umu.sePublications
Change search
Refine search result
1234567 151 - 200 of 1569
CiteExportLink to result list
Permanent link
Cite
Citation style
  • apa
  • ieee
  • modern-language-association-8th-edition
  • vancouver
  • Other style
More styles
Language
  • de-DE
  • en-GB
  • en-US
  • fi-FI
  • nn-NO
  • nn-NB
  • sv-SE
  • Other locale
More languages
Output format
  • html
  • text
  • asciidoc
  • rtf
Rows per page
  • 5
  • 10
  • 20
  • 50
  • 100
  • 250
Sort
  • Standard (Relevance)
  • Author A-Ö
  • Author Ö-A
  • Title A-Ö
  • Title Ö-A
  • Publication type A-Ö
  • Publication type Ö-A
  • Issued (Oldest first)
  • Issued (Newest first)
  • Created (Oldest first)
  • Created (Newest first)
  • Last updated (Oldest first)
  • Last updated (Newest first)
  • Disputation date (earliest first)
  • Disputation date (latest first)
  • Standard (Relevance)
  • Author A-Ö
  • Author Ö-A
  • Title A-Ö
  • Title Ö-A
  • Publication type A-Ö
  • Publication type Ö-A
  • Issued (Oldest first)
  • Issued (Newest first)
  • Created (Oldest first)
  • Created (Newest first)
  • Last updated (Oldest first)
  • Last updated (Newest first)
  • Disputation date (earliest first)
  • Disputation date (latest first)
Select
The maximal number of hits you can export is 250. When you want to export more records please use the Create feeds function.
  • 151.
    Bodin, Ingrid
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Odontology.
    Lind, Magnus
    Henningsson, Gunilla
    Isberg, Annika
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Odontology, Oral and Maxillofacial Radiology.
    Deterioration of intraoral hole size identification after treatment of oral and pharyngeal cancer.1999In: Acta Oto-Laryngologica, ISSN 0001-6489, E-ISSN 1651-2251, Vol. 119, no 5, p. 609-616Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Thirty-one patients with a diagnosed malignant tumour of the oral cavity or pharynx were tested in hole size identification on four test occasions: before all treatment, after radiotherapy and 6 months and 1 year after surgical treatment. They were compared within groups as well as with a group of healthy reference individuals of the same age who underwent the same test procedure at a 2 months' interval. The oral group did not decline in hole size identification after radiotherapy, but did after surgery. The deterioration was persistent 1 year after surgery. The pharyngeal group did not change performance in hole size identification after radiotherapy, nor after surgery. It is obvious that surgery of the oral structures causes the deterioration. No correlation with damage to the lingual nerve could be registered. The oral cavity reacts as one unit, despite sensory input from two sides. The non-operated side does not compensate for the operated side. It is plausible that decreased oral sensory acuity, in recognizing hole size of the bolus, contributes to postoperative swallowing problems.

  • 152.
    Bodin, Ingrid
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Odontology.
    Lind, Magnus
    Henningsson, Gunilla
    Isberg, Annika
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Odontology, Oral and Maxillofacial Radiology.
    Deterioration of intraoral recognition of shapes after treatment of oral and pharyngeal cancer.2000In: Otolaryngology and head and neck surgery, ISSN 0194-5998, E-ISSN 1097-6817, Vol. 122, no 4, p. 584-589Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Thirty patients with diagnosed malignant tumors of the oral cavity or pharynx were tested in regards to intraoral shape recognition at 4 test occasions: before all treatment, after radiotherapy, 6 months after surgery, and 1 year after surgery. They were compared within groups as well as with a group of healthy reference individuals of the same age who underwent the same test procedure at a 2-month interval. The tumor itself did not influence the capability of shape recognition. The reference individuals demonstrated significantly better results on the second test occasion, which is known as a learning effect. Learning improvement was not seen in the patients whose second test occasions were after radiotherapy, implying an impediment amounting to the magnitude of the learning effect. At 6 months after surgery the patients' capabilities of shape recognition had deteriorated significantly with no difference between the oral cancer group and the pharyngeal cancer group. No spontaneous rehabilitation had taken place 1 year after surgery. The presence or absence of surgical lingual nerve damage did not influence the results. The nonoperated side does not compensate for the operated one. It is plausible that decreased oral sensory acuity in recognizing the shape of the bolus contributes to postoperative swallowing problems.

  • 153.
    Bodén, Stina
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Radiation Sciences, Oncology.
    Myte, Robin
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Radiation Sciences, Oncology.
    Wennberg, Maria
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine, Nutritional Research. Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine, Section of Sustainable Health.
    Harlid, Sophia
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Radiation Sciences, Oncology.
    Johansson, Ingegerd
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Odontology, School of Dentistry. Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine, Section of Sustainable Health.
    Shivappa, Nitin
    Hébert, James R
    van Guelpen, Bethany
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Radiation Sciences, Oncology. Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Wallenberg Centre for Molecular Medicine at Umeå University (WCMM).
    Nilsson, Lena Maria
    Umeå University, Arctic Research Centre at Umeå University. Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine, Nutritional Research. Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine, Section of Sustainable Health.
    The inflammatory potential of diet in determining cancer risk: a prospective investigation of two dietary pattern scores2019In: PLoS ONE, ISSN 1932-6203, E-ISSN 1932-6203, Vol. 14, no 4, article id e0214551Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    PURPOSE: Inflammation-related mechanisms may contribute to the link between diet and cancer. We sought to investigate the inflammatory impact of diet on cancer risk using the Dietary inflammatory index (DII) and an adapted Mediterranean diet score (MDS).

    METHODS: This population-based, prospective cohort study used self-reported dietary data from the Västerbotten Intervention Programme, including 100,881 participants, of whom 35,393 had repeated measures. Associations between dietary patterns and cancer risk were evaluated using Cox proportional hazards regression. We also used restricted cubic splines to test for potential non-linear associations.

    RESULTS: A total of 9,250 incident cancer cases were diagnosed during a median follow-up of 15 years. The two dietary patterns were moderately correlated to each other and had similar associations with cancer risk, predominantly lung cancer in men (DII per tertile decrease: Hazard ratio (HR) 0.81 (0.66-0.99), MDS per tertile increase: HR 0.86 (0.72-1.03)), and gastric cancer in men (DII: 0.73 (0.53-0.99), MDS: 0.73 (0.56-0.96)). Associations were, in general, found to be linear. We found no longitudinal association between 10-year change in diet and cancer risk.

    CONCLUSION: We confirm small, but consistent and statistically significant associations between a more anti-inflammatory or healthier diet and reduced risk of cancer, including a lower risk of lung and gastric cancer in men. The dietary indexes produced similar associations with respect to the risk of cancer.

  • 154. Boeing, H
    et al.
    Dietrich, T
    Hoffmann, K
    Pischon, T
    Ferrari, P
    Lahmann, PH
    Boutron-Ruault, MC
    Clavel-Chapelon, F
    Allen, N
    Key, T
    Skeie, G
    Lund, E
    Olsen, A
    Tjonneland, A
    Overvad, K
    Jensen, MK
    Rohrmann, S
    Linseisen, J
    Trichopoulou, A
    Bamia, C
    Psalttopoulou, T
    Weinehall, L
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine, Epidemiology and Public Health Sciences.
    Johansson, Ingegerd
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Odontology, Cariology.
    Sanchez, MJ
    Jakszyn, P
    Ardanaz, E
    Amiano, P
    Chirlaque, MD
    Quiros, JR
    Wirfalt, E
    Berglund, G
    Peeters, PH
    van Gils, CH
    Bueno-de-Mesquita, HB
    Buchner, FL
    Berrino, F
    Palli, D
    Sacerdote, C
    Tumino, R
    Panico, S
    Bingham, S
    Khaw, KT
    Slimani, N
    Norat, T
    Jenab, M
    Riboli, E
    Intake of fruits and vegetables and risk of cancer of the upper aero-digestive tract: the prospective EPIC-study.2006In: Cancer Causes and Control, ISSN 0957-5243, E-ISSN 1573-7225, Vol. 17, no 7, p. 957-969Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Epidemiologic studies suggest that a high intake of fruits and vegetables is associated with decreased risk of cancers of the upper aero-digestive tract. We studied data from 345,904 subjects of the prospective European Investigation into Cancer and Nutrition (EPIC) recruited in seven European countries, who had completed a dietary questionnaire in 1992-1998. During 2,182,560 person years of observation 352 histologically verified incident squamous cell cancer (SCC) cases (255 males; 97 females) of the oral cavity, pharynx, larynx, and esophagus were identified. Linear and restricted cubic spline Cox regressions were fitted on variables of intake of fruits and vegetables and adjusted for potential confounders. We observed a significant inverse association with combined total fruits and vegetables intake (estimated relative risk (RR) = 0.91; 95% confidence interval (95% CI) 0.83-1.00 per 80 g/d of consumption), and nearly significant inverse associations in separate analyses with total fruits and total vegetables intake (RR: 0.97 (95% CI: 0.92-1.02) and RR = 0.89 (95% CI: 0.78-1.02) per 40 g/d of consumption). Overall, vegetable subgroups were not related to risk with the exception of intake of root vegetables in men. Restricted cubic spline regression did not improve the linear model fits except for total fruits and vegetables and total fruits with a significant decrease in risk at low intake levels (<120 g/d) for fruits. Dietary recommendations should consider the potential benefit of increasing fruits and vegetables consumption for reducing the risk of cancers of the upper aero-digestive tract, particularly at low intake.

  • 155. Boffetta, Paolo
    et al.
    Couto, Elisabeth
    Wichmann, Janine
    Ferrari, Pietro
    Trichopoulos, Dimitrios
    Bueno-de-Mesquita, H Bas
    van Duijnhoven, Fränzel J B
    Büchner, Frederike L
    Key, Tim
    Boeing, Heiner
    Nöthlings, Ute
    Linseisen, Jakob
    Gonzalez, Carlos A
    Overvad, Kim
    Nielsen, Michael R S
    Tjønneland, Anne
    Olsen, Anja
    Clavel-Chapelon, Françoise
    Boutron-Ruault, Marie-Christine
    Morois, Sophie
    Lagiou, Pagona
    Naska, Androniki
    Benetou, Vassiliki
    Kaaks, Rudolf
    Rohrmann, Sabine
    Panico, Salvatore
    Sieri, Sabina
    Vineis, Paolo
    Palli, Domenico
    van Gils, Carla H
    Peeters, Petra H
    Lund, Eiliv
    Brustad, Magritt
    Engeset, Dagrun
    Huerta, José María
    Rodríguez, Laudina
    Sánchez, Maria-José
    Dorronsoro, Miren
    Barricarte, Aurelio
    Hallmans, Göran
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine, Nutritional Research.
    Johansson, Ingegerd
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine, Nutritional Research. Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Odontology, Cariology.
    Manjer, Jonas
    Sonestedt, Emily
    Allen, Naomi E
    Bingham, Sheila
    Khaw, Kay-Tee
    Slimani, Nadia
    Jenab, Mazda
    Mouw, Traci
    Norat, Teresa
    Riboli, Elio
    Trichopoulou, Antonia
    Fruit and vegetable intake and overall cancer risk in the European prospective investigation into cancer and nutrition (EPIC)2010In: Journal of the National Cancer Institute, ISSN 0027-8874, E-ISSN 1460-2105, Vol. 102, no 8, p. 529-537Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    BACKGROUND: It is widely believed that cancer can be prevented by high intake of fruits and vegetables. However, inconsistent results from many studies have not been able to conclusively establish an inverse association between fruit and vegetable intake and overall cancer risk. METHODS: We conducted a prospective analysis of the European Prospective Investigation into Cancer and Nutrition (EPIC) cohort to assess relationships between intake of total fruits, total vegetables, and total fruits and vegetables combined and cancer risk during 1992-2000. Detailed information on the dietary habit and lifestyle variables of the cohort was obtained. Cancer incidence and mortality data were ascertained, and hazard ratios (HRs) and 95% confidence intervals (CIs) were estimated using multivariable Cox regression models. Analyses were also conducted for cancers associated with tobacco and alcohol after stratification for tobacco smoking and alcohol drinking. RESULTS: Of the initial 142 605 men and 335 873 women included in the study, 9604 men and 21 000 women were identified with cancer after a median follow-up of 8.7 years. The crude cancer incidence rates were 7.9 per 1000 person-years in men and 7.1 per 1000 person-years in women. Associations between reduced cancer risk and increased intake of total fruits and vegetables combined and total vegetables for the entire cohort were similar (200 g/d increased intake of fruits and vegetables combined, HR = 0.97, 95% CI = 0.96 to 0.99; 100 g/d increased intake of total vegetables, HR = 0.98, 95% CI = 0.97 to 0.99); intake of fruits showed a weaker inverse association (100 g/d increased intake of total fruits, HR = 0.99, 95% CI = 0.98 to 1.00). The reduced risk of cancer associated with high vegetable intake was restricted to women (HR = 0.98, 95% CI = 0.97 to 0.99). Stratification by alcohol intake suggested a stronger reduction in risk in heavy drinkers and was confined to cancers caused by smoking and alcohol. CONCLUSIONS: A very small inverse association between intake of total fruits and vegetables and cancer risk was observed in this study. Given the small magnitude of the observed associations, caution should be applied in their interpretation.

  • 156.
    Boles, Usama
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine, Cardiology. Cardiology Department, Letterkenny University Hospital, Letterkenny, Co. Donegal, Ireland.
    Johansson, Anders
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Odontology. Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine, Family Medicine.
    Wiklund, Urban
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Radiation Sciences.
    Sharif, Zain
    David, Santhosh
    McGrory, Siobhan
    Henein, Michael Y.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine, Cardiology. Molecular & Clinical Sciences Research Institute, St. George University, London, UK.
    Cytokine Disturbances in Coronary Artery Ectasia Do Not Support Atherosclerosis Pathogenesis2018In: International Journal of Molecular Sciences, ISSN 1422-0067, E-ISSN 1422-0067, Vol. 19, no 1, article id 260Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    BACKGROUND: Coronary artery ectasia (CAE) is a rare disorder commonly associated with additional features of atherosclerosis. In the present study, we aimed to examine the systemic immune-inflammatory response that might associate CAE.

    METHODS: Plasma samples were obtained from 16 patients with coronary artery ectasia (mean age 64.9 ± 7.3 years, 6 female), 69 patients with coronary artery disease (CAD) and angiographic evidence for atherosclerosis (age 64.5 ± 8.7 years, 41 female), and 140 controls (mean age 58.6 ± 4.1 years, 40 female) with normal coronary arteries. Samples were analyzed at Umeå University Biochemistry Laboratory, Sweden, using the V-PLEX Pro-Inflammatory Panel 1 (human) Kit. Statistically significant differences (p < 0.05) between patient groups and controls were determined using Mann-Whitney U-tests.

    RESULTS: The CAE patients had significantly higher plasma levels of INF-γ, TNF-α, IL-1β, and IL-8 (p = 0.007, 0.01, 0.001, and 0.002, respectively), and lower levels of IL-2 and IL-4 (p < 0.001 for both) compared to CAD patients and controls. The plasma levels of IL-10, IL-12p, and IL-13 were not different between the three groups. None of these markers could differentiate between patients with pure (n = 6) and mixed with minimal atherosclerosis (n = 10) CAE.

    CONCLUSIONS: These results indicate an enhanced systemic pro-inflammatory response in CAE. The profile of this response indicates activation of macrophages through a pathway and trigger different from those of atherosclerosis immune inflammatory response.

  • 157.
    Boman, Andreas
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Odontology.
    Selvin, Jakob
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Odontology, School of Dentistry.
    Softening Efficacy of Various Solvents on Gutta-percha and Root Canal Sealer2016Independent thesis Advanced level (professional degree), 20 credits / 30 HE creditsStudent thesis
    Abstract [en]

    Solvents have been used in endodontic retreatment for a long time and the dissolving effect is well proven. Latterly chloroform has come in a bad light due to its possible carcinogenicity. Despite the negative health effect it is still used in dental environment. Other more biocompatible solvents have now reached the market and tests should be performed to evaluate the softening efficacy. The purpose of this in-vitro study was to evaluate the softening efficacy of four different solvents used in endodontics; chloroform, eucalyptol, tetrachloroethylene, orange-oil and a control group. 100 simulated canals filled with gutta-percha, epoxy amine resin based sealer, zinc oxide eugenol based sealer and non eugenolcalcium hydroxide based sealer were tested with hardness measurement before and after two minutes exposure time of medicament. Non-eugenol calcium hydroxide failed to set and was excluded from the test. A Shore A durometer was used to evaluate the hardness of the materials and all data was first analyzed with Kruskal-Wallis test and then Mann-Whitney test to compare with control group. With a digital camera connected to a microscope we also took pictures to compare the impressions with the different medicaments. The result showed that chloroform and tetrachloroethylene is significant better to soften gutta-percha than control group (p < 0.05) but only chloroform significant better than control group to soften epoxy amine resin based sealer and zinc oxide eugenol based sealer (p < 0.05). Even if the result was significant, we cannot draw any conclusions due to small sample size.

  • 158. Bondemark, L
    et al.
    Holm, AK
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Odontology, Pediatric Dentistry.
    Hansen, K
    Mohlin, S
    Brattström, V
    Paulin, G
    Pietila, T
    Long-term stability of orthodontic treatment and patient satisfaction. A systematic review.2007In: The Angle orthodontist, Vol. 77, no 1, p. 181-91Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    OBJECTIVE: To evaluate morphologic stability and patient satisfaction at least 5 years after orthodontic treatment. MATERIALS AND METHODS: Published literature was searched through the PubMed and Cochrane Library electronic databases from 1966 to January 2005. The search was performed by an information specialist at the Swedish Council on Technology Assessment in Health Care. The inclusion criteria consisted of a follow-up period of at least 5 years postretention; randomized clinical trials, prospective or retrospective clinical controlled studies, and cohort studies; and orthodontic treatment including fixed or removable appliances, selective grinding, or extractions. Two reviewers extracted the data independently and also assessed the quality of the studies. RESULTS: The search strategy resulted in 1004 abstracts or full-text articles, of which 38 met the inclusion criteria. Treatment of crowding resulted in successful dental alignment. However, the mandibular arch length and width gradually decreased, and crowding of the lower anterior teeth reoccurred postretention. This condition was unpredictable at the individual level (limited evidence). Treatment of Angle Class II division 1 malocclusion with Herbst appliance normalized the occlusion. Relapse occurred but could not be predicted at the individual level (limited evidence). The scientific evidence was insufficient for conclusions on treatment of cross-bite, Angle Class III, open bite, and various other malocclusions as well as on patient satisfaction in a long-term perspective. CONCLUSIONS: This review has exposed the difficulties in drawing meaningful evidence-based conclusions often because of the inherent problems of retrospective and uncontrolled study design.

  • 159.
    Borgström, Rebecka
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Odontology.
    Wallmark, Olof
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Odontology.
    Vertical Displacement with Increased Mandibular Advancement-Comparisons between Two Oral Appliances for Sleep Apnea2015Independent thesis Advanced level (professional degree), 20 credits / 30 HE creditsStudent thesis
    Abstract [en]

    Obstructive sleep apnea (OSA) is a chronic condition that is increasing in prevalence around the world as a result of overweight and obesity epidemics. In mild and moderate OSA, an oral appliance (OA) is an effective treatment alternative. This appliance holds the mandible forward and downwards during sleep in order to increase the upper airway dimension and reduce snoring and sleep apneas. More advancement increases the efficacy of the device. A large vertical opening of the mandible may reduce the cross sectional area of the velopharynx and reduce the positive effects on sleep apneas and decrease comfort. The aim of the present study was to test the hypothesis that the vertical opening changes with an increase in mandibular advancement and that the change differed between one type of OA (OA1) compared with another type of OA (OA2). The vertical opening in the appliances was measured in the two positions, using a digital sliding calliper. The two mandibular positions in each device were measured twice on separate occasions in a random order. The opening changed a median of 0.09 mm (IQR 0.02 to 0.16 mm) with OA2 (p=0.002) and 0.04 mm (IQR -0.04 to 0.12 mm) with OA1 (p=0.38), with no difference in change between them (p=0.14). In conclusion, this pilot study indicates that there is no clinically significant change in opening with increased advancement and also no difference between devices and therefore no indications to change the designs of the two investigated devices.

     

     

  • 160.
    Borhani, Adrian
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Odontology.
    Gabrielsson, Klas
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Odontology.
    The effects of aging on high translucent zirconia2018Independent thesis Advanced level (professional degree), 20 credits / 30 HE creditsStudent thesis
  • 161.
    Borys, Jennifer
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Odontology, School of Dentistry.
    Higher Voltage Influence on Optimal Caries Diagnosis in Digital Radiography2014Independent thesis Advanced level (degree of Master (Two Years)), 20 credits / 30 HE creditsStudent thesis
    Abstract [en]

    It has previously been shown that caries diagnostics is improved when performed on radiographs exposed with a voltage of 60 kV compared to 70 kV. This is because low voltage provides higher subject contrast.

    The aim of the present study was to investigate whether the tube voltage used when exposing bitewings, influence the possibility to diagnose caries when using a new digital system with CMOS-sensors.

    Extracted teeth were mounted and bitewings exposed with both 60 and 70 kV and varying exposure times, using a digital system with CMOS-sensors. Observers with different experience in dentistry evaluated the radiographs for caries. CBCT of each single tooth was used as golden standard.

    There was no significant difference between the results of diagnosing caries between radiographs exposed with 60 kV compared to 70 kV. All radiographs that were exposed to an acceptable level of brightness gave similar result, independent on voltage.

    In conclusion; there was no significant difference between radiographic caries diagnosis performed with radiographs exposed with 60 compared to 70 kV, given that the exposure time was optimized. This indicates that 70 kV can be used for all intraoral examination if a correct decreased exposure time is used and that lowering to 60 kV is not necessary when intraoral examinations for caries evaluation are performed.

  • 162. Boström, Elisabeth A.
    et al.
    Kindstedt, Elin
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Odontology.
    Sulniute, Rima
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Odontology.
    Palmqvist, Py
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Odontology.
    Majster, Mirjam
    Holm, Cecilia Koskinen
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Odontology.
    Zwicker, Stephanie
    Clark, Reuben
    Önell, Sebastian
    Johansson, Ingegerd
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Odontology.
    Lerner, Ulf H.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Odontology. Univ Gothenburg, Sahlgrenska Acad, Ctr Bone & Arthrit Res, Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Lundberg, Pernilla
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Odontology.
    Increased Eotaxin and MCP-1 Levels in Serum from Individuals with Periodontitis and in Human Gingival Fibroblasts Exposed to Pro-Inflammatory Cytokines2015In: PLoS ONE, ISSN 1932-6203, E-ISSN 1932-6203, Vol. 10, no 8, article id e0134608Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Periodontitis is a chronic inflammatory disease of tooth supporting tissues resulting in periodontal tissue destruction, which may ultimately lead to tooth loss. The disease is characterized by continuous leukocyte infiltration, likely mediated by local chemokine production but the pathogenic mechanisms are not fully elucidated. There are no reliable serologic biomarkers for the diagnosis of periodontitis, which is today based solely on the degree of local tissue destruction, and there is no available biological treatment tool. Prompted by the increasing interest in periodontitis and systemic inflammatory mediators we mapped serum cytokine and chemokine levels from periodontitis subjects and healthy controls. We used multivariate partial least squares (PLS) modeling and identified monocyte chemoattractant protein-1 (MCP-1) and eotaxin as clearly associated with periodontitis along with C-reactive protein (CRP), years of smoking and age, whereas the number of remaining teeth was associated with being healthy. Moreover, body mass index correlated significantly with serum MCP-1 and CRP, but not with eotaxin. We detected higher MCP-1 protein levels in inflamed gingival connective tissue compared to healthy but the eotaxin levels were undetectable. Primary human gingival fibroblasts displayed strongly increased expression of MCP-1 and eotaxin mRNA and protein when challenged with tumor necrosis factor-alpha (TNF-alpha and interleukin-1 beta (IL-1 beta), key mediators of periodontal inflammation. We also demonstrated that the upregulated chemokine expression was dependent on the NF-kappa B pathway. In summary, we identify higher levels of CRP, eotaxin and MCP-1 in serum of periodontitis patients. This, together with our finding that both CRP and MCP-1 correlates with BMI points towards an increased systemic inflammatory load in patients with periodontitis and high BMI. Targeting eotaxin and MCP-1 in periodontitis may result in reduced leukocyte infiltration and inflammation in periodontitis and maybe prevent tooth loss.

  • 163. Boström, Elisabeth A.
    et al.
    Lundberg, Pernilla
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Odontology.
    The Newly Discovered Cytokine IL-34 Is Expressed in Gingival Fibroblasts, Shows Enhanced Expression by Pro-Inflammatory Cytokines, and Stimulates Osteoclast Differentiation2013In: PLoS ONE, ISSN 1932-6203, E-ISSN 1932-6203, Vol. 8, no 12, p. e81665-Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: Interleukin-34 (IL-34) is a recently discovered cytokine functionally overlapping macrophage colony stimulating factor (M-CSF), a mediator of inflammation and osteoclastogenesis in bone-degenerative diseases such as rheumatoid arthritis. The objective of this study was to assess the expression of IL-34 in human gingival fibroblasts and investigate if the pro-inflammatory cytokines tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNF-alpha) and Interleukin-1B (IL-1 beta) modulate its expression, and moreover if IL-34 could contribute to recruitment of bone-resorbing osteoclasts. Methods: IL-34 expression was evaluated in gingival fibroblasts by real time PCR following stimulation by TNF-alpha, IL-1 beta, and treatment with inhibitors of intracellular pathways. The formation of osteoclasts was evaluated by tartrate-resistant acid phosphatase (TRAP) staining of bone marrow macrophages treated with IL-34 or M-CSF in addition to receptor activator of nuclear factor kappa-B ligand (RANKL). Results: IL-34 was expressed in gingival fibroblasts. The expression was enhanced by TNF-alpha and IL-1 beta, regulated by the transcription factor nuclear factor kappa B (NF-kappa B) and activation of c-Jun N-terminal kinase (JNK). Further, IL-34 supports RANKL-induced osteoclastogensis of bone marrow macrophages, independently of M-CSF. Summary: In conclusion, this study shows for the first time IL-34 expression in human gingival fibroblasts, stimulated by TNF-alpha and IL-1 beta, key mediators of periodontal inflammation. Furthermore, IL-34 can be substituted for M-CSF in RANKL-induced osteoclastogenesis. IL-34 may contribute to inflammation and osteoclastogenesis in bone-degenerative diseases such as periodontitis.

  • 164.
    Boudewyns, A
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Odontology.
    Marklund, Marie
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Odontology, Ortodontics.
    Hochban, W
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Odontology.
    Alternatives of OSAHS treatment: selection of patients for upper airway surgery and oral appliances2007In: European Respiratory Review, ISSN 0905-9180, Vol. 16, no 106, p. 132-145Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Although continuous positive airway pressure (CPAP) is considered to represent the standard treatment for patients with moderate-to-severe obstructive sleep apnoea/hypopnoea syndrome (OSAHS), poor treatment compliance and/or refusal is an issue in ∼20-3% of these patients.

    As an alternative to life-long CPAP treatment, conservative procedures exist with dental appliances for mandibular advancement, as well as curative surgical techniques.

    Surgical treatment of OSAHS can be divided into the following two main groups:

    1) upper airway surgery by soft tissue resection (uvulopalatopharyngoplasty, etc.), and

    2) skeletal procedures, such as maxillo-mandibular advancement. Proper selection of patients for the different treatment modalities is the key for full treatment success.

    Patient-related factors, such as the site of upper airway collapse, craniofacial characteristics, dental health, obesity, age, profession and positional dependence, as well as treatment-related factors, should be evaluated before a final proposal for these treatment alternatives is formulated.

  • 165. Bougas, Kostas
    et al.
    Ransjö, Maria
    Johansson, Anders
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Odontology, Molecular Periodontology.
    Effects of Porphyromonas gingivalis surface-associated material on osteoclast formation2013In: Odontology: official journal of The Society of the Nippon Dental University, ISSN 1618-1247, E-ISSN 1618-1255, Vol. 101, no 2, p. 141-149Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Porphyromonas gingivalis strongly correlates with periodontitis, but the underlying mechanisms causing dentoalveolar bone resorption are not fully understood. As contradictory effects of P. gingivalis on osteoclastogenesis have been reported, this study investigates the effect of P. gingivalis extract on osteoclast formation. Osteoclast formation in mouse bone marrow (MBM) cell cultures and RAW 264.7 cells was stimulated by nuclear factor-κB ligand (RANKL) or parathyroid hormone (PTH). Cells were cultured with and without P. gingivalis surface-associated material and phenotypic characteristics were examined using microscopy, flow cytometry, and RT-PCR. P. gingivalis significantly decreased osteoclast formation and the expression of osteoclast phenotypic markers in PTH-stimulated MBM cultures. Additionally, P. gingivalis inhibited expression of osteoclast differentiation factors and stimulated expression of the mouse macrophage marker F4/80. The presence of P. gingivalis in RANKL-stimulated MBM cultures and RAW 264.7 cells inhibited osteoclastogenesis. Interestingly, a transient exposure with P. gingivalis before PTH stimulation increased osteoclastogenesis in MBM cultures. Flow cytometric analyses of cells transiently exposed to P. gingivalis demonstrated an increased proportion of potential osteoclast precursor cells. We conclude that a transient exposure of MBM cultures to P. gingivalis increases the number of osteoclast precursors and osteoclast formation, whereas a prolonged exposure completely abolishes osteoclastogenesis.

  • 166.
    Bovinder Ylitalo, Erik
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Biosciences, Pathology.
    Nordstrand, Annika
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Radiation Sciences, Oncology.
    Thysell, Elin
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Biosciences, Pathology.
    Jernberg, Emma
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Biosciences, Pathology.
    Crnalic, Sead
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Surgical and Perioperative Sciences, Orthopaedics.
    Widmark, Anders
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Radiation Sciences, Oncology.
    Bergh, Anders
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Biosciences, Pathology.
    Lerner, Ulf H.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Odontology. Univ Gothenburg, Sahlgrenska Acad, Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Wikström, Pernilla
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Biosciences, Pathology.
    Bone remodeling in relation to androgen receptor activity in prostate cancer bone metastases2018In: Cancer Research, ISSN 0008-5472, E-ISSN 1538-7445, Vol. 78, no 16, p. 50-50Article in journal (Other academic)
  • 167.
    Brady, L. Jeannine
    et al.
    Department of Oral Biology, University of Florida, Gainesville, FL 32610, USA.
    Maddocks, Sarah E.
    School of Oral and Dental Sciences, University of Bristol, Bristol BS1 2LY, UK.
    Larson, Matthew R.
    Department of Physiology and Biophysics, University of Alabama at Birmingham, Birmingham, AL 35294, USA.
    Forsgren, Nina
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Odontology, Cariology.
    Persson, Karina
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Odontology.
    Deivanayagam, Champion C.
    Center for Biophysical Sciences and Engineering, University of Alabama at Birmingham, Birmingham, AL 35294, USA.
    Jenkinson, Howard F.
    School of Oral and Dental Sciences, University of Bristol, Bristol BS1 2LY, UK.
    The changing faces of Streptococcus antigen I/II polypeptide family adhesins2010In: Molecular Microbiology, ISSN 0950-382X, E-ISSN 1365-2958, Vol. 77, no 2, p. 276-286Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Streptococcus mutans antigen I/II (AgI/II) protein was one of the first cell wall-anchored adhesins identified in Gram-positive bacteria. It mediates attachment of S. mutans to tooth surfaces and has been a focus for immunization studies against dental caries. The AgI/II family polypeptides recognize salivary glycoproteins, and are also involved in biofilm formation, platelet aggregation, tissue invasion and immune modulation. The genes encoding AgI/II family polypeptides are found among Streptococcus species indigenous to the human mouth, as well as in Streptococcus pyogenes, S. agalactiae and S. suis. Evidence of functionalities for different regions of the AgI/II proteins has emerged. A sequence motif within the C-terminal portion of Streptococcus gordonii SspB (AgI/II) is bound by Porphyromonas gingivalis, thus promoting oral colonization by this anaerobic pathogen. The significance of other epitopes is now clearer following resolution of regional crystal structures. A new picture emerges of the central V (variable) region, predicted to contain a carbohydrate-binding trench, being projected from the cell surface by a stalk formed by an unusual association between an N-terminal α-helix and a C-terminal polyproline helix. This presentation mode might be important in determining functional conformations of other Gram-positive surface proteins that have adhesin domains flanked by α-helical and proline-rich regions.

    Ever since dental caries (tooth decay) was first shown to be caused by bacteria, there has been continued interest in developing vaccine or passive immunization protocols for its control or prevention (Lehner et al., 1980). Although dental caries is not fatal, and in developed countries caries is now considered to be largely avoidable through controlled diet and good oral hygiene, there remain significant problems with childhood disease, especially among indigent populations. Consequently, caries is one of the most common worldwide infectious diseases. Therefore, research continues towards employing vaccine formulations comprised of peptide components derived from surface proteins of Streptococcus mutans, a major agent associated with dental caries (Lehner et al., 1975). One of the most promising strategies seems to be delivery of peptides, derived from glucan-binding protein B (GbpB) and antigen I/II (AgI/II) protein, via a mucosal (nasal) route. The GbpB polypeptide binds extracellular glucans, thus promoting co-adhesion of S. mutans cells in the development of dental plaque (Taubman and Nash, 2006). The AgI/II protein (also named P1, SpaP, AgB or PAc) is a major surface protein that functions as an adhesin, attaching S. mutans to the saliva-coated tooth enamel surface (Koga et al., 1990; Kelly et al., 1995). Antibodies against SpaP and GbpB block adherence and co-adhesion, respectively, thus disrupting colonization of the oral cavity by S. mutans (Ma et al., 1990; 1998; Taubman and Nash, 2006).

    The terminology AgI/II derives from the identification of two major cell wall antigens I and II in S. mutans by Russell et al. (1980), and the subsequent recognition that AgII was a component of AgI. Following the discovery of AgI/II, it became apparent that genes encoding orthologous proteins were widely dispersed among the streptococci (Jenkinson and Demuth, 1997). The viridans Streptococcus AgI/II adhesins range in composition from 1310 to 1653 amino acid (aa) residues, while the Streptococcus agalactiae AgI/II proteins are smaller (826–932 aa residues) (Tettelin et al., 2005). The widespread distribution of these AgI/II protein genes across the streptococci is perhaps not surprising, given the complex streptococcal communities that exist on surfaces of the oro- and naso-pharynx and within the bacterial soup of saliva. It is interesting, though, that the AgI/II family polypeptide genes have not yet been discovered in Streptococcus pneumoniae, which might be by the fact that S. pneumoniae forms a distinct evolutionary cluster (Kilian et al., 2008).

  • 168. Brage, M
    et al.
    Abrahamson, M
    Lindström, V
    Grubb, A
    Lerner, Ulf
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Odontology, Oral Cell Biology.
    Different cysteine proteinases involved in bone resorption and osteoclast formation.2005In: Calcified Tissue International, ISSN 0171-967X, E-ISSN 1432-0827, Vol. 76, no 6, p. 439-447Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Cysteine proteinases, especially cathepsin K, play an important role in osteoclastic degradation of bone matrix proteins and the process can, consequently, be significantly inhibited by cysteine proteinase inhibitors. We have recently reported that cystatin C and other cysteine proteinase inhibitors also reduce osteoclast formation. However, it is not known which cysteine proteinase(s) are involved in osteoclast differentiation. In the present study, we compared the relative potencies of cystatins C and D as inhibitors of bone resorption in cultured mouse calvariae, osteoclastogenesis in mouse bone marrow cultures, and cathepsin K activity. Inhibition of cathepsin K activity was assessed by determining equilibrium constants for inhibitor complexes in fluorogenic substrate assays. The data demonstrate that whereas human cystatins C and D are equipotent as inhibitors of bone resorption, cystatin D is 10-fold less potent as an inhibitor of osteoclastogenesis and 200-fold less potent as an inhibitor of cathepsin K activity. A recombinant human cystatin C variant with Gly substitutions for residues Arg8, Leu9, Val10, and Trp106 did not inhibit bone resorption, had 1,000-fold decreased inhibitory effect on cathepsin K activity compared to wildtype cystatin C, but was equipotent with wildtype cystatin C as an inhibitor of osteoclastogenesis. It is concluded that (i) different cysteine proteinases are likely to be involved in bone resorption and osteoclast formation, (ii) cathepsin K may not be an exclusive target enzyme in any of the two systems, and (iii) the enzyme(s) involved in osteoclastogenesis might not be a typical papain-like cysteine proteinase.

  • 169. Brage, M
    et al.
    Lie, Anita
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Odontology, Oral Cell Biology.
    Ransjö, Maria
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Odontology, Oral Cell Biology.
    Kasprzykowski, F
    Kasprzykowska, R
    Abrahamson, M
    Grubb, A
    Lerner, Ulf
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Odontology, Oral Cell Biology.
    Osteoclastogenesis is decreased by cysteine proteinase inhibitors2004In: Bone, ISSN 8756-3282, E-ISSN 1873-2763, Vol. 34, no 3, p. 412-24Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The effects of cystatin C and other cysteine proteinase inhibitors on osteoclast formation and differentiation have been investigated. Cystatin C decreased osteoclast formation stimulated by parathyroid hormone (PTH), 1,25(OH)2-vitamin D3 or interleukin-6 (IL-6) (in the presence of its soluble receptor) as assessed by the number of tartrate-resistant acid phosphatase (TRAP+) multinucleated cells in mouse bone marrow cultures. The inhibitory effect was associated with decreased mRNA expression for the calcitonin receptor as well as decreased number of specific binding sites for 125I-calcitonin, and without any effect on the mRNA expression of receptor activator of nuclear factor kappaB (NF-kappaB) ligand (RANKL). Similarly, the cysteine proteinase inhibitors leupeptin, E-64 and benzyloxycarbonyl-Phe-Ala-diazomethane (Z-FA-CHN2) decreased PTH-stimulated formation of TRAP+ multinucleated cells and binding of 125I-calcitonin. A peptidyl derivative synthesized to mimic part of the proteinase-binding site of cystatin C (benzyloxycarbonyl-Arg-Leu-Val-Gly-diazomethane, or Z-RLVG-CHN2) also decreased PTH-stimulated osteoclast formation. In a 9-day culture, addition of cystatin C during the last 5 days was sufficient to cause substantial inhibition of osteoclast formation. Cystatin C-induced decrease of osteoclast formation was associated with enhanced number of F4/80-positive macrophages and increased mRNA expression of the macrophage receptor c-fms in the bone marrow culture. Osteoclast formation in mouse bone marrow cultures as well as in mouse spleen cell cultures, stimulated by macrophage colony-stimulating factor (M-CSF) and RANKL was also decreased by different cysteine proteinase inhibitors. In addition, cystatin C inhibited M-CSF/RANKL induction of calcitonin receptor mRNA in spleen cell cultures. The inhibitory effect by cystatin C in spleen cells was associated with decreased mRNA expression of RANK and the transcription factor NFAT2. It is concluded that cysteine proteinase inhibitors decrease formation of osteoclasts by interfering at a late stage of pre-osteoclast differentiation.

  • 170.
    Brage, Monica
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Odontology.
    Holmlund, A
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Odontology.
    Johansson, Anders
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Odontology.
    Humoral immune response to Aggregatibacter actinomycetemcomitans leukotoxin2011In: Journal of Periodontal Research, ISSN 0022-3484, E-ISSN 1600-0765, Vol. 46, no 2, p. 170-175Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background and Objective: Periodontal disease is an inflammatory condition caused by bacterial infections that result in loss of the tooth supporting tissue. The periodontal pathogens produce virulence factors with capacity to affect the host immune response. Aggregatibacter actinomycetemcomitans is a periodontal pathogen that produces a leukotoxin that specifically affects human leukocytes. The aims of the present study were to examine the presence and function of systemic antibodies to the leukotoxin. Material and Methods:  One hundred and ninety-seven middle-aged (57 ± 5 years) Swedes with well-documented periodontal status and medical factors related to cardiovascular diseases were studied. These data have been published previously. The serum samples were examined for the presence of leukotoxin antibodies by western blot and the capacity to neutralize leukotoxicity in an activity assay with leukotoxin and cultured leukemic cells. Results:  The results showed a high prevalence (57%) of antibodies against A. actinomycetemcomitans leukotoxin in the analyzed population. These antibodies were correlated with leukotoxin neutralizing capacity as well as with the ELISA titers of A. actinomycetemcomitans-specific IgA and IgG. In addition, high levels of leukotoxin antibodies were correlated with increasing age, but not with periodontal disease parameters or cardiovascular risk factors. Conclusion:  Systemic antibodies against A. actionmycetemcomitans leukotoxin were common in this adult Swedish population. These antibodies might contribute to limit the systemic effects of the infection.

  • 171. Brand, HS
    et al.
    Lerner, Ulf
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Odontology, Oral Cell Biology.
    Grubb, A
    Beertsen, W
    Nieuw Amerongen, AV
    Everts, V
    Family 2 cystatins inhibit osteoclast-mediated bone resorption in calvarial bone explants.2004In: Bone, ISSN 8756-3282, E-ISSN 1873-2763, Vol. 35, no 3, p. 689-696Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Osteoclastic bone resorption depends on the activity of various proteolytic enzymes, in particular those belonging to the group of cysteine proteinases. Biochemical studies have shown that cystatins, naturally occurring inhibitors of these enzymes, inhibit bone matrix degradation. Since the mechanism by which cystatins exert this inhibitory effect is not completely resolved yet, we studied the effect of cystatins on bone resorption microscopically and by Ca-release measurements. Calvarial bone explants were cultured in the presence or absence of family 2 cystatins and processed for light and electron microscopic analysis, and the culture media were analyzed for calcium release. Both egg white cystatin and human cystatin C decreased calcium release into the medium significantly. Microscopic analyses of the bone explants demonstrated that in the presence of either inhibitor, a high percentage of osteoclasts was associated with demineralized non-degraded bone matrix. Following a 24-h incubation in the presence of cystatin C, 41% of the cells were adjacent to areas of demineralized non-degraded bone matrix, whereas in controls, this was only 6%. If bone explants were cultured with both PTH and cystatin C, 60% of the osteoclasts were associated with demineralized non-degraded bone matrix, compared to 27% for bones treated with PTH only (P < 0.01). Our study provides evidence that cystatins, the naturally occurring inhibitors of cysteine proteinases, reversibly inhibit bone matrix degradation in the resorption lacunae adjacent to osteoclasts. These findings suggest the involvement of cystatins in the modulation of osteoclastic bone degradation.

  • 172. Bratt, P
    et al.
    Johansson, Ingegerd
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Odontology, Cariology.
    Linder, J
    Ericson, T
    Function of the rat salivary glands after exposure to inorganic mercury1995In: Science of the Total Environment, ISSN 0048-9697, E-ISSN 1879-1026, Vol. 172, no 1, p. 47-55Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In spite of many studies on the toxicity of mercury, very little is known about the effects of mercury on the function of exocrine glands. In the present paper selected functions of Sprague-Dawley rat salivary glands were studied after the exposure of the animals to inorganic mercury at two different doses; 3.25 mg/kg body weight given during 25 days and 7.0 mg/kg body weight given during 27 days. The function of the salivary glands was estimated by saliva secretion rate, secretion of electrolytes, proteins and biosynthesis of glycoproteins. The function was compared between mercury exposed rats and age and sex matched control rats that were given injections with equal volumes of 0.154 mol/l NaCl on the same time schedule. In the present study we report that no significant effect on saliva secretion rate, concentrations of salivary constituents or biosynthesis of glycoproteins in the salivary glands could be observed in rats as a result of mercury exposure at two levels that gave 30 or 60 times higher serum mercury concentrations than in the majority of the Swedish population.

  • 173. Brazier, J
    et al.
    Chmelar, D
    Dubreuil, L
    Feierl, G
    Hedberg, Maria
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Odontology, Oral Microbiology.
    Kalenic, S
    Könönen, E
    Lundgren, B
    Malamou-Ladas, H
    Nagy, E
    Sullivan, Å
    Nord, CE
    European surveillance study on antimicrobial susceptibility of Gram-positive anaerobic cocci2008In: International Journal of Antimicrobial Agents, ISSN 0924-8579, E-ISSN 1872-7913, Vol. 31, no 4, p. 316-320Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Gram-positive anaerobic cocci (GPAC) are a heterogeneous group of microorganisms frequently isolated from local and systemic infections. In this study, the antimicrobial susceptibilities of clinical strains isolated in 10 European countries were investigated. After identification of 299 GPAC to species level, the minimum inhibitory concentrations of penicillin, imipenem, clindamycin, metronidazole, vancomycin and linezolid were determined by the agar dilution method according to the Clinical and Laboratory Standards Institute. The majority of isolates were identified as Finegoldia magna and Parvimonas micra (formerly Peptostreptococcus micros), isolated from skin and soft tissue infections. All isolates were susceptible to imipenem, metronidazole, vancomycin and linezolid. Twenty-one isolates (7%) were resistant to penicillin (n=13) and/or to clindamycin (n=12). Four isolates were resistant to both agents. The majority of resistant isolates were identified as F. magna and originated from blood, abscesses and soft tissue infections.

  • 174.
    Brechter, Anna Bernhold
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Odontology, Oral Cell Biology.
    Persson, Emma
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Odontology, Oral Cell Biology.
    Lundgren, Inger
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Odontology, Oral Cell Biology.
    Lerner, Ulf H
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Odontology, Oral Cell Biology.
    Kinin B1 and B2 receptor expression in osteoblasts and fibroblasts is enhanced by interleukin-1 and tumour necrosis factor-alpha. Effects dependent on activation of NF-kappaB and MAP kinases.2008In: Bone, ISSN 8756-3282, E-ISSN 1873-2763, Vol. 43, no 1, p. 72-83Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Pro-inflammatory mediators formed by the kallikrein-kinin system can stimulate bone resorption and synergistically potentiate bone resorption induced by IL-1 and TNF-alpha. We have shown that the effect is associated with synergistically enhanced RANKL expression and enhanced prostaglandin biosynthesis, due to increased cyclooxygenase-2 expression. In the present study, the effects of osteotropic cytokines and different kinins on the expression of receptor subtypes for bradykinin (BK), des-Arg10-Lys-BK (DALBK), IL-1beta and TNF-alpha have been investigated. IL-1beta and TNF-alpha enhanced kinin B1 and B2 receptor binding in the human osteoblastic cell line MG-63 and the mRNA expression of B1 and B2 receptors in MG-63 cells, human gingival fibroblasts and intact mouse calvarial bones. Kinins did not affect mRNA expression of IL-1 or TNF receptors. EMSA showed that IL-1beta and TNF-alpha activated NF-kappaB and AP-1 in MG-63 cells. IL-1beta stimulated NF-kappaB via a non-canonical pathway (p52/p65) and TNF-alpha via the canonical pathway (p50/p65). Activation of AP-1 involved c-Jun in both IL-1beta and TNF-alpha stimulated cells, but c-Fos only in TNF-alpha stimulated cells. Phospho-ELISA and Western blots showed that IL-1beta activated JNK and p38, but not ERK 1/2 MAP kinase. Pharmacological inhibitors showed that NF-kappaB, p38 and JNK were important for IL-1beta induced stimulation of B1 receptors, and NF-kappaB and p38 for B2 receptors. p38 and JNK were important for TNF-alpha induced stimulation of B1 receptors, whereas NF-kappaB, p38 and JNK were involved in TNF-alpha induced expression of B2 receptors. These data show that IL-1beta and TNF-alpha upregulate B1 and B2 receptor expression by mechanisms involving activation of both NF-kappaB and MAP kinase pathways, but that signal transduction pathways are different for IL-1beta and TNF-alpha. The enhanced kinin receptor expression induced by the pro-inflammatory cytokines IL-1beta and TNF-alpha might be one important mechanism involved in the synergistic enhancement of prostaglandin formation caused by co-treatment with kinins and one of the two cytokines. These mechanisms might help to explain the enhanced bone resorption associated with inflammatory disorders, including periodontitis and rheumatoid arthritis.

  • 175.
    Brechter, Anna
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Odontology, Oral Cell Biology.
    Lerner, Ulf
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Odontology, Oral Cell Biology.
    Bradykinin potentiates cytokine-induced prostaglandin biosynthesis in osteoblasts by enhanced expression of cyclooxygenase 2, resulting in increased RANKL expression2007In: Arthritis and Rheumatism, ISSN 0004-3591, E-ISSN 1529-0131, Vol. 56, no 3, p. 910-923Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    OBJECTIVE: Bradykinin (BK) stimulates bone resorption in vitro and synergistically potentiates interleukin-1 (IL-1)-induced bone resorption and prostaglandin (PG) formation, suggesting that kinins are important in inflammation-induced bone loss. The present study was undertaken to study 1) the role of the kinin B1 and B2 receptors in the synergistic interaction with IL-1 and tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNFalpha), 2) the molecular mechanisms involved in synergistic enhancement of PG formation, and 3) the effects of kinins on cytokine-induced expression of RANKL, RANK, and osteoprotegerin (OPG) (the latter being crucial molecules in osteoclast differentiation). METHODS: Formation of PGs, expression of enzymes involved in arachidonic acid metabolism, and expression of RANKL, RANK, and OPG were assessed in the human osteoblastic cell line MG-63 and in mouse calvarial bones. The role of NF-kappaB and MAP kinases was studied using pharmacologic inhibitors. RESULTS: PGE(2) formation and cyclooxygenase 2 (COX-2) protein expression were induced by IL-1beta and potentiated by kinins with affinity for the B1 or B2 receptors, resulting in PGE(2)-dependent enhancement of RANKL. The enhancements of PGE(2) formation and COX-2 were markedly decreased by inhibition of p38 and JNK MAP kinases, whereas inhibition of NF-kappaB resulted in abolishment of the PGE(2) response with only slight inhibition of COX-2. CONCLUSION: Kinin B1 and B2 receptors synergistically potentiate IL-1- and TNFalpha-induced PG biosynthesis in osteoblasts by a mechanism involving increased levels of COX-2, resulting in increased RANKL. The synergistic stimulation is dependent on NF-kappaB and MAP kinases. These mechanisms might help to explain the enhanced bone resorption associated with inflammatory disorders, including that in rheumatoid arthritis.

  • 176. Brechter, M
    et al.
    Nilson, H
    Lundgren, Stefan
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Odontology, Oral and Maxillofacial Surgery.
    Oxidized titanium implants in reconstructive jaw surgery.2005In: Clinical Implant Dentistry and Related Research, Vol. 7, no Suppl 1, p. 83-7Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    BACKGROUND: Rehabilitation with implant-supported bridges in patients with insufficient bone volumes may require bone reconstructive procedures in conjunction with or prior to implant placement. Clinical follow-up studies using turned titanium and bone grafts have demonstrated higher failure rates than when used in nongrafted patients. Improved bone integration has been demonstrated for oxidized titanium implants; however, their clinical performance in bone reconstruction situations is not known. PURPOSE: This study was performed to analyze the survival and stability of oxidized titanium implants placed in patients subjected to reconstructive jaw surgery at one clinic. MATERIALS AND METHODS: Two hundred oxidized titanium implants (Mk III, TiUnite, Nobel Biocare AB, Göteborg, Sweden) were placed in 47 patients in conjunction with or secondary to six different reconstructive procedures owing to insufficient bone volume. In all six groups, implant stability was assessed by resonance frequency analysis and manually checked for rotation stability at implant insertion, at the time of abutment connection, and after a minimum of 12 months of loading of the prosthetic construction. Periapical radiographs were taken after a minimum of 12 months of loading (mean 21 months) for evaluation of the marginal bone levels. The mean clinical follow-up period was 30 months. RESULTS: Of the 200 implants, 199 were considered osseointegrated at the time of abutment surgery. At the 12-month postloading follow-up, another two implants were considered not stable. Three implants (1.5%) were ranked as unsuccessful. CONCLUSION: Clinical experience with 200 consecutive oxidized implants in various reconstruction situations shows a successful outcome, with only three failures (1.5%) during a mean follow-up period of 30 months.

  • 177. Brown, J
    et al.
    Jacobs, R
    Levring Jäghagen, Eva
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Odontology, School of Dentistry.
    Lindh, C
    Baksi, G
    Schulze, D
    Schulze, R
    Basic training requirements for the use of dental CBCT by dentists: a position paper prepared by the European Academy of DentoMaxilloFacial Radiology2014In: Dento-Maxillo-Facial Radiology, ISSN 0250-832X, E-ISSN 1476-542X, Vol. 43, no 1, article id 20130291Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Cone beam CT (CBCT) is a relatively new imaging modality, which is now widely available to dentists for examining hard tissues in the dental and maxillofacial regions. CBCT gives a three-dimensional depiction of anatomy and pathology, which is similar to medical CT and uses doses generally higher than those used in conventional dental imaging. The European Academy of DentoMaxilloFacial Radiology recognizes that dentists receive training in two-dimensional dental imaging as undergraduates, but most of them have received little or no training in the application and interpretation of cross-sectional three-dimensional imaging. This document identifies the roles of dentists involved in the use of CBCT, examines the training requirements for the justification, acquisition and interpretation of CBCT imaging and makes recommendations for further training of dentists in Europe who intend to be involved in any aspect of CBCT imaging. Two levels of training are recognized. Level 1 is intended to train dentists who prescribe CBCT imaging, such that they may request appropriately and understand the resultant reported images. Level 2 is intended to train to a more advanced level and covers the understanding and skills needed to justify, carry out and interpret a CBCT examination. These recommendations are not intended to create specialists in CBCT imaging but to offer guidance on the training of all dentists to enable the safe use of CBCT in the dentoalveolar region.

  • 178.
    Brundin, Malin
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Odontology.
    Stability of bacterial DNA in relation to microbial detection in teeth2013Doctoral thesis, comprehensive summary (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    The fate of DNA from dead cells is an important issue when interpreting results from root canal infections analysed by the PCR technique. DNA from dead bacterial cells is known to be detectable long time after cell death and its stability is dependent on many different factors. This work investigated factors found in the root canal that could affect the recovery of microbial DNA. In an ex vivo experiment, DNA from non-viable gram-positive Enterococcus faecalis was inoculated in instrumented root canals and recovery of DNA was assessed by PCR over a two-year period. DNA was still recoverable two years after cell death in 21/25 teeth. The fate of DNA from the gram-negative bacteria Fusobacterium nucleatum and the gram-positive Peptostreptococcus anaerobius was assessed in vitro. DNA from dead F. nucleatum and P. anaerobius could be detected by PCR six months post cell death even though it was clear that the DNA was released from the cells due to lost of cell wall integrity during the experimental period. The decomposition rate of extracellular DNA was compared to cell-bound and it was evident that DNA still located inside the bacterium was much less prone to decay than extracellular DNA.

    Free (extracellular) DNA is very prone to decay in a naked form. Binding to minerals is known to protect DNA from degradation. The fate of extracellular DNA was assessed after binding to ceramic hydroxyapatite and dentine. The data showed that free DNA, bound to these materials, was protected from spontaneous decay and from enzymatic decomposition by nucleases.

    The main conclusions from this thesis were: i) DNA from dead bacteria can be detected by PCR years after cell death ex vivo and in vitro. ii) Cell-bound DNA is less prone to decomposition than extracellular DNA. iii) DNA is released from the bacterium some time after cell death. iv) Extracellular DNA bound to hydroxyapatite or dentine is protected from spontaneous decomposition and enzymatic degradation.

  • 179.
    Brundin, Malin
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Odontology.
    Figdor, David
    Johansson, Anders
    Sjögren, Ulf
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Odontology.
    Preservation of bacterial DNA by binding to dentinManuscript (preprint) (Other academic)
  • 180.
    Brundin, Malin
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Odontology.
    Figdor, David
    Department of Microbiology, Monash University, Melbourne, Australia.
    Johansson, Anders
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Odontology.
    Sjögren, Ulf
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Odontology.
    Preservation of bacterial dna by human dentin2014In: Journal of Endodontics, ISSN 0099-2399, E-ISSN 1878-3554, Vol. 40, no 2, p. 241-245Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    INTRODUCTION: The capacity of dentin and collagen to bind DNA and protect against spontaneous and nuclease-induced degradation was evaluated individually and by the incubation of DNA with nuclease-producing bacteria in a mixed culture.

    METHODS: Extracted Fusobacterium nucleatum DNA was incubated with dentin shavings or collagen for 90 minutes. The DNA-bound substrates were incubated in different media (water, sera, and DNase I) for up to 3 months. Amplifiable DNA was released from dentin using EDTA,or from collagen using proteinase K, and evaluated by polymerase chain reaction (PCR). The stability of dentin-bound DNA was also assessed in a mixed culture (Parvimonas micra and Pseudoramibacter alactolyticus) containing a DNase-producing species, Prevotella intermedia. Samples were analyzed for amplifiable DNA.

    RESULTS: In water, dentin-bound DNA was recoverable by PCR at 3 months compared with no detectable DNA after 4 weeks in controls (no dentin). DNA bound to collagen was detectable by PCR after 3 months of incubation in water. In 10% human sera, amplifiable DNA was detectable at 3 months when dentin bound and in controls (no dentin). In mixed bacterial culture, dentin-bound DNA was recoverable throughout the experimental period (3 months), compared with no recoverable F. nucleatum DNA within 24 hours in controls (no dentin).

    CONCLUSIONS: There is a strong binding affinity between DNA and dentin, and between DNA and serum proteins or collagen. These substrates preserve DNA against natural decomposition and protect DNA from nuclease activity, factors that may confound molecular analysis of the endodontic microbiota yet favor paleomicrobiological studies of ancient DNA.

  • 181.
    Brundin, Malin
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Odontology, Endodontics.
    Figdor, David
    Roth, Chrissie
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Odontology, Endodontics.
    Davies, John K
    Sundqvist, Göran
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Odontology, Endodontics.
    Sjögren, Ulf
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Odontology, Endodontics.
    Persistence of dead-cell bacterial DNA in ex vivo root canals and influence of nucleases on DNA decay in vitro2010In: Oral surgery, oral medicine, oral pathology, oral radiology, and endodontics, ISSN 1079-2104, E-ISSN 1528-395X, Vol. 110, no 6, p. 789-794Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Amplifiable DNA is preserved after cell death, but the critical determinant is the form of DNA. Free DNA undergoes spontaneous and enzymatic decomposition, whereas cell-bound E. faecalis DNA persists for long periods.

  • 182.
    Brundin, Malin
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Odontology, Endodontics.
    Figdor, David
    Sundqvist, Göran
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Odontology, Endodontics.
    Sjögren, Ulf
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Odontology, Endodontics.
    DNA Binding to hydroxyapatite: a potential mechanism for preservation of microbial DNA2013In: Journal of Endodontics, ISSN 0099-2399, E-ISSN 1878-3554, Vol. 39, no 2, p. 211-216Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Introduction: Molecular methods are increasingly being deployed for analysis of the microbial flora in the root canal. Such methods are based on the assumption that recovered DNA is associated with the active endodontic infection, yet paleomicrobiology research is based on the recovery of ancient DNA from centuriesold tooth and bone samples, which points to considerable longevity of the DNA molecule in these tissues. The main component of dentin and bone is the mineral hydroxyapatite. This study assessed DNA binding to hydroxyapatite and whether thiS binding affinity stabilizes the DNA molecule in various media.

    Methods: DNA was extracted from Fusobacterium nucleatum and added to ceramic hydroxyapatite for 90 minutes. The DNA-bound hydroxyapatite was incubated in different media (ie, water, sera, and DNase I) for up to 3 months. At predetermined intervals, the recovery of detectable DNA was assessed by releasing the DNA from the hydroxyapatite using EDTA and evaluating the presence of DNA by gel electrophoresis and polymerase chain reaction (PCR) amplification.

    Results: When incubated with hydroxyapatite, nonamplified DNA was detectable after 3 months in water, sera, and DNase I. In contrast, DNA incubated in the same media (without hydroxyapatite) decomposed to levels below the detection level of PCR within 3 weeks, with the exception of DNA in sera in which PCR revealed a weak positive amplification product.

    Conclusions: These results confirm a specific binding affinity of hydroxyapatite for DNA. Hydroxyapatite-bound DNA is more resistant to decay and less susceptible to degradation by serum and nucleases, which may account for the long-term persistence of DNA in bone and tooth.

  • 183.
    Brundin, Malin
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Odontology.
    Figdor, David
    Department of Microbiology, Monash University, Melbourne, Victoria, Australia.
    Sundqvist, Göran
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Odontology.
    Sjögren, Ulf
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Odontology.
    Preservation of Fusobacterium nucleatum and Peptostreptococcus anaerobius DNA after loss of cell viability2015In: International Endodontic Journal, ISSN 0143-2885, E-ISSN 1365-2591, Vol. 48, no 1, p. 37-45Article in journal (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Aim: To investigate whether DNA from two obligate anaerobes, Fusobacterium nucleatum and Peptostreptococcus anaerobius, is recoverable after loss of cell viability induced by air exposure. Methodology: Harvested cultures of F. nucleatum and P. anaerobius were killed by exposure to air and stored in phosphate-buffered saline. Dead cells were incubated aerobically for up to 6 months. Every month, the presence of detectable DNA in the cell pellet and supernatant was assessed by conventional and quantitative PCR. Cell staining techniques were used to characterize the cell wall permeability of air-killed cells. Scanning electron microscopy was used to examine viable, freshly killed and stored cells. Results: With conventional PCR, amplifiable DNA was detectable over 6 months in all samples. Quantitative PCR showed a progressive fall in DNA concentration in nonviable cell pellets and a concomitant rise in DNA concentration in the supernatant. DNA staining showed that some air-killed cells retained an intact cell wall. After storage, SEM of both air-killed species revealed shrivelling of the cells, but some cells of P. anaerobius retained their initial form. Conclusion: Amplifiable DNA from F. nucleatum and P. anaerobius was detectable 6 months after loss of viability. Air-killed anaerobes initially retained their cell form, but cells gradually shriveled over time. The morphological changes were more pronounced with the gram-negative F. nucleatum than the gram-positive P. anaerobius. Over 6 months, there was a gradual increase in cell wall permeability with progressive leakage of DNA. Bacterial DNA was recoverable long after loss of cell viability.

  • 184.
    Brundin, Malin
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Odontology. Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Odontology, Endodontics.
    Figdor, David
    Sundqvist, Göran
    Sjögren, Ulf
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Odontology. Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Odontology, Endodontics.
    Starvation response and growth in serum of Fusobacterium nucleatum, Peptostreptococcus anaerobius, Prevotella intermedia, and Pseudoramibacter alactolyticus.2009In: Oral surgery, oral medicine, oral pathology, oral radiology, and endodontics, ISSN 1079-2104, E-ISSN 1528-395X, Vol. 108, no 1, p. 129-34Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The microbiota inhabiting the untreated root canal differ markedly from those found in post-treatment disease, yet there is limited information on the microbial characteristics distinguishing the different infections. We hypothesized that starvation survival is a key microbial property in species selection. This study analyzed starvation-survival behavior over 60 days of species representative of the untreated root canal infection: Fusobacterium nucleatum, Peptostreptococcus anaerobius, Prevotella intermedia and Pseudoramibacter alactolyticus. All species did not survive 1 day in water. In 1% serum, the 4 species could not survive beyond 2-3 weeks. They required a high initial cell density and >or=10% serum to survive the observation period. The results highlight a poor starvation-survival capacity of these 4 species compared with species prevalent in post-treatment infection, which are well equipped to endure starvation and survive in low numbers on minimal serum. These findings point to starvation-survival capacity as a selection factor for microbial participation in post-treatment disease.

  • 185. Brunkwall, Louise
    et al.
    Chen, Yan
    Hindy, George
    Rukh, Gull
    Ericson, Ulrika
    Barroso, Ines
    Johansson, Ingegerd
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Odontology.
    Franks, Paul W.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine, Medicine. Genetic and Molecular Epidemiology Unit, Department of Clinical Sciences, Lund University, Malmö, Sweden; Department of Nutrition, Harvard School of Public Health, Boston, MA.
    Orho-Melander, Marju
    Renström, Frida
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Biobank Research. Genetic and Molecular Epidemiology Unit, Department of Clinical Sciences, Lund University, Malmö, Sweden.
    Sugar-sweetened beverage consumption and genetic predisposition to obesity in 2 Swedish cohorts2016In: American Journal of Clinical Nutrition, ISSN 0002-9165, E-ISSN 1938-3207, Vol. 104, no 3, p. 809-815Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: The consumption of sugar-sweetened beverages (SSBs), which has increased substantially during the last decades, has been associated with obesity and weight gain.

    Objective: Common genetic susceptibility to obesity has been shown to modify the association between SSB intake and obesity risk in 3 prospective cohorts from the United States. We aimed to replicate these findings in 2 large Swedish cohorts.

    Design: Data were available for 21,824 healthy participants from the Malmö Diet and Cancer study and 4902 healthy participants from the Gene-Lifestyle Interactions and Complex Traits Involved in Elevated Disease Risk Study. Self-reported SSB intake was categorized into 4 levels (seldom, low, medium, and high). Unweighted and weighted genetic risk scores (GRSs) were constructed based on 30 body mass index [(BMI) in kg/m2]-associated loci, and effect modification was assessed in linear regression equations by modeling the product and marginal effects of the GRS and SSB intake adjusted for age-, sex-, and cohort-specific covariates, with BMI as the outcome. In a secondary analysis, models were additionally adjusted for putative confounders (total energy intake, alcohol consumption, smoking status, and physical activity).

    Results: In an inverse variance-weighted fixed-effects meta-analysis, each SSB intake category increment was associated with a 0.18 higher BMI (SE = 0.02; P = 1.7 × 10−20n = 26,726). In the fully adjusted model, a nominal significant interaction between SSB intake category and the unweighted GRS was observed (P-interaction = 0.03). Comparing the participants within the top and bottom quartiles of the GRS to each increment in SSB intake was associated with 0.24 (SE = 0.04; P = 2.9 × 10−8n = 6766) and 0.15 (SE = 0.04; P = 1.3 × 10−4n = 6835) higher BMIs, respectively.

    Conclusions: The interaction observed in the Swedish cohorts is similar in magnitude to the previous analysis in US cohorts and indicates that the relation of SSB intake and BMI is stronger in people genetically predisposed to obesity.

  • 186. Bruno-Ambrosius, K
    et al.
    Swanholm, G
    Twetman, Svante
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Odontology, Pediatric Dentistry.
    Eating habits, smoking and toothbrushing in relation to dental caries: a 3-year study in Swedish female teenagers.2005In: International journal of paediatric dentistry, Vol. 15, no 3, p. 190-196Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    OBJECTIVES: The aims of the present study were to describe eating, toothbrushing and smoking habits in a cohort of Swedish female adolescents, and to relate the findings to dental caries increment. DESIGN: The research took the form of a longitudinal study. SUBJECTS AND METHODS: The study sample consisted of a cohort of 162 girls under regular dental care, aged 12 years at baseline, who were followed for 3 years, from the sixth to the ninth grade. Eating, oral cleaning and smoking habits were self-reported three times per year through a questionnaire, and caries data at baseline and after 3 years were collected from dental records. RESULTS: The results showed significantly (P < 0.05) impaired eating habits during the study period and that adherence to regular main meals diminished. In the eighth grade, one-third of the girls skipped breakfast before school and only 50% had their free school lunch daily. The omission of breakfast and irregular main meals, as well as smoking were significantly associated with caries (decayed, missed and filled surfaces) increment in the eighth grade (odds ratio = 4.1-4.9, P < 0.05). Snacks, light meals, soft drinks and sweets were already frequently consumed at baseline and continued to be so over the years. Although > 95% of subjects reported that they brushed their teeth at least once a day, approximately 20% did not do it every evening, and this figure remained stable over the study period. However, snacks, soft drinks and sweets, and toothbrushing habits had no significant influence on caries development. CONCLUSION: Dietary advice for caries prevention in adolescent girls should focus on the importance of retaining regular main meals, and especially, not skipping breakfast.

  • 187. Bruno-Ambrosius, Katarina
    et al.
    Yucel-Lindberg, Tülay
    Twetman, Svante
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Odontology. Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Odontology, Pediatric Dentistry.
    Salivary buffer capacity in relation to menarche and progesterone levels in saliva from adolescent girls: a longitudinal study.2004In: Acta Odontologica Scandinavica, ISSN 0001-6357, E-ISSN 1502-3850, Vol. 62, no 5, p. 269-72Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The aim of this study was to investigate the relationship between salivary buffer capacity and menarche, and to explore any association with levels of the sex hormone progesterone in stimulated whole saliva in adolescent girls. The material comprised 162 girls, 12 years of age at baseline in the 6th grade, who were followed for 3 years. Every 4th month, a stimulated whole saliva sample was collected, secretion rate and buffer capacity were determined, and information was gathered on menarche, ongoing menses, and caries increment. Once yearly, the salivary concentration of progesterone was determined with an enzyme immunoassay kit. The results showed a significantly impaired salivary buffer capacity over the years (P < 0.05). Low buffer capacity was significantly correlated with low secretion rate (r = 0.42; P< 0.001) and DMFT increment (r=0.20; P<0.05). Pre-menarche buffer capacity did not differ from the postmenarche scores. The concentration of progesterone in saliva increased with age but displayed no significant relationship to buffer capacity, flow rate, or caries increment. In conclusion, the findings of this study suggest that the salivary buffer capacity may be impaired over the adolescent years in females, but the reason remains unclear.

  • 188.
    Bryndahl, Fredrik
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Odontology, Oral and Maxillofacial Radiology.
    Temporomandibular joint disk displacement and subsequent adverse mandibular growth: a radiographic, histologic and biomolecular experimental study2008Doctoral thesis, comprehensive summary (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    The mandibular condyles represent important growth sites within the facial skeleton. Condylar growth is not a pacemaker of mandibular development, but it provides regional adaptive growth that is of considerable clinical significance, as the condyle’s upward and backward growth movement regulates the anteriorly and inferiorly directed displacement of the mandible as a whole.

    Orthopedic problems of the temporomandibular joint (TMJ), such as displacement of the TMJ disk, are common in the adolescent population. Clinical studies of mandibular asymmetry and mandibular retrognathia in adults as well as in children and adolescents, have reported an association with coexisting non-reducing displacement of the TMJ disk without identifying the cause and effect. Through experimental studies causality has been established, and unilateral affliction during growth has been shown to retard ipsilateral mandibular development with facial asymmetry as the sequel. It was hypothesized that bilateral non-reducing TMJ disk displacement during growth would impair mandibular development bilaterally, resulting in mandibular retrognathia. TMJ disk displacement has repeatedly been demonstrated to induce histological reactions of the condylar cartilage. An additional assumption was therefore that a non-deranged TMJ disk function is crucial for the maintenance of the growing condyle’s biophysical environment, and that a connection ought to exist between the amount of condylar cartilage changes caused by TMJ disk displacement and the amount of subsequent adverse mandibular growth. It was also hypothesized that non-reducing displacement of the TMJ disk in growing individuals would result in qualitative and quantitative changes of the condylar subchondral bone.

    An improved experimental cephalometric method was developed in order to optimize the reliability of longitudinal radiographic evaluation of fast growing small animals. Bilateral non-reducing TMJ disk displacement was surgically created in ten growing New Zealand White rabbits, with ten additional rabbits serving as a sham operated control group. The amount and direction of craniofacial growth was followed over time in serial cephalograms, aided by tantalum implants in the jaws. The study period was chosen to correspond to childhood and adolescence in man. The assessed growth of each side of the mandible was correlated to the histological feature of ipsilateral condylar cartilage at the end of the growth period. The amount and composition of subchondral bone from three regions of interest in the condyle, and the expression of local growth factors in the adjacent condylar cartilage was evaluated.

    The results verified that bilateral non-reducing TMJ disk displacement retarded mandibular growth bilaterally; the extent corresponding to mandibular retrognathia in man. Displacement of the TMJ disk during the growth period induced condylar cartilage adaptive reactions that were associated with both an adverse amount and direction of mandibular growth, manifesting in a retrognathic mandibular growth pattern. Growth impairment fluctuated over time, with the most striking retardation occurring during periods of increased general growth, implying a local growth reduction explicitly counteracting general hormonal growth acceleration. A significant decrease of the total amount of subchondral bone, in spite of a general increase of new bone formation in the experimental condyles, pointed to a reparative compensation for an extensive resorption of subchondral bone due to displacement of the TMJ disk, but not to the extent that normal growth would be maintained. These results constitute an explanation for the adverse mandibular development following non-reducing TMJ disk displacement in growing individuals.

    This project has shown that non-reducing displacement of the TMJ disk during growth has significant consequences on facial development. The findings strongly advocate early and accurate diagnosis and treatment of TMJ disk displacement in the adolescent population, thereby presumably reducing the need for future orthodontic and surgical craniofacial corrective therapy. The results furthermore enhance the need for full appraisal of TMJ disk function in the adolescent population during orthodontic functional therapy, as the condylar cartilage and subchondral bone reactions to a concomitantly displaced non-reducing TMJ disk must be expected to interfere with the intended growth stimulating treatment. The findings of intact articular layers in spite of gross histological and morphological soft and hard tissue changes as a sequel to TMJ disk displacement in growing individuals, implicate a clinical risk of false positive radiographic diagnosis of degenerative changes of the TMJ in children and adolescents.

  • 189.
    Bryndahl, Fredrik
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Odontology. Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Odontology, Oral and Maxillofacial Radiology.
    Eriksson, Lars
    Malmö högskola.
    Legrell, Per Erik
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Odontology. Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Odontology, Oral and Maxillofacial Radiology.
    Isberg, Annika
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Odontology. Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Odontology, Oral and Maxillofacial Radiology.
    Bilateral TMJ disk displacement induces mandibular retrognathia2006In: Journal of dental research, ISSN 0022-0345, Vol. 85, no 12, p. 1118-1123Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 190.
    Bryndahl, Fredrik
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Odontology. Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Odontology, Oral and Maxillofacial Radiology.
    Legrell, Per Erik
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Odontology. Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Odontology, Oral and Maxillofacial Radiology.
    Eriksson, Lars
    Malmö Högskola.
    Isberg, Annika
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Odontology. Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Odontology, Oral and Maxillofacial Radiology.
    Titanium screw implants in optimization of radiographic evaluation of facial growth in longitudinal Animal studies2004In: The angle orthodontist, ISSN 0003-3219, Vol. 74, no 5, p. 610-617Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 191.
    Bryndahl, Fredrik
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Odontology, Oral and Maxillofacial Radiology.
    Warfvinge, G
    Eriksson, L
    Isberg, A
    Cartilage changes link retrognathic mandibular growth to TMJ disc displacement in a rabbit model2011In: International Journal of Oral and Maxillofacial Surgery, ISSN 0901-5027, E-ISSN 1399-0020, Vol. 40, no 6, p. 621-627Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Recent experimental research demonstrated that non-reducing temporomandibular joint (TMJ) disc displacement in growing rabbits impaired mandibular growth. TMJ disc displacement is also shown to induce histological changes of the condylar cartilage. The authors hypothesized that the severity of these changes would correlate to the magnitude of mandibular growth. Bilateral non-reducing TMJ disc displacement was surgically created in 10 growing New Zealand White rabbits. Ten additional rabbits constituted a sham operated control group. Aided by tantalum implants, growth was cephalometrically determined for each mandibular side during a period equivalent to childhood and adolescence in man. At the end of the growth period, histologically classified cartilage features were correlated with the assessed ipsilateral mandibular growth. Non-reducing displacement of the TMJ disc during the growth period induced histological reactions of the condylar cartilage in the rabbit model. The severity of cartilage changes was inversely correlated to the magnitude and the direction of mandibular growth, which resulted in a retrognathic growth pattern.

  • 192.
    Bryndahl, Fredrik
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Odontology, Oral and Maxillofacial Radiology.
    Warfvinge, Gunnar
    Malmö högskola.
    Eriksson, Lars
    Malmö högskola.
    Isberg, Annika
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Odontology, Oral and Maxillofacial Radiology.
    Cartilage changes link retrognathic growth to TMJ disk displacementManuscript (preprint) (Other academic)
  • 193.
    Bryndahl, Fredrik
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Odontology, Oral and Maxillofacial Radiology.
    Warfvinge, Gunnar
    Rabie, A Bakr M
    Isberg, Annika
    Subchondral bone loss explains retrognathic mandibular growth at TMJ disk displacementManuscript (preprint) (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
  • 194. Buckland, G
    et al.
    Travier, N
    Cottet, V
    Gonzalez, CA
    Lujan-Barroso, L
    Agudo, A
    Trichopoulou, A
    Lagiou, P
    Trichopoulos, D
    Peeters, PH
    May, A
    Bueno-de-Mesquita, HB
    Duijnhoven, FJ Bvan
    Key, TJ
    Allen, N
    Khaw, KT
    Wareham, N
    Romieu, I
    McCormack, V
    Boutron-Ruault, M
    Clavel-Chapelon, F
    Panico, S
    Agnoli, C
    Palli, D
    Tumino, R
    Vineis, P
    Amiano, P
    Barricarte, A
    Rodriguez, L
    Sanchez, MJ
    Chirlaque, MD
    Kaaks, R
    Teucher, B
    Boeing, H
    Bergmann, MM
    Overvad, K
    Dahm, CC
    Tjonneland, A
    Olsen, A
    Manjer, J
    Wirfalt, E
    Hallmans, Göran
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine, Nutritional Research. Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Biobank Research.
    Johansson, Ingegerd
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Odontology, School of Dentistry.
    Lund, E
    Hjartaker, A
    Skeie, G
    Vergnaud, AC
    Norat, T
    Romaguera, D
    Riboli, E
    Adherence to the mediterranean diet and risk of breast cancer in the European prospective investigation into cancer and nutrition cohort study2013In: International Journal of Cancer, ISSN 0020-7136, E-ISSN 1097-0215, Vol. 132, no 12, p. 2918-2927Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Epidemiological evidence suggests that the Mediterranean diet (MD) could reduce the risk of breast cancer (BC). As evidence from the prospective studies remains scarce and conflicting, we investigated the association between adherence to the MD and risk of BC among 335,062 women recruited from 1992 to 2000, in ten European countries, and followed for 11 years on average. Adherence to the MD was estimated through an adapted relative Mediterranean diet (arMED) score excluding alcohol. Cox proportional hazards regression models were used while adjusting for BC risk factors. A total of 9,009 postmenopausal and 1,216 premenopausal first primary incident invasive BC were identified (5,862 estrogen or progesterone receptor positive [ER+/PR+] and 1,018 estrogen and progesterone receptor negative [ER/PR]). The arMED was inversely associated with the risk of BC overall and in postmenopausal women (high vs. low arMED score; hazard ratio [HR] = 0.94 [95% confidence interval [CI]: 0.88, 1.00] ptrend = 0.048, and HR = 0.93 [95% CI: 0.87, 0.99] ptrend = 0.037, respectively). The association was more pronounced in ER/PR tumors (HR = 0.80 [95% CI: 0.65, 0.99] ptrend = 0.043). The arMED score was not associated with BC in premenopausal women. Our findings show that adherence to a MD excluding alcohol was related to a modest reduced risk of BC in postmenopausal women, and this association was stronger in receptor-negative tumors. The results support the potential scope for BC prevention through dietary modification.

  • 195. Buckland, Genevieve
    et al.
    Agudo, Antonio
    Luján, Leila
    Jakszyn, Paula
    Bueno-de-Mesquita, H Bas
    Palli, Domenico
    Boeing, Heiner
    Carneiro, Fátima
    Krogh, Vittorio
    Sacerdote, Carlotta
    Tumino, Rosario
    Panico, Salvatore
    Nesi, Gabriella
    Manjer, Jonas
    Regnér, Sara
    Johansson, Ingegerd
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Odontology. Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine, Nutritional Research.
    Stenling, Roger
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Biosciences, Pathology.
    Sanchez, María-José
    Dorronsoro, Miren
    Barricarte, Aurelio
    Navarro, Carmen
    Quirós, J Ramón
    Allen, Naomi E
    Key, Timothy J
    Bingham, Sheila
    Kaaks, Rudolf
    Overvad, Kim
    Jensen, Majken
    Olsen, Anja
    Tjønneland, Anne
    Peeters, Petra H M
    Numans, Mattijs E
    Ocké, Marga C
    Clavel-Chapelon, Françoise
    Morois, Sophie
    Boutron-Ruault, Marie-Christine
    Trichopoulou, Antonia
    Lagiou, Pagona
    Trichopoulos, Dimitrios
    Lund, Eiliv
    Couto, Elisabeth
    Boffeta, Paolo
    Jenab, Mazda
    Riboli, Elio
    Romaguera, Dora
    Mouw, Traci
    González, Carlos A
    Adherence to a Mediterranean diet and risk of gastric adenocarcinoma within the European Prospective Investigation into Cancer and Nutrition (EPIC) cohort study2010In: American Journal of Clinical Nutrition, ISSN 0002-9165, E-ISSN 1938-3207, Vol. 91, no 2, p. 381-390Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    BACKGROUND: The Mediterranean dietary pattern is believed to protect against cancer, although evidence from cohort studies that have examined particular cancer sites is limited.

    OBJECTIVE: We aimed to explore the association between adherence to a relative Mediterranean diet (rMED) and incident gastric adenocarcinoma (GC) within the European Prospective Investigation into Cancer and Nutrition study.

    DESIGN: The study included 485,044 subjects (144,577 men) aged 35-70 y from 10 European countries. At recruitment, dietary and lifestyle information was collected. An 18-unit rMED score, incorporating 9 key components of the Mediterranean diet, was used to estimate rMED adherence. The association between rMED and GC with respect to anatomic location (cardia and noncardia) and histologic types (diffuse and intestinal) was investigated. A calibration study in a subsample was used to control for dietary measurement error.

    RESULTS: After a mean follow-up of 8.9 y, 449 validated incident GC cases were identified and used in the analysis. After stratification by center and age and adjustment for recognized cancer risk factors, high compared with low rMED adherence was associated with a significant reduction in GC risk (hazard ratio: 0.67; 95% CI: 0.47, 0.94). A 1-unit increase in the rMED score was associated with a decreased risk of GC of 5% (95% CI: 0.91, 0.99). There was no evidence of heterogeneity between different anatomic locations or histologic types. The calibrated results showed similar trends (overall hazard ratio for GC: 0.93; 95% CI: 0.89, 0.99).

    CONCLUSION: Greater adherence to an rMED is associated with a significant reduction in the risk of incident GC.

  • 196.
    Bugaytsova, Jeanna A.
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Biochemistry and Biophysics.
    Björnham, Oscar
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Department of Applied Physics and Electronics. Swedish Defence Research Agency, 906 21 Umeå, Sweden.
    Chernov, Yevgen A.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Biochemistry and Biophysics.
    Gideonsson, Pär
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Biochemistry and Biophysics.
    Henriksson, Sara
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Biochemistry and Biophysics.
    Mendez, Melissa
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Biochemistry and Biophysics.
    Sjöström, Rolf
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Biochemistry and Biophysics.
    Mahdavi, Jafar
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Biochemistry and Biophysics. School of Life Sciences, CBS, University of Nottingham, NG7 2RD Nottingham, UK.
    Shevtsova, Anna
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Biochemistry and Biophysics.
    Ilver, Dag
    Moonens, Kristof
    Quintana-Hayashi, Macarena P.
    Moskalenko, Roman
    Aisenbrey, Christopher
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Department of Chemistry.
    Bylund, Göran
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Biochemistry and Biophysics.
    Schmidt, Alexej
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Biochemistry and Biophysics. Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Biosciences.
    Åberg, Anna
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Biochemistry and Biophysics.
    Brännström, Kristoffer
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Biochemistry and Biophysics.
    Koeniger, Verena
    Vikström, Susanne
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Biochemistry and Biophysics.
    Rakhimova, Lena
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Biochemistry and Biophysics. Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Biosciences.
    Hofer, Anders
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Biochemistry and Biophysics.
    Ögren, Johan
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine, Section of Medicine.
    Liu, Hui
    Goldman, Matthew D.
    Whitmire, Jeannette M.
    Åden, Jörgen
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Department of Chemistry.
    Younson, Justine
    Kelly, Charles G.
    Gilman, Robert H.
    Chowdhury, Abhijit
    Mukhopadhyay, Asish K.
    Nair, G. Balakrish
    Papadakos, Konstantinos S.
    Martinez-Gonzalez, Beatriz
    Sgouras, Dionyssios N.
    Engstrand, Lars
    Unemo, Magnus
    Danielsson, Dan
    Suerbaum, Sebastian
    Oscarson, Stefan
    Morozova-Roche, Ludmilla A.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Biochemistry and Biophysics.
    Olofsson, Anders
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Biochemistry and Biophysics.
    Gröbner, Gerhard
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Department of Chemistry.
    Holgersson, Jan
    Esberg, Anders
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Odontology.
    Strömberg, Nicklas
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Odontology.
    Landström, Maréne
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Biosciences.
    Eldridge, Angela M.
    Chromy, Brett A.
    Hansen, Lori M.
    Solnick, Jay V.
    Linden, Sara K.
    Haas, Rainer
    Dubois, Andre
    Merrell, D. Scott
    Schedin, Staffan
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Department of Applied Physics and Electronics.
    Remaut, Han
    Arnqvist, Anna
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Biochemistry and Biophysics.
    Berg, Douglas E.
    Boren, Thomas
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Biochemistry and Biophysics.
    Helicobacter pylori Adapts to Chronic Infection and Gastric Disease via pH-Responsive BabA-Mediated Adherence2017In: Cell Host and Microbe, ISSN 1931-3128, E-ISSN 1934-6069, Vol. 21, no 3, p. 376-389Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The BabA adhesin mediates high-affinity binding of Helicobacter pylori to the ABO blood group antigen-glycosylated gastric mucosa. Here we show that BabA is acid responsive-binding is reduced at low pH and restored by acid neutralization. Acid responsiveness differs among strains; often correlates with different intragastric regions and evolves during chronic infection and disease progression; and depends on pH sensor sequences in BabA and on pH reversible formation of high-affinity binding BabA multimers. We propose that BabA's extraordinary reversible acid responsiveness enables tight mucosal bacterial adherence while also allowing an effective escape from epithelial cells and mucus that are shed into the acidic bactericidal lumen and that bio-selection and changes in BabA binding properties through mutation and recombination with babA-related genes are selected by differences among individuals and by changes in gastric acidity over time. These processes generate diverse H. pylori subpopulations, in which BabA's adaptive evolution contributes to H. pylori persistence and overt gastric disease.

  • 197.
    Bugaytsova, Jeanna
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Biochemistry and Biophysics.
    Chernov, Yevgen A
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Biochemistry and Biophysics.
    Gideonsson, Pär
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Biochemistry and Biophysics.
    Mendez, Melissa
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Biochemistry and Biophysics.
    Henriksson, Sara
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Biochemistry and Biophysics. Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Molecular Biology (Faculty of Medicine).
    Mahdavi, Jafar
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Biochemistry and Biophysics. School of Life Sciences, CBS, University of Nottingham, Nottingham, UK..
    Quintana-Hayashi, Macarena
    Department of Biochemistry and Cell biology, Sahlgrenska Academy, University of Gothenburg, Gothenburg, Sweden..
    Shevtsova, Anna
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Biochemistry and Biophysics.
    Sjöström, Rolf
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Biochemistry and Biophysics.
    Moskalenko, Roman
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Biochemistry and Biophysics. Department of Pathology, Medical Institute, State University, Sumy, Ukraine.
    Aisenbrey, Christopher
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Department of Chemistry. Université de Strasbourg, Institut de Chimie, Strasbourg, France.
    Moonens, Kristof
    Structural and Molecular Microbiology, VIB Department of Structural Biology, Belgium.
    Björnham, Oscar
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Department of Applied Physics and Electronics. FOI Totalförsvarets Forskningsinstitut, Umeå, Sweden..
    Brännström, Kristoffer
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Biochemistry and Biophysics.
    Bylund, Göran
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Biochemistry and Biophysics.
    Königer, Verena
    Max von Pettenkofer Institute of Hygiene and Medical Microbiology, LMU, Munich, Germany.
    Vikström, Susanne
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Biochemistry and Biophysics.
    Schmidt, Alexej
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Biochemistry and Biophysics. Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Biosciences.
    Rakhimova, Lena
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Biochemistry and Biophysics.
    Hofer, Anders
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Biochemistry and Biophysics.
    Ögren, Johan
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Odontology.
    Ilver, Dag
    Department of Biochemistry and Cell biology, Sahlgrenska Academy, University of Gothenburg, Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Liu, Hui
    Department of Medicine, USUHS, Bethesda, MD, USA.
    Goldman, Matthew
    Department of Pediatrics, USUHS, Bethesda, MD, USA.
    Whitmire, Jeannette M
    Department of Microbiology and Immunology, USUHS, Bethesda, MD USA.
    Kelly, Charles G
    King's College London, Dental Institute, London, UK.
    Gilman, Robert H
    Department of International Health, John Hopkins School of Public Health, Baltimore, MD, USA.
    Chowdhury, Abhijit
    Centre for Liver Research, School of Digestive and Liver Diseases, Institute of Post Graduate Medical Education & Research, Kolkata, India.
    Mukhopadhyay, Asish K
    Division of Bacteriology, National Institute of Cholera and Enteric Diseases, Kolkata, India.
    Nair, Balakrish G
    Translational Health Science and Technology Institute, Haryana, India.
    Papadakos, Konstantinos S
    Hellenic Pasteur Institute, Athens, Greece.
    Martinez-Gonzalez, Beatriz
    Hellenic Pasteur Institute, Athens, Greece.
    Sgouras, Dionyssios N
    Hellenic Pasteur Institute, Athens, Greece.
    Engstrand, Lars
    Department of Microbiology, Tumor and Cell Biology, Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Unemo, Magnus
    Department of Laboratory Medicine, Microbiology, Örebro University Hospital, Örebro, Sweden.
    Danielsson, Dan
    Department of Laboratory Medicine, Microbiology, Örebro University Hospital, Örebro, Sweden.
    Sebastian, Suerbaum
    Institute for Medical Microbiology and Hospital Epidemiology Hannover Medical School, Hannover, Germany.
    Oscarson, Stefan
    Centre for Synthesis and Chemical Biology, School of Chemistry, University College Dublin, Dublin, Ireland.
    Morozova-Roche, Ludmilla
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Biochemistry and Biophysics.
    Gröbner, Gerhard
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Department of Chemistry.
    Holgersson, Jan
    Department of Clinical Chemistry and Transfusion Medicine, Sahlgrenska Academy, University of Gothenburg, Sahlgrenska University Hospital, Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Strömberg, Nicklas
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Odontology.
    Esberg, Anders
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Odontology.
    Eldridge, Angela
    Department of Pathology and Laboratory Medicine, University of California Davis School of Medicine, Sacramento, CA, USA.
    Chromy, Brett A
    Department of Pathology and Laboratory Medicine, University of California Davis School of Medicine, Sacramento, CA, USA.
    Hansen, Lori
    Departments of Medical Microbiology and Immunology, Center for Comparative Medicine, University of California Davis, Davis, CA, USA.
    Solnick, Jay
    Departments of Medical Microbiology and Immunology, Center for Comparative Medicine, University of California Davis, Davis, CA, USA.
    Haas, Rainer
    Max von Pettenkofer Institute of Hygiene and Medical Microbiology, LMU Munich, Munich, Germany.
    Schedin, Staffan
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Department of Applied Physics and Electronics.
    Lindén, Sara K
    Department of Biochemistry and Cell biology, Sahlgrenska Academy, University of Gothenburg, Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Dubois, Andre
    Department of Medicine, USUHS, Bethesda, MD, USA.
    Merrell, D. Scott
    Department of Microbiology and Immunology, USUHS, Bethesda, MD, USA.
    Remaut, Han
    Structural and Molecular Microbiology, VIB Department of Structural Biology, VIB, Brussels, Belgium.
    Arnqvist, Anna
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Biochemistry and Biophysics.
    Berg, Douglas E
    Department of Medicine, University of California San Diego, La Jolla, CA, USA.
    Borén, Thomas
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Biochemistry and Biophysics.
    Acid Responsive Helicobacter pylori Adherence: Implications for Chronic Infection and DiseaseManuscript (preprint) (Other academic)
  • 198.
    Bugaytsova, Zhanna
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Odontology.
    Lindström, E Börje
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Department of Molecular Biology (Faculty of Science and Technology).
    Localization, purification and properties of a tetrathionate hydrolase from Acidithiobacillus caldus2004In: European Journal of Biochemistry, ISSN 0014-2956, E-ISSN 1432-1033, Vol. 271, no 2, p. 272-280Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The moderately thermophilic bacterium Acidithiobacillus caldus is found in bacterial populations in many bioleaching operations throughout the world. This bacterium oxidizes elemental sulfur and other reduced inorganic sulfur compounds as the sole source of energy. The purpose of this study was to purify and characterize the tetrathionate hydrolase of A. caldus. The enzyme was purified 16.7-fold by one step chromatography using a SP Sepharose column. The purified enzyme resolved into a single band in 10% polyacrylamide gel, both under denaturing and native conditions. Its homogeneity was confirmed by N-terminal amino acid sequencing. Tetrathionate hydrolase was shown to be a homodimer with a molecular mass of 103 kDa (composed from two 52 kDa monomers). The purified enzyme had optimum activity at pH 3.0 and 40 degreesC and an isoelectric point of 9.8. The periplasmic localization of the enzyme was determined by differential fractionation of A. caldus cells. Detected products of the tetrathionate hydrolase reaction were thiosulfate and pentathionate as confirmed by RP-HPLC analysis. The activity of the purified enzyme was drastically enhanced by divalent metal ions.

  • 199. Buhlin, Kare
    et al.
    Holmer, Jacob
    Gustafsson, Anders
    Hörkkö, Sohvi
    Pockley, Alan Graham
    Johansson, Anders
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Odontology.
    Paju, Susanna
    Klinge, Björn
    Pussinen, Pirkko
    Association of periodontitis with persistent, pro-atherogenic antibody responses2015In: Journal of Clinical Periodontology, ISSN 0303-6979, E-ISSN 1600-051X, Vol. 42, no 11, p. 1006-1014Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    AIM: To study antibody responses associated with molecular mimicry in periodontitis.

    MATERIAL AND METHODS: Fifty-four periodontitis cases (mean age 54.0 years) and 44 controls (53.6 years) were examined, after which cases received periodontal treatment. Established immunoassays were used to analyse levels of antibodies against two pathogens, Aggregatibacter actinomycetemcomitans (Aa) and Porphyromonas gingivalis (Pg), heat shock proteins (Hsp), Hsp60, Hsp65, and Hsp70, and epitopes of oxidized low density lipoprotein (oxLDL) (CuOx-LDL and MDA-LDL) in plasma samples that were collected at baseline, after 3 (n=48) and 6 (n=30) months.

    RESULTS: When age, sex, smoking habit, and the number of teeth were considered in multivariate logistic regressions, Aa and Pg IgG, Hsp65-IgA, CuOx-LDL-IgG and -IgM and MDA-LDL-IgG antibody levels were associated with periodontitis, whereas Hsp60-IgG2 antibody levels were inversely associated. The Aa antibody levels significantly correlated with the levels of IgA antibodies to Hsp65 and Hsp70, and both OxLDL IgA-antibody levels. The levels of antibodies to Pg correlated with IgG antibodies to Hsp60, Hsp70 and both oxLDL antibody epitopes. None of the antibody levels changed significantly after treatment.

    CONCLUSIONS: Periodontitis is associated with persistently high levels of circulating antibodies that are reactive with pathogen- and host-derived antigens.

  • 200.
    Buiyan, Salmah
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Odontology, School of Dentistry.
    Sheng, Nongfei
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Odontology, School of Dentistry.
    Experience of Oral Care among Elderly in Nursing Homes2014Independent thesis Advanced level (degree of Master (Two Years)), 20 credits / 30 HE creditsStudent thesis
    Abstract [en]

    Life expectancy among the elderly has been improving for decades and edentulousness is constantly decreasing among the senior citizens. The steady decrease of tooth loss among the elderly is a challenge to the dental profession due to the increased demand of oral care. This study aims to explore the perspectives regarding oral health and oral care among the elderly living in nursing homes.

    Ten subjects from two nursing homes in Umeå were interviewed based on a defined interview guide. The interview guide contained open-ended questions regarding oral health and oral care. The subjects were interviewed, all the interviews were recorded and transcribed verbatim. Categories, subcategories and codes were created using qualitative content analysis.

    Two categories and six subcategories were established based on qualitative content analysis. The two categories revealed opposing attitudes, the first promoted oral care and the second disfavored oral health. The oral care promoted factors included general satisfaction with the elderly’s’ present oral status, positive experiences associated with oral care and strong desire to maintain their own oral hygiene. The most notable negative factors for good oral health was the lack of thorough oral examinations and individually adapted assistance with daily oral hygiene. The informants took oral hygiene as a part of their integrity and expressed wishes to be independent.

    In general, the informants held positive attitudes toward their current oral status and understood that proper oral care is a prerequisite to good oral health. However, it should be noted that assistance with oral hygiene is not practiced in either of the two nursing homes on a regular basis. This may be attributed to staff shortages and the residents desire to maintain their independence.

1234567 151 - 200 of 1569
CiteExportLink to result list
Permanent link
Cite
Citation style
  • apa
  • ieee
  • modern-language-association-8th-edition
  • vancouver
  • Other style
More styles
Language
  • de-DE
  • en-GB
  • en-US
  • fi-FI
  • nn-NO
  • nn-NB
  • sv-SE
  • Other locale
More languages
Output format
  • html
  • text
  • asciidoc
  • rtf