843Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Invasive mycoses remain underdiagnosed and difficult to treat. Hospitalized individuals with compromised immunity increase in number and constitute the main risk group for severe fungal infections. Current antifungal therapy is hampered by slow and insensitive diagnostics and frequent toxic side effects of standard antifungal drugs. Identification of new antifungal compounds with high efficacy and low toxicity is therefore urgently required. We investigated the antifungal activity of tempol, a cell-permeable nitroxide. To narrow down possible mode of action we used RNA-seq technology and metabolomics to probe for pathways specifically disrupted in the human fungal pathogen Candida albicans due to tempol administration. We found genes upregulated which are involved in iron homeostasis, mitochondrial stress, steroid synthesis, and amino acid metabolism. In an ex vivo whole blood infection, tempol treatment reduced C. albicans colony forming units and at the same time increased the release of pro-inflammatory cytokines, such as interleukin 8 (IL-8, monocyte chemoattractant protein-1, and macrophage migration inhibitory factor). In a systemic mouse model, tempol was partially protective with a significant reduction of fungal burden in the kidneys of infected animals during infection onset. The results obtained propose tempol as a promising new antifungal compound and open new opportunities for the future development of novel therapies.

  • 152.
    Hosseinzadeh, Ava
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Clinical Microbiology. Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Umeå Centre for Microbial Research (UCMR). Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Molecular Infection Medicine Sweden (MIMS).
    Thompson, Paul R.
    Segal, Brahm H.
    Urban, Constantin F.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Clinical Microbiology. Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Umeå Centre for Microbial Research (UCMR). Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Molecular Infection Medicine Sweden (MIMS).
    Nicotine induces neutrophil extracellular traps2016In: Journal of Leukocyte Biology, ISSN 0741-5400, E-ISSN 1938-3673, Vol. 100, no 5, p. 1105-1112Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    NETs serve to ensnare and kill microbial pathogens. However, NETs can at the same time contribute to tissue damage and excessive inflammation. Nicotine is a major toxic agent and has been associated with exacerbated inflammatory diseases. The current study aimed at investigating the role of nicotine, the addictive component of tobacco and electronic cigarettes, on triggering NET formation. We report that nicotine induces neutrophils to release NETs in a dose-dependent manner. Nicotine-induced NET formation is mediated via nicotine acetylcholine receptors, depends on Akt and PAD4 activation, but is Nox2-independent, as demonstrated by pharmacological inhibition of Nox2 and by use of Nox2-deficient mouse neutrophils. These findings demonstrate that nicotine induces NETs, which may in turn contribute to smoking-related diseases.

  • 153.
    Hosseinzadeh, Ava
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Molecular Biology (Faculty of Medicine). Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Molecular Infection Medicine Sweden (MIMS). Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Umeå Centre for Microbial Research (UCMR).
    Urban, Constantin F.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Molecular Infection Medicine Sweden (MIMS). Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Clinical Microbiology, Clinical Bacteriology. Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Molecular Biology (Faculty of Medicine).
    Novel Insight into Neutrophil Immune Responses by Dry Mass Determination of Candida albicans Morphotypes2013In: PLoS ONE, ISSN 1932-6203, E-ISSN 1932-6203, Vol. 8, no 10, article id e77993Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The common fungal pathogen Candida albicans has the ability to grow as a yeast or as a hypha and can alternate between these morphotypes. The overall biomass of both morphotypes increases with growth. However, only yeasts, but not hyphae, exist as discrete cellular entities. Multiplicity of infection (MOI) is a useful parameter to determine the initial inoculum of yeasts for in vitro infection assays. Since the amount of hyphae is difficult to quantify, comparable starting conditions in such assays cannot be determined accurately for yeasts and hyphae using MOI. To circumvent this problem, we have established a set of correlation coefficients to convert fungal metabolic activity and optical density to dry mass. Using these correlations, we were able to accurately compare ROS production and IL-8 release by polymorphonuclear neutrophils upon infection with equal dry mass amounts of yeast and hyphal morphotypes. Neutrophil responses depended on the initial form of infection, irrespective of C. albicans wild-type yeasts transforming to hyphal growth during the assay. Infection with a high mass of live C. albicans yeasts resulted in lower neutrophil ROS and this decrease stems from efficient ROS detoxification by C. albicans without directly affecting the phagocyte ROS machinery. Moreover, we show that dead C. albicans induces significantly less ROS and IL-8 release than live fungi, but thimerosal-killed C. albicans were still able to detoxify neutrophil ROS. Thus, the dry mass approach presented in this study reveals neutrophil responses to different amounts and morphotypes of C. albicans and serves as a template for studies that aim to identify morphotype-specific responses in a variety of immune cells.

  • 154. Howell, Matthew
    et al.
    Aliashkevich, Alena
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Molecular Infection Medicine Sweden (MIMS). Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Molecular Biology (Faculty of Medicine). Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Umeå Centre for Microbial Research (UCMR).
    Sundararajan, Kousik
    Daniel, Jeremy J.
    Lariviere, Patrick J.
    Goley, Erin D.
    Cava, Felipe
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Molecular Infection Medicine Sweden (MIMS). Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Molecular Biology (Faculty of Medicine). Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Umeå Centre for Microbial Research (UCMR).
    Brown, Pamela J. B.
    Agrobacterium tumefaciens divisome proteins regulate the transition from polar growth to cell division2019In: Molecular Microbiology, ISSN 0950-382X, E-ISSN 1365-2958, Vol. 111, no 4, p. 1074-1092Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The mechanisms that restrict peptidoglycan biosynthesis to the pole during elongation and re-direct peptidoglycan biosynthesis to mid-cell during cell division in polar-growing Alphaproteobacteria are largely unknown. Here, we explore the role of early division proteins of Agrobacterium tumefaciens including three FtsZ homologs, FtsA and FtsW in the transition from polar growth to mid-cell growth and ultimately cell division. Although two of the three FtsZ homologs localize to mid-cell, exhibit GTPase activity and form co-polymers, only one, FtsZ(AT), is required for cell division. We find that FtsZ(AT) is required not only for constriction and cell separation, but also for initiation of peptidoglycan synthesis at mid-cell and cessation of polar peptidoglycan biosynthesis. Depletion of FtsZ(AT) in A. tumefaciens causes a striking phenotype: cells are extensively branched and accumulate growth active poles through tip splitting events. When cell division is blocked at a later stage by depletion of FtsA or FtsW, polar growth is terminated and ectopic growth poles emerge from mid-cell. Overall, this work suggests that A. tumefaciens FtsZ makes distinct contributions to the regulation of polar growth and cell division.

  • 155.
    Huang, Shenghua
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Department of Chemistry.
    Hainzl, Tobias
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Department of Chemistry.
    Grundström, Christin
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Department of Chemistry.
    Forsman, Cecilia
    Orphan Biovitrum AB, Umeå, Sweden.
    Samuelsson, Göran
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Department of Plant Physiology.
    Sauer-Eriksson, A Elisabeth
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Department of Chemistry. Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Umeå Centre for Microbial Research (UCMR).
    Structural studies of β-Carbonic Anhydrase from the Green Alga Coccomyxa: Inhibitor complexes with Anions and Acetazolamide2011In: PLoS ONE, ISSN 1932-6203, E-ISSN 1932-6203, Vol. 6, no 12, p. e28458-Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The β-class carbonic anhydrases (β-CAs) are widely distributed among lower eukaryotes, prokaryotes, archaea, and plants. Like all CAs, the β-enzymes catalyze an important physiological reaction, namely the interconversion between carbon dioxide and bicarbonate. In plants the enzyme plays an important role in carbon fixation and metabolism. To further explore the structure-function relationship of β-CA, we have determined the crystal structures of the photoautotroph unicellular green alga Coccomyxa β-CA in complex with five different inhibitors: acetazolamide, thiocyanate, azide, iodide, and phosphate ions. The tetrameric Coccomyxa β-CA structure is similar to other β-CAs but it has a 15 amino acid extension in the C-terminal end, which stabilizes the tetramer by strengthening the interface. Four of the five inhibitors bind in a manner similar to what is found in complexes with α-type CAs. Iodide ions, however, make contact to the zinc ion via a zinc-bound water molecule or hydroxide ion - a type of binding mode not previously observed in any CA. Binding of inhibitors to Coccomyxa β-CA is mediated by side-chain movements of the conserved residue Tyr-88, extending the width of the active site cavity with 1.5-1.8 Å. Structural analysis and comparisons with other α- and β-class members suggest a catalytic mechanism in which the movements of Tyr-88 are important for the CO(2)-HCO(3) (-) interconversion, whereas a structurally conserved water molecule that bridges residues Tyr-88 and Gln-38, seems important for proton transfer, linking water molecules from the zinc-bound water to His-92 and buffer molecules.

  • 156. Hurwitz, Julia L.
    et al.
    Jones, Bart G.
    Charpentier, Emmanuelle
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Molecular Infection Medicine Sweden (MIMS). Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Umeå Centre for Microbial Research (UCMR). Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Molecular Biology (Faculty of Medicine). Max Planck Institute for Infection Biology, Berlin, Germany; Humboldt University, Berlin, Germany.
    Woodland, David L.
    Hypothesis: RNA and DNA Viral Sequence Integration into the Mammalian Host Genome Supports Long-Term B Cell and T Cell Adaptive Immunity2017In: Viral immunology, ISSN 0882-8245, E-ISSN 1557-8976, Vol. 30, no 9, p. 628-632Article in journal (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Viral sequence integration into the mammalian genome has long been perceived as a health risk. In some cases, integration translates to chronic viral infection, and in other instances, oncogenic gene mutations occur. However, research also shows that animal cells can benefit from integrated viral sequences (e.g., to support host cell development or to silence foreign invaders). Here we propose that, comparable with the clustered regularly interspaced short palindromic repeats that provide bacteria with adaptive immunity against invasive bacteriophages, animal cells may co-opt integrated viral sequences to support immune memory. We hypothesize that host cells express viral peptides from open reading frames in integrated sequences to boost adaptive B cell and T cell responses long after replicating viruses are cleared. In support of this hypothesis, we examine previous literature describing (1) viruses that infect acutely (e.g., vaccinia viruses and orthomyxoviruses) followed by unexplained, long-term persistence of viral nucleotide sequences, viral peptides, and virus-specific adaptive immunity, (2) the high frequency of endogenous viral genetic elements found in animal genomes, and (3) mechanisms with which animal host machinery supports foreign sequence integration.

  • 157.
    Härtlova, Anetta
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Molecular Infection Medicine Sweden (MIMS). Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Department of Molecular Biology (Faculty of Science and Technology). Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Umeå Centre for Microbial Research (UCMR).
    Erttmann, Saskia F.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Molecular Infection Medicine Sweden (MIMS). Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Molecular Biology (Faculty of Medicine). Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Umeå Centre for Microbial Research (UCMR).
    Raffi, Faizal A. M.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Molecular Infection Medicine Sweden (MIMS). Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Umeå Centre for Microbial Research (UCMR). Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Molecular Biology (Faculty of Medicine).
    Schmalz, Anja M.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Molecular Infection Medicine Sweden (MIMS). Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Umeå Centre for Microbial Research (UCMR). Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Molecular Biology (Faculty of Medicine).
    Resch, Ulrike
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Molecular Infection Medicine Sweden (MIMS). Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Umeå Centre for Microbial Research (UCMR). Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Molecular Biology (Faculty of Medicine).
    Anugula, Sharath
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Molecular Infection Medicine Sweden (MIMS). Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Umeå Centre for Microbial Research (UCMR). Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Molecular Biology (Faculty of Medicine).
    Lienenklaus, Stefan
    Nilsson, Lisa M.
    Kroeger, Andrea
    Nilsson, Jonas A.
    Ek, Torben
    Weiss, Siegfried
    Gekara, Nelson O.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Molecular Infection Medicine Sweden (MIMS).
    DNA Damage Primes the Type I Interferon System via the Cytosolic DNA Sensor STING to Promote Anti-Microbial Innate Immunity2015In: Immunity, ISSN 1074-7613, E-ISSN 1097-4180, Vol. 42, no 2, p. 332-343Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Dysfunction in Ataxia-telangiectasia mutated (ATM), a central component of the DNA repair machinery, results in Ataxia Telangiectasia (AT), a cancer-prone disease with a variety of inflammatory manifestations. By analyzing AT patient samples and Atm(-/-) mice, we found that unrepaired DNA lesions induce type I interferons (IFNs), resulting in enhanced anti-viral and anti-bacterial responses in Atm(-/-) mice. Priming of the type I interferon system by DNA damage involved release of DNA into the cytoplasm where it activated the cytosolic DNA sensing STING-mediated pathway, which in turn enhanced responses to innate stimuli by activating the expression of Toll-like receptors, RIG-I-like receptors, cytoplasmic DNA sensors, and their downstream signaling partners. This study provides a potential explanation for the inflammatory phenotype of AT patients and establishes damaged DNA as a cell intrinsic danger signal that primes the innate immune system for a rapid and amplified response to microbial and environmental threats.

  • 158.
    Ignatov, Dmitriy
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Umeå Centre for Microbial Research (UCMR). Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Molecular Biology (Faculty of Medicine). Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Molecular Infection Medicine Sweden (MIMS).
    Johansson, Jörgen
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Umeå Centre for Molecular Medicine (UCMM). Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Molecular Biology (Faculty of Medicine). Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Molecular Infection Medicine Sweden (MIMS).
    RNA-mediated signal perception in pathogenic bacteria2017In: Wiley Interdisciplinary Reviews-RNA, ISSN 1757-7004, Vol. 8, no 6, article id e1429Article, review/survey (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Bacterial pathogens encounter several different environments during an infection, many of them possibly being detrimental. In order to sense its surroundings and adjust the gene expression accordingly, different regulatory schemes are undertaken. With these, the bacterium appropriately can differentiate between various environmental cues to express the correct virulence factor at the appropriate time and place. An attractive regulator device is RNA, which has an outstanding ability to alter its structure in response to external stimuli, such as metabolite concentration or alterations in temperature, to control its downstream gene expression. This review will describe the function of riboswitches and thermometers, with a particular emphasis on regulatory RNAs being important for bacterial pathogenicity.

  • 159.
    Ishikawa, Takahiko
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Molecular Biology (Faculty of Medicine). Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Umeå Centre for Microbial Research (UCMR).
    Sabharwal, Dharmesh
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Molecular Biology (Faculty of Medicine). Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Umeå Centre for Microbial Research (UCMR).
    Bröms, Jeanette
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Clinical Microbiology, Clinical Bacteriology. Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Molecular Infection Medicine Sweden (MIMS). Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Umeå Centre for Microbial Research (UCMR).
    Milton, Debra L
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Molecular Biology (Faculty of Medicine). Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Umeå Centre for Microbial Research (UCMR).
    Sjöstedt, Anders
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Clinical Microbiology, Clinical Bacteriology. Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Umeå Centre for Microbial Research (UCMR). Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Molecular Infection Medicine Sweden (MIMS).
    Uhlin, Bernt Eric
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Molecular Biology (Faculty of Medicine). Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Molecular Infection Medicine Sweden (MIMS). Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Umeå Centre for Microbial Research (UCMR).
    Wai, Sun Nyunt
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Molecular Biology (Faculty of Medicine). Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Umeå Centre for Microbial Research (UCMR).
    Pathoadaptive conditional regulation of the type VI secretion system in Vibrio cholerae O1 strains2012In: Infection and Immunity, ISSN 0019-9567, E-ISSN 1098-5522, Vol. 80, no 2, p. 575-584Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The most recently discovered secretion pathway in gram-negative bacteria, the type VI secretion system (T6SS), is present in many species and is considered important for the survival of non-O1 non-O139 Vibrio cholerae in aquatic environments. Until now, it was not known whether there is a functionally active T6SS in wild-type V. cholerae O1 strains, the cause of cholera disease in humans. Here, we demonstrate the presence of a functionally active T6SS in wild-type V. cholerae O1 strains, as evidenced by the secretion of the T6SS substrate Hcp, which required several gene products encoded within the putative vas gene cluster. Our analyses showed that the T6SS of wild-type V. cholerae O1 strain A1552 was functionally activated when the bacteria were grown under high-osmolarity conditions. The T6SS was also active when the bacteria were grown under low temperature (23°C), suggesting that the system may be important for the survival of the bacterium in the environment. A test of the interbacterial virulence of V. cholerae strain A1552 against an Escherichia coli K-12 strain showed that it was strongly enhanced under high osmolarity and that it depended on the hcp genes. Interestingly, we found that the newly recognized osmoregulatory protein OscR plays a role in the regulation of T6SS gene expression and secretion of Hcp from V. cholerae O1 strains.

  • 160.
    Jiang, Hui
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Molecular Infection Medicine Sweden (MIMS). Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Umeå Centre for Microbial Research (UCMR).
    Panda, Swarupa
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Molecular Infection Medicine Sweden (MIMS). Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Umeå Centre for Microbial Research (UCMR).
    Gekara, Nelson O.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Molecular Infection Medicine Sweden (MIMS). Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Umeå Centre for Microbial Research (UCMR).
    Comet and micronucleus assays for analyzing DNA damage and genome integrity2019In: DNA SENSORS AND INFLAMMASOMES / [ed] Sohn, J, ELSEVIER ACADEMIC PRESS INC , 2019, p. 299-307Chapter in book (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Detection of DNA damage in cells is fundamental for the study of DNA repair and genome-instability associated processes including carcinogenesis. Many studies often rely on cytotoxicity assays to estimate genotoxicity. However, measurements of cytotoxicity, a delayed outcome requiring high threshold genotoxicity to induce, does not provide information about the subtle, early genotoxic effects relevant for mechanistic understanding of DNA repair processes. Here describe how to combine two simple procedures for monitoring the presence of DNA damage in individual eukaryotic cells using: (1) the Comet assay for measuring initial DNA breaks and (2) the Micronucleus assay for detecting delayed outcome DNA breaks in dividing cells. We discuss the principles, experimental design considerations and troubleshooting tips for optimizing these methods. They require standard molecular biology instruments and a fluorescent microscope.

  • 161.
    Jiang, Hui
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Molecular Infection Medicine Sweden (MIMS). Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Umeå Centre for Microbial Research (UCMR).
    Xue, Xiaoyu
    Panda, Swarupa
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Molecular Infection Medicine Sweden (MIMS). Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Umeå Centre for Microbial Research (UCMR).
    Kawale, Ajinkya
    Hooy, Richard M.
    Liang, Fengshan
    Sohn, Jungsan
    Sung, Patrick
    Gekara, Nelson O.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Molecular Infection Medicine Sweden (MIMS). Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Umeå Centre for Microbial Research (UCMR). Department of Molecular Biosciences, The Wenner-Gren Institute, Stockholm University, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Chromatin-bound cGAS is an inhibitor of DNA repair and hence accelerates genome destabilization and cell death2019In: EMBO Journal, ISSN 0261-4189, E-ISSN 1460-2075, article id e102718Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    DNA repair via homologous recombination (HR) is indispensable for genome integrity and cell survival but if unrestrained can result in undesired chromosomal rearrangements. The regulatory mechanisms of HR are not fully understood. Cyclic GMP‐AMP synthase (cGAS) is best known as a cytosolic innate immune sensor critical for the outcome of infections, inflammatory diseases, and cancer. Here, we report that cGAS is primarily a chromatin‐bound protein that inhibits DNA repair by HR, thereby accelerating genome destabilization, micronucleus generation, and cell death under conditions of genomic stress. This function is independent of the canonical STING‐dependent innate immune activation and is physiologically relevant for irradiation‐induced depletion of bone marrow cells in mice. Mechanistically, we demonstrate that inhibition of HR repair by cGAS is linked to its ability to self‐oligomerize, causing compaction of bound template dsDNA into a higher‐ordered state less amenable to strand invasion by RAD51‐coated ssDNA filaments. This previously unknown role of cGAS has implications for understanding its involvement in genome instability‐associated disorders including cancer.

  • 162. Jinek, Martin
    et al.
    Chylinski, Krzysztof
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Molecular Infection Medicine Sweden (MIMS). Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Umeå Centre for Microbial Research (UCMR). Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Molecular Biology (Faculty of Medicine).
    Fonfara, Ines
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Molecular Infection Medicine Sweden (MIMS). Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Umeå Centre for Microbial Research (UCMR). Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Molecular Biology (Faculty of Medicine).
    Hauer, Michael
    Doudna, Jennifer A
    Charpentier, Emmanuelle
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Molecular Infection Medicine Sweden (MIMS). Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Umeå Centre for Microbial Research (UCMR). Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Molecular Biology (Faculty of Medicine).
    A programmable dual-RNA-guided DNA endonuclease in adaptive bacterial immunity2012In: Science, ISSN 0036-8075, E-ISSN 1095-9203, Vol. 337, no 6096, p. 816-821Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Clustered regularly interspaced short palindromic repeats (CRISPR)/CRISPR-associated (Cas) systems provide bacteria and archaea with adaptive immunity against viruses and plasmids by using CRISPR RNAs (crRNAs) to guide the silencing of invading nucleic acids. We show here that in a subset of these systems, the mature crRNA that is base-paired to trans-activating crRNA (tracrRNA) forms a two-RNA structure that directs the CRISPR-associated protein Cas9 to introduce double-stranded (ds) breaks in target DNA. At sites complementary to the crRNA-guide sequence, the Cas9 HNH nuclease domain cleaves the complementary strand, whereas the Cas9 RuvC-like domain cleaves the noncomplementary strand. The dual-tracrRNA:crRNA, when engineered as a single RNA chimera, also directs sequence-specific Cas9 dsDNA cleavage. Our study reveals a family of endonucleases that use dual-RNAs for site-specific DNA cleavage and highlights the potential to exploit the system for RNA-programmable genome editing.

  • 163.
    Johansson, Jörgen
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Molecular Biology (Faculty of Medicine). Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Umeå Centre for Microbial Research (UCMR). Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Molecular Infection Medicine Sweden (MIMS).
    RNA thermosensors in bacterial pathogens.2009In: Bacterial Sensing and Signaling / [ed] Collin M, Schuch R, S. Karger, 2009, Vol. 16, p. 150-160Chapter in book (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    During the course of an infection, a pathogenic bacterium has to sense the environment and adjust its gene expression appropriately. One such environmental cue is the difference in temperature inside and outside the host. RNA thermosensors are structures that can respond to differences in temperature by altering their conformation and thereby allowing/preventing binding of the ribosome to the translational start site. This chapter discusses different types of RNA thermosensors in general and RNA thermosensors known to control virulence gene expression in particular.

  • 164.
    Johansson, Jörgen
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Molecular Infection Medicine Sweden (MIMS). Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Umeå Centre for Microbial Research (UCMR). Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Molecular Biology (Faculty of Medicine).
    Freitag, Nancy E.
    Regulation of Listeria monocytogenes Virulence2019In: Microbiology Spectrum, ISSN 2165-0497, Vol. 7, no 4Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Whereas obligate human and animal bacterial pathogens may be able to depend upon the warmth and relative stability of their chosen replication niche, environmental bacteria such as Listeria monocytogenes that harbor the ability to replicate both within animal cells and in the outside environment must maintain the capability to manage life under a variety of disparate conditions. Bacterial life in the outside environment requires adaptation to wide ranges of temperature, available nutrients, and physical stresses such as changes in pH and osmolarity as well as desiccation. Following ingestion by a susceptible animal host, the bacterium must adapt to similar changes during transit through the gastrointestinal tract and overcome a variety of barriers associated with host innate immune responses. Rapid alteration of patterns of gene expression and protein synthesis represent one strategy for quickly adapting to a dynamic host landscape. Here, we provide an overview of the impressive variety of strategies employed by the soil-dwelling, foodborne, mammalian pathogen L. monocytogenes to straddle diverse environments and optimize bacterial fitness both inside and outside host cells.

  • 165. Jöchl, Christoph
    et al.
    Loh, Edmund
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Molecular Biology (Faculty of Medicine). Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Umeå Centre for Microbial Research (UCMR). Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Molecular Infection Medicine Sweden (MIMS).
    Ploner, Andreas
    Haas, Hubertus
    Hüttenhofer, Alexander
    Development-dependent scavenging of nucleic acids in the filamentous fungus Aspergillus fumigatus.2009In: RNA biology, ISSN 1555-8584, Vol. 6, no 2, p. 179-186Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Aspergillus fumigatus is an ubiquitous, filamentous and opportunistic pathogenic fungus which causes fatal invasive aspergillosis among immuno-compromised patients. Since therapeutic strategies are currently limited, the mortality rate of invasive aspergillosis is high and thus, alternative antifungal strategies are required. In this study, we demonstrate that during vegetative growth Aspergillus fumigatus is able to scavenge nucleic acids within its cell wall with accumulation rates of several thousand-fold, compared to the surrounding medium. To investigate, whether nucleic acids, attached to the fungal cell wall, are able to move further into the cytoplasm of fungal cells, we directly applied siRNAs, in the absence of lipo-transfection reagents, to growing A. fumigatus cells. In fact, addition of two 21-nt siRNA duplexes resulted in knock-down of their corresponding target mRNAs, odcA and pyrG, respectively. These findings indicate that RNA interference, mediated by siRNAs, can be used as a fast and efficient tool to investigate the functions of genes within filamentous fungi. In addition, siRNA-based therapies may provide novel approaches for antifungal treatment.

  • 166.
    Karah, Nabil
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Molecular Biology (Faculty of Medicine). Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Molecular Infection Medicine Sweden (MIMS). Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Umeå Centre for Microbial Research (UCMR).
    Dwibedi, Chinmay Kumar
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Clinical Microbiology. Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Molecular Infection Medicine Sweden (MIMS).
    Sjöström, Karin
    Edquist, Petra
    Johansson, Anders
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Clinical Microbiology. Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Molecular Infection Medicine Sweden (MIMS).
    Wai, Sun Nyunt
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Molecular Biology (Faculty of Medicine). Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Molecular Infection Medicine Sweden (MIMS). Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Umeå Centre for Microbial Research (UCMR).
    Uhlin, Bernt Eric
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Molecular Biology (Faculty of Medicine). Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Molecular Infection Medicine Sweden (MIMS). Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Umeå Centre for Microbial Research (UCMR).
    Novel Aminoglycoside Resistance Transposons and Transposon-Derived Circular Forms Detected in Carbapenem-Resistant Acinetobacter baumannii Clinical Isolates2016In: Antimicrobial Agents and Chemotherapy, ISSN 0066-4804, E-ISSN 1098-6596, Vol. 60, no 3, p. 1801-1818Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Acinetobacter baumannii has emerged as an important opportunistic pathogen equipped with a growing number of antibiotic resistance genes. Our study investigated the molecular epidemiology and antibiotic resistance features of 28 consecutive carbapenem-resistant clinical isolates of A. baumannii collected throughout Sweden in 2012 and 2013. The isolates mainly belonged to clonal complexes (CCs) with an extensive international distribution, such as CC2 (n = 16) and CC25 (n = 7). Resistance to carbapenems was related to bla(OXA-23) (20 isolates), bla(OXA-24/40-like) (6 isolates), bla(OXA-467) (1 isolate), and ISAba1-bla(OXA-69) (1 isolate). Ceftazidime resistance was associated with bla(PER-7) in the CC25 isolates. Two classical point mutations were responsible for resistance to quinolones in all the isolates. Isolates with high levels of resistance to aminoglycosides carried the 16S rRNA methylase armA gene. The isolates also carried a variety of genes encoding aminoglycoside-modifying enzymes. Several novel structures involved in aminoglycoside resistance were identified, including Tn6279, Delta Tn6279, Ab-ST3- aadB, and different assemblies of Tn6020 and TnaphA6. Importantly, a number of circular forms related to the IS26 or ISAba125 composite trans-posons were detected. The frequent occurrence of these circular forms in the populations of several isolates indicates a potential role of these circular forms in the dissemination of antibiotic resistance genes.

  • 167.
    Karah, Nabil
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Molecular Infection Medicine Sweden (MIMS). Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Molecular Biology (Faculty of Medicine). Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Umeå Centre for Microbial Research (UCMR).
    Jolley, Keith A.
    Hall, Ruth M.
    Uhlin, Bernt Eric
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Molecular Infection Medicine Sweden (MIMS). Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Molecular Biology (Faculty of Medicine). Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Umeå Centre for Microbial Research (UCMR).
    Database for the ampC alleles in Acinetobacter baumannii2017In: PLoS ONE, ISSN 1932-6203, E-ISSN 1932-6203, Vol. 12, no 5, article id e0176695Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Acinetobacter baumannii is a troublesome opportunistic pathogen with a high capacity for clonal dissemination. We announce the establishment of a database for the ampC locus in A. baumannii, in which novel ampC alleles are differentiated based on the occurrence of >= 1 nucleotide change, regardless of whether it is silent or missense. The database is openly accessible at the pubmlst platform for A. baumannii (http://pubmlst.org/abaumannii/). Forty-eight distinctive alleles of the ampC locus have so far been identified and deposited in the database. Isolates from clonal complex 1 (CC1), according to the Pasteur multilocus sequence typing scheme, had a variety of the ampC locus alleles, including alleles 1, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 13, 14, 17, and 18. On the other hand, isolates from CC2 had the ampC alleles 2, 3, 19, 20, 21, 22, 23, 24, 26, 27, 28, and 46. Allele 3 was characteristic for sequence types ST3 or ST32. The ampC alleles 10, 16, and 25 were characteristic for CC10, ST16, and CC25, respectively. Our study points out that novel gene databases, in which alleles are numbered based on differences in their nucleotide identities, should replace traditional records that use amino acid substitutions to define new alleles.

  • 168.
    Karah, Nabil
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Molecular Infection Medicine Sweden (MIMS). Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Molecular Biology (Faculty of Medicine). Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Umeå Centre for Microbial Research (UCMR).
    Samuelsen, Ørjan
    Zarrilli, Raffaele
    Sahl, Jason W.
    Wai, Sun Nyunt
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Molecular Infection Medicine Sweden (MIMS). Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Molecular Biology (Faculty of Medicine). Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Umeå Centre for Microbial Research (UCMR).
    Uhlin, Bernt Eric
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Molecular Infection Medicine Sweden (MIMS). Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Molecular Biology (Faculty of Medicine). Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Umeå Centre for Microbial Research (UCMR).
    CRISPR-cas subtype I-Fb in Acinetobacter baumannii: evolution and utilization for strain subtyping2015In: PLoS ONE, ISSN 1932-6203, E-ISSN 1932-6203, Vol. 10, no 2, article id e0118205Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Clustered regularly interspaced short palindromic repeats (CRISPR) are polymorphic elements found in the genome of some or all strains of particular bacterial species, providing them with a system of acquired immunity against invading bacteriophages and plasmids. Two CRISPR-Cas systems have been identified in Acinetobacter baumannii, an opportunistic pathogen with a remarkable capacity for clonal dissemination. In this study, we investigated the mode of evolution and diversity of spacers of the CRISPR-cas subtype I-Fb locus in a global collection of 76 isolates of A. baumannii obtained from 14 countries and 4 continents. The locus has basically evolved from a common ancestor following two main lineages and several pathways of vertical descent. However, this vertical passage has been interrupted by occasional events of horizontal transfer of the whole locus between distinct isolates. The isolates were assigned into 40 CRISPR-based sequence types (CST). CST1 and CST23-24 comprised 18 and 9 isolates, representing two main sub-clones of international clones CC1 and CC25, respectively. Epidemiological data showed that some of the CST1 isolates were acquired or imported from Iraq, where it has probably been endemic for more than one decade and occasionally been able to spread to USA, Canada, and Europe. CST23-24 has shown a remarkable ability to cause national outbreaks of infections in Sweden, Argentina, UAE, and USA. The three isolates of CST19 were independently imported from Thailand to Sweden and Norway, raising a concern about the prevalence of CST19 in Thailand. Our study highlights the dynamic nature of the CRISPR-cas subtype I-Fb locus in A. baumannii, and demonstrates the possibility of using a CRISPR-based approach for subtyping a significant part of the global population of A. baumannii.

  • 169.
    Karched, Maribasappa
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Odontology.
    Ihalin, Rikka
    Eneslätt, Kjell
    Zhong, D
    Oscarsson, Jan
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Odontology, Oral Microbiology.
    Wai, Sun Nyunt
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Molecular Biology (Faculty of Medicine). Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Umeå Centre for Microbial Research (UCMR).
    Chen, C
    Asikainen, Sirkka
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Odontology.
    Vesicle-independent extracellular release of a proinflammatory outer membrane lipoprotein in free-soluble form2008In: BMC Microbiology, ISSN 1471-2180, E-ISSN 1471-2180, Vol. 28, no 8:18Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [sv]

    Aggregatibacter actinomycetemcomitans is an oral bacterium associated with aggressively progressing periodontitis. Extracellular release of bacterial outer membrane proteins has been suggested to mainly occur via outer membrane vesicles. This study investigated the presence and conservation of peptidoglycan-associated lipoprotein (AaPAL) among A. actinomycetemcomitans strains, the immunostimulatory effect of AaPAL, and whether live cells release this structural outer membrane lipoprotein in free-soluble form independent of vesicles. RESULTS: The pal locus and its gene product were confirmed in clinical A. actinomycetemcomitans strains by PCR-restriction fragment length polymorphism and immunoblotting. Culturing under different growth conditions revealed no apparent requirement for the AaPAL expression. Inactivation of pal in a wild-type strain (D7S) and in its spontaneous laboratory variant (D7SS) resulted in pleiotropic cellular effects. In a cell culture insert model (filter pore size 0.02 um), AaPAL was detected from filtrates when strains D7S and D7SS were incubated in serum or broth in the inserts. Electron microscopy showed that A. actinomycetemcomitans vesicles (0.05-0.2 um) were larger than the filter pores and that there were no vesicles in the filtrates. The filtrates were immunoblot negative for a cytoplasmic marker, cyclic AMP (cAMP) receptor protein. An ex vivo model indicated cytokine production from human whole blood stimulated by AaPAL. CONCLUSIONS: Free-soluble AaPAL can be extracellularly released in a process independent of vesicles.

  • 170.
    Kauppi, Anna M.
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Clinical Microbiology, Clinical Bacteriology. Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Molecular Infection Medicine Sweden (MIMS). Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Umeå Centre for Microbial Research (UCMR).
    Edin, Alicia
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Clinical Microbiology, Clinical Bacteriology. Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Molecular Infection Medicine Sweden (MIMS). Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Umeå Centre for Microbial Research (UCMR).
    Ziegler, Ingrid
    Mölling, Paula
    Sjöstedt, Anders
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Clinical Microbiology, Clinical Bacteriology. Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Molecular Infection Medicine Sweden (MIMS). Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Umeå Centre for Microbial Research (UCMR).
    Gylfe, Åsa
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Clinical Microbiology, Clinical Bacteriology. Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Molecular Infection Medicine Sweden (MIMS). Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Umeå Centre for Microbial Research (UCMR).
    Strålin, Kristoffer
    Johansson, Anders
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Clinical Microbiology, Clinical Bacteriology. Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Molecular Infection Medicine Sweden (MIMS). Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Umeå Centre for Microbial Research (UCMR).
    Metabolites in Blood for Prediction of Bacteremic Sepsis in the Emergency Room2016In: PLoS ONE, ISSN 1932-6203, E-ISSN 1932-6203, Vol. 11, no 1, article id e0147670Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    A metabolomics approach for prediction of bacteremic sepsis in patients in the emergency room (ER) was investigated. In a prospective study, whole blood samples from 65 patients with bacteremic sepsis and 49 ER controls were compared. The blood samples were analyzed using gas chromatography coupled to time-of-flight mass spectrometry. Multivariate and logistic regression modeling using metabolites identified by chromatography or using conventional laboratory parameters and clinical scores of infection were employed. A predictive model of bacteremic sepsis with 107 metabolites was developed and validated. The number of metabolites was reduced stepwise until identifying a set of 6 predictive metabolites. A 6-metabolite predictive logistic regression model showed a sensitivity of 0.91(95% CI 0.69-0.99) and a specificity 0.84 (95% CI 0.58-0.94) with an AUC of 0.93 (95% CI 0.89-1.01). Myristic acid was the single most predictive metabolite, with a sensitivity of 1.00 (95% CI 0.85-1.00) and specificity of 0.95 (95% CI 0.74-0.99), and performed better than various combinations of conventional laboratory and clinical parameters. We found that a metabolomics approach for analysis of acute blood samples was useful for identification of patients with bacteremic sepsis. Metabolomics should be further evaluated as a new tool for infection diagnostics.

  • 171. Keyser, P
    et al.
    Elofsson, Mikael
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Chemistry. Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Umeå Centre for Microbial Research (UCMR).
    Rosell, S
    Wolf-Watz, Hans
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Molecular Biology (Faculty of Science and Technology). Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Umeå Centre for Microbial Research (UCMR). Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Molecular Infection Medicine Sweden (MIMS).
    Virulence blockers as alternatives to antibiotics: type III secretion inhibitors against Gram-negative bacteria2008In: Journal of Internal Medicine, Vol. 264, no 1, p. 17-29Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In recent years mounting problems related to antibiotic-resistant bacteria have resulted in the prediction that we are entering the preantibiotic era. A way of preventing such a development would be to introduce novel antibacterial medicines with modes of action distinct from conventional antibiotics. Recent studies of bacterial virulence factors and toxins have resulted in increased understanding of the way in which pathogenic bacteria manipulate host cellular processes. This knowledge may now be used to develop novel antibacterial medicines that disarm pathogenic bacteria. The type III secretion system (T3SS) is known to be a potent virulence mechanism shared by a broad spectrum of pathogenic Gram-negative bacteria that interact with human, animal and plant hosts by injecting effector proteins into the cytosol of host cells. Diseases, such as bubonic plague, shigellosis, salmonellosis, typhoid fever, pulmonary infections, sexually transmitted chlamydia and diarrhoea largely depend on the bacterial proteins injected by the T3SS machinery. Recently a number of T3SS inhibitors have been identified using screening-based approaches. One class of inhibitors, the salicylidene acylhydrazides, has been subjected to chemical optimization and evaluation in several in vitro and ex vivo assays in multiple bacterial species including Yersinia spp., Chlamydia spp., Salmonella spp. and Pseudotuberculosis aeruginosa. Reports published up to date indicate that T3SS inhibitors have the potential to be developed into novel antibacterial therapeutics.

  • 172.
    Khandige, Surabhi
    et al.
    Odense, Denmark.
    Kronborg, Tina
    Odense, Denmark.
    Uhlin, Bernt Eric
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Molecular Biology (Faculty of Medicine). Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Molecular Infection Medicine Sweden (MIMS). Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Umeå Centre for Microbial Research (UCMR).
    Möller-Jensen, Jakob
    Odense, Denmark.
    sRNA-Mediated Regulation of P-Fimbriae Phase Variation in Uropathogenic Escherichia coli2015In: PLoS Pathogens, ISSN 1553-7366, E-ISSN 1553-7374, Vol. 11, no 8, article id e1005109Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Uropathogenic Escherichia coli (UPEC) are capable of occupying physiologically distinct intracellular and extracellular niches within the urinary tract. This feat requires the timely regulation of gene expression and small RNAs (sRNAs) are known to mediate such rapid adjustments in response to changing environmental cues. This study aimed to uncover sRNA-mediated gene regulation in the UPEC strain UTI89, during infection of bladder epithelial cells. Hfq is an RNA chaperone known to facilitate and stabilize sRNA and target mRNA interactions with bacterial cells. The co-immunoprecipitation and high throughput RNA sequencing of Hfq bound sRNAs performed in this study, revealed distinct sRNA profiles in UPEC in the extracellular and intracellular environments. Our findings emphasize the importance of studying regulatory sRNAs in a biologically relevant niche. This strategy also led to the discovery of a novel virulence-associated trans-acting sRNA-PapR. Deletion of papR was found to enhance adhesion of UTI89 to both bladder and kidney cell lines in a manner independent of type-1 fimbriae. We demonstrate PapR mediated post-transcriptional repression of the P-fimbriae phase regulator gene papI and postulate a role for such regulation in fimbrial cross-talk at the population level in UPEC. Our results further implicate the Leucine responsive protein (LRP) as a transcriptional activator regulating PapR expression. Our study reports, for the first time, a role for sRNAs in regulation of P-fimbriae phase variation and emphasizes the importance of studying pathogenesis-specific sRNAs within a relevant biological niche.

  • 173.
    Klinth, Jeanna E.
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Department of Physics. Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Umeå Centre for Microbial Research (UCMR). Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Molecular Infection Medicine Sweden (MIMS). Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Molecular Biology (Faculty of Medicine).
    Castelain, Mickael
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Department of Physics.
    Uhlin, Bernt Eric
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Molecular Biology (Faculty of Medicine).
    Axner, Ove
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Department of Physics.
    The Influence of pH on the Specific Adhesion of P Piliated Escherichia coli2012In: PLoS ONE, ISSN 1932-6203, E-ISSN 1932-6203, Vol. 7, no 6, p. e38548-Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Adhesion to host tissues is an initiating step in a majority of bacterial infections. In the case of Gram-negative bacteria this adhesion is often mediated by a specific interaction between an adhesin, positioned at the distal end of bacterial pili, and its receptor on the surface of the host tissue. Furthermore, the rod of the pilus, and particularly its biomechanical properties, is believed to be crucial for the ability of bacteria to withstand external forces caused by, for example, (in the case of urinary tract infections) urinary rinsing flows by redistributing the force to several pili. In this work, the adhesion properties of P-piliated E. coli and their dependence of pH have been investigated in a broad pH range by both the surface plasmon resonance technique and force measuring optical tweezers. We demonstrate that P piliated bacteria have an adhesion ability throughout the entire physiologically relevant pH range (pH 4.5 - 8). We also show that pH has a higher impact on the binding rate than on the binding stability or the biomechanical properties of pili; the binding rate was found to have a maximum around pH 5 while the binding stability was found to have a broader distribution over pH and be significant over the entire physiologically relevant pH range. Force measurements on a single organelle level show that the biomechanical properties of P pili are not significantly affected by pH.

  • 174.
    Klinth, Jeanna E
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Department of Physics. Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Umeå Centre for Microbial Research (UCMR). Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Department of Molecular Biology (Faculty of Science and Technology). Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Molecular Infection Medicine Sweden (MIMS). Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Centre for Biomedical Engineering and Physics (CMTF).
    Pinkner, Jerome S
    Hultgren, Scott J
    Almqvist, Fredrik
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Department of Chemistry. Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Umeå Centre for Microbial Research (UCMR).
    Uhlin, Bernt Eric
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Department of Molecular Biology (Faculty of Science and Technology). Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Umeå Centre for Microbial Research (UCMR). Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Molecular Infection Medicine Sweden (MIMS). Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Molecular Biology (Faculty of Medicine).
    Axner, Ove
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Department of Physics. Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Umeå Centre for Microbial Research (UCMR). Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Centre for Biomedical Engineering and Physics (CMTF).
    Impairment of the biomechanical compliance of P pili: a novel means of inhibiting uropathogenic bacterial infections?2012In: European Biophysics Journal, ISSN 0175-7571, E-ISSN 1432-1017, Vol. 41, no 3, p. 285-295Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Gram-negative bacteria often initiate their colonization by use of extended attachment organelles, so called pili. When exposed to force, the rod of helix-like pili has been found to be highly extendable, mainly attributed to uncoiling and recoiling of its quaternary structure. This provides the bacteria with the ability to redistribute an external force among a multitude of pili, which enables them to withstand strong rinsing flows, which, in turn, facilitates adherence and colonization processes critical to virulence. Thus, pili fibers are possible targets for novel antibacterial agents. By use of a substance that compromises compliance of the pili, the ability of bacteria to redistribute external forces can be impaired, so they will no longer be able to resist strong urine flow and thus be removed from the host. It is possible such a substance can serve as an alternative to existing antibiotics in the future or be a part of a multi-drug. In this work we investigated whether it is possible to achieve this by targeting the recoiling process. The test substance was purified PapD. The effect of PapD on the compliance of P pili was assessed at the single organelle level by use of force-measuring optical tweezers. We showed that the recoiling process, and thus the biomechanical compliance, in particular the recoiling process, can be impaired by the presence of PapD. This leads to a new concept in the search for novel drug candidates combating uropathogenic bacterial infections-"coilicides", targeting the subunits of which the pilus rod is composed.

  • 175.
    Kouokam, J Clavin
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Molecular Biology (Faculty of Medicine).
    Wai, Sun Nyunt
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Molecular Biology (Faculty of Medicine). Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Umeå Centre for Microbial Research (UCMR).
    Fällman, Maria
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Molecular Biology (Faculty of Medicine). Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Umeå Centre for Microbial Research (UCMR).
    Dobrindt, Ulrich
    Hacker, Jörg
    Uhlin, Bernt Eric
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Molecular Biology (Faculty of Medicine). Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Umeå Centre for Microbial Research (UCMR).
    Active cytotoxic necrotizing factor 1 associated with outer membrane vesicles from uropathogenic Escherichia coli.2006In: Infection and Immunity, ISSN 0019-9567, E-ISSN 1098-5522, Vol. 74, no 4, p. 2022-2030Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Cytotoxic necrotizing factor type 1 (CNF1) is one of the virulence factors produced by uropathogenic Escherichia coli (UPEC). How this toxin is translocated from the bacterial cytoplasm to the surrounding environment is not well understood. Our data suggest that CNF1 may be regarded as a secreted protein, since it could be detected in culture supernatants. Furthermore, we found that CNF1 was tightly associated to outer membrane vesicles, suggesting that such vesicles play a role in the secretion of this protein. Interestingly, vesicle samples containing CNF1 could exert the effects known for this protein on HeLa cell cultures, showing that CNF1 is transported by vesicles in its active form. Taken together, our results strongly suggest that outer membrane vesicles could be a means for the bacteria to deliver CNF1 to the environment and to the infected tissue. In addition, our results indicate that the histone-like nucleoid structuring protein H-NS has a role in the downregulation of CNF1 production and that it affects the outer membrane vesicle release in UPEC strain J96.

  • 176.
    Krajewski, Stefanie Sandra
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Molecular Infection Medicine Sweden (MIMS). Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Umeå Centre for Microbial Research (UCMR). Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Molecular Biology (Faculty of Medicine).
    Ignatov, Dmitry
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Molecular Infection Medicine Sweden (MIMS). Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Umeå Centre for Microbial Research (UCMR). Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Molecular Biology (Faculty of Medicine).
    Johansson, Jörgen
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Molecular Infection Medicine Sweden (MIMS). Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Umeå Centre for Microbial Research (UCMR). Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Molecular Biology (Faculty of Medicine).
    Two Are Better Than One: Dual Targeting of Riboswitches by Metabolite Analogs2017In: Cell Chemical Biology, ISSN 2451-9456, E-ISSN 2451-9448, Vol. 24, no 5, p. 535-537Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In this issue of Cell Chemical Biology, Wang et al. (2017) examine the effect of the novel synthetic molecule ribocil-C and the natural compound roseoflavin in Gram-positive pathogens. In methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA), ribocil-C and roseoflavin target two autonomous riboswitches simultaneously, thereby inhibiting de novo synthesis and uptake of riboflavin.

  • 177.
    Krajewski, Stefanie Sandra
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Molecular Infection Medicine Sweden (MIMS). Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Umeå Centre for Microbial Research (UCMR). Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Molecular Biology (Faculty of Medicine).
    Isoz, Isabelle
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Molecular Infection Medicine Sweden (MIMS). Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Umeå Centre for Microbial Research (UCMR). Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Molecular Biology (Faculty of Medicine).
    Johansson, Jörgen
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Molecular Infection Medicine Sweden (MIMS). Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Umeå Centre for Microbial Research (UCMR). Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Molecular Biology (Faculty of Medicine).
    Antibacterial and antivirulence effect of 6-N-hydroxylaminopurine in Listeria monocytogenes2017In: Nucleic Acids Research, ISSN 0305-1048, E-ISSN 1362-4962, Vol. 45, no 4, p. 1914-1924Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The emerging development of antibiotic resistant bacteria calls for novel types of antibacterial agents. In this work we examined the putative antibacterial effect of purine analogs in Listeria monocytogenes. We show that, among several tested purine analogs, only 6-N-hydroxylaminopurine (6-N-HAP) reduces the viability of the Gram-positive pathogenListeria monocy-togenes. As in Bacillus subtilis, 6-N-HAP terminates expression at guanine riboswitches in L. monocyto-genes hence preventing expression of their downstream genes. However, we show that the bacteriocidal effect of the compound was unlinked to the terminated expression at the guanine riboswitches. When further examining the antimicrobial effect, we observed that 6-N-HAP acts as a potent mutagen in L. monocytogenes, by increasing the mutation rate and inducing the SOS-response. Also, addition of 6N-HAP decreased virulence gene expression by reducing both the levels and activity of the virulence regulator PrfA.

  • 178.
    Krishnan, K. Syam
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Department of Chemistry.
    Bengtsson, Christoffer
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Department of Chemistry.
    Good, James A. D.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Department of Chemistry. Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Umeå Centre for Microbial Research (UCMR).
    Mirkhanov, Shamil
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Department of Chemistry.
    Chorell, Erik
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Department of Chemistry.
    Johansson, Lennart B. -Å.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Department of Chemistry.
    Almqvist, Fredrik
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Department of Chemistry. Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Umeå Centre for Microbial Research (UCMR).
    Synthesis of fluorescent ring-fused 2-pyridone peptidomimetics2013In: Journal of Organic Chemistry, ISSN 0022-3263, E-ISSN 1520-6904, Vol. 78, no 23, p. 12207-12213Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Thiazolino fused 2-pyridones peptidomimetics are of significant biological importance due to their ability to interfere with adhesive fiber formation in uropathogenic Escherichia coli and oligomerization of amyloid fibres. We have developed an efficient synthetic route to fluorescent BODIPY analogues, with structural diversification from a key intermediate enabling introduction of C-2 substituents and late incorporation of the BODIPY moiety. A mild lithium halide mediated hydrolysis enabled preparation of peptidomimetic fluorophores with useful photophysical properties for further chemical biology applications.

  • 179. Krypotou, Emilia
    et al.
    Scortti, Mariela
    Grundström, Christin
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Department of Chemistry. Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Umeå Centre for Microbial Research (UCMR).
    Oelker, Melanie
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Department of Chemistry. Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Umeå Centre for Microbial Research (UCMR).
    Luisi, Ben F.
    Sauer-Eriksson, A. Elisabeth
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Department of Chemistry. Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Umeå Centre for Microbial Research (UCMR).
    Vazquez-Boland, Jose
    Control of Bacterial Virulence through the Peptide Signature of the Habitat2019In: Cell reports, ISSN 2211-1247, E-ISSN 2211-1247, Vol. 26, no 7, p. 1815-1827Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    To optimize fitness, pathogens selectively activate their virulence program upon host entry. Here, we report that the facultative intracellular bacterium Listeria monocytogenes exploits exogenous oligopeptides, a ubiquitous organic N source, to sense the environment and control the activity of its virulence transcriptional activator, PrfA. Using a genetic screen in adsorbent- treated ( PrfA-inducing) medium, we found that PrfA is functionally regulated by the balance between activating and inhibitory nutritional peptides scavenged via the Opp transport system. Activating peptides provide essential cysteine precursor for the PrfA-inducing cofactor glutathione ( GSH). Non-cysteine-containing peptides cause promiscuous PrfA inhibition. Biophysical and co-crystallization studies reveal that peptides inhibit PrfA through steric blockade of the GSH binding site, a regulation mechanism directly linking bacterial virulence and metabolism. L. monocytogenes mutant analysis in macrophages and our functional data support a model in which changes in the balance of antagonistic Oppimported oligopeptides promote PrfA induction intra-cellularly and PrfA repression outside the host.

  • 180.
    Kulén, Martina
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Department of Chemistry. Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Umeå Centre for Microbial Research (UCMR).
    Lindgren, Marie
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Clinical Microbiology, Clinical Bacteriology. Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Umeå Centre for Microbial Research (UCMR). Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Molecular Biology (Faculty of Medicine). Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Molecular Infection Medicine Sweden (MIMS).
    Hansen, Sabine
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Molecular Biology (Faculty of Medicine). Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Molecular Infection Medicine Sweden (MIMS). Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Umeå Centre for Microbial Research (UCMR).
    Cairns, Andrew G.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Department of Chemistry. Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Umeå Centre for Microbial Research (UCMR).
    Grundström, Christin
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Department of Chemistry. Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Umeå Centre for Microbial Research (UCMR).
    Begum, Afshan
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Department of Chemistry. Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Umeå Centre for Microbial Research (UCMR).
    van der Lingen, Ingeborg
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Department of Chemistry. Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Umeå Centre for Microbial Research (UCMR).
    Brännström, Kristoffer
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Biochemistry and Biophysics.
    Hall, Michael
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Department of Chemistry. Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Umeå Centre for Microbial Research (UCMR).
    Sauer, Uwe H.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Department of Chemistry. Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Umeå Centre for Microbial Research (UCMR).
    Johansson, Jörgen
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Molecular Infection Medicine Sweden (MIMS). Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Umeå Centre for Microbial Research (UCMR). Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Molecular Biology (Faculty of Medicine).
    Sauer-Eriksson, A. Elisabeth
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Department of Chemistry. Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Umeå Centre for Microbial Research (UCMR). Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Molecular Infection Medicine Sweden (MIMS).
    Almqvist, Fredrik
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Department of Chemistry. Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Umeå Centre for Microbial Research (UCMR). Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Molecular Infection Medicine Sweden (MIMS).
    Structure-based design of inhibitors targeting PrfA, the master virulence regulator of Listeria monocytogenes2018In: Journal of Medicinal Chemistry, ISSN 0022-2623, E-ISSN 1520-4804, Vol. 61, no 9, p. 4165-4175Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Listeria monocytogenes is a bacterial pathogen that controls much of its virulence through the transcriptional regulator PrfA. In this study, we describe structure guided design and synthesis of a set of PrfA inhibitors based on ring-fused 2-pyridone heterocycles. Our most effective compound decreased virulence factor expression, reduced bacterial uptake into eukaryotic cells, and improved survival of chicken embryos infected with L. monocytogenes compared to previously identified compounds. Crystal structures identified an intraprotein "tunnel" as the main inhibitor binding site (A1), where the compounds participate in an extensive hydrophobic network that restricts the protein's ability to form functional DNA-binding helix−turn−helix (HTH) motifs. Our studies also revealed a hitherto unsuspected structural plasticity of the HTH motif. In conclusion, we have designed 2-pyridone analogues that function as site-A1 selective PrfA inhibitors with potent antivirulence properties.

  • 181.
    Kumar, Dinesh
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Biochemistry and Biophysics.
    Viberg, Jörgen
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Biochemistry and Biophysics.
    Nilsson, Anna Karin
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Biochemistry and Biophysics.
    Chabes, Andrei
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Biochemistry and Biophysics. Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Molecular Infection Medicine Sweden (MIMS). Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Umeå Centre for Microbial Research (UCMR).
    Highly mutagenic and severely imbalanced dNTP pools can escape detection by the S-phase checkpoint2010In: Nucleic Acids Research, ISSN 0305-1048, E-ISSN 1362-4962, Vol. 38, no 12, p. 3975-3983Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    A balanced supply of deoxyribonucleoside triphosphates (dNTPs) is one of the key prerequisites for faithful genome duplication. Both the overall concentration and the balance among the individual dNTPs (dATP, dTTP, dGTP, and dCTP) are tightly regulated, primarily by the enzyme ribonucleotide reductase (RNR). We asked whether dNTP pool imbalances interfere with cell cycle progression and are detected by the S-phase checkpoint, a genome surveillance mechanism activated in response to DNA damage or replication blocks. By introducing single amino acid substitutions in loop 2 of the allosteric specificity site of Saccharomyces cerevisiae RNR, we obtained a collection of strains with various dNTP pool imbalances. Even mild dNTP pool imbalances were mutagenic, but the mutagenic potential of different dNTP pool imbalances did not directly correlate with their severity. The S-phase checkpoint was activated by the depletion of one or several dNTPs. In contrast, when none of the dNTPs was limiting for DNA replication, even extreme and mutagenic dNTP pool imbalances did not activate the S-phase checkpoint and did not interfere with the cell cycle progression.

  • 182.
    Kumar, Keshav
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Molecular Infection Medicine Sweden (MIMS). Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Umeå Centre for Microbial Research (UCMR).
    Cava, Felipe
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Molecular Infection Medicine Sweden (MIMS). Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Umeå Centre for Microbial Research (UCMR).
    Chromatographic analysis of peptidoglycan samples with the aid of a chemometric technique: introducing a novel analytical procedure to classify bacterial cell wall collection2019In: Analytical Methods, ISSN 1759-9660, E-ISSN 1759-9679, Vol. 11, no 12, p. 1671-1679Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The technical development of liquid chromatography has provided the necessary sensitivity to characterise peptidoglycan samples. However, the analysis of large numbers of complex chromatographic data sets without the aid of a proper chemometric technique is a laborious task, carrying a high risk of losing important biochemical information. The present work describes the development of a simple analytical procedure using self-organising map (SOM) analysis to analyse the large number of complex chromatographic data sets from bacterial peptidoglycan samples. SOM analysis essentially maps the samples to a hexagonal sheet based on their compositional similarity, and thus provides an approach to classify the bacterial cell wall collection in an unsupervised manner. The utility of the proposed approach was successfully validated by analysing peptidoglycan samples belonging to the Alphaproteobacterium class. The classification results achieved with SOM analysis were found to correlate well with their relative similarity in peptidoglycan compositions. In summary, the SOM analysis-based analytical procedure is shown to be useful towards automatising the analyses of chromatographic data sets of peptidoglycan samples from bacterial collections.

  • 183.
    Kumar, Keshav
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Molecular Infection Medicine Sweden (MIMS). Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Molecular Biology (Faculty of Medicine). Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Umeå Centre for Microbial Research (UCMR).
    Cava, Felipe
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Molecular Infection Medicine Sweden (MIMS). Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Molecular Biology (Faculty of Medicine). Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Umeå Centre for Microbial Research (UCMR).
    Integrating network analysis with chromatography: introducing a novel chemometry-chromatography based analytical procedure to classify the bacterial cell wall collection2018In: Analytical Methods, ISSN 1759-9660, E-ISSN 1759-9679, Vol. 10, no 10, p. 1172-1180Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The present work integrates network analysis with chromatography and proposes a novel analytical procedure to classify the bacterial cell wall collection. The network analysis model can capture the heterogeneity present in the datasets and hence can provide unsupervised classification. The proposed approach is successfully applied for classifying the peptidoglycan samples of certain bacterial collections belonging to the class of Alphaproteobacteria. The obtained classification results are found to correlate well with their relative similarity in the peptidoglycan compositions. In summary, the proposed network analysis approach can be helpful in automatizing the bacterial cell wall analysis. The proposed approach can be useful to accelerate the research related to understanding the morphology of bacterial cell walls, host-pathogen interaction and development of effective antibiotics.

  • 184.
    Kumar, Keshav
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Molecular Infection Medicine Sweden (MIMS). Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Molecular Biology (Faculty of Medicine). Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Umeå Centre for Microbial Research (UCMR).
    Cava, Felipe
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Molecular Infection Medicine Sweden (MIMS). Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Molecular Biology (Faculty of Medicine). Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Umeå Centre for Microbial Research (UCMR).
    Principal coordinate analysis assisted chromatographic analysis of bacterial cell wall collection: a robust classification approach2018In: Analytical Biochemistry, ISSN 0003-2697, E-ISSN 1096-0309, Vol. 550, p. 8-14Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In the present work, Principal coordinate analysis (PCoA) is introduced to develop a robust model to classify the chromatographic data sets of peptidoglycan sample. PcoA captures the heterogeneity present in the data sets by using the dissimilarity matrix as input. Thus, in principle, it can even capture the subtle differences in the bacterial peptidoglycan composition and can provide a more robust and fast approach for classifying the bacterial collection and identifying the novel cell wall targets for further biological and clinical studies. The utility of the proposed approach is successfully demonstrated by analysing the two different kind of bacterial collections. The first set comprised of peptidoglycan sample belonging to different subclasses of Alphaproteobacteria. Whereas, the second set that is relatively more intricate for the chemometric analysis consist of different wild type Vibrio Cholerae and its mutants having subtle differences in their peptidoglycan composition. The present work clearly proposes a useful approach that can classify the chromatographic data sets of chromatographic peptidoglycan samples having subtle differences. Furthermore, present work clearly suggest that PCoA can be a method of choice in any data analysis workflow.

  • 185.
    Larsson, Mikael
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Biosciences, Physiological chemistry.
    Caraballo, Rémi
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Department of Chemistry.
    Ericsson, Madelene
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Biosciences, Physiological chemistry.
    Lookene, Aivar
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Biosciences. Tallinn University of Technology, Department of Chemistry, Tallinn, Estonia.
    Enquist, Per-Anders
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Department of Chemistry.
    Elofsson, Mikael
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Department of Chemistry. Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Umeå Centre for Microbial Research (UCMR).
    Nilsson, Stefan K.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Biosciences.
    Olivecrona, Gunilla
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Biosciences, Physiological chemistry.
    Identification of a small molecule that stabilizes lipoprotein lipase in vitro and lowers triglycerides in vivo2014In: Biochemical and Biophysical Research Communications - BBRC, ISSN 0006-291X, E-ISSN 1090-2104, Vol. 450, no 2, p. 1063-1069Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Patients at increased cardiovascular risk commonly display high levels of plasma triglycerides (TGs) levels, elevated LDL cholesterol, small dense LDL particles and low levels of HDL-cholesterol. Many remain at high risk even after successful statin therapy, presumably because TG levels remain high. Lipoprotein lipase (LPL) maintains TG homeostasis in blood by hydrolysis of TG-rich lipoproteins. Efficient clearance of TGs is accompanied by increased levels of HDL-cholesterol and decreased levels of small dense LDL. Given the central role of LPL in lipid metabolism we sought to find small molecules that could increase LPL activity and serve as starting points for drug development efforts against cardiovascular disease. Using a small molecule screening approach we have identified small molecules that can protect LPL from inactivation by the controller protein angiopoietin-like protein 4 during incubations in vitro. One of the selected compounds, 50F10, was directly shown to preserve the active homodimer structure of LPL, as demonstrated by heparin-Sepharose chromatography. This compound tended to reduce fasting TG levels in normal rats. On injection to hypertriglyceridemic apolipoprotein A-V deficient mice the compound ameliorated the postprandial response after an olive oil gavage. This compound is a potential lead compound for the development of drugs that could reduce the residual risk associated with elevated TGs in dyslipidemia.

  • 186. Lavander, Moa
    et al.
    Sundberg, Lena
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Department of Molecular Biology (Faculty of Science and Technology).
    Edqvist, Petra J
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Department of Molecular Biology (Faculty of Science and Technology). Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Molecular Biology (Faculty of Medicine).
    Lloyd, Scott A
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Molecular Biology (Faculty of Medicine). Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Department of Molecular Biology (Faculty of Science and Technology).
    Wolf-Watz, Hans
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Umeå Centre for Microbial Research (UCMR). Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Department of Molecular Biology (Faculty of Science and Technology).
    Forsberg, Ake
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Department of Molecular Biology (Faculty of Science and Technology). Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Umeå Centre for Microbial Research (UCMR).
    Characterisation of the type III secretion protein YscU in Yersinia pseudotuberculosis: YscU cleavage--dispensable for TTSS but essential for survival2003In: Advances in Experimental Medicine and Biology, ISSN 0065-2598, E-ISSN 2214-8019, Vol. 529, p. 109-112Article in journal (Other academic)
  • 187.
    Le Rhun, Anais
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Molecular Infection Medicine Sweden (MIMS). Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Umeå Centre for Microbial Research (UCMR). Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Molecular Biology (Faculty of Medicine). Max Planck Institute for Infection Biology, Department of Regulation in Infection Biology, D-10117 Berlin, Germany; Helmholtz Centre for Infection Research, Department of Regulation in Infection Biology, D-38124 Braunschweig, Germany.
    Lecrivain, Anne-Laure
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Molecular Infection Medicine Sweden (MIMS). Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Umeå Centre for Microbial Research (UCMR). Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Molecular Biology (Faculty of Medicine). Max Planck Institute for Infection Biology, Department of Regulation in Infection Biology, D-10117 Berlin, Germany.
    Reimegard, Johan
    Proux-Wera, Estelle
    Broglia, Laura
    Della Beffa, Cristina
    Charpentier, Emmanuelle
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Molecular Infection Medicine Sweden (MIMS). Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Umeå Centre for Microbial Research (UCMR). Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Molecular Biology (Faculty of Medicine). Max Planck Institute for Infection Biology, Department of Regulation in Infection Biology, D-10117 Berlin, Germany; Helmholtz Centre for Infection Research, Department of Regulation in Infection Biology, D-38124 Braunschweig, Germany; Humboldt University, D-10115 Berlin, Germany.
    Identification of endoribonuclease specific cleavage positions reveals novel targets of RNase III in Streptococcus pyogenes2017In: Nucleic Acids Research, ISSN 0305-1048, E-ISSN 1362-4962, Vol. 45, no 5, p. 2329-2340Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    A better understanding of transcriptional and post-transcriptional regulation of gene expression in bacteria relies on studying their transcriptome. RNA sequencing methods are used not only to assess RNA abundance but also the exact boundaries of primary and processed transcripts. Here, we developed a method, called identification of specific cleavage position (ISCP), which enables the identification of direct endoribonuclease targets in vivo by comparing the 5' and 3' ends of processed transcripts between wild type and RNase deficient strains. To demonstrate the ISCP method, we used as a model the double-stranded specific RNase III in the human pathogen Streptococcus pyogenes. We mapped 92 specific cleavage positions (SCPs) among which, 48 were previously described and 44 are new, with the characteristic 2 nucleotides 3' overhang of RNase III. Most SCPs were located in untranslated regions of RNAs. We screened for RNase III targets using transcriptomic differential expression analysis (DEA) and compared those with the RNase III targets identified using the ISCP method. Our study shows that in S. pyogenes, under standard growth conditions, RNase III has a limited impact both on antisense transcripts and on global gene expression with the expression of most of the affected genes being downregulated in an RNase III deletion mutant.

  • 188.
    Le Rhun, Anaïs
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Molecular Infection Medicine Sweden (MIMS). Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Molecular Biology (Faculty of Medicine). Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Umeå Centre for Microbial Research (UCMR). Helmholtz Centre for Infection Research (HZI), Department of Regulation in Infection Biology, D-38124 Braunschweig, Germany.
    Multifaceted RNA-mediated regulatory mechanisms in Streptococcus pyogenes2015Doctoral thesis, comprehensive summary (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Bacterial pathogens rely on precise regulation of gene expression to coordinate host infection processes and resist invasion by mobile genetic elements. An interconnected network of protein and RNA regulators dynamically controls the expression of virulence factors using a variety of mechanisms. In this thesis, the role of selected regulators, belonging to the class of small RNAs (sRNAs), is investigated.

    Streptococcus pyogenes is a pathogen responsible for a wide range of human diseases. Genome-wide screenings have indicated that S. pyogenes encodes numerous sRNAs, yet only a limited number have been characterized. A major goal of this study was to identify and characterize novel sRNAs and antisense RNAs (asRNAs) using RNA sequencing analysis. We validated 30 novel sRNAs and asRNAs, and identified 9 sRNAs directly cleaved by the ribonucleases RNase III and/or RNase Y.

    Previous work from the laboratory has highlighted the role of sRNAs from the type II Clustered Regularly Interspaced Short Palindromic Repeats-CRISPR associated proteins (CRISPR-Cas) systems in S. pyogenes. CRISPR-Cas systems provide adaptive immunity to prokaryotes against infection by mobile genetic elements. Two sRNAs, forming a complementary duplex (dual-RNA), are effectors of this system: the mature CRISPR RNAs (crRNAs) and the trans-activating crRNA (tracrRNA). The dual-RNA guides the Cas9 endonuclease to cleave both strands of the invading DNA in a sequence-specific manner. This RNA-programmable CRISPR-Cas9 system is now utilized for genome editing and engineering in a wide range of cells and organisms. To expand the potentialities of this tool, we both, searched for Cas9 orthologs and predicted numerous tracrRNA orthologs. We defined tracrRNA as a new family of sRNAs sharing the ability to base-pair to cognate crRNAs, without conservation of structure, sequence or location. We show that Cas9 and the dual tracrRNA:crRNAs are only interchangeable between closely related type II CRISPR-Cas systems.

    In summary, this thesis presents new insights into RNA-mediated regulatory mechanisms in S. pyogenes. We identified and described the expression of novel sRNAs, highlighting potential antisense RNAs. Focusing on the dual-RNA programmable type II CRISPR-Cas system, we provided evidence for co-evolution of the Cas9 enzyme with tracrRNA:crRNA, a basis for Cas9 multiplexing in genome editing.

  • 189.
    Le Rhun, Anaïs
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Molecular Infection Medicine Sweden (MIMS). Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Umeå Centre for Microbial Research (UCMR). Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Molecular Biology (Faculty of Medicine).
    Charpentier, Emmanuelle
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Molecular Infection Medicine Sweden (MIMS). Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Umeå Centre for Microbial Research (UCMR). Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Molecular Biology (Faculty of Medicine).
    Small RNAs in streptococci2012In: RNA Biology, ISSN 1547-6286, E-ISSN 1555-8584, Vol. 9, no 4, p. 414-426Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The group of streptococci includes species responsible for severe diseases in humans. To adapt to their environment and infect their hosts, streptococci depend on precise regulation of gene expression. The last decade has witnessed increasing findings of small RNAs (sRNAs) having regulatory functions in bacteria. More recently, genome-wide screens revealed that streptococcal genomes also encode multiple sRNAs. Some sRNAs including the class of CRISPR RNAs (crRNAs) play critical roles in streptococcal adaptation and virulence. Analysis of sRNA mechanisms uncovered three sRNAs that target in trans mRNA (FasX), sRNA (tracrRNA) and DNA (crRNA). Overall, the current understanding of sRNA-mediated regulation in streptococci remains very limited. Given the complexity of regulatory networks and the number of recently predicted sRNAs, future research should reveal new functions and mechanisms for the streptococcal sRNAs. Here, we provide a comprehensive summary of the information available on the topic.

  • 190.
    Li, Yunlong
    et al.
    Center for Emerging Infectious Diseases, Wuhan Institute of Virology, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Wuhan, China.
    Hu, Yangbo
    Center for Emerging Infectious Diseases, Wuhan Institute of Virology, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Wuhan, China.
    Francis, Matthew
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Umeå Centre for Microbial Research (UCMR). Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Molecular Biology (Faculty of Medicine).
    Chen, Shiyun
    Center for Emerging Infectious Diseases, Wuhan Institute of Virology, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Wuhan, China.
    RcsB positively regulates the Yersinia Ysc-Yop type III secretion system by activating expression of the master transcriptional regulator LcrF2015In: Environmental Microbiology, ISSN 1462-2912, E-ISSN 1462-2920, Vol. 17, no 4, p. 1219-1233Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The Rcs phosphorelay is a complex signaling pathway used by the family Enterobacteriaceae to sense, respond and adapt to environmental changes during free-living or host-associated lifestyles. In this study, we show that the Rcs phosphorelay pathway positively regulates the virulence plasmid encoded Ysc-Yop type III secretion system (T3SS) in the enteropathogen Yesinia pseudotuberculosis. Both the overexpression of the wild-type Rcs regulator RcsB or the constitutive active RscB(D56E) variant triggered more abundant Ysc-Yop synthesis and secretion, whereas the non-phosphorylatable mutant RcsB(D56Q) negated this. Congruently, enhanced Yops expression and secretion occurred in an in cis rscB(D56E) mutant but not in an isogenic rscB(D56Q) mutant. Screening for regulatory targets of RcsB identified the virG-lcrF operon that encodes for LcrF, the Ysc-Yop T3SS master regulator. Protein-DNA binding assays confirmed that RcsB directly bound to this operon promoter, which subsequently caused stimulated lcrF transcription. Moreover, active RcsB enhanced the ability of bacteria to deliver Yop effectors into immune cells during cell contact, and this promoted an increase in bacterial viability. Taken together, our study demonstrates the role of the Rcs system in regulating the Ysc-Yop T3SS in Yersinia and reports on RcsB being the first transcriptional activator known to directly control lcrF transcription.

  • 191.
    Li, Yunlong
    et al.
    Center for Emerging Infectious Diseases, Wuhan Institute of Virology, The Chinese Academy of Sciences, Wuhan, China.
    Li, Lamei
    Center for Emerging Infectious Diseases, Wuhan Institute of Virology, The Chinese Academy of Sciences, Wuhan, China.
    Huang, Li
    Center for Emerging Infectious Diseases, Wuhan Institute of Virology, The Chinese Academy of Sciences, Wuhan, China.
    Francis, Matthew
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Umeå Centre for Microbial Research (UCMR).
    Hu, Yangbo
    Center for Emerging Infectious Diseases, Wuhan Institute of Virology, The Chinese Academy of Sciences, Wuhan, China.
    Chen, Shiyun
    Center for Emerging Infectious Diseases, Wuhan Institute of Virology, The Chinese Academy of Sciences, Wuhan, China.
    Yersinia Ysc-Yop type III secretion feedback inhibition is relieved through YscV-dependent recognition and secretion of LcrQ2014In: Molecular Microbiology, ISSN 0950-382X, E-ISSN 1365-2958, Vol. 91, no 3, p. 494-507Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Human pathogenic Yersinia species share a virulence plasmid encoding the Ysc-Yop type III secretion system (T3SS). A plasmid-encoded anti-activator, LcrQ, negatively regulates the expression of this secretion system. Under inducible conditions, LcrQ is secreted outside of bacterial cells and this activates the T3SS, but the mechanism of targeting LcrQ for type III secretion remains largely unknown. In this study, we characterized the regulatory role of the export apparatus component YscV. Depletion or overexpression of YscV compromised Yop synthesis and this primarily prevented secretion of LcrQ. It followed that a lcrQ deletion reversed the repressive effects of excessive YscV. Further characterization demonstrated that the YscV residues 493–511 located within the C-terminal soluble cytoplasmic domain directly bound with LcrQ. Critically, YscV-LcrQ complex formation was a requirement for LcrQ secretion, since YscVΔ493–511 failed to secrete LcrQ. This forced a cytoplasmic accumulation of LcrQ, which predictably caused the feedback inhibition of Yops synthesis. Based on these observations, we proposed a model for the YscV-dependent secretion of LcrQ and its role in regulating Yop synthesis in Yersinia.

  • 192. Liaci, AM
    et al.
    Chandra, Naresh
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Umeå Centre for Microbial Research (UCMR). Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Molecular Infection Medicine Sweden (MIMS). Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Clinical Microbiology, Section of Virology.
    Munender, S
    Liu, Y
    Pfenning, V
    Bachmann, P
    Caraballo, R
    Chai, W
    Johansson, E
    Cupelli, K
    Hassemer, T
    Blaum, B
    Elofsson, M
    Feizi, T
    Arnberg, N
    Stehle, T
    Primary attachment receptors of human adenovirus type 36Manuscript (preprint) (Other academic)
  • 193.
    Lindell, Kristoffer
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Department of Molecular Biology (Faculty of Science and Technology). Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Umeå Centre for Microbial Research (UCMR).
    Fahlgren, Anna
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Molecular Biology (Faculty of Medicine). Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Umeå Centre for Microbial Research (UCMR).
    Hjerde, Erik
    Willassen, Nils-Peder
    Fällman, Maria
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Molecular Biology (Faculty of Medicine). Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Umeå Centre for Microbial Research (UCMR).
    Milton, Debra
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Molecular Biology (Faculty of Medicine). Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Umeå Centre for Microbial Research (UCMR).
    Lipopolysaccharide O-Antigen Prevents Phagocytosis of Vibrio anguillarum by Rainbow Trout (Oncorhynchus mykiss) Skin Epithelial Cells2012In: PLoS ONE, ISSN 1932-6203, E-ISSN 1932-6203, Vol. 7, no 5, p. e37678-Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Colonization of host tissues is a first step taken by many pathogens during the initial stages of infection. Despite the impact of bacterial disease on wild and farmed fish, only a few direct studies have characterized bacterial factors required for colonization of fish tissues. In this study, using live-cell and confocal microscopy, rainbow trout skin epithelial cells, the main structural component of the skin epidermis, were demonstrated to phagocytize bacteria. Mutant analyses showed that the fish pathogen Vibrio anguillarum required the lipopolysaccharide O-antigen to evade phagocytosis and that O-antigen transport required the putative wzm-wzt-wbhA operon, which encodes two ABC polysaccharide transporter proteins and a methyltransferase. Pretreatment of the epithelial cells with mannose prevented phagocytosis of V. anguillarum suggesting that a mannose receptor is involved in the uptake process. In addition, the O-antigen transport mutants could not colonize the skin but they did colonize the intestines of rainbow trout. The O-antigen polysaccharides were also shown to aid resistance to the antimicrobial factors, lysozyme and polymyxin B. In summary, rainbow trout skin epithelial cells play a role in the fish innate immunity by clearing bacteria from the skin epidermis. In defense, V. anguillarum utilizes O-antigen polysaccharides to evade phagocytosis by the epithelial cells allowing it to colonize rapidly fish skin tissues.

  • 194.
    Lindgren, Anders E G
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Department of Chemistry.
    Larsson, Andreas
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Department of Chemistry.
    Linusson, Anna
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Department of Chemistry.
    Elofsson, Michael
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Department of Chemistry. Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Umeå Centre for Microbial Research (UCMR).
    Statistical molecular design: a tool to follow up hits from small-molecule screening.2014In: Methods in Molecular Biology, ISSN 1064-3745, E-ISSN 1940-6029, Vol. 1056, p. 169-188Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In high-throughput screening (HTS) a robust assay is used to interrogate a large collection of small organic molecules in order to find compounds, hits, with a desired biological activity. The hits are then further explored by an iterative process where new compounds are designed, purchased, or synthesized, followed by an evaluation in one or more assays. Statistical molecular design (SMD) is a useful method to select a balanced, varied, and information-rich compound collection based on hits from HTS in order to create a foundation for development of optimized compounds with improved properties. In this chapter, we describe the use of SMD to explore a hit obtained from small-molecule screening.

  • 195.
    Lindgren, Helena
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Clinical Microbiology, Clinical Bacteriology. Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Molecular Infection Medicine Sweden (MIMS).
    Honn, Marie
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Clinical Microbiology, Clinical Bacteriology. Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Molecular Infection Medicine Sweden (MIMS).
    Salomonsson, Emelie
    Kuoppa, Kerstin
    Forsberg, Åke
    Swedish Def Res Agcy, Div CBRN Def & Secur, SE-90182 Umea, Sweden .
    Sjöstedt, Anders
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Clinical Microbiology. Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Molecular Infection Medicine Sweden (MIMS). Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Umeå Centre for Microbial Research (UCMR).
    Iron content differs between Francisella tularensis subspecies tularensis and subspecies holarctica strains and correlates to their susceptibility to H(2)O(2)-induced killing2011In: Infection and Immunity, ISSN 0019-9567, E-ISSN 1098-5522, Vol. 79, no 3, p. 1218-1224Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Francisella tularensis, the causative agent of tularemia, is one of the most infectious bacterial pathogens known and is classified as a category A select agent and a facultative intracellular bacterium. Why F. tularensis subsp. tularensis causes a more severe form of tularemia than F. tularensis subsp. holarctica does is not known. In this study, we have identified prominent phenotypic differences between the subspecies, since we found that F. tularensis subsp. tularensis strains contained less iron than F. tularensis subsp. holarctica strains. Moreover, strain SCHU S4 of F. tularensis subsp. tularensis was less susceptible than FSC200 and the live vaccine strain (LVS) of F. tularensis subsp. holarctica to H(2)O(2)-induced killing. The activity of the H(2)O(2)-degrading enzyme catalase was similar between the strains, whereas the iron content affected their susceptibility to H(2)O(2), since iron starvation rendered F. tularensis subsp. holarctica strains more resistant to H(2)O(2). Complementing LVS with fupA, which encodes an important virulence factor that regulates iron uptake, reduced its iron content and increased the resistance to H(2)O(2)-mediated killing. By real-time PCR, it was demonstrated that FSC200 and LVS expressed higher levels of gene transcripts related to iron uptake and storage than SCHU S4 did, and this likely explained their high iron content. Together, the results suggest that F. tularensis subsp. tularensis strains have restricted iron uptake and storage, which is beneficial for their resistance to H(2)O(2)-induced killing. This may be an important factor for the higher virulence of this subspecies of F. tularensis, as reactive oxygen species, such as H(2)O(2), are important bactericidal components during tularemia.

  • 196.
    Lindholm, Mark
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Odontology.
    Aung, Kyaw Min
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Umeå Centre for Microbial Research (UCMR). Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Molecular Biology (Faculty of Medicine).
    Wai, Sun Nyunt
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Umeå Centre for Microbial Research (UCMR). Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Molecular Biology (Faculty of Medicine).
    Oscarsson, Jan
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Odontology.
    Role of OmpA1 and OmpA2 in Aggregatibacter actinomycetemcomitans and Aggregatibacter aphrophilus serum resistance2019In: Journal of Oral Microbiology, ISSN 2000-2297, E-ISSN 2000-2297, Vol. 11, no 1, article id 1536192Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Aggregatibacter actinomycetemcomitans and Aggregatibacter aphrophilus belong to the HACEK group of fastidious Gram-negative organisms, a recognized cause of infective endocarditis. A. actinomycetemcomitans is also implicated in aggressive forms of periodontitis. We demonstrated that A. aphrophilus strains, as A. actinomycetemcomitans are ubiquitously serum resistant. Both species encode two Outer membrane protein A paralogues, here denoted OmpA1 and OmpA2. As their respective pangenomes contain several OmpA1 and OmpA2 alleles, they represent potential genotypic markers. A naturally competent strain of A. actinomycetemcomitans and A. aphrophilus, respectively were used to elucidate if OmpA1 and OmpA2 contribute to serum resistance. Whereas OmpA1 was critical for survival of A. actinomycetemcomitans D7SS in 50% normal human serum (NHS), serum resistant ompA1 mutants were fortuitously obtained, expressing enhanced levels of OmpA2. Similarly, OmpA1 rather than OmpA2 was a major contributor to serum resistance of A. aphrophilus HK83. Far-Western blot revealed that OmpA1AA, OmpA2AA, and OmpA1AP can bind to C4-binding protein, an inhibitor of classical and mannose-binding lectin (MBL) complement activation. Indeed, ompA1 mutants were susceptible to these pathways, but also to alternative complement activation. This may at least partly reflect a compromised outer membrane integrity but is also consistent with alternative mechanisms involved in OmpA-mediated serum resistance.

  • 197.
    Lindquist, Richard
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Clinical Microbiology, Virology. Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Molecular Infection Medicine Sweden (MIMS). Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Umeå Centre for Microbial Research (UCMR).
    Överby, Anna K.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Clinical Microbiology, Virology. Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Molecular Infection Medicine Sweden (MIMS). Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Umeå Centre for Microbial Research (UCMR).
    The Role of Viperin in Antiflavivirus Responses2018In: DNA and Cell Biology, ISSN 1044-5498, E-ISSN 1557-7430, Vol. 37, no 9, p. 725-730Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Viperin is an interferon (IFN)-stimulated gene product, which is part of the first line of the intracellular response against viral infection. It is a potent antiviral protein, strongly upregulated after IFN-stimulation and virus infection. Viperin is antivirally active against many different viruses from different families and has been shown to inhibit several flaviviruses. Flaviviruses are an important group of arthropod-borne viruses that cause millions of infections annually. In this review, we focus on the recent advances of the antiviral mechanisms of viperin against these flaviviruses, both pointing to similarities and differences between viruses within the same genera.

  • 198.
    Lindqvist, Richard
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Clinical Microbiology, Virology. Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Molecular Infection Medicine Sweden (MIMS). Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Umeå Centre for Microbial Research (UCMR).
    Upadhyay, Arunkumar S.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Clinical Microbiology, Virology. Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Molecular Infection Medicine Sweden (MIMS). Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Umeå Centre for Microbial Research (UCMR).
    Överby, Anna K.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Clinical Microbiology, Virology. Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Molecular Infection Medicine Sweden (MIMS). Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Umeå Centre for Microbial Research (UCMR).
    Tick-Borne Flaviviruses and the Type I Interferon Response2018In: Viruses, ISSN 1999-4915, E-ISSN 1999-4915, Vol. 10, no 7, article id 340Article, review/survey (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Flaviviruses are globally distributed pathogens causing millions of human infections every year. Flaviviruses are arthropod-borne viruses and are mainly transmitted by either ticks or mosquitoes. Mosquito-borne flaviviruses and their interactions with the innate immune response have been well-studied and reviewed extensively, thus this review will discuss tick-borne flaviviruses and their interactions with the host innate immune response.

  • 199.
    Liu, Junfa
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Department of Molecular Biology (Faculty of Science and Technology). Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Umeå Centre for Microbial Research (UCMR).
    Obi, Ikenna R
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Department of Molecular Biology (Faculty of Science and Technology). Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Umeå Centre for Microbial Research (UCMR).
    Thanikkal, Edvin J
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Department of Molecular Biology (Faculty of Science and Technology). Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Umeå Centre for Microbial Research (UCMR).
    Kieselbach, Thomas
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Department of Chemistry.
    Francis, Matthew S
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Department of Molecular Biology (Faculty of Science and Technology). Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Umeå Centre for Microbial Research (UCMR).
    Phosphorylated CpxR Restricts Production of the RovA Global Regulator in Yersinia pseudotuberculosis2011In: PLoS ONE, ISSN 1932-6203, E-ISSN 1932-6203, Vol. 6, no 8, p. e23314-Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: RovA is a global transcriptional regulator of gene expression in pathogenic Yersinia. RovA levels are kept in check by a sophisticated layering of distinct transcriptional and post-transcriptional regulatory mechanisms. In the enteropathogen Y. pseudotuberculosis, we have previously reported that the extracytoplasmic stress sensing CpxA-CpxR two-component regulatory system modulates rovA expression.

    Methodology/Principal Findings: In this study, we characterized CpxR phosphorylation (CpxR similar to P) in vitro, and determined that phosphorylation was necessary for CpxR to efficiently bind to the PCR-amplified upstream regulatory region of rovA. The precise CpxR similar to P binding site was mapped by a nuclease protection assay and directed mutagenesis confirmed that in vivo binding to the rovA promoter inhibits transcription. Reduced RovA production was most pronounced following CpxR, P accumulation in the Yersinia cytoplasm during chronic Cpx pathway activation and by the indiscriminate phosphodonor action of acetyl phosphate.

    Conclusions/Significance: Cpx pathway activation restricts levels of the RovA global regulator. The regulatory influence of CpxR similar to P must therefore extend well beyond periplasmic quality control in the Yersinia envelope, to include genes involved in environmental survival and pathogenicity.

  • 200.
    Liu, Junfa
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Department of Molecular Biology (Faculty of Science and Technology). Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Umeå Centre for Microbial Research (UCMR).
    Thanikkal, Edvin
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Department of Molecular Biology (Faculty of Science and Technology). Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Umeå Centre for Microbial Research (UCMR).
    Obi, Ikenna
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Department of Molecular Biology (Faculty of Science and Technology). Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Umeå Centre for Microbial Research (UCMR).
    Francis, Matthew
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Department of Molecular Biology (Faculty of Science and Technology). Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Umeå Centre for Microbial Research (UCMR).
    Elevated CpxR~P levels repress the Ysc-Yop type III secretion system of Yersinia pseudotuberculosis2012In: Research in Microbiology, ISSN 0923-2508, E-ISSN 1769-7123, Vol. 163, no 8, p. 518-530Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    One way that Gram-negative bacteria respond to extracytoplasmic stress is through the CpxA-CpxR system. An activated CpxA sensor kinase phosphorylates the CpxR response regulator to instigate positive auto-amplification of Cpx pathway activation, as well as synthesis of various bacterial survival factors. In the absence of CpxA, human enteropathogenic Yersinia pseudotuberculosis accumulates high CpxR~P levels aided by the action of low molecular weight phosphodonors such as acetyl~P. Critically, these bacteria are also defective for plasmid encoded Ysc-Yop-dependent type III synthesis and secretion, an essential determinant of virulence. Herein, we investigated whether elevated CpxR~P levels account for lost Ysc-Yop function. Decisively, reducing CpxR~P in Yersinia defective for CpxA phosphatase activity - through incorporating second-site suppressor mutations in ackA-pta or cpxR - dramatically restored Ysc-Yop T3S function. Moreover, the repressive effect of accumulated CpxR~P is a direct consequence of binding to the promoter regions of the T3S genes. Thus, Cpx pathway activation has two consequences in Yersinia; one, to maintain quality control in the bacterial envelope, and the second, to restrict ysc-yop gene expression to those occasions where it will have maximal effect.

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