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  • 151.
    Bergh, Johanna
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Biosciences, Pathology. Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Clinical Microbiology, Virology.
    Marklund, Ingrid
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Clinical Microbiology, Virology.
    Gustavsson, C
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Biosciences, Pathology.
    Wiklund, Fredrik
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Radiation Sciences, Oncology.
    Grönberg, Henrik
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Radiation Sciences, Oncology.
    Allard, Annika
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Clinical Microbiology, Virology.
    Alexeyev, Olog
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Biosciences, Pathology.
    Elgh, Fredrik
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Clinical Microbiology, Virology. Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Biosciences, Pathology.
    No link between viral findings in the prostate and subsequent cancer development2007In: British Journal of Cancer, ISSN 0007-0920, E-ISSN 1532-1827, Vol. 96, no 1, p. 137-139Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In an investigation of 201 prostate tissue samples from patients with benign prostate hyperplasia that later progressed to prostate cancer and 201 matched controls that did not, there were no differences in the prevalence of adenovirus, herpesvirus, papilloma virus, polyoma virus and Candida albicans DNA.

  • 152.
    Bergh, Johanna
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Medical Biosciences, Pathology.
    Marklund, Ingrid
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Clinical Microbiology, Virology.
    Thellenberg-Karlsson, Camilla
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Radiation Sciences, Oncology.
    Grönberg, Henrik
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Radiation Sciences, Oncology.
    Elgh, Fredrik
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Medical Biosciences, Pathology.
    Alexeyev, Oleg A
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Medical Biosciences, Pathology.
    Detection of Escherichia coli 16S RNA and Cytotoxic Necrotizing Factor 1 Gene in Benign Prostate Hyperplasia.2007In: Eur Urol, ISSN 0302-2838, Vol. 51, no 2, p. 457-463Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 153.
    Berglin, Eva
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine, Reumatology.
    Lorentzon, Ronnie
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Surgical and Perioperative Sciences, Sports Medicine.
    Nordmark, L
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Radiation Sciences, Diagnostic Radiology.
    Nilsson-Sojka, Birgitta
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Clinical Microbiology, Clinical Immunology.
    Rantapää Dahlqvist, Solbritt
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine, Reumatology.
    Predictors of radiological progression and changes in hand bone density in early rheumatoid arthritis2003In: Rheumatology, ISSN 1462-0324, E-ISSN 1462-0332, Vol. 42, no 2, p. 268-275Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    OBJECTIVE: To identify predictors for radiological and functional outcome and bone loss in the hands in early rheumatoid arthritis (RA) during the first 2 yr of disease and to study the relationship between these variables.

    METHODS: An inception cohort of consecutively recruited patients was examined at baseline and after 12 and 24 months using X-rays of hands and feet, clinical [28-joint count, Health Assessment Questionnaire (HAQ), global visual analogue scale (VAS), grip strength] and laboratory (erythrocyte sedimentation rate, C-reactive protein, markers of bone formation and resorption) measurements and dual-energy X-ray absorptiometry measurements of the hands.

    RESULTS: Joint destruction increased significantly during the study, with the Larsen score at baseline as the strongest predictor. Radiological progression and bone loss over 24 months were significantly retarded in patients responding to therapy. The effects of the shared epitope and initial high inflammatory activity on radiological progression were overridden by the therapeutic response. Radiological progression correlated significantly with bone loss. Global VAS, Larsen score and HAQ at inclusion significantly predicted change in HAQ over time.

    CONCLUSIONS: Radiological progression and bone loss were retarded by early therapeutic response. Bone loss was related to radiological progression.

  • 154.
    Berglin, Ewa
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine, Rheumatology.
    Johansson, T.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Biochemistry and Biophysics.
    Sundin, U.
    Jidell, Erik
    Wadell, Göran
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Clinical Microbiology, Virology.
    Hallmans, Göran
    Rantapää-Dahlqvist, Solbritt
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine, Rheumatology.
    Radiological outcome in rheumatoid arthritis is predicted by presence of antibodies against cyclic citrullinated peptide before and at disease onset, and by IgA-RF at disease onset2006In: Annals of the Rheumatic Diseases, ISSN 0003-4967, E-ISSN 1468-2060, Vol. 65, no 4, p. 453-458Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    OBJECTIVE: To evaluate the significance of antibodies against cyclic citrullinated peptide (anti-CCP) and rheumatoid factors (RFs), before the onset of rheumatoid arthritis and when presenting as early disease (baseline), for disease activity and progression. METHODS: 93 of a cohort of 138 patients with early rheumatoid arthritis (<12 months of symptoms) had donated blood before symptoms of rheumatoid arthritis (defined as pre-patients) and were identified from among blood donors within the Medical Biobank of northern Sweden. Disease activity (erythrocyte sedimentation rate (ESR), C reactive protein, joint score, global visual analogue scale) and radiological destruction in hands and feet (Larsen score) were assessed at baseline and after two years. Anti-CCP antibodies and RFs were analysed using enzyme immunoassays. HLA shared epitope (SE) alleles (DRB1*0401/0404) were identified. RESULTS: Patients with anti-CCP antibodies before disease onset had significantly higher Larsen score at baseline and after two years. In multiple regression analyses baseline values of anti-CCP/IgA-RF/IgG-RF/IgM-RF, swollen joint count, and Larsen score significantly predicted radiological outcome at two years. In logistic regression analyses, baseline values of anti-CCP antibodies/IgA-RF, therapeutic response at six months, and swollen joint count/ESR significantly predicted radiological progression after two years. The baseline titre of anti-CCP antibodies was higher in patients with radiological progression and decreased significantly in those with response to therapy. SE allele carriage was associated with a positive test for anti-CCP antibodies in pre-patients and in early rheumatoid arthritis. CONCLUSIONS: Presence of anti-CCP antibodies before disease onset is associated with more severe radiological damage. The titre of anti-CCP antibodies is related to disease severity.

  • 155.
    Bergman, Elin
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Clinical Microbiology.
    Interaktiv datoradministrerad intervention baserat på motiverande samtal hos personer med hög risk för klamydia.2015Independent thesis Advanced level (professional degree), 20 credits / 30 HE creditsStudent thesis
  • 156.
    Bergner, Helén
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Clinical Microbiology, Virology.
    Screening för virus i myggor insamlade sommaren 2017 i Västerbotten2018Independent thesis Basic level (degree of Bachelor), 10 credits / 15 HE creditsStudent thesis
  • 157.
    Bergqvist, Joakim
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Clinical Microbiology.
    Forsman, Oscar
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Clinical Microbiology.
    Larsson, Pär
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Biosciences.
    Näslund, Jonas
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Clinical Microbiology.
    Lilja, Tobias
    Engdahl, Cecilia
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Department of Chemistry.
    Lindström, Anders
    Gylfe, Åsa
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Clinical Microbiology.
    Ahlm, Clas
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Clinical Microbiology.
    Evander, Magnus
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Clinical Microbiology. Umeå University, Arctic Research Centre at Umeå University.
    Bucht, Göran
    [ 1 ] CBRN Def & Secur, Swedish Def Res Agcy, SE-90182 Umea, Sweden.
    Detection and Isolation of Sindbis Virus from Mosquitoes Captured During an Outbreak in Sweden, 20132015In: Vector Borne and Zoonotic Diseases, ISSN 1530-3667, E-ISSN 1557-7759, Vol. 15, no 2, p. 133-140Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Mosquito-borne alphaviruses have the potential to cause large outbreaks throughout the world. Here we investigated the causative agent of an unexpected Sindbis virus (SINV) outbreak during August-September, 2013, in a previously nonendemic region of Sweden. Mosquitoes were collected using carbon dioxide-baited CDC traps at locations close to human cases. The mosquitoes were initially screened as large pools by SINV-specific quantitative RT-PCR, and the SINV-positive mosquitoes were species determined by single-nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) analysis, followed by sequencing the barcoding region of the cytochrome oxidase I gene. The proportion of the collected mosquitoes was determined by a metabarcoding strategy. By using novel strategies for PCR screening and genetic typing, a new SINV strain, Lovanger, was isolated from a pool of 1600 mosquitoes composed of Culex, Culiseta, and Aedes mosquitoes as determined by metabarcoding. The SINV-positive mosquito Culiseta morsitans was identified by SNP analysis and sequencing. After whole-genome sequencing and phylogenetic analysis, the SINV Lovanger isolate was shown to be most closely similar to recent Finnish SINV isolates. In conclusion, within a few weeks, we were able to detect and isolate a novel SINV strain and identify the mosquito vector during a sudden SINV outbreak.

  • 158.
    Bergqvist, Simon
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Clinical Microbiology, Biomedical Laboratory Science. Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Biosciences, Clinical chemistry.
    Preanalytisk stabilitet för 25(OH)-vitamin D i koagulerat blod och serum2019Independent thesis Basic level (professional degree), 10 credits / 15 HE creditsStudent thesis
  • 159.
    Bergstedt Oscarsson, Kristina
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Clinical Microbiology, Infectious Diseases.
    Brorstad, Alette
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Clinical Microbiology, Infectious Diseases.
    Baudin, Maria
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Clinical Microbiology, Virology.
    Lindberg, Anne
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine, Medicine.
    Forssén, Annika
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine, Family Medicine.
    Evander, Magnus
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Clinical Microbiology, Virology.
    Eriksson, Marie
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Umeå School of Business and Economics (USBE), Statistics.
    Ahlm, Clas
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Clinical Microbiology, Infectious Diseases.
    Human Puumala hantavirus infection in northern Sweden: increased seroprevalence and association to risk and health factors2016In: BMC Infectious Diseases, ISSN 1471-2334, E-ISSN 1471-2334, Vol. 16, article id 566Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    BACKGROUND: The rodent borne Puumala hantavirus (PUUV) causes haemorrhagic fever with renal syndrome in central and northern Europe. The number of cases has increased and northern Sweden has experienced large outbreaks in 1998 and 2006-2007 which raised questions regarding the level of immunity in the human population.

    METHODS: A randomly selected population aged between 25 and 74 years from northern Sweden were invited during 2009 to participate in a WHO project for monitoring of trends and determinants in cardiovascular disease. Health and risk factors were evaluated and sera from 1,600 participants were available for analysis for specific PUUV IgG antibodies using a recombinant PUUV nucleocapsid protein ELISA.

    RESULTS: The overall seroprevalence in the investigated population was 13.4 %, which is a 50 % increase compared to a similar study only two decades previously. The prevalence of PUUV IgG increased with age, and among 65-75 years it was 22 %. More men (15.3 %) than women (11.4 %) were seropositive (p < 0.05). The identified risk factors were smoking (OR = 1.67), living in rural areas (OR = 1.92), and owning farmland or forest (OR = 2.44). No associations were found between previous PUUV exposure and chronic lung disease, diabetes, hypertension, renal dysfunction, stroke or myocardial infarction.

    CONCLUSIONS: PUUV is a common infection in northern Sweden and there is a high life time risk to acquire PUUV infection in endemic areas. Certain risk factors as living in rural areas and smoking were identified. Groups with increased risk should be targeted for future vaccination when available, and should also be informed about appropriate protection from rodent secreta.

  • 160.
    Bergstedt-Oskarsson, Kristina
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine, Family Medicine.
    Brorstad, Alette
    Baudin, Maria
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Clinical Microbiology, Virology.
    Lindberg, Anne
    Forssén, Annika
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine, Family Medicine.
    Evander, Magnus
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Clinical Microbiology, Virology.
    Ahlm, Clas
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Clinical Microbiology, Infectious Diseases.
    Seroepidemiology, comorbidity and riskfactors for Puumula hantavirus in a highly endemic area of Sweden2011Conference paper (Other academic)
  • 161.
    Binesse, Johan
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Clinical Microbiology, Clinical Bacteriology. Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Molecular Infection Medicine Sweden (MIMS).
    Lindgren, Helena
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Clinical Microbiology, Clinical Bacteriology. Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Molecular Infection Medicine Sweden (MIMS).
    Lindgren, Lena
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Clinical Microbiology, Clinical Bacteriology. Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Molecular Infection Medicine Sweden (MIMS).
    Conlan, Wayne
    Sjöstedt, Anders
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Clinical Microbiology, Clinical Bacteriology. Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Molecular Infection Medicine Sweden (MIMS).
    Roles of Reactive Oxygen Species-Degrading Enzymes of Francisella tularensis SCHU S42015In: Infection and Immunity, ISSN 0019-9567, E-ISSN 1098-5522, Vol. 83, no 6, p. 2255-2263Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Francisella tularensis is a facultative intracellular bacterium utilizing macrophages as its primary intracellular habitat and is therefore highly capable of resisting the effects of reactive oxygen species (ROS), potent mediators of the bactericidal activity of macrophages. We investigated the roles of enzymes presumed to be important for protection against ROS. Four mutants of the highly virulent SCHU S4 strain with deletions of the genes encoding catalase (katG), glutathione peroxidase (gpx), a DyP-type peroxidase (FTT0086), or double deletion of FTT0086 and katG showed much increased susceptibility to hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) and slightly increased susceptibility to paraquat but not to peroxynitrite (ONOO-) and displayed intact intramacrophage replication. Nevertheless, mice infected with the double deletion mutant showed significantly longer survival than SCHU S4-infected mice. Unlike the aforementioned mutants, deletion of the gene coding for alkyl-hydroperoxide reductase subunit C (ahpC) generated a mutant much more susceptible to paraquat and ONOO- but not to H2O2. It showed intact replication in J774 cells but impaired replication in bone marrow-derived macrophages and in internal organs of mice. The live vaccine strain, LVS, is more susceptible than virulent strains to ROS-mediated killing and possesses a truncated form of FTT0086. Expression of the SCHU S4 FTT0086 gene rendered LVS more resistant to H2O2, which demonstrates that the SCHU S4 strain possesses additional detoxifying mechanisms. Collectively, the results demonstrate that SCHU S4 ROS-detoxifying enzymes have overlapping functions, and therefore, deletion of one or the other does not critically impair the intracellular replication or virulence, although AhpC appears to have a unique function.

  • 162. Birdsell, D. N.
    et al.
    Özsürekci, Y.
    Rawat, A.
    Aycan, A. E.
    Mitchell, C. L.
    Sahl, J. W.
    Johansson, Anders
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Clinical Microbiology. Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Molecular Infection Medicine Sweden (MIMS).
    Colman, R. E.
    Schupp, J. M.
    Ceyhan, M.
    Keim, P. S.
    Wagner, D. M.
    Coinfections identified from metagenomic analysis of cervical lymph nodes from tularemia patients2018In: BMC Infectious Diseases, ISSN 1471-2334, E-ISSN 1471-2334, Vol. 18, article id 319Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: Underlying coinfections may complicate infectious disease states but commonly go unnoticed because an a priori clinical suspicion is usually required so they can be detected via targeted diagnostic tools. Shotgun metagenomics is a broad diagnostic tool that can be useful for identifying multiple microbes simultaneously especially if coupled with lymph node aspirates, a clinical matrix known to house disparate pathogens. The objective of this study was to analyze the utility of this unconventional diagnostic approach (shotgun metagenomics) using clinical samples from human tularemia cases as a test model. Tularemia, caused by the bacterium Francisella tularensis, is an emerging infectious disease in Turkey. This disease commonly manifests as swelling of the lymph nodes nearest to the entry of infection. Because swollen cervical nodes are observed from many different types of human infections we used these clinical sample types to analyze the utility of shotgun metagenomics.

    Methods: We conducted an unbiased molecular survey using shotgun metagenomics sequencing of DNA extracts from fine-needle aspirates of neck lymph nodes from eight tularemia patients who displayed protracted symptoms. The resulting metagenomics data were searched for microbial sequences (bacterial and viral).

    Results: F. tularensis sequences were detected in all samples. In addition, we detected DNA of other known pathogens in three patients. Both Hepatitis B virus (HBV) and Human Parvovirus B-19 were detected in one individual and Human Parvovirus B-19 alone was detected in two other individuals. Subsequent PCR coupled with Sanger sequencing verified the metagenomics results. The HBV status was independently confirmed via serological diagnostics, despite evading notice during the initial assessment.

    Conclusion: Our data highlight that shotgun metagenomics of fine-needle lymph node aspirates is a promising clinical diagnostic strategy to identify coinfections. Given the feasibility of the diagnostic approach demonstrated here, further steps to promote integration of this type of diagnostic capability into mainstream clinical practice are warranted.

  • 163. Birdsell, Dawn N
    et al.
    Johansson, Anders
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Clinical Microbiology, Infectious Diseases.
    Öhrman, Caroline
    Swedish Defense Research Agency, Umeå.
    Kaufman, Emily
    Molins, Claudia
    Pearson, Talima
    Gyuranecz, Miklós
    Naumann, Amber
    Vogler, Amy J
    Myrtennäs, Kerstin
    Swedish Defense Research Agency, Umeå.
    Larsson, Pär
    Swedish Defense Research Agency, Umeå.
    Forsman, Mats
    Swedish Defense Research Agency, Umeå.
    Sjödin, Andreas
    Swedish Defense Research Agency, Umeå.
    Gillece, John D
    Schupp, James
    Petersen, Jeannine M
    Keim, Paul
    Wagner, David M
    Francisella tularensis subsp. tularensis group A.I, United States2014In: Emerging Infectious Diseases, ISSN 1080-6040, E-ISSN 1080-6059, Vol. 20, no 5, p. 861-865Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    We used whole-genome analysis and subsequent characterization of geographically diverse strains using new genetic signatures to identify distinct subgroups within Francisella tularensis subsp. tularensis group A.I: A.I.3, A.I.8, and A.I.12. These subgroups exhibit complex phylogeographic patterns within North America. The widest distribution was observed for A.I.12, which suggests an adaptive advantage.

  • 164.
    Birgitta, Evengård
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Clinical Microbiology, Infectious Diseases.
    Fatigue. Epidemiology and Social/Industrial aspects2008In: Fatigue Science for Human Health, Springer, 2008, p. 17-31Chapter in book (Refereed)
  • 165.
    Bitar, Aziz
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Clinical Microbiology.
    Vibrio cholerae modulates the immune defense of human gut mucosa2018Doctoral thesis, comprehensive summary (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    The key function of innate immunity is to sense danger signals and initiate effective responses as a defense mechanism against pathogens. Simultaneously, effector responses must be regulated to avoid excessive inflammation with resulting tissue damage. microRNAs (miRNAs), are small endogenous molecules, that has recently gained attention as important regulatory elements in the human inflammation cascade. The control over host miRNA expression may represent a previously uncharacterized molecular strategy exploited by pathogens to mitigate innate host cell responses.

    Vibrio cholerae is a Gram-negative bacterium that colonizes the human small intestine and causes life-threatening secretory diarrhea, essentially mediated by cholera toxin (CT). It is considered a non-invasive pathogen and does not cause clinical inflammation. Still, cholera is associated with inflammatory changes of the small intestine. Furthermore, CT-negative strains of V. cholerae cause gastroenteritis and are associated with extra-intestinal manifestations, suggesting that other virulence factors than CT are also involved in the pathogenesis.

    The innate immune response to V. cholerae is poorly investigated and the potential role of miRNA in cholera had not been studied before. Therefore, this thesis explores the role of intestinal epithelial cells in response to V. cholerae infection with a focus on regulatory miRNA as a potential contributor to the pathogenesis. The in vivo material was small intestinal biopsies from patients suffering from V. cholerae infection. As an in vitro model for V. cholerae attack on intestinal epithelium, we used tight monolayers of T84 cells infected with V. cholerae and their released factors. We analyzed changes in levels of cytokines, immunomodulatory microRNA and their target genes.

    We showed that miRNA-146a and miRNA-155 reached significantly elevated levels in the intestinal mucosa at acute stages of disease in V. cholerae infected patients and declined to normal levels at the convalescent stage. Low-grade inflammation was identified at the acute stage of V. cholerae infection, which correlated with elevated levels of regulatory miRNA. Furthermore, outer membrane vesicles (OMVs) released by the bacteria were shown to induce miR-146a and live bacteria induced miR-155 in intestinal epithelial cells. In addition, OMVs decreased epithelial permeability and caused mRNA suppression of pro-inflammatory cytokines, including immune cell attractant IL-8 and CLL20, and the inflammasome markers IL-1b and IL-18. These results propose that V. cholerae regulates the host expression of miRNA during infection and may set the threshold for activation of the intestinal epithelium.

    Moreover, we showed that V. cholerae also harbors inflammatory-inducing capabilities, by secreting a pore-forming toxin, Vibrio cholerae cytolysin (VCC). By using genetically modified strains as well as soluble protein challenge experiments, VCC was found solely responsible for the increased epithelial permeability and induction of several pro-inflammatory cytokines in intestinal epithelial cells. In contrast to OMVs, VCC displayed strong upregulation of the pro-inflammatory cytokines IL-8, TNF-a, CCL20 and IL-1b and IRAK2, a key signaling molecule in the IL-1 inflammasome pathway. This suggest that VCC is an important virulence factor in the V. cholerae pathogenesis, particularly in CT-negative strains. Furthermore, we showed that the bacterium could control the inflammatory actions of VCC by secreting the PrtV protease, which degraded VCC and consequently abolished inflammation.  

    In summary, we showed that V. cholerae harbors immunomodulating capabilities, both at the gene level, through induction of host regulatory miRNA, and at the protein level, through secretion of VCC and PrtV. These strategies may be relevant for V. cholerae to promote survival in the gut and cause successful infections in the human host.

  • 166.
    Bitar, Aziz
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Clinical Microbiology, Immunology/Immunchemistry.
    Aung, Kyaw Min
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Molecular Infection Medicine Sweden (MIMS). Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Molecular Biology (Faculty of Medicine). Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Clinical Microbiology, Immunology/Immunchemistry.
    Wai, Sun Nyunt
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Molecular Infection Medicine Sweden (MIMS). Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Molecular Biology (Faculty of Medicine).
    Hammarström, Marie-Louise
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Clinical Microbiology, Immunology/Immunchemistry.
    Vibrio cholerae derived outer membrane vesicles modulate the inflammatory response of human intestinal epithelial cells by inducing microRNA-146a2019In: Scientific Reports, ISSN 2045-2322, E-ISSN 2045-2322, Vol. 9, article id 7212Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The small intestinal epithelium of Vibrio cholerae infected patients expresses the immunomodulatory microRNAs miR-146a and miR-155 at acute stage of disease. V. cholerae release outer membrane vesicles (OMVs) that serve as vehicles for translocation of virulence factors including V. cholerae cytolysin (VCC). The aim was to investigate whether OMVs, with and/or without VCC-cargo could be responsible for induction of microRNAs in intestinal epithelial cells and thereby contribute to immunomodulation. Polarized tight monolayers of T84 cells were challenged with OMVs of wildtype and a VCC deletion mutant of the non-O1/non-O139 (NOVC) V. cholerae strain V:5/04 and with soluble VCC. OMVs, with and without VCC-cargo, caused significantly increased levels of miR-146a. Increase was seen already after 2 hours challenge with OMVs and persisted after 12 hours. Challenge with soluble VCC caused significant increases in interleukin-8 (IL-8), tumour necrosis factor-α (TNF-α), CCL20, IL-1β, and IRAK2 mRNA levels while challenge with OMVs did not cause increases in expression levels of any of these mRNAs. These results suggest that V. cholerae bacteria release OMVs that induce miR-146a in order to pave the way for colonization by reducing the strength of an epithelial innate immune defence reaction and also preventing inflammation in the mucosa that factors like VCC can evoke.

  • 167.
    Bitar, Aziz
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Clinical Microbiology, Immunology/Immunchemistry.
    De, Rituparna
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Clinical Microbiology, Immunology/Immunchemistry. Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Molecular Infection Medicine Sweden (MIMS).
    Melgar, Silvia
    Aung, Kyaw Min
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Clinical Microbiology, Immunology/Immunchemistry. Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Molecular Infection Medicine Sweden (MIMS).
    Rahman, Arman
    Qadri, Firdausi
    Wai, Sun Nyunt
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Molecular Infection Medicine Sweden (MIMS).
    Shirin, Tahmina
    Hammarström, Marie-Louise
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Clinical Microbiology, Immunology/Immunchemistry.
    Induction of immunomodulatory miR-146a and miR-155 in small intestinal epithelium of Vibrio cholerae infected patients at acute stage of cholera2017In: PLoS ONE, ISSN 1932-6203, E-ISSN 1932-6203, Vol. 12, no 3, article id 0173817Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The potential immunomodulatory role of microRNAs in small intestine of patients with acute watery diarrhea caused by Vibrio cholerae O1 or enterotoxigenic Escherichia coli (ETEC) infection was investigated. Duodenal biopsies were obtained from study-participants at the acute (day 2) and convalescent (day 21) stages of disease, and from healthy individuals. Levels of miR-146a, miR-155 and miR-375 and target gene (IRAK1, TRAF6, CARD10) and 11 cytokine mRNAs were determined by qRT-PCR. The cellular source of microRNAs in biopsies was analyzed by in situ hybridization. The ability of V. cholerae bacteria and their secreted products to cause changes in microRNA- and mRNA levels in polarized tight monolayers of intestinal epithelial cells was investigated. miR-146a and miR-155 were expressed at significantly elevated levels at acute stage of V. cholerae infection and declined to normal at convalescent stage (P<0.009 versus controls; P = 0.03 versus convalescent stage, pairwise). Both microRNAs were mainly expressed in the epithelium. Only marginal down-regulation of target genes IRAK1 and CARD10 was seen and a weak cytokine-profile was identified in the acute infected mucosa. No elevation of microRNA levels was seen in ETEC infection. Challenge of tight monolayers with the wild type V. cholerae O1 strain C6706 and clinical isolates from two study-participants, caused significant increase in miR-155 and miR-146a by the strain C6706 (P<0.01). One clinical isolate caused reduction in IRAK1 levels (P<0.05) and none of the strains induced inflammatory cytokines. In contrast, secreted factors from these strains caused markedly increased levels of IL-8, IL-1β, and CARD10 (P<0.001), without inducing microRNA expression. Thus, miR-146a and miR-155 are expressed in the duodenal epithelium at the acute stage of cholera. The inducer is probably the V. cholerae bacterium. By inducing microRNAs the bacterium can limit the innate immune response of the host, including inflammation evoked by its own secreted factors, thereby decreasing the risk of being eliminated.

  • 168.
    Bitar, Aziz
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Clinical Microbiology.
    Kyaw, Min Aung
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Molecular Infection Medicine Sweden (MIMS).
    Marie-Louise, Hammarström
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Clinical Microbiology, Immunology/Immunchemistry.
    Wai, Sun Nynt
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Molecular Infection Medicine Sweden (MIMS).
    Vibrio cholerae derived outer membrane vesicles modulate the inflammatory response ofhuman intestinal epithelial cells by inducing microRNA-146aIn: Scientific Reports, ISSN 2045-2322, E-ISSN 2045-2322Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The small intestinal epithelium of Vibrio cholerae infected patients expresses the immunomodulatory microRNAs miR-146a and miR-155 at acute stage of disease. V. cholerae release outer membrane vesicles (OMVs) that serve as vehicles for translocation of virulencefactors including V. cholerae cytolysin (VCC). The aim was to investigate whether OMVs, with and/or without VCC-cargo could be responsible for induction of microRNAs in intestinal epithelial cells and thereby contribute to immunomodulation. Polarized tight monolayers of T84 cells were challenged with OMVs of wild-type and a VCC deletion mutant of the non-O1/non-O139 (NOVC) V. cholerae strain V:5/04 and with soluble VCC. OMVs, with and without VCC-cargo, caused significantly increased levels of miR-146a. Challenge with soluble VCC caused significant increases in interleukin-8 (IL-8), tumour necrosis factor-α(TNF-α), CCL20, IL-1β, and IRAK2 mRNA levels while challenge with OMVs did not causeany changes. Notably, OMVs from the VCC deficient mutant caused significant decreases in CCL20 and IL-18 mRNA levels. These results suggest that V. cholerae bacteria release OMVs that induce miR-146a in order to pave the way for colonization by reducing thestrength of an epithelial innate immune defence reaction and also preventing inflammation inthe mucosa that factors like VCC can evoke.

  • 169.
    Bixo, Mi
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Clinical Microbiology, Biomedical Laboratory Science.
    Detektion av alloantikroppar hos nyligt transfunderade DAT-positiva patienter: Utvärdering med en experimentell in vitro modell2018Independent thesis Basic level (professional degree), 10 credits / 15 HE creditsStudent thesis
  • 170. Bjelkmar, Par
    et al.
    Hansen, Anette
    Schonning, Caroline
    Bergstrom, Jakob
    Lofdahl, Margareta
    Lebbad, Marianne
    Wallensten, Anders
    Allestam, Gorel
    Stenmark, Stephan
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Clinical Microbiology.
    Lindh, Johan
    Early outbreak detection by linking health advice line calls to water distribution areas retrospectively demonstrated in a large waterborne outbreak of cryptosporidiosis in Sweden2017In: BMC Public Health, ISSN 1471-2458, E-ISSN 1471-2458, Vol. 17, article id 328Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: In the winter and spring of 2011 a large outbreak of cryptosporidiosis occurred in Skelleftea municipality, Sweden. This study summarizes the outbreak investigation in terms of outbreak size, duration, clinical characteristics, possible source(s) and the potential for earlier detection using calls to a health advice line. Methods: The investigation included two epidemiological questionnaires and microbial analysis of samples from patients, water and other environmental sources. In addition, a retrospective study based on phone calls to a health advice line was performed by comparing patterns of phone calls between different water distribution areas. Results: Our analyses showed that approximately 18,500 individuals were affected by a waterborne outbreak of cryptosporidiosis in Skelleftea in 2011. This makes it the second largest outbreak of cryptosporidiosis in Europe to date. Cryptosporidium hominis oocysts of subtype IbA10G2 were found in patient and sewage samples, but not in raw water or in drinking water, and the initial contamination source could not be determined. The outbreak went unnoticed to authorities for several months. The analysis of the calls to the health advice line provides strong indications early in the outbreak that it was linked to a particular water treatment plant. Conclusions: We conclude that an earlier detection of the outbreak by linking calls to a health advice line to water distribution areas could have limited the outbreak substantially.

  • 171. Bjerner, J
    et al.
    Lebedin, Y
    Bellanger, L
    Kuroki, M
    Shively, J E
    Varaas, T
    Nustad, K
    Hammarström, Sten
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Clinical Microbiology, Immunology/Immunchemistry.
    Børmer, O P
    Protein epitopes in carcinoembryonic antigen. Report of the ISOBM TD8 workshop.2002In: Tumor Biology, ISSN 1010-4283, E-ISSN 1423-0380, Vol. 23, no 4, p. 249-62Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    To characterize antigenic sites in carcinoembryonic antigen (CEA) further and to investigate whether there are differences between colon tumor CEA and meconium CEA (NCA-2) that can be detected by anti-CEA monoclonal antibodies (MAb), 19 new anti-CEA MAb were analyzed with respect to specificity, epitope reactivity and affinity. Their reactivities were compared with 10 anti-CEA MAb with known CEA-domain binding specificity that have previously been classified into five nonoverlapping epitope groups, GOLD 1-5. Cross-inhibition assays with antigen-coated microtiter plates and immunoradiometric assays were performed in almost all combinations of MAbs, using conventionally purified CEA (domain structure: N-A1B1-A2B2-A3B3-C) from liver metastasis of colorectal carcinomas, recombinant CEA, meconium CEA (NCA-2), truncated forms of CEA and NCA (CEACAM6) as the antigens. The affinity of the MAbs for CEA was also determined. The new MAbs were generally of high affinity and suitable for immunoassays. Three new MAbs were assigned to GOLD epitope group 5 (N-domain binding), 3 MAbs to group 4 (A1B1 domain), 1 to group 3 (A3B3 domain), 3 to group 2 (A2B2 domain) and 3 to group 1 (also the A3B3 domain). Three MAbs formed a separate group related to group 4, they were classified as GOLD 4' (A1B1 domain binding). The remaining 3 MAbs appear to represent new subspecificities with some relationship to GOLD groups 1, 2 or 4, respectively. Five MAbs, all belonging to epitope group 1 and 3, reacted strongly with tumor CEA but only weakly or not at all with meconium CEA, demonstrating that the two products of the CEA gene differ from each other, probably due to different posttranslational modifications.

  • 172. Bjornsdottir, Halla
    et al.
    Christenson, Karin
    Forsman, Huamei
    Stylianou, Marios
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Clinical Microbiology, Clinical Bacteriology.
    Urban, Constantin
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Clinical Microbiology, Clinical Bacteriology.
    Dahlgren, Claes
    Karlsson, Anna
    Bylund, Johan
    Cytotoxic Peptides from S. aureus Cause Neutrophil Cell Death with NET-like Features2014In: Scandinavian Journal of Immunology, ISSN 0300-9475, E-ISSN 1365-3083, Vol. 79, no 6, p. 432-432Article in journal (Other academic)
  • 173. Bjornsdottir, Halla
    et al.
    Rudin, Agnes Dahlstrand
    Klose, Felix P.
    Elmwall, Jonas
    Welin, Amanda
    Stylianou, Marios
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Clinical Microbiology.
    Christenson, Karin
    Urban, Constantin F.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Clinical Microbiology.
    Forsman, Huamei
    Dahlgren, Claes
    Karlsson, Anna
    Bylund, Johan
    Phenol-soluble Modulin α Peptide Toxins from aggressive Staphylococcus aureus induce rapid Formation of neutrophil extracellular Traps through a reactive Oxygen species-independent Pathway2017In: Frontiers in Immunology, ISSN 1664-3224, E-ISSN 1664-3224, Vol. 8, article id 257Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Neutrophils have the ability to capture and kill microbes extracellularly through the formation of neutrophil extracellular traps (NETs). These are DNA and protein structures that neutrophils release extracellularly and are believed to function as a defense mechanism against microbes. The classic NET formation process, triggered by, e.g., bacteria, fungi, or by direct stimulation of protein kinase C through phorbol myristate acetate, is an active process that takes several hours and relies on the production of reactive oxygen species (ROS) that are further modified by myeloperoxidase (MPO). We show here that NET-like structures can also be formed by neutrophils after interaction with phenol-soluble modulin alpha (PSM alpha) that are cytotoxic membrane-disturbing peptides, secreted from community-acquired methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (CA-MRSA). The PSMa-induced NETs contained the typical protein markers and were able to capture microbes. The PSMa-induced NET structures were disintegrated upon prolonged exposure to DNase-positive S. aureus but not on exposure to DNase-negative Candida albicans. Opposed to classic NETosis, PSMa-triggered NET formation occurred very rapidly, independently of ROS or MPO, and was also manifest at 4 degrees C. These data indicate that rapid NETs release may result from cytotoxic membrane disturbance by PSMa peptides, a process that may be of importance for CA-MRSA virulence.

  • 174.
    Björkman, Åsa
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Clinical Microbiology, Virology.
    Finns det ett samband mellan självkänsla och sexuell risk hos svenska universitetsstudenter?: Självkänsla och stress inverkan på benägenheten att ha oskyddat sex - en populationsstudie i enkätform2016Independent thesis Basic level (professional degree), 20 credits / 30 HE creditsStudent thesis
  • 175.
    Björkström, Markus V
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Clinical Sciences, Paediatrics.
    Hall, Lina
    Söderlund, Stina
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Clinical Sciences, Paediatrics.
    Håkansson, Eva Grahn
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Clinical Microbiology, Clinical Bacteriology.
    Håkansson, Stellan
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Clinical Sciences, Paediatrics.
    Domellöf, Magnus
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Clinical Sciences, Paediatrics.
    Intestinal flora in very low-birth weight infants2009In: Acta Paediatrica, ISSN 0803-5253, E-ISSN 1651-2227, Vol. 98, no 11, p. 1762-1767Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    AIM: To study the early faecal microbiota in very low-birth weight infants (VLBW, <1500 g), possible associations between faecal microbiota and faecal calprotectin (f-calprotectin) and to describe the faecal microbiota in cases with necrotizing enterocolitis (NEC) before diagnosis. METHODS: Stool samples from the first weeks of life were analysed in 48 VLBW infants. Bacterial cultures were performed and f-calprotectin concentrations were measured. In three NEC cases, cultures were performed on stool samples obtained before diagnosis. RESULTS: Bifidobacteria and lactobacilli were often identified in the first stool sample, 55% and 71% of cases, respectively within the first week of life. A positive correlation between lactic acid bacteria (LAB) and volume of enteral feed was found. Other bacteria often identified were Escherichia coli, Enterococcus and Staphyloccus sp. F-calprotectin was not associated with any bacterial species. All NEC cases had an early colonization of LAB. Prior to onset of disease, all cases had a high colonization of non-E. coli Gram-negative species. CONCLUSION: In contrast to the previous studies in VLBW infants, we found an early colonization with LAB. We speculate that this may be due to early feeding of non-pasteurized breast milk.

  • 176. Björkström, Niklas K
    et al.
    Lindgren, Therese
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Clinical Microbiology, Infectious Diseases.
    Stoltz, Malin
    Fauriat, Cyril
    Braun, Monika
    Evander, Magnus
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Clinical Microbiology, Virology.
    Michaëlsson, Jakob
    Malmberg, Karl-Johan
    Klingström, Jonas
    Ahlm, Clas
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Clinical Microbiology, Infectious Diseases.
    Ljunggren, Hans-Gustaf
    Rapid expansion and long-term persistence of elevated NK cell numbers in humans infected with hantavirus2011In: Journal of Experimental Medicine, ISSN 0022-1007, E-ISSN 1540-9538, Vol. 208, no 1, p. 13-21Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Natural killer (NK) cells are known to mount a rapid response to several virus infections. In experimental models of acute viral infection, this response has been characterized by prompt NK cell activation and expansion followed by rapid contraction. In contrast to experimental model systems, much less is known about NK cell responses to acute viral infections in humans. We demonstrate that NK cells can rapidly expand and persist at highly elevated levels for >60 d after human hantavirus infection. A large part of the expanding NK cells expressed the activating receptor NKG2C and were functional in terms of expressing a licensing inhibitory killer cell immunoglobulin-like receptor (KIR) and ability to respond to target cell stimulation. These results demonstrate that NK cells can expand and remain elevated in numbers for a prolonged period of time in humans after a virus infection. In time, this response extends far beyond what is considered normal for an innate immune response.

  • 177.
    Björkstén, Bengt
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Clinical Sciences, Paediatrics. Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Clinical Microbiology, Virology.
    The nitroblue tetrazolium (NBT) test: a methodological and clinical study1974Doctoral thesis, comprehensive summary (Other academic)
  • 178. Björndal, Asa Szekely
    et al.
    Szekely, Laszlo
    Elgh, Fredrik
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Clinical Microbiology, Virology.
    Ebola virus infection inversely correlates with the overall expression levels of promyelocytic leukaemia (PML) protein in cultured cells2003In: BMC Microbiology, ISSN 1471-2180, E-ISSN 1471-2180, Vol. 3, p. 6-Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    We have established a simple fixation and immunofluorescence staining procedure that allows specific co-detection and precise sub-cellular localization of the PML nuclear bodies and the Ebola virus encoded proteins NP, VP35 and VP40 in formaldehyde treated cells. Interferon-alpha treatment delays virus production in vitro. Intact PML bodies may play an anti-viral role in Ebola infected cells.

  • 179.
    Björnfot, Ann-Catrin
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Molecular Infection Medicine Sweden (MIMS). Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Department of Molecular Biology (Faculty of Science and Technology).
    Lavander, Moa
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Clinical Microbiology, Infectious Diseases.
    Forsberg, Åke
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Molecular Infection Medicine Sweden (MIMS). Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Molecular Biology (Faculty of Medicine).
    Wolf-Watz, Hans
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Molecular Infection Medicine Sweden (MIMS). Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Department of Molecular Biology (Faculty of Science and Technology). Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Umeå Centre for Microbial Research (UCMR).
    Autoproteolysis of YscU of Yersinia pseudotuberculosis is important for regulation of expression and secretion of Yop proteins2009In: Journal of Bacteriology, ISSN 0021-9193, E-ISSN 1098-5530, Vol. 191, no 13, p. 4259-4267Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    YscU of Yersinia can be autoproteolysed to generate a 10-kDa C-terminal polypeptide designated YscU(CC). Autoproteolysis occurs at the conserved N downward arrowPTH motif of YscU. The specific in-cis-generated point mutants N263A and P264A were found to be defective in proteolysis. Both mutants expressed and secreted Yop proteins (Yops) in calcium-containing medium (+Ca(2+) conditions) and calcium-depleted medium (-Ca(2+) conditions). The level of Yop and LcrV secretion by the N263A mutant was about 20% that of the wild-type strain, but there was no significant difference in the ratio of the different secreted Yops, including LcrV. The N263A mutant secreted LcrQ regardless of the calcium concentration in the medium, corroborating the observation that Yops were expressed and secreted in Ca(2+)-containing medium by the mutant. YscF, the type III secretion system (T3SS) needle protein, was secreted at elevated levels by the mutant compared to the wild type when bacteria were grown under +Ca(2+) conditions. YscF secretion was induced in the mutant, as well as in the wild type, when the bacteria were incubated under -Ca(2+) conditions, although the mutant secreted smaller amounts of YscF. The N263A mutant was cytotoxic for HeLa cells, demonstrating that the T3SS-mediated delivery of effectors was functional. We suggest that YscU blocks Yop release and that autoproteolysis is required to relieve this block.

  • 180. Björquist, P
    et al.
    Brohlin, Maria
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Clinical Microbiology, Biomedical Laboratory Science.
    Ehnebom, J
    Ericsson, M
    Kristiansen, C
    Pohl, G
    Deinum, J
    Plasminogen activator inhibitor type-1 interacts exclusively with the proteinase domain of tissue plasminogen activator.1994In: Biochimica et Biophysica Acta, ISSN 0006-3002, E-ISSN 1878-2434, Vol. 1209, no 2, p. 191-202Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Two different techniques have been used to study the complex formation of recombinant human plasminogen activator inhibitor type-1, PAI-1, with either recombinant human two-chain tissue plasminogen activator, tc tPA (EC 3.4.21.68), or the tPA deletion variants tc K2P, containing the kringle 2 domain and the proteinase domain, and P, containing only the proteinase domain. The same value for Kon, 2.10(7) M-1s-1 for binding of PAI-1 was found for the three tPA forms by direct detection of the complex formation in real time by surface plasmon resonance, BIAcore, or indirectly by monitoring the time course of the inhibition of tPA using the chromogenic substrate N-methylsulfonyl-D-Phe-Gly-Arg-4-pNA-acetate. Apparently, no conformational change is involved in the rate-limiting step, since the kon value was found to be independent of the temperature from 20 to 35 degrees C. By the BIAcore technique, it was found that the complex between PAI-1 and tPA covalently coupled to the surface, was stable at 25 degrees C, since no dissociation was seen in buffer. However, extended treatment with 1 M NH4OH destroyed the complex with t 1/2 = 5 h. The same kon values and complex composition were found by measuring either the binding of tPA to PAI-1 captured on the monoclonal antibody MAI-11 or the binding of PAI-1 to tPA captured on the monoclonal antibody 2:2 B10. Quantification of the complex composition between PAI-1 captured on the monoclonal antibody MAI-11 with either tPA, K2P or P gave a one-to-one ratio with the fraction of active PAI-1, consistent with the results from SDS-PAGE and the specific activity of PAI-1. The complexes of the three tPA forms with PAI-1 captured on a large surface of MAI-11 dissociated more rapidly from MAI-11, with the same apparent koff, kdis, = 2.10(-3) s-1, compared with 0.7-10(-3) s-1 for the dissociation of PAI-1 alone. In consistance, the Kd, calculated from the direct determination of the kon and koff for the association of different form of PAI-1 to a small surface of MAI-11, was found to be higher for PAI-1 in complex with tPA than for free active PAI-1. Apparently, upon complex formation, a change is induced in PAI-1 at the binding epitope for MAI-11.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 400 WORDS)

  • 181.
    Block, Emma
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Clinical Microbiology, Biomedical Laboratory Science.
    En jämförande neurografisk studie: Hur mätparametrar för utvärdering av neurofysiologisk sjukdom påverkas vid olika vinklar på armbågen2019Independent thesis Basic level (professional degree), 10 credits / 15 HE creditsStudent thesis
  • 182.
    Blom, Amanda
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Clinical Microbiology, Biomedical Laboratory Science.
    HSP90- och IAP-inhibitor motverkar cisplatinresistens i lungcancerceller2013Independent thesis Basic level (professional degree), 10 credits / 15 HE creditsStudent thesis
  • 183.
    Blomberg, Jeanette
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Biochemistry and Biophysics.
    Höglund, Andreas
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Molecular Biology (Faculty of Medicine).
    Eriksson, David
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Clinical Microbiology, Immunology/Immunchemistry.
    Ruuth, Kristina
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Molecular Biology (Faculty of Medicine).
    Jacobsson, Maria
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Molecular Biology (Faculty of Medicine).
    Nilsson, Jonas
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Molecular Biology (Faculty of Medicine).
    Lundgren, Erik
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Molecular Biology (Faculty of Medicine).
    Inhibition of cellular FLICE-like inhibitory protein abolishes insensitivity to interferon-α in a resistant variant of the human U937 cell line2011In: Apoptosis (London), ISSN 1360-8185, E-ISSN 1573-675X, Vol. 16, no 8, p. 783-794Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Type I interferons constitute a family of pleiotropic cytokines that have a key role in both adaptive and innate immunity. The interferon signalling pathways mediate transcriptional regulation of hundreds of genes, which result in mRNA degradation, decreased protein synthesis, cell cycle inhibition and induction of apoptosis. To elucidate regulatory networks important for interferon induced cell death, we generated interferon resistant U937 cells by selection in progressively increasing concentrations of interferon-α (IFN-α). The results show that IFN-α activates the death receptor signalling pathway and that IFN resistance was associated with cross-resistance to several death receptor ligands in a manner similar to previously described Fas resistant U937 cell lines. Increased expression of the long splice variant of the cellular FLICE-like inhibitor protein (cFLIP-L) was associated with the resistance to death receptor and IFN-α stimulation. Accordingly, inhibition of cFLIP-L expression with cycloheximide or through cFLIP short harpin RNA interference restored sensitivity to Fas and/or IFN-α. Thus, we now show that selection for interferon resistance can generate cells with increased expression of cFLIP, which protects the cells from both IFN-α and death receptor mediated apoptosis.

  • 184.
    Blomdahl, Karin
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Clinical Microbiology, Biomedical Laboratory Science.
    Könsskillnader i progress av hjärtengagemang hos patienter med ärftlig transthyretinamyloidos: En studie över tid2015Independent thesis Basic level (professional degree), 180 HE creditsStudent thesis
  • 185. Blusch, Jürgen H
    et al.
    Deryckere, François
    Windheim, Mark
    Ruzsics, Zsolt
    Arnberg, Niklas
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Clinical Microbiology, Virology.
    Adrian, Thomas
    Burgert, Hans-Gerhard
    The novel early region 3 protein E3/49K is specifically expressed by adenoviruses of subgenus D: implications for epidemic keratoconjunctivitis and adenovirus evolution2002In: Virology, ISSN 0042-6822, E-ISSN 1096-0341, Vol. 296, no 1, p. 94-106Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The early transcription unit 3 (E3) of adenoviruses (Ads) encodes immunomodulatory functions. We previously described a novel gene of 49K within the E3 region of Ad19a, an Ad of subgenus D that is similar to Ad8 and Ad37 causes epidemic keratoconjunctivitis (EKC). Interestingly, 49K was reported not to be present in Ad9 and Ad17, other subgenus D Ads not causing EKC. Therefore, we investigated whether 49K is selectively expressed in EKC-causing Ads. Using specific DNA probes, we detect 49K-homologous genes in all subgenus D Ads tested. Moreover, 49K-specific antibodies recognize a high molecular weight protein in cells infected with all subgenus D serotypes irrespective of their ability to cause EKC. Sequencing of several 49K genes reveals a high homology without a distinct feature recognizable for those of EKC-associated Ad strains. Thus, E3/49K is a subgenus D specific E3 protein whose expression does not correlate with the EKC-causing phenotype and thus may rather be implicated in illnesses commonly caused by this subgenus. Interestingly, the 49K sequences of Ad19a and Ad37 are identical. To estimate the extent of the sequence identity between these two viruses, we initially sequenced the right ITR and the hexon. This analysis revealed that the right ITR of Ad19a is identical to Ad37, while the hexon sequence is Ad19p-like. This suggested that the region of identity is much larger and that Ad19a arose by recombination of Ad37 with an Ad19p-like Ad. Further sequencing mapped the crossover within the DNA binding protein. Thus, Ad19a contains a large sequence block ( approximately 13 kb), from the 100K gene to the right ITR, identical to Ad37. The implications of these findings in light of the temporal appearance of the EKC-causing Ad strains are discussed.

  • 186.
    Bodén, Elisabeth
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Clinical Sciences, Obstetrics and Gynaecology. Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Clinical Microbiology, Virology.
    Human papilloma virus: association with vulvovaginitis and genital intra-epithelial neoplasia1991Doctoral thesis, comprehensive summary (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    In many women with gynecological complaints such as itching, burning, discharge, and fissures causing dyspareunia, examination of the vulvovaginal mucosa reveals hyperkeratotic and papillomatous changes. Polymerase Chain Reaction (PCR) technique revealed 64% of such lesions to harbour Human Papilloma Virus (HPV)- DNA, whereas Southern blot (SB) technique showed 50% to be positive for HPV- DNA.

    Women with papillomatous lesions were more often HPV-DNA positive than those with/Zat hyperkeratotic lesions. The virus-induced vulvovaginitis described was sometimes the sole cause of atypical Pap-smears. However, papilloma virus infections in vulva and vagina were often accompanied by cervical as well as vaginal and vulval intra-epithelial neoplasia.

    In women with an atypical Pap-smear, signs of HPV were observed by colposcopy in 58% of cases, by cytology in 21%, by histopathology in 53% and by HPV- DNA hybridization techniques in 46%. Colposcopy, cytology and histopathology were more sensitive than SB and Filter In Situ Hybridization (FISH) in detecting HPV in benign epithelium and in mild to moderate dysplasia. The FISH technique, when applied to cell samples and the SB technique for biopsy material proved equally sensitive when benign tissue and mild to moderate dysplasia were analysed. However, in women with severe dysplastic lesions, use of the SB technique on biopsy material proved more sensitive than FISH.

    In lesions with severe dysplasia, HPV-DNA was very often present (67% of CIN III lesions). HPV 16, which is capable of oncogenic transformation, was found in 54% of such tissue.

    At follow-up after laser treatment of genital intra-epithelial neoplasia, HPV-DNA could be detected in 38% of cases. This indicates that HPV may affect the entire mucosa of the lower genital tract, even when not clinically detectable. Thus, to eradicate the virus, systemic therapy would appear to be required.

    Vulvovaginal HPV infection is an entity with characteristic symptoms, morphological changes and oncogenic potential. Certain HPV-types are associated with the development of genital intra-epithelial neoplasia. The diagnostic methods presently available are not, however, sensitive enough for detection of HPV-infection and there is no effective treatment currently available. It would therefore be premature to suggest the introduction of a screening program for certain oncogenic HPV- types. Further study of the natural history of the virus infection is needed before any step can be taken toward using HPV screening in the effort to prevent cervical cancer.7

  • 187. Bofill-Mas, Silvia
    et al.
    Albinana-Gimenez, Nestor
    Clemente-Casares, Pilar
    Hundesa, Ayalkibet
    Rodriguez-Manzano, Jesus
    Allard, Annika
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Clinical Microbiology, Virology.
    Calvo, Miquel
    Girones, Rosina
    Quantification and stability of human adenoviruses and polyomavirus JCPyV in wastewater matrices.2006In: Applied and Environmental Microbiology, ISSN 0099-2240, E-ISSN 1098-5336, Vol. 72, no 12, p. 7894-6Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Human adenoviruses (HAdV) and human polyomavirus JCPyV have been previously proposed as indicators of fecal viral contamination in the environment. Different wastewater matrices have been analyzed by applying real-time quantitative PCR procedures for the presence, quantity, and stability of a wide diversity of excreted HAdV and JCPyV. High quantities of HAdV and JCPyV were detected in sewage, effluent wastewater, sludge, and biosolid samples. Both viruses showed high stability in urban sewage. These results confirm the suitability of both viruses as indicators of human fecal viral pollution.

  • 188.
    Boklund, Kajsa
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Clinical Microbiology, Biomedical Laboratory Science. Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Biosciences, Clinical chemistry.
    Jämförelse av citratkoncentration i koagulationsprovtagningsrör: Jämförelse av citratkoncentrationerna 3,8 % och 3,2 % i koagulationsprovtagningsrör och dess effekter på analysresultat i samband med rörposttransport2014Independent thesis Basic level (professional degree), 10 credits / 15 HE creditsStudent thesis
  • 189.
    Boldrup, Linda
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Medical Biosciences, Pathology.
    Coates, Philip J
    Hedberg, Ylva
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Medical Biosciences, Pathology. Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Clinical Microbiology, Biomedical Laboratory Science.
    Sjöström, Björn
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Clinical Sciences, Otorhinolaryngology.
    Dahlqvist, Åke
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Clinical Sciences, Otorhinolaryngology.
    Nylander, Karin
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Medical Biosciences, Pathology.
    Expression of p63, COX-2, EGFR and beta-catenin in smokers and patients with squamous cell carcinoma of the head and neck reveal variations in non-neoplastic tissue and no obvious changes in smokers.2005In: International Journal of Oncology, ISSN 1019-6439, Vol. 27, no 6, p. 1661-1667Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Squamous cell carcinoma of the head and neck (SCCHN), the 6th most common malignancy in the world, is associated with smoking and has a low 5-year survival rate. Various changes have been described at different stages of SCCHN tumour development, including overexpression of p63, a protein important for development of normal epidermal structures. p63 has been suggested to activate beta-catenin, and nuclear accumulation of beta-catenin is an important event in many cancers. Elevated COX-2 activity and overexpression of EGFR protein has been shown in a variety of human cancers, including SCCHN. An important question for the pathogenesis of SCCHN is when the genetic changes take place during the natural course of the disease, and whether they appear in clinically normal oral mucosa to predispose tumour development. We mapped the expression of p63, COX-2, EGFR, beta-catenin, and PP2A in oral mucosa from smokers/non-smokers and from patients with SCCHN. We also considered if changes occurring in tumours are present in the clinically normal tissue adjacent to the tumour. No direct influence of heavy smoking on the levels of the proteins studied could be seen. Tumours and clinically normal non-neoplastic tissue from SCCHN patients showed increased expression of COX-2 and PP2A. Interestingly, non-neoplastic tissue adjacent to SCCHN also showed increased beta-catenin, although this was not seen in tumours. The data support the notion that pre-existing alterations in clinically normal epithelium exist in patients with SCCHN and could be important for the pathogenesis of the disease and for local recurrences.

  • 190.
    Boman, Andreas
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Clinical Microbiology, Clinical Bacteriology.
    Detection of tularemia in trapped wild voles.2014Independent thesis Advanced level (professional degree), 20 credits / 30 HE creditsStudent thesis
  • 191.
    Boman, Jens
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Clinical Microbiology, Virology.
    Gaydos, Charlotte
    Department of Medicine, The Johns Hopkins University, Baltimore, Maryland.
    Juto, Per
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Clinical Microbiology, Virology.
    Wadell, Göran
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Clinical Microbiology, Virology.
    Quinn, Thomas C
    Department of Medicine, The Johns Hopkins University, Baltimore, Maryland.
    Failure to detect Chlamydia trachomatis in cell culture by using a monoclonal antibody directed against the major outer membrane protein1997In: Journal of Clinical Microbiology, ISSN 0095-1137, E-ISSN 1098-660X, Vol. 35, no 10, p. 2679-2680Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Two commercially available monoclonal antibodies for cell culture confirmation of Chlamydia trachomatis were compared in two prospective studies and one large retrospective study. In total, more than 33,000 genital specimens were cultured in parallel and stained with both antibodies, one of which was directed against the major outer membrane protein (MOMP) and one uf which was directed against the lipopolysaccharide (LPS). We found the anti-LPS-based assay to be more sensitive and as specific as the anti-MOMP-based assay for C. trachomatis cell culture confirmation of genital specimens.

  • 192. Bonebrake, Timothy C.
    et al.
    Brown, Christopher J.
    Bell, Johann D.
    Blanchard, Julia L.
    Chauvenet, Alienor
    Champion, Curtis
    Chen, I-Ching
    Clark, Timothy D.
    Colwell, Robert K.
    Danielsen, Finn
    Dell, Anthony I.
    Donelson, Jennifer M.
    Evengard, Birgitta
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Clinical Microbiology, Infectious Diseases.
    Ferrier, Simon
    Frusher, Stewart
    Garcia, Raquel A.
    Griffis, Roger B.
    Hobday, Alistair J.
    Jarzyna, Marta A.
    Lee, Emma
    Lenoir, Jonathan
    Linnetved, Hlif
    Martin, Victoria Y.
    McCormack, Phillipa C.
    McDonald, Jan
    McDonald-Madden, Eve
    Mitchell, Nicola
    Mustonen, Tero
    Pandolfi, John M.
    Pettorelli, Nathalie
    Possingham, Hugh
    Pulsifer, Peter
    Reynolds, Mark
    Scheffers, Brett R.
    Sorte, Cascade J. B.
    Strugnell, Jan M.
    Tuanmu, Mao-Ning
    Twiname, Samantha
    Verges, Adriana
    Villanueva, Cecilia
    Wapstra, Erik
    Wernberg, Thomas
    Pecl, Gretta T.
    Managing consequences of climate-driven species redistribution requires integration of ecology, conservation and social science2018In: Biological Reviews, ISSN 1464-7931, E-ISSN 1469-185X, Vol. 93, no 1, p. 284-305Article, review/survey (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Climate change is driving a pervasive global redistribution of the planet's species. Species redistribution poses new questions for the study of ecosystems, conservation science and human societies that require a coordinated and integrated approach. Here we review recent progress, key gaps and strategic directions in this nascent research area, emphasising emerging themes in species redistribution biology, the importance of understanding underlying drivers and the need to anticipate novel outcomes of changes in species ranges. We highlight that species redistribution has manifest implications across multiple temporal and spatial scales and from genes to ecosystems. Understanding range shifts from ecological, physiological, genetic and biogeographical perspectives is essential for informing changing paradigms in conservation science and for designing conservation strategies that incorporate changing population connectivity and advance adaptation to climate change. Species redistributions present challenges for human well-being, environmental management and sustainable development. By synthesising recent approaches, theories and tools, our review establishes an interdisciplinary foundation for the development of future research on species redistribution. Specifically, we demonstrate how ecological, conservation and social research on species redistribution can best be achieved by working across disciplinary boundaries to develop and implement solutions to climate change challenges. Future studies should therefore integrate existing and complementary scientific frameworks while incorporating social science and human-centred approaches. Finally, we emphasise that the best science will not be useful unless more scientists engage with managers, policy makers and the public to develop responsible and socially acceptable options for the global challenges arising from species redistributions.

  • 193. Bonnedahl, J
    et al.
    Drobni, P
    Johansson, Anders
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Clinical Microbiology, Infectious Diseases.
    Hernandez, J
    Melhus, A
    Stedt, J
    Olsen, B
    Drobni, M
    Characterization, and comparison, of human clinical and black-headed gull (Larus ridibundus) extended-spectrum beta-lactamase-producing bacterial isolates from Kalmar, on the southeast coast of Sweden2010In: Journal of Antimicrobial Chemotherapy, ISSN 0305-7453, E-ISSN 1460-2091, Vol. 65, no 9, p. 1939-1944Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The finding of CTX-M-type ESBLs in E. coli isolated from black-headed gulls in Sweden, where 'background resistance' is low, is consistent with an ongoing environmental spread of these plasmid-borne resistance genes. The results indicate that a potential for transfer between the human population and environment exists even in countries with a low level of antibiotic resistance.

  • 194.
    Bonnedahl, Jonas
    et al.
    Högskolan i Kalmar.
    Broman, Tina
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Molecular Biology (Faculty of Medicine). Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Clinical Microbiology, Infectious Diseases.
    Waldenström, Jonas
    Högskolan i Kalmar.
    Palmgren, Helena
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Clinical Microbiology, Infectious Diseases.
    Niskanen, Taina
    Olsen, Björn
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Clinical Microbiology, Infectious Diseases.
    In search of human-associated bacterial pathogens in Antarctic wildlife: report from six penguin colonies regularly visited by tourists.2005In: Ambio: A Journal of the Human Environment, ISSN 0044-7447, Vol. 34, no 6, p. 430-2Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    We investigated the potential role of Antarctic tourism in the introduction of human-associated pathogens into Antarctic wildlife. We collected and analyzed 233 fecal samples from eight bird species. The samples were collected at six localities on the Antarctic Peninsula, which often is visited by tourists. Every sample was investigated for pathogens of potential human origin: Campylobacter jejuni, Salmonella spp., and Yersina spp. None of these bacteria was found. Our data suggest that the tourism industry so far has achieved its goal of not introducing pathogens into the Antarctic region. There is, however, an urgent need to further investigate the situation in areas closer to permanent Antarctic settlements.

  • 195. Bonnedahl, Jonas
    et al.
    Drobni, Mirva
    Gauthier-Clerc, Michel
    Hernandez, Jorge
    Granholm, Susanne
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Clinical Microbiology, Clinical Bacteriology. Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Clinical Microbiology, Infectious Diseases.
    Kayser, Yves
    Melhus, Asa
    Kahlmeter, Gunnar
    Waldenström, Jonas
    Johansson, Anders
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Clinical Microbiology, Infectious Diseases. Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Clinical Microbiology, Clinical Bacteriology.
    Olsen, Björn
    Uppsala universitet.
    Dissemination of Escherichia coli with CTX-M type ESBL between humans and yellow-legged gulls in the south of France2009In: PLoS ONE, ISSN 1932-6203, E-ISSN 1932-6203, Vol. 4, no 6, p. e5958-Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Extended Spectrum beta-Lactamase (ESBL) producing Enterobacteriaceae started to appear in the 1980s, and have since emerged as some of the most significant hospital-acquired infections with Escherichia coli and Klebsiella being main players. More than 100 different ESBL types have been described, the most widespread being the CTX-M beta-lactamase enzymes (bla(CTX-M) genes). This study focuses on the zoonotic dissemination of ESBL bacteria, mainly CTX-M type, in the southern coastal region of France. We found that the level of general antibiotic resistance in single randomly selected E. coli isolates from wild Yellow-legged Gulls in France was high. Nearly half the isolates (47.1%) carried resistance to one or more antibiotics (in a panel of six antibiotics), and resistance to tetracycline, ampicillin and streptomycin was most widespread. In an ESBL selective screen, 9.4% of the gulls carried ESBL producing bacteria and notably, 6% of the gulls carried bacteria harboring CTX-M-1 group of ESBL enzymes, a recently introduced and yet the most common clinical CTX-M group in France. Multi locus sequence type and phylogenetic group designations were established for the ESBL isolates, revealing that birds and humans share E. coli populations. Several ESBL producing E. coli isolated from birds were identical to or clustered with isolates with human origin. Hence, wild birds pick up E. coli of human origin, and with human resistance traits, and may accordingly also act as an environmental reservoir and melting pot of bacterial resistance with a potential to re-infect human populations.

  • 196.
    Bonnedahl, Jonas
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Clinical Microbiology, Infectious Diseases.
    Palmgren, Helena
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Clinical Microbiology, Infectious Diseases.
    Hernandez, Jorge
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Clinical Microbiology, Infectious Diseases.
    Waldenström, Jonas
    Naturvetenskapliga institutionen, Högskolan i Kalmar.
    Olsen, Björn
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Clinical Microbiology, Infectious Diseases.
    Salmonella in migrating birds - myth or reality?Manuscript (preprint) (Other academic)
  • 197.
    Borgstedt, Håkan
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Clinical Microbiology, Biomedical Laboratory Science.
    Överföring av Yersinia pseudotuberculosis effektorproteinet YopE till HeLa-celler, mer än en mekanism?2012Independent thesis Basic level (degree of Bachelor), 10 credits / 15 HE creditsStudent thesis
  • 198.
    Bosson, Jenny. A.
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine, Pulmonary Medicine.
    Pourazar, Jamshid
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine, Pulmonary Medicine.
    Blomberg, Anders
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine, Pulmonary Medicine.
    Sandström, Thomas
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine, Pulmonary Medicine.
    Connolly-Andersen, Anne-Marie
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Clinical Microbiology, Infectious Diseases.
    Rankin, Gregory
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine, Pulmonary Medicine.
    Langrish, J. P.
    Increased Soluble Thrombomodulin In Plasma Following Diesel Exhaust Exposure2015In: American Journal of Respiratory and Critical Care Medicine, ISSN 1073-449X, E-ISSN 1535-4970, Vol. 191, article id A3210Article in journal (Other academic)
  • 199.
    Boström, Emelie
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Clinical Microbiology, Biomedical Laboratory Science.
    Validering av kolonn för analys av alkoholer och glykoler med gaskromatografi: Jämförelse av två kolonner samt fortsatt validering för klinisk tillämpning2018Independent thesis Basic level (professional degree), 10 credits / 15 HE creditsStudent thesis
  • 200.
    Boström, Markus
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Clinical Microbiology, Biomedical Laboratory Science.
    Utvärdering av 16S rRNA PCR vid mikrobiologisk diagnostik av misstänkt ortopedisk implantat infektioner2016Independent thesis Basic level (professional degree), 10 credits / 15 HE creditsStudent thesis
1234567 151 - 200 of 1697
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