umu.sePublikasjoner
Endre søk
Begrens søket
1234567 151 - 200 of 522
RefereraExporteraLink til resultatlisten
Permanent link
Referera
Referensformat
  • apa
  • ieee
  • modern-language-association-8th-edition
  • vancouver
  • Annet format
Fler format
Språk
  • de-DE
  • en-GB
  • en-US
  • fi-FI
  • nn-NO
  • nn-NB
  • sv-SE
  • Annet språk
Fler språk
Utmatningsformat
  • html
  • text
  • asciidoc
  • rtf
Treff pr side
  • 5
  • 10
  • 20
  • 50
  • 100
  • 250
Sortering
  • Standard (Relevans)
  • Forfatter A-Ø
  • Forfatter Ø-A
  • Tittel A-Ø
  • Tittel Ø-A
  • Type publikasjon A-Ø
  • Type publikasjon Ø-A
  • Eldste først
  • Nyeste først
  • Skapad (Eldste først)
  • Skapad (Nyeste først)
  • Senast uppdaterad (Eldste først)
  • Senast uppdaterad (Nyeste først)
  • Disputationsdatum (tidligste først)
  • Disputationsdatum (siste først)
  • Standard (Relevans)
  • Forfatter A-Ø
  • Forfatter Ø-A
  • Tittel A-Ø
  • Tittel Ø-A
  • Type publikasjon A-Ø
  • Type publikasjon Ø-A
  • Eldste først
  • Nyeste først
  • Skapad (Eldste først)
  • Skapad (Nyeste først)
  • Senast uppdaterad (Eldste først)
  • Senast uppdaterad (Nyeste først)
  • Disputationsdatum (tidligste først)
  • Disputationsdatum (siste først)
Merk
Maxantalet träffar du kan exportera från sökgränssnittet är 250. Vid större uttag använd dig av utsökningar.
  • 151.
    Engström, Patrik
    et al.
    Umeå universitet, Medicinska fakulteten, Molekylär Infektionsmedicin, Sverige (MIMS). Umeå universitet, Medicinska fakulteten, Umeå Centre for Microbial Research (UCMR). Umeå universitet, Medicinska fakulteten, Institutionen för molekylärbiologi (Medicinska fakulteten).
    Nguyen, Bidong D.
    Normark, Johan
    Umeå universitet, Medicinska fakulteten, Institutionen för molekylärbiologi (Medicinska fakulteten). Umeå universitet, Medicinska fakulteten, Molekylär Infektionsmedicin, Sverige (MIMS). Umeå universitet, Medicinska fakulteten, Umeå Centre for Microbial Research (UCMR).
    Nilsson, Ingela
    Umeå universitet, Medicinska fakulteten, Institutionen för molekylärbiologi (Medicinska fakulteten). Umeå universitet, Medicinska fakulteten, Molekylär Infektionsmedicin, Sverige (MIMS). Umeå universitet, Medicinska fakulteten, Umeå Centre for Microbial Research (UCMR).
    Bastidas, Robert J.
    Gylfe, Åsa
    Umeå universitet, Medicinska fakulteten, Umeå Centre for Microbial Research (UCMR). Umeå universitet, Medicinska fakulteten, Molekylär Infektionsmedicin, Sverige (MIMS). Umeå universitet, Medicinska fakulteten, Institutionen för klinisk mikrobiologi.
    Elofsson, Mikael
    Umeå universitet, Medicinska fakulteten, Umeå Centre for Microbial Research (UCMR). Umeå universitet, Medicinska fakulteten, Molekylär Infektionsmedicin, Sverige (MIMS). Umeå universitet, Teknisk-naturvetenskapliga fakulteten, Kemiska institutionen.
    Fields, Kenneth A.
    Valdivia, Raphael H.
    Wolf-Watz, Hans
    Umeå universitet, Medicinska fakulteten, Umeå Centre for Microbial Research (UCMR). Umeå universitet, Medicinska fakulteten, Institutionen för molekylärbiologi (Medicinska fakulteten). Umeå universitet, Medicinska fakulteten, Molekylär Infektionsmedicin, Sverige (MIMS).
    Bergström, Sven
    Umeå universitet, Medicinska fakulteten, Umeå Centre for Microbial Research (UCMR). Umeå universitet, Medicinska fakulteten, Institutionen för molekylärbiologi (Medicinska fakulteten). Umeå universitet, Medicinska fakulteten, Molekylär Infektionsmedicin, Sverige (MIMS).
    Mutations in hemG Mediate Resistance to Salicylidene Acylhydrazides, Demonstrating a Novel Link between Protoporphyrinogen Oxidase (HemG) and Chlamydia trachomatis Infectivity2013Inngår i: Journal of Bacteriology, ISSN 0021-9193, E-ISSN 1098-5530, Vol. 195, nr 18, s. 4221-4230Artikkel i tidsskrift (Fagfellevurdert)
    Abstract [en]

    Salicylidene acylhydrazides (SAHs) inhibit the type III secretion system (T3S) of Yersinia and other Gram-negative bacteria. In addition, SAHs restrict the growth and development of Chlamydia species. However, since the inhibition of Chlamydia growth by SAH is suppressed by the addition of excess iron and since SAHs have an iron-chelating capacity, their role as specific T3S inhibitors is unclear. We investigated here whether SAHs exhibit a function on C. trachomatis that goes beyond iron chelation. We found that the iron-saturated SAH INP0341 (IS-INP0341) specifically affects C. trachomatis infectivity with reduced generation of infectious elementary body (EB) progeny. Selection and isolation of spontaneous SAH-resistant mutant strains revealed that mutations in hemG suppressed the reduced infectivity caused by IS-INP0341 treatment. Structural modeling of C. trachomatis HemG predicts that the acquired mutations are located in the active site of the enzyme, suggesting that IS-INP0341 inhibits this domain of HemG and that protoporphyrinogen oxidase (HemG) and heme metabolism are important for C. trachomatis infectivity.

  • 152.
    Enquist, Per-Anders
    et al.
    Umeå universitet, Medicinska fakulteten, Umeå Centre for Microbial Research (UCMR). Umeå universitet, Medicinska fakulteten, Molekylär Infektionsmedicin, Sverige (MIMS). Umeå universitet, Teknisk-naturvetenskapliga fakulteten, Kemiska institutionen.
    Gylfe, Åsa
    Umeå universitet, Medicinska fakulteten, Institutionen för klinisk mikrobiologi, Klinisk bakteriologi.
    Hägglund, Ulrik
    Creative Antibiotics, Tvistevägen 48, SE90719 Umeå, Sweden.
    Lindström, Pia
    Creative Antibiotics, Tvistevägen 48, SE90719 Umeå, Sweden.
    Norberg-Scherman, Henrik
    Creative Antibiotics, Tvistevägen 48, SE90719 Umeå, Sweden.
    Sundin, Charlotta
    Creative Antibiotics, Tvistevägen 48, SE90719 Umeå, Sweden.
    Elofsson, Mikael
    Umeå universitet, Teknisk-naturvetenskapliga fakulteten, Kemiska institutionen. Umeå universitet, Medicinska fakulteten, Umeå Centre for Microbial Research (UCMR). Umeå universitet, Medicinska fakulteten, Molekylär Infektionsmedicin, Sverige (MIMS).
    Derivatives of 8-hydroxyquinoline-antibacterial agents that target intra- and extracellular Gram-negative pathogens2012Inngår i: Bioorganic & Medicinal Chemistry Letters, ISSN 0960-894X, E-ISSN 1090-2120, Vol. 22, nr 10, s. 3550-3553Artikkel i tidsskrift (Fagfellevurdert)
    Abstract [en]

    Small molecule screening identified 5-nitro-7-((4-phenylpiperazine-1-yl-)methyl)quinolin-8-ol INP1750 as a putative inhibitor of type III secretion (T3S) in the Gram-negative pathogen Yersinia pseudotuberculosis. In this study we report structure-activity relationships for inhibition of T3S and show that the most potent compounds target both the extracellular bacterium Y. pseudotuberculosis and the intracellular pathogen Chlamydia trachomatis in cell-based infection models.

  • 153.
    Eriksson, Jonas
    et al.
    Umeå universitet, Teknisk-naturvetenskapliga fakulteten, Kemiska institutionen.
    Grundström, Christin
    Umeå universitet, Teknisk-naturvetenskapliga fakulteten, Kemiska institutionen. Umeå universitet, Medicinska fakulteten, Umeå Centre for Microbial Research (UCMR).
    Sauer-Eriksson, A Elisabeth
    Umeå universitet, Teknisk-naturvetenskapliga fakulteten, Kemiska institutionen. Umeå universitet, Medicinska fakulteten, Umeå Centre for Microbial Research (UCMR).
    Sauer, Uwe H
    Umeå universitet, Teknisk-naturvetenskapliga fakulteten, Kemiska institutionen. Umeå universitet, Medicinska fakulteten, Umeå Centre for Microbial Research (UCMR).
    Wolf-Watz, Hans
    Umeå universitet, Teknisk-naturvetenskapliga fakulteten, Institutionen för molekylärbiologi (Teknisk-naturvetenskaplig fakultet). Umeå universitet, Medicinska fakulteten, Umeå Centre for Microbial Research (UCMR).
    Elofsson, Mikael
    Umeå universitet, Teknisk-naturvetenskapliga fakulteten, Kemiska institutionen. Umeå universitet, Medicinska fakulteten, Umeå Centre for Microbial Research (UCMR). Umeå universitet, Medicinska fakulteten, Molekylär Infektionsmedicin, Sverige (MIMS).
    Small Molecule Screening for Inhibitors of the YopH Phosphatase of Yersinia pseudotuberculosis2012Inngår i: Advances in Yersinia Research, New York: Springer, 2012, Vol. 954, s. 357-363Kapittel i bok, del av antologi (Fagfellevurdert)
    Abstract [en]

    Bacterial virulence systems are attractive targets for development of new antibacterial agents. Yersinia spp. utilize the type III secretion (T3S) system to secrete and translocate Yersinia outer proteins (Yop effectors) into the cytosol of the target cell and thereby overcome host defenses to successfully establish an infection. Thus, the Yop effectors constitute attractive targets for drug development. In the present study we apply small molecule screening to identify inhibitors of one of the secreted proteins YopH, a tyrosine phosphatase required for virulence. Characterization of seven inhibitors indicated that both competitive and noncompetitive inhibitors were identified with IC50 values of 6–20 μM.

  • 154.
    Erttmann, Saskia F.
    et al.
    Umeå universitet, Medicinska fakulteten, Umeå Centre for Microbial Research (UCMR). Umeå universitet, Medicinska fakulteten, Molekylär Infektionsmedicin, Sverige (MIMS).
    Gekara, Nelson O.
    Umeå universitet, Medicinska fakulteten, Molekylär Infektionsmedicin, Sverige (MIMS). Umeå universitet, Medicinska fakulteten, Umeå Centre for Microbial Research (UCMR). Department of Molecular Biosciences, The Wenner-Gren Institute, Stockholm University, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Hydrogen peroxide release by bacteria suppresses inflammasome-dependent innate immunity2019Inngår i: Nature Communications, ISSN 2041-1723, E-ISSN 2041-1723, Vol. 10, artikkel-id 3493Artikkel i tidsskrift (Fagfellevurdert)
    Abstract [en]

    Hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) has a major function in host-microbial interactions. Although most studies have focused on the endogenous H2O2 produced by immune cells to kill microbes, bacteria can also produce H2O2. How microbial H2O2 influences the dynamics of host-microbial interactions is unclear. Here we show that H2O2 released by Streptococcus pneumoniae inhibits inflammasomes, key components of the innate immune system, contributing to the pathogen colonization of the host. We also show that the oral commensal H2O2-producing bacteria Streptococcus oralis can block inflammasome activation. This study uncovers an unexpected role of H2O2 in immune suppression and demonstrates how, through this mechanism, bacteria might restrain the immune system to co-exist with the host.

  • 155.
    Erttmann, Saskia F.
    et al.
    Umeå universitet, Medicinska fakulteten, Molekylär Infektionsmedicin, Sverige (MIMS). Umeå universitet, Medicinska fakulteten, Institutionen för molekylärbiologi (Medicinska fakulteten). Umeå universitet, Medicinska fakulteten, Umeå Centre for Microbial Research (UCMR).
    Härtlova, Anetta
    Umeå universitet, Medicinska fakulteten, Molekylär Infektionsmedicin, Sverige (MIMS). Umeå universitet, Medicinska fakulteten, Institutionen för molekylärbiologi (Medicinska fakulteten). Umeå universitet, Medicinska fakulteten, Umeå Centre for Microbial Research (UCMR).
    Sloniecka, Marta
    Umeå universitet, Medicinska fakulteten, Molekylär Infektionsmedicin, Sverige (MIMS). Umeå universitet, Medicinska fakulteten, Institutionen för molekylärbiologi (Medicinska fakulteten). Umeå universitet, Medicinska fakulteten, Umeå Centre for Microbial Research (UCMR).
    Raffi, Faizal A. M.
    Umeå universitet, Medicinska fakulteten, Molekylär Infektionsmedicin, Sverige (MIMS). Umeå universitet, Medicinska fakulteten, Institutionen för molekylärbiologi (Medicinska fakulteten). Umeå universitet, Medicinska fakulteten, Umeå Centre for Microbial Research (UCMR).
    Hosseinzadeh, Ava
    Umeå universitet, Medicinska fakulteten, Molekylär Infektionsmedicin, Sverige (MIMS). Umeå universitet, Medicinska fakulteten, Umeå Centre for Microbial Research (UCMR). Umeå universitet, Medicinska fakulteten, Institutionen för klinisk mikrobiologi.
    Edgren, Tomas
    Umeå universitet, Medicinska fakulteten, Institutionen för molekylärbiologi (Medicinska fakulteten). Umeå universitet, Medicinska fakulteten, Umeå Centre for Microbial Research (UCMR).
    Rofougaran, Reza
    Resch, Ulrike
    Umeå universitet, Medicinska fakulteten, Molekylär Infektionsmedicin, Sverige (MIMS). Umeå universitet, Medicinska fakulteten, Institutionen för molekylärbiologi (Medicinska fakulteten). Umeå universitet, Medicinska fakulteten, Umeå Centre for Microbial Research (UCMR).
    Fällman, Maria
    Umeå universitet, Medicinska fakulteten, Molekylär Infektionsmedicin, Sverige (MIMS). Umeå universitet, Medicinska fakulteten, Institutionen för molekylärbiologi (Medicinska fakulteten). Umeå universitet, Medicinska fakulteten, Umeå Centre for Microbial Research (UCMR).
    Ek, Torben
    Gekara, Nelson O.
    Umeå universitet, Medicinska fakulteten, Molekylär Infektionsmedicin, Sverige (MIMS). Umeå universitet, Medicinska fakulteten, Institutionen för molekylärbiologi (Medicinska fakulteten). Umeå universitet, Medicinska fakulteten, Umeå Centre for Microbial Research (UCMR).
    Loss of the DNA Damage Repair Kinase ATM Impairs Inflammasome-Dependent Anti-Bacterial Innate Immunity2016Inngår i: Immunity, ISSN 1074-7613, E-ISSN 1097-4180, Vol. 45, nr 1, s. 106-118Artikkel i tidsskrift (Fagfellevurdert)
    Abstract [en]

    The ATM kinase is a central component of the DNA damage repair machinery and redox balance. ATM dysfunction results in the multisystem disease ataxia-telangiectasia (AT). A major cause of mortality in AT is respiratory bacterial infections. Whether ATM deficiency causes innate immune defects that might contribute to bacterial infections is not known. Here we have shown that loss of ATM impairs inflammasome- dependent anti-bacterial innate immunity. Cells from AT patients or Atm(-/-) mice exhibited diminished interleukin-1 beta (IL-1 beta) production in response to bacteria. In vivo, Atm(-/-) mice were more susceptible to pulmonary S. pneumoniae infection in a manner consistent with inflammasome defects. Our data indicate that such defects were due to oxidative inhibition of inflammasome complex assembly. This study reveals an unanticipated function of reactive oxygen species (ROS) in negative regulation of inflammasomes and proposes a theory for the notable susceptibility of AT patients to pulmonary bacterial infection.

  • 156.
    Espaillat, Akbar
    Umeå universitet, Medicinska fakulteten, Institutionen för molekylärbiologi (Medicinska fakulteten). Umeå universitet, Medicinska fakulteten, Molekylär Infektionsmedicin, Sverige (MIMS).
    Uncovering novel cell wall chemistries in gram negative bacteria: from development or dedicated peptidoglycan chemometric tools to functional genomics2019Doktoravhandling, med artikler (Annet vitenskapelig)
    Abstract [en]

    Bacteria are surrounded by an external cell wall whose main component is a polymeric net-like structure called the peptidoglycan (PG) or murein sacculus. PG plays crucial roles in bacterial physiology (eg morphogenesis, growth fitness and regulation of innate immunity). Based on the characteristics of this macromolecule, bacteria are grouped as gram negative and positive. Gram negatives present a thin PG layer in the periplasmic space, while Gram positive bacteria contain one thick multi-layered sacculus covering the cytoplasmic membrane. Although the PG sacculus is widely conserved between bacteria, variations in its chemical structure (ie sugars and peptide components) have been reported as a coping mechanism to stress. For example, V. choleraeis able to downregulate PG biosynthesis through non-canonical D-amino acids (NCDAAs) cell wall editing when entering stationary phase. NCDAAs production relies on Bsr enzymes, broad spectrum racemases which are expressed in V. cholerae under the control of stress sigma factor RpoS. In this thesis, we present a comprehensive study that allows us to determine the basic structural and biochemical features required for prominent D-amino acid production by Bsr enzymes.

    V. cholerae’s PG editing by NCDAAs revealed the existence of previously unappreciated  chemical modification in the cell wall of bacteria. Such an observation made us question whether the latest technology could reveal, otherwise undetectable, novel PG traits and furthermore, revisit the existence of murein in bacteria which were previously defined as PG-less. Finally, these studies would promote a global assessment of the degree of PG-chemical variability at a Kingdom scale.

    On the search for novel functional chemistries and associated mechanisms of cell wall regulation, we analysed the cell wall of hundreds of different species. Here, I present two proof of concept studies: i) investigation of the existence of PG in the Plantomycetes Kuenenia stuttgartiensis, a species previously classified as PG-less; and ii) PG chemical diversity within Class Alphaproteobacteria. To do so, we developed and experimentally validated an innovative chemometric pipeline to rapidly analyse large PG datasets. Chemometric analyses revealed 3 PG clusters within Alphaproteobacteria, which included unprecedented PG modifications widely conserved in family Acetobacteria: amidation at the α-(L)-carboxyl of meso-diaminopimelic acid and the presence of (1–3) cross-linked muropeptides between L-Ala and D-(meso)-diaminopimelate residues from adjacent moieties. Fluctuations of the relative abundance of these PG traits were growth phase and media composition dependent. Functional studies demonstrated that Acetobacteria atypical muropeptides enabled cellular protection against Type VI secreted endopeptidases and negatively affected innate immune system recognition suggesting relevant functional roles in the environmental adaptability of these bacteria.

  • 157.
    Espaillat, Akbar
    et al.
    Umeå universitet, Medicinska fakulteten, Institutionen för molekylärbiologi (Medicinska fakulteten). Umeå universitet, Medicinska fakulteten, Molekylär Infektionsmedicin, Sverige (MIMS). Umeå universitet, Medicinska fakulteten, Umeå Centre for Microbial Research (UCMR).
    Carrasco-Lopez, Cesar
    Bernardo-Garcia, Noelia
    Pietrosemoli, Natalia
    Otero, Lisandro H.
    Alvarez, Laura
    Umeå universitet, Medicinska fakulteten, Institutionen för molekylärbiologi (Medicinska fakulteten). Umeå universitet, Medicinska fakulteten, Molekylär Infektionsmedicin, Sverige (MIMS). Umeå universitet, Medicinska fakulteten, Umeå Centre for Microbial Research (UCMR).
    de Pedro, Miguel A.
    Pazos, Florencio
    Davis, Brigid M.
    Waldor, Matthew K.
    Hermoso, Juan A.
    Cava, Felipe
    Umeå universitet, Medicinska fakulteten, Institutionen för molekylärbiologi (Medicinska fakulteten). Umeå universitet, Medicinska fakulteten, Molekylär Infektionsmedicin, Sverige (MIMS). Umeå universitet, Medicinska fakulteten, Umeå Centre for Microbial Research (UCMR).
    Structural basis for the broad specificity of a new family of amino-acid racemases2014Inngår i: Acta Crystallographica Section D: Biological Crystallography, ISSN 0907-4449, E-ISSN 1399-0047, Vol. 70, s. 79-90Artikkel i tidsskrift (Fagfellevurdert)
    Abstract [en]

    Broad-spectrum amino-acid racemases (Bsrs) enable bacteria to generate noncanonical D-amino acids, the roles of which in microbial physiology, including the modulation of cell-wall structure and the dissolution of biofilms, are just beginning to be appreciated. Here, extensive crystallographic, mutational, biochemical and bioinformatic studies were used to define the molecular features of the racemase BsrV that enable this enzyme to accommodate more diverse substrates than the related PLP-dependent alanine racemases. Conserved residues were identified that distinguish BsrV and a newly defined family of broad-spectrum racemases from alanine racemases, and these residues were found to be key mediators of the multispecificity of BrsV. Finally, the structural analysis of an additional Bsr that was identified in the bioinformatic analysis confirmed that the distinguishing features of BrsV are conserved among Bsr family members.

  • 158.
    Espaillat, Akbar
    et al.
    Umeå universitet, Medicinska fakulteten, Molekylär Infektionsmedicin, Sverige (MIMS).
    Forsmo, Oskar
    Umeå universitet, Medicinska fakulteten, Molekylär Infektionsmedicin, Sverige (MIMS).
    El Biari, Khouzaima
    Björk, Rafael
    Umeå universitet, Teknisk-naturvetenskapliga fakulteten, Kemiska institutionen.
    Lemaitre, Bruno
    Trygg, Johan
    Umeå universitet, Teknisk-naturvetenskapliga fakulteten, Kemiska institutionen.
    Canada, Francisco Javier
    de Pedro, Miguel A.
    Cava, Felipe
    Umeå universitet, Medicinska fakulteten, Molekylär Infektionsmedicin, Sverige (MIMS).
    Chemometric Analysis of Bacterial Peptidoglycan Reveals Atypical Modifications That Empower the Cell Wall against Predatory Enzymes and Fly Innate Immunity2016Inngår i: Journal of the American Chemical Society, ISSN 0002-7863, E-ISSN 1520-5126, Vol. 138, nr 29, s. 9193-9204Artikkel i tidsskrift (Fagfellevurdert)
    Abstract [en]

    Peptidoglycan is a fundamental structure for most bacteria. It contributes to the cell morphology and provides cell wall integrity against environmental insults. While several studies have reported a significant degree of variability in the chemical composition and organization of peptidoglycan in the domain Bacteria, the real diversity of this polymer is far from fully explored. This work exploits rapid ultraperformance liquid chromatography and multivariate data analysis to uncover peptidoglycan chemical diversity in the Class Alphaproteobacteria, a group of Gram negative bacteria that are highly heterogeneous in terms of metabolism, morphology and life-styles. Indeed, chemometric analyses revealed novel peptidoglycan structures conserved in Acetobacteria: amidation at the alpha-(L)-carboxyl of meso-diaminopimelic acid and the presence of muropeptides cross-linked by (1-3) L-Ala-D-(meso)diaminopimelate cross-links. Both structures are growth-controlled modifications that influence sensitivity to Type VI secretion system peptidoglycan endopeptidases and recognition by the Drosophila innate immune system, suggesting relevant roles in the environmental adaptability of these bacteria. Collectively our findings demonstrate the discriminative power of chemometric tools on large cell wall-chromatographic data sets to discover novel peptidoglycan structural properties in bacteria.

  • 159. Fabrik, Ivo
    et al.
    Härtlova, Anetta
    Umeå universitet, Medicinska fakulteten, Institutionen för molekylärbiologi (Medicinska fakulteten). Umeå universitet, Medicinska fakulteten, Molekylär Infektionsmedicin, Sverige (MIMS).
    Rehulka, Pavel
    Stulik, Jiri
    Serving the new masters: dendritic cells as hosts for stealth intracellular bacteria2013Inngår i: Cellular Microbiology, ISSN 1462-5814, E-ISSN 1462-5822, Vol. 15, nr 9, s. 1473-1483Artikkel i tidsskrift (Fagfellevurdert)
  • 160.
    Fahlgren, Anna
    et al.
    Umeå universitet, Medicinska fakulteten, Umeå Centre for Microbial Research (UCMR).
    Avican, Kemal
    Umeå universitet, Medicinska fakulteten, Umeå Centre for Microbial Research (UCMR). Umeå universitet, Medicinska fakulteten, Molekylär Infektionsmedicin, Sverige (MIMS).
    Westermark, Linda
    Umeå universitet, Medicinska fakulteten, Molekylär Infektionsmedicin, Sverige (MIMS). Umeå universitet, Medicinska fakulteten, Umeå Centre for Microbial Research (UCMR).
    Nordfelth, Roland
    Umeå universitet, Medicinska fakulteten, Umeå Centre for Microbial Research (UCMR).
    Fällman, Maria
    Umeå universitet, Medicinska fakulteten, Molekylär Infektionsmedicin, Sverige (MIMS). Umeå universitet, Medicinska fakulteten, Umeå Centre for Microbial Research (UCMR).
    Colonization of cecum is important for development of persistent infection by Yersinia pseudotuberculosis2014Inngår i: Infection and Immunity, ISSN 0019-9567, E-ISSN 1098-5522, Vol. 82, nr 8, s. 3471-3482Artikkel i tidsskrift (Fagfellevurdert)
    Abstract [en]

    Yersiniosis is a human disease caused by the bacterium Yersinia pseudotuberculosis or Yersinia enterocolitica. The infection is usually resolved but can lead to postinfectious sequelae, including reactive arthritis and erythema nodosum. The commonly used Yersinia mouse infection model mimics acute infection in humans to some extent but leads to systemic infection and eventual death. Here, we analyzed sublethal infection doses of Y. pseudotuberculosis in mice in real time using bioluminescent imaging and found that infections using these lower doses result in extended periods of asymptomatic infections in a fraction of mice. In a search for the site for bacterial persistence, we found that the cecum was the primary colonization site and was the site where the organism resided during a 115-day infection period. Persistent infection was accompanied by sustained fecal shedding of cultivable bacteria. Cecal patches were identified as the primary site for cecal colonization during persistence. Y. pseudotuberculosis bacteria were present in inflammatory lesions, in localized foci, or as single cells and also in neutrophil exudates in the cecal lumen. The chronically colonized cecum may serve as a reservoir for dissemination of infection to extraintestinal sites, and a chronic inflammatory state may trigger the onset of postinfectious sequelae. This novel mouse model for bacterial persistence in cecum has potential as an investigative tool to unveil a deeper understanding of bacterial adaptation and host immune defense mechanisms during persistent infection.

  • 161.
    Fahlgren, Anna
    et al.
    Umeå universitet, Medicinska fakulteten, Institutionen för molekylärbiologi (Medicinska fakulteten).
    Westermark, Linda
    Umeå universitet, Medicinska fakulteten, Institutionen för molekylärbiologi (Medicinska fakulteten). Umeå universitet, Medicinska fakulteten, Molekylär Infektionsmedicin, Sverige (MIMS).
    Akopyan, Karen
    Umeå universitet, Medicinska fakulteten, Institutionen för molekylärbiologi (Medicinska fakulteten). Umeå universitet, Medicinska fakulteten, Molekylär Infektionsmedicin, Sverige (MIMS).
    Fällman, Maria
    Umeå universitet, Medicinska fakulteten, Institutionen för molekylärbiologi (Medicinska fakulteten). Umeå universitet, Medicinska fakulteten, Umeå Centre for Microbial Research (UCMR).
    Cell type-specific effects of Yersinia pseudotuberculosis virulence effectors2009Inngår i: Cellular Microbiology, ISSN 1462-5814, E-ISSN 1462-5822, Vol. 11, nr 12, s. 1750-1767Artikkel i tidsskrift (Fagfellevurdert)
    Abstract [en]

    One important feature of Yersinia pseudotuberculosis that enables resistance against the host immune defence is delivery of the antiphagocytic effectors YopH and YopE into phagocytic cells. The tyrosine phosphatase YopH influences integrin signalling, and YopE impairs cytoskeletal dynamics by inactivating Rho GTPases. Here, we report the impact of these effectors on internalization by dendritic cells (DCs), which internalize antigens to orchestrate host immune responses. We found that this pathogen resists internalization by DCs via YopE. YopH that is important for blocking phagocytosis by macrophages and neutrophils and which is also present inside the DCs does not contribute to the resistance. However, the YopH targets Fyb and p130Cas show higher expression levels in macrophages than in DCs. Furthermore, live cell microscopy revealed that the cells internalize Y. pseudotuberculosis in different ways: the macrophages utilize a locally restricted receptor-mediated zipper mechanism, whereas DCs utilize macropinocytosis involving constitutive ruffling that randomly catches bacteria into membrane folds. We conclude that YopH impacts early phagocytic signalling from the integrin receptor to which the bacterium binds and that this tight receptor-mediated stimulation is absent in DC macropinocytosis. Inactivation of cytoskeletal dynamics by YopE affects ruffling activity and hence also internalization. The different modes of internalization can be coupled to the major functions of these respective cell types: elimination by phagocytosis and antigen sampling.

  • 162.
    Fahlén, Jessica
    et al.
    Umeå universitet, Samhällsvetenskapliga fakulteten, Statistiska institutionen.
    Landfors, Mattias
    Umeå universitet, Teknisk-naturvetenskapliga fakulteten, Institutionen för matematik och matematisk statistik.
    Freyhult, Eva
    Umeå universitet, Medicinska fakulteten, Institutionen för klinisk mikrobiologi, Klinisk bakteriologi. Umeå universitet, Medicinska fakulteten, Molekylär Infektionsmedicin, Sverige (MIMS).
    Bylesjö, Max
    Trygg, Johan
    Umeå universitet, Teknisk-naturvetenskapliga fakulteten, Kemiska institutionen.
    Hvidsten, Torgeir
    Umeå universitet, Teknisk-naturvetenskapliga fakulteten, Institutionen för fysiologisk botanik. Umeå universitet, Teknisk-naturvetenskapliga fakulteten, Umeå Plant Science Centre (UPSC).
    Rydén, Patrik
    Umeå universitet, Teknisk-naturvetenskapliga fakulteten, Institutionen för matematik och matematisk statistik.
    Bioinformatics strategies for cDNA-microarray data processing2009Inngår i: Batch effects and noise in microarray experiments: sources and solutions / [ed] Scherer, Andreas, Wiley and Sons , 2009, 1, , s. 272s. 61-74Kapittel i bok, del av antologi (Annet vitenskapelig)
    Abstract [en]

    

    Pre-processing plays a vital role in cDNA-microarray data analysis. Without proper pre-processing it is likely that the biological conclusions will be misleading. However, there are many alternatives and in order to choose a proper pre-processing procedure it is necessary to understand the effect of different methods. This chapter discusses several pre-processing steps, including image analysis, background correction, normalization, and filtering. Spike-in data are used to illustrate how different procedures affect the analytical ability to detect differentially expressed genes and estimate their regulation. The result shows that pre-processing has a major impact on both the experiment’s sensitivity andits bias. However, general recommendations are hard to give, since pre-processing consists of several actions that are highly dependent on each other. Furthermore, it is likely that pre-processing have a major impact on downstream analysis, such as clustering and classification, and pre-processing methods should be developed and evaluated with this in mind.

  • 163. Fang, Hanwei
    et al.
    Gomes, Ana Rita
    Klages, Natacha
    Pino, Paco
    Maco, Bohumil
    Walker, Eloise M.
    Zenonos, Zenon A.
    Angrisano, Fiona
    Baum, Jake
    Doerig, Christian
    Baker, David A.
    Billker, Oliver
    Umeå universitet, Medicinska fakulteten, Molekylär Infektionsmedicin, Sverige (MIMS). Umeå universitet, Teknisk-naturvetenskapliga fakulteten, Institutionen för molekylärbiologi (Teknisk-naturvetenskaplig fakultet).
    Brochet, Mathieu
    Epistasis studies reveal redundancy among calcium-dependent protein kinases in motility and invasion of malaria parasites2018Inngår i: Nature Communications, ISSN 2041-1723, E-ISSN 2041-1723, Vol. 9, artikkel-id 4248Artikkel i tidsskrift (Fagfellevurdert)
    Abstract [en]

    In malaria parasites, evolution of parasitism has been linked to functional optimisation. Despite this optimisation, most members of a calcium-dependent protein kinase (CDPK) family show genetic redundancy during erythrocytic proliferation. To identify relationships between phospho-signalling pathways, we here screen 294 genetic interactions among protein kinases in Plasmodium berghei. This reveals a synthetic negative interaction between a hypomorphic allele of the protein kinase G (PKG) and CDPK4 to control erythrocyte invasion which is conserved in P. falciparum. CDPK4 becomes critical when PKG-dependent calcium signals are attenuated to phosphorylate proteins important for the stability of the inner membrane complex, which serves as an anchor for the acto-myosin motor required for motility and invasion. Finally, we show that multiple kinases functionally complement CDPK4 during erythrocytic proliferation and transmission to the mosquito. This study reveals how CDPKs are wired within a stage-transcending signalling network to control motility and host cell invasion in malaria parasites.

  • 164.
    Farag, Salah
    et al.
    Umeå universitet, Teknisk-naturvetenskapliga fakulteten, Institutionen för molekylärbiologi (Teknisk-naturvetenskaplig fakultet).
    Francis, Monika K.
    Umeå universitet, Medicinska fakulteten, Institutionen för medicinsk kemi och biofysik.
    Nadeem, Aftab
    Umeå universitet, Medicinska fakulteten, Institutionen för molekylärbiologi (Medicinska fakulteten).
    Wai, Sun Nyunt
    Umeå universitet, Medicinska fakulteten, Institutionen för molekylärbiologi (Medicinska fakulteten). Umeå universitet, Medicinska fakulteten, Umeå Centre for Microbial Research (UCMR). Umeå universitet, Medicinska fakulteten, Molekylär Infektionsmedicin, Sverige (MIMS).
    Francis, Matthew S
    Umeå universitet, Teknisk-naturvetenskapliga fakulteten, Institutionen för molekylärbiologi (Teknisk-naturvetenskaplig fakultet). Umeå universitet, Medicinska fakulteten, Umeå Centre for Microbial Research (UCMR).
    Impact of Defective Translocon Assemblies on Hierarchal Yop Effector Translocation by Yersinia pseudotuberculosisManuskript (preprint) (Annet vitenskapelig)
  • 165. Fasullo, Michael
    et al.
    Tsaponina, Olga
    Umeå universitet, Medicinska fakulteten, Institutionen för medicinsk kemi och biofysik.
    Sun, Mingzeng
    Chabes, Andrei
    Umeå universitet, Medicinska fakulteten, Institutionen för medicinsk kemi och biofysik. Umeå universitet, Medicinska fakulteten, Molekylär Infektionsmedicin, Sverige (MIMS). Umeå universitet, Medicinska fakulteten, Umeå Centre for Microbial Research (UCMR).
    Elevated dNTP levels suppress hyper-recombination in Saccharomyces cerevisiae S-phase checkpoint mutants2010Inngår i: Nucleic Acids Research, ISSN 0305-1048, E-ISSN 1362-4962, Vol. 38, nr 4, s. 1195-1203Artikkel i tidsskrift (Fagfellevurdert)
    Abstract [en]

    MEC1, the essential yeast homolog of the human ATR/ATM genes, controls the S-phase checkpoint and prevents replication fork collapse at slow zones of DNA replication. The viability of hypomorphic mec1-21 is reduced in the rad52 mutant, defective in homologous recombination, suggesting that replication generates recombinogenic lesions. We previously observed a 6-, 10- and 30-fold higher rate of spontaneous sister chromatid exchange (SCE), heteroallelic recombination and translocations, respectively, in mec1-21 mutants compared to wild-type. Here we report that the hyper-recombination phenotype correlates with lower deoxyribonucleoside triphosphate (dNTP) levels, compared to wild-type. By introducing a dun1 mutation, thus eliminating inducible expression of ribonucleotide reductase in mec1-21, rates of spontaneous SCE increased 15-fold above wild-type. All the hyper-recombination phenotypes were reduced by SML1 deletions, which increase dNTP levels. Measurements of dNTP pools indicated that, compared to wild-type, there was a significant decrease in dNTP levels in mec1-21, dun1 and mec1-21 dun1, while the dNTP levels of mec1-21 sml1, mec1-21 dun1 sml1 and sml1 mutants were approximately 2-fold higher. Interestingly, higher dNTP levels in mec1-21 dun1 sml1 correlate with approximately 2-fold higher rate of spontaneous mutagenesis, compared to mec1-21 dun1. We suggest that higher dNTP levels in specific checkpoint mutants suppress the formation of recombinogenic lesions.

  • 166. Fernebro, Jenny
    et al.
    Blomberg, Christel
    Morfeldt, Eva
    Wolf-Watz, Hans
    Umeå universitet, Teknisk-naturvetenskaplig fakultet, Molekylärbiologi (Teknisk-naturvetenskaplig fakultet). Umeå universitet, Medicinsk fakultet, Umeå Centre for Microbial Research (UCMR). Umeå universitet, Medicinsk fakultet, Molekylär Infektionsmedicin, Sverige (MIMS).
    Normark, Staffan
    Normark, Birgitta Henriques
    The influence of in vitro fitness defects on pneumococcal ability to colonize and to cause invasive disease.2008Inngår i: BMC microbiology, ISSN 1471-2180, Vol. 8, s. 65-Artikkel i tidsskrift (Fagfellevurdert)
    Abstract [en]

    BACKGROUND: Streptococcus pneumoniae is a genetically diverse major human pathogen, yet a common colonizer of the nasopharynx. Here we analyzed the influence of defects affecting in vitro growth rate, on the ability of S. pneumoniae to colonize and to cause invasive disease in vivo. RESULTS: Of eleven different clinical isolates one serotype 14 carrier isolate showed a significantly longer generation time as compared to other isolates, and was severely attenuated in mice. To directly investigate the impact of growth rate on virulence, a panel of mutants in five non-essential housekeeping genes was constructed in the virulent TIGR4 background by insertion-deletion mutagenesis. Three of these mutants (ychF, hemK and yebC) were, to different degrees, growth defective, and showed a reduced invasiveness in an intranasal murine challenge model that correlated to their in vitro growth rate, but remained capable of colonizing the upper airways. The growth defect, as well as virulence defect of the hemK insertion-deletion mutant, was mediated by polarity effects on the downstream yrdC gene, encoding a probable chaperone in ribosome assembly. CONCLUSION: We conclude that large fitness defects are needed to completely prevent pneumococci from causing invasive disease after intranasal challenge. However, even severe growth defects still allow pneumococci to persistently colonize the upper airways.

  • 167. Fleurie, Aurore
    et al.
    Zoued, Abdelrahim
    Alvarez, Laura
    Hines, Kelly M.
    Cava, Felipe
    Umeå universitet, Medicinska fakulteten, Molekylär Infektionsmedicin, Sverige (MIMS). Umeå universitet, Medicinska fakulteten, Institutionen för molekylärbiologi (Medicinska fakulteten). Umeå universitet, Medicinska fakulteten, Umeå Centre for Microbial Research (UCMR).
    Xu, Libin
    Davis, Brigid M.
    Waldor, Matthew K.
    A Vibrio cholerae BolA-Like Protein Is Required for Proper Cell Shape and Cell Envelope Integrity2019Inngår i: mBio, ISSN 2161-2129, E-ISSN 2150-7511, Vol. 10, nr 4, artikkel-id e00790-19Artikkel i tidsskrift (Fagfellevurdert)
    Abstract [en]

    BolA family proteins are conserved in Gram-negative bacteria and many eukaryotes. While diverse cellular phenotypes have been linked to this protein family, the molecular pathways through which these proteins mediate their effects are not well described. Here, we investigated the roles of BolA family proteins in Vibrio cholerae, the cholera pathogen. Like Escherichia coli, V. cholerae encodes two BolA proteins, BolA and IbaG. However, in marked contrast to E. coli, where bolA is linked to cell shape and ibaG is not, in V. cholerae, bolA mutants lack morphological defects, whereas ibaG proved critical for the generation and/or maintenance of the pathogen's morphology. Notably, the bizarre-shaped, multipolar, elongated, and wide cells that predominated in exponential-phase Delta ibaG V. cholerae cultures were not observed in stationary-phase cultures. The V. cholerae Delta ibaG mutant exhibited increased sensitivity to cell envelope stressors, including cell wall-acting antibiotics and bile, and was defective in intestinal colonization. Delta ibaG V. cholerae had reduced peptidoglycan and lipid II and altered outer membrane lipids, likely contributing to the mutant's morphological defects and sensitivity to envelope stressors. Transposon insertion sequencing analysis of ibaG's genetic interactions suggested that ibaG is involved in several processes involved in the generation and homeostasis of the cell envelope. Furthermore, copurification studies revealed that IbaG interacts with proteins containing iron-sulfur clusters or involved in their assembly. Collectively, our findings suggest that V. cholerae IbaG controls cell morphology and cell envelope integrity through its role in biogenesis or trafficking of iron-sulfur cluster proteins. IMPORTANCE BolA-like proteins are conserved across prokaryotes and eukaryotes. These proteins have been linked to a variety of phenotypes, but the pathways and mechanisms through which they act have not been extensively characterized. Here, we unraveled the role of the BolA-like protein IbaG in the cholera pathogen Vibrio cholerae. The absence of IbaG was associated with dramatic changes in cell morphology, sensitivity to envelope stressors, and intestinal colonization defects. IbaG was found to be required for biogenesis of several components of the V. cholerae cell envelope and to interact with numerous iron-sulfur cluster-containing proteins and factors involved in their assembly. Thus, our findings suggest that IbaG governs V. cholerae cell shape and cell envelope homeostasis through its effects on iron-sulfur proteins and associated pathways. The diversity of processes involving ironsulfur-containing proteins is likely a factor underlying the range of phenotypes associated with BolA family proteins.

  • 168.
    Fonfara, Ines
    et al.
    Umeå universitet, Medicinska fakulteten, Molekylär Infektionsmedicin, Sverige (MIMS).
    Curth, Ute
    Pingoud, Alfred
    Wende, Wolfgang
    Creating highly specific nucleases by fusion of active restriction endonucleases and catalytically inactive homing endonucleases2012Inngår i: Nucleic Acids Research, ISSN 0305-1048, E-ISSN 1362-4962, Vol. 40, nr 2, s. 847-860Artikkel i tidsskrift (Fagfellevurdert)
    Abstract [en]

    Zinc-finger nucleases and TALE nucleases are produced by combining a specific DNA-binding module and a non-specific DNA-cleavage module, resulting in nucleases able to cleave DNA at a unique sequence. Here a new approach for creating highly specific nucleases was pursued by fusing a catalytically inactive variant of the homing endonuclease I-SceI, as DNA binding-module, to the type IIP restriction enzyme PvuII, as cleavage module. The fusion enzymes were designed to recognize a composite site comprising the recognition site of PvuII flanked by the recognition site of I-SceI. In order to reduce activity on PvuII sites lacking the flanking I-SceI sites, the enzymes were optimized so that the binding of I-SceI to its sites positions PvuII for cleavage of the composite site. This was achieved by optimization of the linker and by introducing amino acid substitutions in PvuII which decrease its activity or disturb its dimer interface. The most specific variant showed a more than 1000-fold preference for the addressed composite site over an unaddressed PvuII site. These results indicate that using a specific restriction enzyme, such as PvuII, as cleavage module, offers an alternative to the otherwise often used catalytic domain of FokI, which by itself does not contribute to the specificity of the engineered nuclease.

  • 169.
    Fonfara, Ines
    et al.
    Umeå universitet, Medicinska fakulteten, Molekylär Infektionsmedicin, Sverige (MIMS). Umeå universitet, Medicinska fakulteten, Umeå Centre for Microbial Research (UCMR). Helmholtz Centre for Infection Research, Department of Regulation in Infection Biology, Braunschweig, Germany.
    Le Rhun, Anaïs
    Umeå universitet, Medicinska fakulteten, Molekylär Infektionsmedicin, Sverige (MIMS). Umeå universitet, Medicinska fakulteten, Umeå Centre for Microbial Research (UCMR). Helmholtz Centre for Infection Research, Department of Regulation in Infection Biology, Braunschweig, Germany.
    Chylinski, Krzysztof
    Umeå universitet, Medicinska fakulteten, Molekylär Infektionsmedicin, Sverige (MIMS). Umeå universitet, Medicinska fakulteten, Umeå Centre for Microbial Research (UCMR). Deptartment of Biochemistry and Cell Biology, Max F. Perutz Laboratories, University of Vienna, Austria.
    Makarova, Kira S.
    Lécrivain, Anne-Laure
    Umeå universitet, Medicinska fakulteten, Molekylär Infektionsmedicin, Sverige (MIMS). Umeå universitet, Medicinska fakulteten, Umeå Centre for Microbial Research (UCMR).
    Bzdrenga, Janek
    Umeå universitet, Medicinska fakulteten, Molekylär Infektionsmedicin, Sverige (MIMS). Umeå universitet, Medicinska fakulteten, Umeå Centre for Microbial Research (UCMR).
    Koonin, Eugene V.
    Charpentier, Emmanuelle
    Umeå universitet, Medicinska fakulteten, Molekylär Infektionsmedicin, Sverige (MIMS). Umeå universitet, Medicinska fakulteten, Umeå Centre for Microbial Research (UCMR). Helmholtz Centre for Infection Research, Department of Regulation in Infection Biology, Braunschweig, Germany ; Hannover Medical School, Hannover, Germany .
    Phylogeny of Cas9 determines functional exchangeability of dual-RNA and Cas9 among orthologous type II CRISPR-Cas systems2014Inngår i: Nucleic Acids Research, ISSN 0305-1048, E-ISSN 1362-4962, Vol. 42, nr 4, s. 2577-2590Artikkel i tidsskrift (Fagfellevurdert)
    Abstract [en]

    The CRISPR-Cas-derived RNA-guided Cas9 endonuclease is the key element of an emerging promising technology for genome engineering in a broad range of cells and organisms. The DNA-targeting mechanism of the type II CRISPR-Cas system involves maturation of tracrRNA: crRNA duplex (dual-RNA), which directs Cas9 to cleave invading DNA in a sequence-specific manner, dependent on the presence of a Protospacer Adjacent Motif (PAM) on the target. We show that evolution of dual-RNA and Cas9 in bacteria produced remarkable sequence diversity. We selected eight representatives of phylogenetically defined type II CRISPR-Cas groups to analyze possible coevolution of Cas9 and dual-RNA. We demonstrate that these two components are interchangeable only between closely related type II systems when the PAM sequence is adjusted to the investigated Cas9 protein. Comparison of the taxonomy of bacterial species that harbor type II CRISPR-Cas systems with the Cas9 phylogeny corroborates horizontal transfer of the CRISPR-Cas loci. The reported collection of dual-RNA: Cas9 with associated PAMs expands the possibilities for multiplex genome editing and could provide means to improve the specificity of the RNA-programmable Cas9 tool.

  • 170.
    Fonfara, Ines
    et al.
    Umeå universitet, Medicinska fakulteten, Molekylär Infektionsmedicin, Sverige (MIMS). Helmholtz Centre for Infection Research, Department of Regulation in Infection Biology, Braunschweig 38124, Germany; 3Max Planck Institute for Infection Biology, Department of Regulation in Infection Biology, Berlin 10117, Germany.
    Richter, Hagen
    Bratovic, Majda
    Le Rhun, Anaïs
    Umeå universitet, Medicinska fakulteten, Molekylär Infektionsmedicin, Sverige (MIMS). Helmholtz Centre for Infection Research, Department of Regulation in Infection Biology, Braunschweig 38124, Germany; 3Max Planck Institute for Infection Biology, Department of Regulation in Infection Biology, Berlin 10117, Germany.
    Charpentier, Emmanuelle
    Umeå universitet, Medicinska fakulteten, Molekylär Infektionsmedicin, Sverige (MIMS). Helmholtz Centre for Infection Research, Department of Regulation in Infection Biology, Braunschweig 38124, Germany; 3Max Planck Institute for Infection Biology, Department of Regulation in Infection Biology, Berlin 10117, Germany.
    The CRISPR-associated DNA-cleaving enzyme Cpf1 also processes precursor CRISPR RNA2016Inngår i: Nature, ISSN 0028-0836, E-ISSN 1476-4687, Vol. 532, nr 7600, s. 517-520Artikkel i tidsskrift (Fagfellevurdert)
    Abstract [en]

    CRISPR-Cas systems that provide defence against mobile genetic elements in bacteria and archaea have evolved a variety of mechanisms to target and cleave RNA or DNA(1). The well-studied types I, II and III utilize a set of distinct CRISPR-associated ( Cas) proteins for production of mature CRISPR RNAs (crRNAs) and interference with invading nucleic acids. In types I and III, Cas6 or Cas5d cleaves precursor crRNA (pre-crRNA)(2-5) and the mature crRNAs then guide a complex of Cas proteins ( Cascade-Cas3, type I; Csm or Cmr, type III) to target and cleave invading DNA or RNA(6-12). In type II systems, RNase III cleaves pre-crRNA base-paired with trans-activating crRNA (tracrRNA) in the presence of Cas9 (refs 13, 14). The mature tracrRNA-crRNA duplex then guides Cas9 to cleave target DNA15. Here, we demonstrate a novel mechanism in CRISPR-Cas immunity. We show that type V-A Cpf1 from Francisella novicida is a dual-nuclease that is specific to crRNA biogenesis and target DNA interference. Cpf1 cleaves pre-crRNA upstream of a hairpin structure formed within the CRISPR repeats and thereby generates intermediate crRNAs that are processed further, leading to mature crRNAs. After recognition of a 5'-YTN- 3' protospacer adjacent motif on the non-target DNA strand and subsequent probing for an eight-nucleotide seed sequence, Cpf1, guided by the single mature repeat-spacer crRNA, introduces double-stranded breaks in the target DNA to generate a 5' overhang(16). The RNase and DNase activities of Cpf1 require sequence- and structure-specific binding to the hairpin of crRNA repeats. Cpf1 uses distinct active domains for both nuclease reactions and cleaves nucleic acids in the presence of magnesium or calcium. This study uncovers a new family of enzymes with specific dual endoribonuclease and endonuclease activities, and demonstrates that type V- A constitutes the most minimalistic of the CRISPR- Cas systems so far described.

  • 171.
    Forsell, Joakim
    et al.
    Umeå universitet, Medicinska fakulteten, Institutionen för klinisk mikrobiologi.
    Bengtsson-Palme, Johan
    Department of Infectious Diseases, Institute of Biomedicine, The Sahlgrenska Academy, and Centre for Antibiotic Resistance Research (CARe), University of Gothenburg, Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Angelin, Martin
    Umeå universitet, Medicinska fakulteten, Institutionen för klinisk mikrobiologi, Infektionssjukdomar.
    Johansson, Anders
    Umeå universitet, Medicinska fakulteten, Institutionen för klinisk mikrobiologi, Klinisk bakteriologi. Umeå universitet, Medicinska fakulteten, Molekylär Infektionsmedicin, Sverige (MIMS).
    Evengård, Birgitta
    Umeå universitet, Medicinska fakulteten, Institutionen för klinisk mikrobiologi, Infektionssjukdomar.
    Granlund, Margareta
    Umeå universitet, Medicinska fakulteten, Institutionen för klinisk mikrobiologi.
    The relation between Blastocystis and the intestinal microbiota in Swedish travellers2017Inngår i: BMC Microbiology, ISSN 1471-2180, E-ISSN 1471-2180, Vol. 17, artikkel-id 231Artikkel i tidsskrift (Fagfellevurdert)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: Blastocystis sp. is a unicellular eukaryote that is commonly found in the human intestine. Its ability to cause disease is debated and a subject for ongoing research. In this study, faecal samples from 35 Swedish university students were examined through shotgun metagenomics before and after travel to the Indian peninsula or Central Africa. We aimed at assessing the impact of travel on Blastocystis carriage and seek associations between Blastocystis and the bacterial microbiota.

    Results: We found a prevalence of Blastocystis of 16/35 (46%) before travel and 15/35 (43%) after travel. The two most commonly Blastocystis subtypes (STs) found were ST3 and ST4, accounting for 20 of the 31 samples positive for Blastocystis. No mixed subtype carriage was detected. All ten individuals with a typable ST before and after travel maintained their initial ST. The composition of the gut bacterial community was not significantly different between Blastocystis-carriers and non-carriers. Interestingly, the presence of Blastocystis was accompanied with higher abundances of the bacterial genera Sporolactobacillus and Candidatus Carsonella. Blastocystis carriage was positively associated with high bacterial genus richness, and negatively correlated to the Bacteroides-driven enterotype. These associations were both largely dependent on ST4 – a subtype commonly described from Europe – while the globally prevalent ST3 did not show such significant relationships.

    Conclusions: The high rate of Blastocystis subtype persistence found during travel indicates that long-term carriage of Blastocystis is common. The associations between Blastocystis and the bacterial microbiota found in this study could imply a link between Blastocystis and a healthy microbiota as well as with diets high in vegetables. Whether the associations between Blastocystis and the microbiota are resulting from the presence of Blastocystis, or are a prerequisite for colonization with Blastocystis, are interesting questions for further studies.

  • 172.
    Forslund, Anna-Lena
    et al.
    Umeå universitet, Teknisk-naturvetenskapliga fakulteten, Institutionen för molekylärbiologi (Teknisk-naturvetenskaplig fakultet).
    Forsberg, Åke
    Umeå universitet, Medicinska fakulteten, Umeå Centre for Microbial Research (UCMR). Umeå universitet, Medicinska fakulteten, Molekylär Infektionsmedicin, Sverige (MIMS). Umeå universitet, Teknisk-naturvetenskapliga fakulteten, Institutionen för molekylärbiologi (Teknisk-naturvetenskaplig fakultet). Umeå universitet, Medicinska fakulteten, Institutionen för molekylärbiologi (Medicinska fakulteten).
    Kuoppa, Kerstin
    FOI Swedish Defence Research Agency, Division of CBRN Defence and Security.
    Meibom, Karin L.
    Université Paris Descartes, Faculté de Médecine Necker-Enfants Malades; INSERM, U570, Unit of Pathogenesis of Systemic Infections.
    Alkhuder, Khaled
    Université Paris Descartes, Faculté de Médecine Necker-Enfants Malades; INSERM, U570, Unit of Pathogenesis of Systemic Infections.
    Dubail, Iharilalao
    Université Paris Descartes, Faculté de Médecine Necker-Enfants Malades; INSERM, U570, Unit of Pathogenesis of Systemic Infections.
    Dupuis, Marion
    Université Paris Descartes, Faculté de Médecine Necker-Enfants Malades; INSERM, U570, Unit of Pathogenesis of Systemic Infections.
    Charbit, Alain
    Université Paris Descartes, Faculté de Médecine Necker-Enfants Malades; INSERM, U570, Unit of Pathogenesis of Systemic Infections.
    Hfq, a novel pleiotropic regulator of virulence-associated genes in Francisella tularensis2009Inngår i: Infection and Immunity, ISSN 0019-9567, E-ISSN 1098-5522, Vol. 77, nr 5, s. 1866-80Artikkel i tidsskrift (Fagfellevurdert)
    Abstract [en]

    Francisella tularensis is a highly infectious pathogen that infects animals and humans, causing tularemia. The ability to replicate within macrophages is central for virulence and relies on expression of genes located in the Francisella pathogenicity island (FPI), as well as expression of other genes. Regulation of FPI-encoded virulence gene expression in F. tularensis involves at least four regulatory proteins and is not fully understood. Here we studied the RNA-binding protein Hfq in F. tularensis and particularly the role that it plays as a global regulator of gene expression in stress tolerance and pathogenesis. We demonstrate that Hfq promotes resistance to several cellular stresses (including osmotic and membrane stresses). Furthermore, we show that Hfq is important for the ability of the F. tularensis vaccine strain LVS to induce disease and persist in organs of infected mice. We also demonstrate that Hfq is important for stress tolerance and full virulence in a virulent clinical isolate of F. tularensis, FSC200. Finally, microarray analyses revealed that Hfq regulates expression of numerous genes, including genes located in the FPI. Strikingly, Hfq negatively regulates only one of two divergently expressed putative operons in the FPI, in contrast to the other known regulators, which regulate the entire FPI. Hfq thus appears to be a new pleiotropic regulator of virulence in F. tularensis, acting mostly as a repressor, in contrast to the other regulators identified so far. Moreover, the results obtained suggest a novel regulatory mechanism for a subset of FPI genes.

  • 173.
    Forslund, Anna-Lena
    et al.
    Umeå universitet, Medicinska fakulteten, Umeå Centre for Microbial Research (UCMR). Umeå universitet, Medicinska fakulteten, Molekylär Infektionsmedicin, Sverige (MIMS). Umeå universitet, Medicinska fakulteten, Institutionen för molekylärbiologi (Medicinska fakulteten).
    Salomonsson, Emelie Näslund
    Umeå universitet, Medicinska fakulteten, Umeå Centre for Microbial Research (UCMR). Umeå universitet, Medicinska fakulteten, Molekylär Infektionsmedicin, Sverige (MIMS). Umeå universitet, Medicinska fakulteten, Institutionen för molekylärbiologi (Medicinska fakulteten).
    Golovliov, Igor
    Umeå universitet, Medicinska fakulteten, Institutionen för klinisk mikrobiologi, Klinisk bakteriologi. Umeå universitet, Medicinska fakulteten, Umeå Centre for Microbial Research (UCMR). Umeå universitet, Medicinska fakulteten, Molekylär Infektionsmedicin, Sverige (MIMS).
    Kuoppa, Kerstin
    Michell, Stephen
    Titball, Richard
    Oyston, Petra
    Noppa, Laila
    FOI.
    Sjöstedt, Anders
    Umeå universitet, Medicinska fakulteten, Institutionen för klinisk mikrobiologi, Klinisk bakteriologi. Umeå universitet, Medicinska fakulteten, Umeå Centre for Microbial Research (UCMR). Umeå universitet, Medicinska fakulteten, Molekylär Infektionsmedicin, Sverige (MIMS).
    Forsberg, Åke
    Umeå universitet, Medicinska fakulteten, Molekylär Infektionsmedicin, Sverige (MIMS). Umeå universitet, Medicinska fakulteten, Umeå Centre for Microbial Research (UCMR). Umeå universitet, Teknisk-naturvetenskapliga fakulteten, Institutionen för molekylärbiologi (Teknisk-naturvetenskaplig fakultet).
    The type IV pilin, PilA, is required for full virulence of Francisella tularensis subspecies tularensis2010Inngår i: BMC Microbiology, ISSN 1471-2180, E-ISSN 1471-2180, Vol. 10, s. 227-Artikkel i tidsskrift (Fagfellevurdert)
    Abstract [en]

    This suggests that expression and surface localisation of PilA contribute to virulence in the highly virulent type A strain, while PilT was dispensable for virulence in the mouse infection model.

  • 174.
    Francis, Matthew
    et al.
    Umeå universitet, Teknisk-naturvetenskapliga fakulteten, Institutionen för molekylärbiologi (Teknisk-naturvetenskaplig fakultet). Umeå universitet, Medicinska fakulteten, Umeå Centre for Microbial Research (UCMR).
    Aili, Margareta
    Umeå universitet, Teknisk-naturvetenskapliga fakulteten, Institutionen för molekylärbiologi (Teknisk-naturvetenskaplig fakultet).
    Wiklund, Magda-Lena
    Umeå universitet, Teknisk-naturvetenskapliga fakulteten, Institutionen för molekylärbiologi (Teknisk-naturvetenskaplig fakultet).
    Wolf-Watz, Hans
    Umeå universitet, Teknisk-naturvetenskapliga fakulteten, Institutionen för molekylärbiologi (Teknisk-naturvetenskaplig fakultet). Umeå universitet, Medicinska fakulteten, Molekylär Infektionsmedicin, Sverige (MIMS). Umeå universitet, Medicinska fakulteten, Umeå Centre for Microbial Research (UCMR).
    A study of the YopD-LcrH interaction from Yersinia pseudotuberculosis reveals a role for hydrophobic residues within the amphipathic domain of YopD2000Inngår i: Molecular Microbiology, ISSN 0950-382X, E-ISSN 1365-2958, Vol. 38, nr 1, s. 85-102Artikkel i tidsskrift (Fagfellevurdert)
    Abstract [en]

    The enteropathogen Yersinia pseudotuberculosis is a model system used to study the molecular mechanisms by which Gram-negative pathogens translocate effector proteins into target eukaryotic cells by a common type III secretion machine. Of the numerous proteins produced by Y. pseudotuberculosis that act in concert to establish an infection, YopD (Yersiniaouter protein D) is a crucial component essential for yop regulation and Yop effector translocation. In this study, we describe the mechanisms by which YopD functions to control these processes. With the aid of the yeast two-hybrid system, we investigated the interaction between YopD and the cognate chaperone LcrH. We confirmed that non-secreted LcrH is necessary for YopD stabilization before secretion, presumably by forming a complex with YopD in the bacterial cytoplasm. At least in yeast, this complex depends upon the N-terminal domain and a C-terminal amphipathic α-helical domain of YopD. Introduction of amino acid substitutions within the hydrophobic side of the amphipathic α-helix abolished the YopD–LcrH interaction, indicating that hydrophobic, as opposed to electrostatic, forces of attraction are important for this process. Suppressor mutations isolated within LcrH could compensate for defects in the amphipathic domain of YopD to restore binding. Isolation of LcrH mutants unable to interact with wild-type YopD revealed no single domain responsible for YopD binding. The YopD and LcrH mutants generated in this study will be relevant tools for understanding YopD function during a Yersinia infection.

  • 175.
    Francis, Matthew S.
    et al.
    Umeå universitet, Teknisk-naturvetenskapliga fakulteten, Institutionen för molekylärbiologi (Teknisk-naturvetenskaplig fakultet). Umeå universitet, Medicinska fakulteten, Umeå Centre for Microbial Research (UCMR). Umeå universitet, Medicinska fakulteten, Institutionen för molekylärbiologi (Medicinska fakulteten).
    Aili, Margareta
    Umeå universitet, Teknisk-naturvetenskapliga fakulteten, Institutionen för molekylärbiologi (Teknisk-naturvetenskaplig fakultet).
    Wiklund, Magda-Lena
    Umeå universitet, Teknisk-naturvetenskapliga fakulteten, Institutionen för molekylärbiologi (Teknisk-naturvetenskaplig fakultet). Umeå universitet, Medicinska fakulteten, Institutionen för molekylärbiologi (Medicinska fakulteten).
    Wolf-Watz, Hans
    Umeå universitet, Medicinska fakulteten, Umeå Centre for Microbial Research (UCMR). Umeå universitet, Medicinska fakulteten, Molekylär Infektionsmedicin, Sverige (MIMS). Umeå universitet, Medicinska fakulteten, Institutionen för molekylärbiologi (Medicinska fakulteten). Umeå universitet, Teknisk-naturvetenskapliga fakulteten, Institutionen för molekylärbiologi (Teknisk-naturvetenskaplig fakultet).
    A study of the YopD-LcrH interaction from Yersinia pseudotuberculosis reveals a role for hydrophobic residues within the amphipathic domain of YopD2000Inngår i: Molecular Microbiology, ISSN 0950-382X, E-ISSN 1365-2958, Vol. 38, nr 1, s. 85-102Artikkel i tidsskrift (Fagfellevurdert)
    Abstract [en]

    The enteropathogen Yersinia pseudotuberculosis is a model system used to study the molecular mechanisms by which Gram-negative pathogens translocate effector proteins into target eukaryotic cells by a common type III secretion machine. Of the numerous proteins produced by Y. pseudotuberculosis that act in concert to establish an infection, YopD (Yersinia outer protein D) is a crucial component essential for yop regulation and Yop effector translocation. In this study, we describe the mechanisms by which YopD functions to control these processes. With the aid of the yeast two-hybrid system, we investigated the interaction between YopD and the cognate chaperone LcrH. We confirmed that non-secreted LcrH is necessary for YopD stabilization before secretion, presumably by forming a complex with YopD in the bacterial cytoplasm. At least in yeast, this complex depends upon the N-terminal domain and a C-terminal amphipathic alpha-helical domain of YopD. Introduction of amino acid substitutions within the hydrophobic side of the amphipathic alpha-helix abolished the YopD-LcrH interaction, indicating that hydrophobic, as opposed to electrostatic, forces of attraction are important for this process. Suppressor mutations isolated within LcrH could compensate for defects in the amphipathic domain of YopD to restore binding. Isolation of LcrH mutants unable to interact with wild-type YopD revealed no single domain responsible for YopD binding. The YopD and LcrH mutants generated in this study will be relevant tools for understanding YopD function during a Yersinia infection.

  • 176.
    Frost, Stefan
    et al.
    Umeå universitet, Teknisk-naturvetenskapliga fakulteten, Institutionen för molekylärbiologi (Teknisk-naturvetenskaplig fakultet). Umeå universitet, Medicinska fakulteten, Molekylär Infektionsmedicin, Sverige (MIMS).
    Ho, Oanh
    Umeå universitet, Teknisk-naturvetenskapliga fakulteten, Kemiska institutionen.
    Login, Frédéric H
    Umeå universitet, Teknisk-naturvetenskapliga fakulteten, Institutionen för molekylärbiologi (Teknisk-naturvetenskaplig fakultet). Umeå universitet, Medicinska fakulteten, Molekylär Infektionsmedicin, Sverige (MIMS).
    Weise, Christoph F
    Umeå universitet, Teknisk-naturvetenskapliga fakulteten, Kemiska institutionen.
    Wolf-Watz, Hans
    Umeå universitet, Teknisk-naturvetenskapliga fakulteten, Institutionen för molekylärbiologi (Teknisk-naturvetenskaplig fakultet). Umeå universitet, Medicinska fakulteten, Molekylär Infektionsmedicin, Sverige (MIMS).
    Wolf-Watz, Magnus
    Umeå universitet, Teknisk-naturvetenskapliga fakulteten, Kemiska institutionen.
    Autoproteolysis and Intramolecular Dissociation of Yersinia YscU Precedes Secretion of Its C-Terminal Polypeptide YscU CC2012Inngår i: PLoS ONE, ISSN 1932-6203, E-ISSN 1932-6203, Vol. 7, nr 11, artikkel-id e49349Artikkel i tidsskrift (Fagfellevurdert)
    Abstract [en]

    Type III secretion system mediated secretion and translocation of Yop-effector proteins across the eukaryotic target cell membrane by pathogenic Yersinia is highly organized and is dependent on a switching event from secretion of early structural substrates to late effector substrates (Yops). Substrate switching can be mimicked in vitro by modulating the calcium levels in the growth medium. YscU that is essential for regulation of this switch undergoes autoproteolysis at a conserved N↑PTH motif, resulting in a 10 kDa C-terminal polypeptide fragment denoted YscUCC. Here we show that depletion of calcium induces intramolecular dissociation of YscUCC from YscU followed by secretion of the YscUCC polypeptide. Thus, YscUCC behaved in vivo as a Yop protein with respect to secretion properties. Further, destabilized yscU mutants displayed increased rates of dissociation of YscUCC in vitro resulting in enhanced Yop secretion in vivo at 30°C relative to the wild-type strain.These findings provide strong support to the relevance of YscUCC dissociation for Yop secretion. We propose that YscUCC orchestrates a block in the secretion channel that is eliminated by calcium depletion. Further, the striking homology between different members of the YscU/FlhB family suggests that this protein family possess regulatory functions also in other bacteria using comparable mechanisms.

  • 177. Fuhrmann, Jakob
    et al.
    Mierzwa, Beata
    Trentini, Debora B.
    Spiess, Silvia
    Umeå universitet, Medicinska fakulteten, Molekylär Infektionsmedicin, Sverige (MIMS).
    Lehner, Anita
    Charpentier, Emmanuelle
    Umeå universitet, Medicinska fakulteten, Molekylär Infektionsmedicin, Sverige (MIMS).
    Clausen, Tim
    Structural Basis for Recognizing Phosphoarginine and Evolving Residue-Specific Protein Phosphatases in Gram-Positive Bacteria2013Inngår i: Cell Reports, ISSN 2211-1247, Vol. 3, nr 6, s. 1832-1839Artikkel i tidsskrift (Fagfellevurdert)
    Abstract [en]

    Many cellular pathways are regulated by the competing activity of protein kinases and phosphatases. The recent identification of arginine phosphorylation as a protein modification in bacteria prompted us to analyze the molecular basis of targeting phosphoarginine. In this work, we characterize an annotated tyrosine phosphatase, YwlE, that counteracts the protein arginine kinase McsB. Strikingly, structural studies of YwlE reaction intermediates provide a direct view on a captured arginine residue. Together with biochemical data, the crystal structures depict the evolution of a highly specific phospho-arginine phosphatase, with the use of a size-and-polarity filter for distinguishing phosphorylated arginine from other phosphorylated side chains. To confirm the proposed mechanism, we performed bioinformatic searches for phosphatases, employing a similar selectivity filter, and identified a protein in Drosophila melanogaster exhibiting robust arginine phosphatase activity. In sum, our findings uncover the molecular framework for specific targeting of phospho-arginine and suggest that protein arginine (de) phosphorylation may be relevant in eukaryotes.

  • 178. Fuhrmann, Jakob
    et al.
    Schmidt, Andreas
    Spiess, Silvia
    Lehner, Anita
    Turgay, Kürsad
    Mechtler, Karl
    Charpentier, Emmanuelle
    Umeå universitet, Medicinska fakulteten, Institutionen för molekylärbiologi (Medicinska fakulteten). Umeå universitet, Medicinska fakulteten, Umeå Centre for Microbial Research (UCMR). Umeå universitet, Medicinska fakulteten, Molekylär Infektionsmedicin, Sverige (MIMS).
    Clausen, Tim
    McsB is a protein arginine kinase that phosphorylates and inhibits the heat-shock regulator CtsR2009Inngår i: Science, ISSN 0036-8075, E-ISSN 1095-9203, Vol. 324, nr 5932, s. 1323-1327Artikkel i tidsskrift (Fagfellevurdert)
    Abstract [en]

    All living organisms face a variety of environmental stresses that cause the misfolding and aggregation of proteins. To eliminate damaged proteins, cells developed highly efficient stress response and protein quality control systems. We performed a biochemical and structural analysis of the bacterial CtsR/McsB stress response. The crystal structure of the CtsR repressor, in complex with DNA, pinpointed key residues important for high-affinity binding to the promoter regions of heat-shock genes. Moreover, biochemical characterization of McsB revealed that McsB specifically phosphorylates arginine residues in the DNA binding domain of CtsR, thereby impairing its function as a repressor of stress response genes. Identification of the CtsR/McsB arginine phospho-switch expands the repertoire of possible protein modifications involved in prokaryotic and eukaryotic transcriptional regulation.

  • 179.
    Gaca, Anthony O.
    et al.
    Rochester, New York, USA .
    Kudrin, Pavel
    University of Tartu, Institute of Technology, Tartu, Estonia.
    Colomer-Winter, Cristina
    Rochester, New York, USA .
    Beljantseva, Jelena
    University of Tartu, Institute of Technology, Tartu, Estonia.
    Liu, Kuanqing
    Madison, Wisconsin, USA .
    Anderson, Brent
    Madison, Wisconsin, USA .
    Wang, Jue D.
    Madison, Wisconsin, USA .
    Rejman, Dominik
    Prague, Czech Republic.
    Potrykus, Katarzyna
    Gdańsk, Poland; Bethesda, Maryland, USA.
    Cashel, Michael
    Bethesda, Maryland, USA.
    Hauryliuk, Vasili
    Umeå universitet, Medicinska fakulteten, Institutionen för molekylärbiologi (Medicinska fakulteten). Umeå universitet, Medicinska fakulteten, Molekylär Infektionsmedicin, Sverige (MIMS). University of Tartu, Institute of Technology, Tartu, Estonia.
    Lemos, Jose A.
    Rochester, New York, USA .
    From (p)ppGpp to (pp)pGpp: characterization of Regulatory Effects of pGpp Synthesized by the Small Alarmone Synthetase of Enterococcus faecalis2015Inngår i: Journal of Bacteriology, ISSN 0021-9193, E-ISSN 1098-5530, Vol. 197, nr 18, s. 2908-2919Artikkel i tidsskrift (Fagfellevurdert)
    Abstract [en]

    The bacterial stringent response (SR) is a conserved stress tolerance mechanism that orchestrates physiological alterations to enhance cell survival. This response is mediated by the intracellular accumulation of the alarmones pppGpp and ppGpp, collectively called (p) ppGpp. In Enterococcus faecalis, (p) ppGpp metabolism is carried out by the bifunctional synthetase/hydrolase E. faecalis Rel (Rel(Ef)) and the small alarmone synthetase (SAS) RelQ(Ef). Although Rel is the main enzyme responsible for SR activation in Firmicutes, there is emerging evidence that SASs can make important contributions to bacterial homeostasis. Here, we showed that RelQ(Ef) synthesizes ppGpp more efficiently than pppGpp without the need for ribosomes, tRNA, or mRNA. In addition to (p) ppGpp synthesis from GDP and GTP, RelQ(Ef) also efficiently utilized GMP to form GMP 3'-diphosphate (pGpp). Based on this observation, we sought to determine if pGpp exerts regulatory effects on cellular processes affected by (p) ppGpp. We found that pGpp, like (p) ppGpp, strongly inhibits the activity of E. faecalis enzymes involved in GTP biosynthesis and, to a lesser extent, transcription of rrnB by Escherichia coli RNA polymerase. Activation of E. coli RelA synthetase activity was observed in the presence of both pGpp and ppGpp, while RelQ(Ef) was activated only by ppGpp. Furthermore, enzymatic activity of RelQ(Ef) is insensitive to relacin, a (p) ppGpp analog developed as an inhibitor of "long" RelA/SpoT homolog (RSH) enzymes. We conclude that pGpp can likely function as a bacterial alarmone with target-specific regulatory effects that are similar to what has been observed for (p) ppGpp. IMPORTANCE Accumulation of the nucleotide second messengers (p) ppGpp in bacteria is an important signal regulating genetic and physiological networks contributing to stress tolerance, antibiotic persistence, and virulence. Understanding the function and regulation of the enzymes involved in (p) ppGpp turnover is therefore critical for designing strategies to eliminate the protective effects of this molecule. While characterizing the (p) ppGpp synthetase RelQ of Enterococcus faecalis (RelQ(Ef)), we found that, in addition to (p) ppGpp, RelQ(Ef) is an efficient producer of pGpp (GMP 3'-diphosphate). In vitro analysis revealed that pGpp exerts complex, target-specific effects on processes known to be modulated by (p) ppGpp. These findings provide a new regulatory feature of RelQ(Ef) and suggest that pGpp may represent a new member of the (pp) pGpp family of alarmones.

  • 180. Garnier, Fabien
    et al.
    Janapatla, Rajendra Prasad
    Charpentier, Emmanuelle
    Umeå universitet, Medicinska fakulteten, Molekylär Infektionsmedicin, Sverige (MIMS).
    Masson, Geoffrey
    Grélaud, Carole
    Stach, Jean François
    Denis, François
    Ploy, Marie-Cécile
    Insertion sequence 1515 in the ply gene of a type 1 clinical isolate of Streptococcus pneumoniae abolishes pneurnolysin expression2007Inngår i: Journal of Clinical Microbiology, ISSN 0095-1137, E-ISSN 1098-660X, Vol. 45, nr 7, s. 2296-2297Artikkel i tidsskrift (Fagfellevurdert)
    Abstract [en]

    Abstract: A serotype 1 Streptococcus pneumoniae strain isolated by blood culture from a woman with pneumonia was found to harbor insertion sequence (IS) 1515 in the pneumolysin gene, abolishing pneumolysin expression. To our knowledge, this is the first report of an IS in the pneumolysin gene of S. pneumoniae.

  • 181.
    Gekara, Nelson O.
    et al.
    Umeå universitet, Medicinska fakulteten, Molekylär Infektionsmedicin, Sverige (MIMS). Umeå universitet, Medicinska fakulteten, Umeå Centre for Microbial Research (UCMR). Department of Molecular Biosciences, The Wenner-Gren Institute, Stockholm University, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Jiang, Hui
    Umeå universitet, Medicinska fakulteten, Molekylär Infektionsmedicin, Sverige (MIMS). Umeå universitet, Medicinska fakulteten, Umeå Centre for Microbial Research (UCMR).
    The innate immune DNA sensor cGAS: A membrane, cytosolic, or nuclear protein?2019Inngår i: Science Signaling, ISSN 1945-0877, E-ISSN 1937-9145, Vol. 12, nr 581, artikkel-id eaax3521Artikkel i tidsskrift (Annet vitenskapelig)
    Abstract [en]

    Cyclic cGMP-AMP synthase (cGAS) alerts the innate immune system to the presence of foreign or damaged self-DNA inside the cell and is critical for the outcome of infections, inflammatory diseases, and cancer. Two studies now demonstrate that cGAS activation is regulated by differential subcellular localization through its non-enzymatic, N-terminal domain.

  • 182.
    Gillenius, Erik
    et al.
    Umeå universitet, Medicinska fakulteten, Institutionen för klinisk mikrobiologi. Umeå universitet, Medicinska fakulteten, Molekylär Infektionsmedicin, Sverige (MIMS). Umeå universitet, Medicinska fakulteten, Umeå Centre for Microbial Research (UCMR).
    Urban, Constantin F
    Umeå universitet, Medicinska fakulteten, Institutionen för klinisk mikrobiologi, Klinisk bakteriologi. Umeå universitet, Medicinska fakulteten, Molekylär Infektionsmedicin, Sverige (MIMS). Umeå universitet, Medicinska fakulteten, Umeå Centre for Microbial Research (UCMR).
    The adhesive protein invasin of Yersinia pseudotuberculosis induces neutrophil extracellular traps via β1 integrins2015Inngår i: Microbes and infection, ISSN 1286-4579, E-ISSN 1769-714X, Vol. 17, nr 5, s. 327-336Artikkel i tidsskrift (Fagfellevurdert)
    Abstract [en]

    Yersinia pseudotuberculosis adhesive protein invasin is crucial for the bacteria to cross the intestine epithelium by binding to β1 integrins on M-cells and gaining access to the underlying tissues. After the crossing invasin can bind to β1 integrins on other cell surfaces, however effector proteins delivered by the type III secretion system Y. pseudotuberculosis efficiently inhibit potential immune responses induced by this interaction. Here, we use mutant Y. pseudotuberculosis strains lacking the type III secretion system and additionally invasin-expressing Escherichia coli to analyze neutrophil responses towards invasin. Our data reveals that invasin induces production of reactive oxygen species and release of chromatin into the extracellular milieu, which we confirmed to be neutrophil extracellular traps by immunofluorescence microscopy. This was mediated through β1 integrins and was dependent on both the production of reactive oxygen species and signaling through phosphoinositide 3-kinase. We therefore have gained insight into a potential role of integrins in inflammation and infection clearance that has not previously been described, suggesting that targeting of β1 integrins could be utilized as an adjunctive therapy against yersiniosis.

  • 183.
    Golovliov, Igor
    et al.
    Umeå universitet, Medicinska fakulteten, Molekylär Infektionsmedicin, Sverige (MIMS). Umeå universitet, Medicinska fakulteten, Institutionen för klinisk mikrobiologi, Klinisk bakteriologi.
    Lindgren, Helena
    Umeå universitet, Medicinska fakulteten, Molekylär Infektionsmedicin, Sverige (MIMS). Umeå universitet, Medicinska fakulteten, Institutionen för klinisk mikrobiologi, Klinisk bakteriologi.
    Eneslätt, Kjell
    Umeå universitet, Medicinska fakulteten, Molekylär Infektionsmedicin, Sverige (MIMS). Umeå universitet, Medicinska fakulteten, Institutionen för klinisk mikrobiologi, Klinisk bakteriologi.
    Conlan, Wayne
    Mosnier, Amandine
    Henry, Thomas
    Sjöstedt, Anders
    Umeå universitet, Medicinska fakulteten, Molekylär Infektionsmedicin, Sverige (MIMS). Umeå universitet, Medicinska fakulteten, Institutionen för klinisk mikrobiologi, Klinisk bakteriologi.
    An In Vitro Co-culture Mouse Model Demonstrates Efficient Vaccine-Mediated Control of Francisella tularensis SCHU S4 and Identifies Nitric Oxide as a Predictor of Efficacy2016Inngår i: Frontiers in Cellular and Infection Microbiology, E-ISSN 2235-2988, Vol. 6, artikkel-id 152Artikkel i tidsskrift (Fagfellevurdert)
    Abstract [en]

    Francisella tularensis is a highly virulent intracellular bacterium and cell-mediated immunity is critical for protection, but mechanisms of protection against highly virulent variants, such as the prototypic strain F. tularensis strain SCHU S4, are poorly understood. To this end, we established a co-culture system, based on splenocytes from naive, or immunized mice and in vitro infected bone marrow-derived macrophages that allowed assessment of mechanisms controlling infection with F. tularensis. We utilized the system to understand why the clpB gene deletion mutant, Delta clpB, of SCHU S4 shows superior efficacy as a vaccine in the mouse model as compared to the existing human vaccine, the live vaccine strain (LVS). Compared to naive splenocytes, Delta clpB-, or LVS-immune splenocytes conferred very significant control of a SCHU S4 infection and the Delta clpB-immune splenocytes were superior to the LVS-immune splenocytes. Cultures with the Delta clpB-immune splenocytes also contained higher levels of IFN-gamma, IL-17, and GM-CSF and nitric oxide, and T cells expressing combinations of IFN-gamma, TNF-alpha, and IL-17, than did cultures with LVS-immune splenocytes. There was strong inverse correlation between bacterial replication and levels of nitrite, an end product of nitric oxide, and essentially no control was observed when BMDM from iNOS(-/-) mice were infected. Collectively, the co-culture model identified a critical role of nitric oxide for protection against a highly virulent strain of F. tularensis.

  • 184.
    Good, James A. D.
    et al.
    Umeå universitet, Teknisk-naturvetenskapliga fakulteten, Kemiska institutionen. Umeå universitet, Medicinska fakulteten, Umeå Centre for Microbial Research (UCMR).
    Andersson, Christopher
    Umeå universitet, Medicinska fakulteten, Institutionen för molekylärbiologi (Medicinska fakulteten). Umeå universitet, Medicinska fakulteten, Umeå Centre for Microbial Research (UCMR). Umeå universitet, Medicinska fakulteten, Molekylär Infektionsmedicin, Sverige (MIMS).
    Hansen, Sabine
    Umeå universitet, Medicinska fakulteten, Institutionen för molekylärbiologi (Medicinska fakulteten). Umeå universitet, Medicinska fakulteten, Molekylär Infektionsmedicin, Sverige (MIMS). Umeå universitet, Medicinska fakulteten, Umeå Centre for Microbial Research (UCMR).
    Wall, Jessica
    Umeå universitet, Medicinska fakulteten, Institutionen för molekylärbiologi (Medicinska fakulteten). Umeå universitet, Medicinska fakulteten, Umeå Centre for Microbial Research (UCMR). Umeå universitet, Medicinska fakulteten, Molekylär Infektionsmedicin, Sverige (MIMS).
    Krishnan, Syam
    Umeå universitet, Teknisk-naturvetenskapliga fakulteten, Kemiska institutionen. Umeå universitet, Medicinska fakulteten, Umeå Centre for Microbial Research (UCMR).
    Begum, Afshan
    Umeå universitet, Teknisk-naturvetenskapliga fakulteten, Kemiska institutionen. Umeå universitet, Medicinska fakulteten, Umeå Centre for Microbial Research (UCMR).
    Grundström, Christin
    Umeå universitet, Teknisk-naturvetenskapliga fakulteten, Kemiska institutionen. Umeå universitet, Medicinska fakulteten, Umeå Centre for Microbial Research (UCMR).
    Niemiec, Moritz Sebastian
    Umeå universitet, Teknisk-naturvetenskapliga fakulteten, Kemiska institutionen.
    Vaitkevicius, Karolis
    Umeå universitet, Medicinska fakulteten, Institutionen för molekylärbiologi (Medicinska fakulteten). Umeå universitet, Medicinska fakulteten, Umeå Centre for Microbial Research (UCMR). Umeå universitet, Medicinska fakulteten, Molekylär Infektionsmedicin, Sverige (MIMS).
    Chorell, Erik
    Umeå universitet, Teknisk-naturvetenskapliga fakulteten, Kemiska institutionen. Umeå universitet, Medicinska fakulteten, Umeå Centre for Microbial Research (UCMR).
    Wittung-Stafshede, Pernilla
    Umeå universitet, Teknisk-naturvetenskapliga fakulteten, Kemiska institutionen.
    Sauer, Uwe H.
    Umeå universitet, Teknisk-naturvetenskapliga fakulteten, Kemiska institutionen. Umeå universitet, Medicinska fakulteten, Umeå Centre for Microbial Research (UCMR).
    Sauer–Eriksson, A. Elisabeth
    Umeå universitet, Teknisk-naturvetenskapliga fakulteten, Kemiska institutionen. Umeå universitet, Medicinska fakulteten, Umeå Centre for Microbial Research (UCMR).
    Almqvist, Fredrik
    Umeå universitet, Teknisk-naturvetenskapliga fakulteten, Kemiska institutionen. Umeå universitet, Medicinska fakulteten, Umeå Centre for Microbial Research (UCMR).
    Johansson, Jörgen
    Umeå universitet, Medicinska fakulteten, Institutionen för molekylärbiologi (Medicinska fakulteten). Umeå universitet, Medicinska fakulteten, Umeå Centre for Microbial Research (UCMR). Umeå universitet, Medicinska fakulteten, Molekylär Infektionsmedicin, Sverige (MIMS).
    Attenuating Listeria monocytogenes virulence by targeting the regulatory protein PrfA2016Inngår i: Cell chemical biology, ISSN 2451-9448, Vol. 23, nr 3, s. 404-414Artikkel i tidsskrift (Fagfellevurdert)
    Abstract [en]

    The transcriptional activator PrfA, a member of the Crp/Fnr family, controls the expression of some key virulence factors necessary for infection by the human bacterial pathogen Listeria monocytogenes. Phenotypic screening identified ring-fused 2-pyridone molecules that at low micromolar concentrations attenuate L. monocytogenes infectivity by reducing the expression of virulence genes, without compromising bacterial growth. These inhibitors bind the transcriptional regulator PrfA and decrease its affinity for the consensus DNA binding site. Structural characterization of this interaction revealed that one of the ring-fused 2-pyridones, compound 1, binds within a hydrophobic pocket, located between the C- and N-terminal domains of PrfA, and interacts with residues important for PrfA activation. This indicates that these inhibitors maintain the DNA-binding helix-turn-helix motif of PrfA in a disordered state, thereby preventing a PrfA:DNA interaction. Ring-fused 2-pyridones represent a new class of chemical probes for studying virulence in L. monocytogenes.

  • 185.
    Good, James A. D.
    et al.
    Umeå universitet, Teknisk-naturvetenskapliga fakulteten, Kemiska institutionen. Umeå universitet, Medicinska fakulteten, Umeå Centre for Microbial Research (UCMR).
    Kulén, Martina
    Umeå universitet, Teknisk-naturvetenskapliga fakulteten, Kemiska institutionen. Umeå universitet, Medicinska fakulteten, Umeå Centre for Microbial Research (UCMR).
    Silver, Jim
    Umeå universitet, Medicinska fakulteten, Umeå Centre for Microbial Research (UCMR). Umeå universitet, Teknisk-naturvetenskapliga fakulteten, Institutionen för molekylärbiologi (Teknisk-naturvetenskaplig fakultet).
    Krishnan, K. Syam
    Umeå universitet, Teknisk-naturvetenskapliga fakulteten, Kemiska institutionen. Umeå universitet, Medicinska fakulteten, Umeå Centre for Microbial Research (UCMR).
    Bahnan, Wael
    Umeå universitet, Medicinska fakulteten, Umeå Centre for Microbial Research (UCMR). Umeå universitet, Teknisk-naturvetenskapliga fakulteten, Institutionen för molekylärbiologi (Teknisk-naturvetenskaplig fakultet). Umeå universitet, Medicinska fakulteten, Molekylär Infektionsmedicin, Sverige (MIMS).
    Núñez-Otero, Carlos
    Umeå universitet, Medicinska fakulteten, Umeå Centre for Microbial Research (UCMR). Umeå universitet, Medicinska fakulteten, Molekylär Infektionsmedicin, Sverige (MIMS). Umeå universitet, Medicinska fakulteten, Institutionen för klinisk mikrobiologi.
    Nilsson, Ingela
    Umeå universitet, Medicinska fakulteten, Umeå Centre for Microbial Research (UCMR). Umeå universitet, Teknisk-naturvetenskapliga fakulteten, Institutionen för molekylärbiologi (Teknisk-naturvetenskaplig fakultet). Umeå universitet, Medicinska fakulteten, Molekylär Infektionsmedicin, Sverige (MIMS).
    Wede, Emma
    Umeå universitet, Medicinska fakulteten, Umeå Centre for Microbial Research (UCMR). Umeå universitet, Teknisk-naturvetenskapliga fakulteten, Institutionen för molekylärbiologi (Teknisk-naturvetenskaplig fakultet). Umeå universitet, Medicinska fakulteten, Molekylär Infektionsmedicin, Sverige (MIMS).
    de Groot, Esmee
    Umeå universitet, Medicinska fakulteten, Umeå Centre for Microbial Research (UCMR). Umeå universitet, Teknisk-naturvetenskapliga fakulteten, Institutionen för molekylärbiologi (Teknisk-naturvetenskaplig fakultet). Umeå universitet, Medicinska fakulteten, Molekylär Infektionsmedicin, Sverige (MIMS).
    Gylfe, Åsa
    Umeå universitet, Medicinska fakulteten, Umeå Centre for Microbial Research (UCMR). Umeå universitet, Medicinska fakulteten, Molekylär Infektionsmedicin, Sverige (MIMS). Umeå universitet, Medicinska fakulteten, Institutionen för klinisk mikrobiologi.
    Bergström, Sven
    Umeå universitet, Medicinska fakulteten, Umeå Centre for Microbial Research (UCMR). Umeå universitet, Teknisk-naturvetenskapliga fakulteten, Institutionen för molekylärbiologi (Teknisk-naturvetenskaplig fakultet). Umeå universitet, Medicinska fakulteten, Molekylär Infektionsmedicin, Sverige (MIMS).
    Almqvist, Fredrik
    Umeå universitet, Teknisk-naturvetenskapliga fakulteten, Kemiska institutionen. Umeå universitet, Medicinska fakulteten, Umeå Centre for Microbial Research (UCMR).
    Thiazolino 2-pyridone amide isosteres as inhibitors of Chlamydia trachomatis infectivity2017Inngår i: Journal of Medicinal Chemistry, ISSN 0022-2623, E-ISSN 1520-4804, Vol. 60, nr 22, s. 9393-9399Artikkel i tidsskrift (Fagfellevurdert)
    Abstract [en]

    Chlamydia trachomatis is a global health burden due to its prevalence as a sexually transmitted disease and as the causative agent of the eye infection trachoma. We recently discovered 3-amido thiazolino 2-pyridones which attenuated C. trachomatis infectivity without affecting host cell or commensal bacteria viability. We present here the synthesis and evaluation of nonhydrolyzable amide isosteres based on this class, leading to highly potent 1,2,3-triazole based infectivity inhibitors (EC50 ≤ 20 nM).

  • 186.
    Good, James A. D.
    et al.
    Umeå universitet, Teknisk-naturvetenskapliga fakulteten, Kemiska institutionen. Umeå universitet, Medicinska fakulteten, Umeå Centre for Microbial Research (UCMR).
    Silver, Jim
    Umeå universitet, Medicinska fakulteten, Umeå Centre for Microbial Research (UCMR). Umeå universitet, Medicinska fakulteten, Molekylär Infektionsmedicin, Sverige (MIMS). Umeå universitet, Medicinska fakulteten, Institutionen för molekylärbiologi (Medicinska fakulteten).
    Nunez-Otero, Carlos
    Umeå universitet, Medicinska fakulteten, Institutionen för klinisk mikrobiologi.
    Bahnan, Wael
    Umeå universitet, Medicinska fakulteten, Umeå Centre for Microbial Research (UCMR). Umeå universitet, Medicinska fakulteten, Molekylär Infektionsmedicin, Sverige (MIMS). Umeå universitet, Medicinska fakulteten, Institutionen för molekylärbiologi (Medicinska fakulteten).
    Krishnan, K. Syam
    Umeå universitet, Medicinska fakulteten, Umeå Centre for Microbial Research (UCMR). Umeå universitet, Teknisk-naturvetenskapliga fakulteten, Kemiska institutionen.
    Salin, Olli
    Umeå universitet, Medicinska fakulteten, Umeå Centre for Microbial Research (UCMR). Umeå universitet, Medicinska fakulteten, Molekylär Infektionsmedicin, Sverige (MIMS). Umeå universitet, Medicinska fakulteten, Institutionen för klinisk mikrobiologi.
    Engström, Patrik
    Umeå universitet, Medicinska fakulteten, Umeå Centre for Microbial Research (UCMR). Umeå universitet, Medicinska fakulteten, Molekylär Infektionsmedicin, Sverige (MIMS). Umeå universitet, Medicinska fakulteten, Institutionen för molekylärbiologi (Medicinska fakulteten).
    Svensson, Richard
    Department of Pharmacy, Uppsala University, SE-751 23 Uppsala, Sweden; The Uppsala University Drug Optimization and Pharmaceutical Profiling Platform, Chemical Biology Consortium Sweden, Uppsala University, SE-751 23 Uppsala, Sweden.
    Artursson, Per
    Department of Pharmacy, Uppsala University, SE-751 23 Uppsala, Sweden; The Uppsala University Drug Optimization and Pharmaceutical Profiling Platform, Chemical Biology Consortium Sweden, Uppsala University, SE-751 23 Uppsala, Sweden.
    Gylfe, Åsa
    Umeå universitet, Medicinska fakulteten, Umeå Centre for Microbial Research (UCMR). Umeå universitet, Medicinska fakulteten, Molekylär Infektionsmedicin, Sverige (MIMS). Umeå universitet, Medicinska fakulteten, Institutionen för klinisk mikrobiologi.
    Bergström, Sven
    Umeå universitet, Medicinska fakulteten, Umeå Centre for Microbial Research (UCMR). Umeå universitet, Medicinska fakulteten, Molekylär Infektionsmedicin, Sverige (MIMS). Umeå universitet, Medicinska fakulteten, Institutionen för molekylärbiologi (Medicinska fakulteten).
    Almqvist, Fredrik
    Umeå universitet, Teknisk-naturvetenskapliga fakulteten, Kemiska institutionen. Umeå universitet, Medicinska fakulteten, Umeå Centre for Microbial Research (UCMR).
    Thiazolino 2-Pyridone Amide Inhibitors of Chlamydia trachomatis Infectivity2016Inngår i: Journal of Medicinal Chemistry, ISSN 0022-2623, E-ISSN 1520-4804, Vol. 59, nr 5, s. 2094-2108Artikkel i tidsskrift (Fagfellevurdert)
    Abstract [en]

    The bacterial pathogen Chlamydia trachomatis is a global health burden currently treated with broad-spectrum antibiotics which disrupt commensal bacteria. We recently identified a compound through phenotypic screening that blocked infectivity of this intracellular pathogen without host cell toxicity (compound 1, KSK 120). Herein, we present the optimization of 1 to a class of thiazolino 2-pyridone amides that are highly efficacious (EC50 <= 100 nM) in attenuating infectivity across multiple serovars of C. trachomatis without host cell toxicity. The lead compound 21a exhibits reduced lipophilicity versus 1 and did not affect the growth or viability of representative commensal flora at 50 mu M. In microscopy studies, a highly active fluorescent analogue 37 localized inside the parasitiphorous inclusion, indicative of a specific targeting of bacterial components. In summary, we present a class of small molecules to enable the development of specific treatments for C. trachomatis.

  • 187. Goormaghtigh, Frederic
    et al.
    Fraikin, Nathan
    Putrins, Marta
    Hallaert, Thibaut
    Hauryliuk, Vasili
    Umeå universitet, Medicinska fakulteten, Institutionen för molekylärbiologi (Medicinska fakulteten). Umeå universitet, Medicinska fakulteten, Molekylär Infektionsmedicin, Sverige (MIMS). Institute of Technology, University of Tartu, Tartu, Estonia.
    Garcia-Pino, Abel
    Sjödin, Andreas
    Umeå universitet, Teknisk-naturvetenskapliga fakulteten, Kemiska institutionen. Division of CBRN Security and Defence, FOI–Swedish Defence Research Agency, Umeå, Sweden.
    Kasvandik, Sergo
    Udekwu, Klas
    Tenson, Tanel
    Kaldalu, Niilo
    Van Melderen, Laurence
    Reassessing the Role of Type II Toxin-Antitoxin Systems in Formation of Escherichia coli Type II Persister Cells2018Inngår i: mBio, ISSN 2161-2129, E-ISSN 2150-7511, Vol. 9, nr 3, artikkel-id e00640-18Artikkel i tidsskrift (Fagfellevurdert)
    Abstract [en]

    Persistence is a reversible and low-frequency phenomenon allowing a subpopulation of a clonal bacterial population to survive antibiotic treatments. Upon removal of the antibiotic, persister cells resume growth and give rise to viable progeny. Type II toxin-antitoxin (TA) systems were assumed to play a key role in the formation of persister cells in Escherichia coli based on the observation that successive deletions of TA systems decreased persistence frequency. In addition, the model proposed that stochastic fluctuations of (p)ppGpp levels are the basis for triggering activation of TA systems. Cells in which TA systems are activated are thought to enter a dormancy state and therefore survive the antibiotic treatment. Using independently constructed strains and newly designed fluorescent reporters, we reassessed the roles of TA modules in persistence both at the population and single-cell levels. Our data confirm that the deletion of 10 TA systems does not affect persistence to ofloxacin or ampicillin. Moreover, microfluidic experiments performed with a strain reporting the induction of the yefM-yoeB TA system allowed the observation of a small number of type II persister cells that resume growth after removal of ampicillin. However, we were unable to establish a correlation between high fluorescence and persistence, since the fluorescence of persister cells was comparable to that of the bulk of the population and none of the cells showing high fluorescence were able to resume growth upon removal of the antibiotic. Altogether, these data show that there is no direct link between induction of TA systems and persistence to antibiotics. IMPORTANCE Within a growing bacterial population, a small subpopulation of cells is able to survive antibiotic treatment by entering a transient state of dormancy referred to as persistence. Persistence is thought to be the cause of relapsing bacterial infections and is a major public health concern. Type II toxin-antitoxin systems are small modules composed of a toxic protein and an antitoxin protein counteracting the toxin activity. These systems were thought to be pivotal players in persistence until recent developments in the field. Our results demonstrate that previous influential reports had technical flaws and that there is no direct link between induction of TA systems and persistence to antibiotics.

  • 188. Goormaghtigh, Frederic
    et al.
    Fraikin, Nathan
    Putrins, Marta
    Hauryliuk, Vasili
    Umeå universitet, Medicinska fakulteten, Institutionen för molekylärbiologi (Medicinska fakulteten). Umeå universitet, Medicinska fakulteten, Molekylär Infektionsmedicin, Sverige (MIMS). Institute of Technology, University of Tartu, Tartu, Estonia.
    Garcia-Pino, Abel
    Udekwu, Klas
    Tenson, Tanel
    Kaldalu, Niilo
    Van Melderen, Laurence
    Reply to Holden and Errington, "Type II Toxin-Antitoxin Systems and Persister Cells"2018Inngår i: mBio, ISSN 2161-2129, E-ISSN 2150-7511, Vol. 9, nr 5, artikkel-id e01838-18Artikkel i tidsskrift (Fagfellevurdert)
  • 189. Gratz, Nina
    et al.
    Siller, Maria
    Schaljo, Barbara
    Pirzada, Zaid A
    Gattermeier, Irene
    Vojtek, Ivo
    Kirschning, Carsten J
    Wagner, Hermann
    Charpentier, Emmanuelle
    Umeå universitet, Medicinska fakulteten, Molekylär Infektionsmedicin, Sverige (MIMS).
    Kovarik, Pavel
    Akira, Shizuo
    Group A streptococcus activates type I interferon production and MyD88-dependent signaling without involvement of TLR2, TLR4, and TLR92008Inngår i: Journal of Biological Chemistry, ISSN 0021-9258, E-ISSN 1083-351X, Vol. 283, nr 29, s. 19879-19887Artikkel i tidsskrift (Fagfellevurdert)
    Abstract [en]

    Bacterial pathogens are recognized by the innate immune system through pattern recognition receptors, such as Toll-like receptors (TLRs). Engagement of TLRs triggers signaling cascades that launch innate immune responses. Activation of MAPKs and NF-kappaB, elements of the major signaling pathways induced by TLRs, depends in most cases on the adaptor molecule MyD88. In addition, Gram-negative or intracellular bacteria elicit MyD88-independent signaling that results in production of type I interferon (IFN). Here we show that in mouse macrophages, the activation of MyD88-dependent signaling by the extracellular Gram-positive human pathogen group A streptococcus (GAS; Streptococcus pyogenes) does not require TLR2, a receptor implicated in sensing of Gram-positive bacteria, or TLR4 and TLR9. Redundant engagement of either of these TLR molecules was excluded by using TLR2/4/9 triple-deficient macrophages. We further demonstrate that infection of macrophages by GAS causes IRF3 (interferon-regulatory factor 3)-dependent, MyD88-independent production of IFN. Surprisingly, IFN is induced also by GAS lacking slo and sagA, the genes encoding cytolysins that were shown to be required for IFN production in response to other Gram-positive bacteria. Our data indicate that (i) GAS is recognized by a MyD88-dependent receptor other than any of those typically used by bacteria, and (ii) GAS as well as GAS mutants lacking cytolysin genes induce type I IFN production by similar mechanisms as bacteria requiring cytoplasmic escape and the function of cytolysins.

  • 190. Grimm, Melissa J
    et al.
    Vethanayagam, R Robert
    Almyroudis, Nikolaos G
    Dennis, Carly G
    Khan, A Nazmul H
    D'Auria, Anthony C
    Singel, Kelly L
    Davidson, Bruce A
    Knight, Paul R
    Blackwell, Timothy S
    Hohl, Tobias M
    Mansour, Michael K
    Vyas, Jatin M
    Röhm, Marc
    Umeå universitet, Medicinska fakulteten, Institutionen för klinisk mikrobiologi, Klinisk bakteriologi. Umeå universitet, Medicinska fakulteten, Molekylär Infektionsmedicin, Sverige (MIMS).
    Urban, Constantin F
    Umeå universitet, Medicinska fakulteten, Institutionen för klinisk mikrobiologi, Klinisk bakteriologi. Umeå universitet, Medicinska fakulteten, Molekylär Infektionsmedicin, Sverige (MIMS).
    Kelkka, Tiina
    Holmdahl, Rikard
    Segal, Brahm H
    Monocyte- and macrophage-targeted NADPH oxidase mediates antifungal host defense and regulation of acute inflammation in mice2013Inngår i: Journal of Immunology, ISSN 0022-1767, E-ISSN 1550-6606, Vol. 190, nr 8, s. 4175-4184Artikkel i tidsskrift (Fagfellevurdert)
    Abstract [en]

    Chronic granulomatous disease, an inherited disorder of the NADPH oxidase in which phagocytes are defective in the generation of superoxide anion and downstream reactive oxidant species, is characterized by severe bacterial and fungal infections and excessive inflammation. Although NADPH oxidase isoforms exist in several lineages, reactive oxidant generation is greatest in neutrophils, where NADPH oxidase has been deemed vital for pathogen killing. In contrast, the function and importance of NADPH oxidase in macrophages are less clear. Therefore, we evaluated susceptibility to pulmonary aspergillosis in globally NADPH oxidase-deficient mice versus transgenic mice with monocyte/macrophage-targeted NADPH oxidase activity. We found that the lethal inoculum was >100-fold greater in transgenic versus globally NADPH oxidase-deficient mice. Consistent with these in vivo results, NADPH oxidase in mouse alveolar macrophages limited germination of phagocytosed Aspergillus fumigatus spores. Finally, globally NADPH oxidase-deficient mice developed exuberant neutrophilic lung inflammation and proinflammatory cytokine responses to zymosan, a fungal cell wall-derived product composed principally of particulate beta-glucans, whereas inflammation in transgenic and wild-type mice was mild and transient. Taken together, our studies identify a central role for monocyte/macrophage NADPH oxidase in controlling fungal infection and in limiting acute lung inflammation. The Journal of Immunology, 2013, 190: 4175-4184.

  • 191.
    Gripenland, Jonas
    Umeå universitet, Medicinska fakulteten, Institutionen för molekylärbiologi (Medicinska fakulteten). Umeå universitet, Medicinska fakulteten, Molekylär Infektionsmedicin, Sverige (MIMS).
    Regulatory roles of two small RNAs in the human pathogen Listeria monocytogenes and the evaluation of an alternative infection model2012Doktoravhandling, med artikler (Annet vitenskapelig)
    Abstract [en]

    Listeriosis is a potentially lethal disease caused by the Gram-positive facultative intracellular pathogen Listeria monocytogenes (L.m.). L.m. is found ubiquitously in the environment and infects humans via ingestion of contaminated food. Contaminated products are usually derived from ruminants and involve dairy products and different kinds of processed meat. Listeriosis is a potential lifethreatening disease with a total mortality rate of 20-30 %. The development of listeriosis may lead to meningitis and septicemia or other invasive diseases. Pregnant women are of increased risk of developing listeriosis and a materno-fetal infection commonly lead to spontaneous abortion or still-birth.

    Regulation of gene expression, and specifically virulence gene expression, is essential for pathogenic bacteria to be equipped for handling counteractions from the host as well as thriving in the often hostile environment. In pathogenic Listeria, virulence gene expression is under the control of the global virulence gene regulator PrfA. The expression of prfA is highly regulated at the transcriptional, post-transcriptional and post- translational level. We have identified a novel type of post-transcriptional regulation of prfA-mRNA by a trans-acting riboswitch element (SreA). By binding to the leader region of prfA-mRNA, SreA negatively regulates the expression of prfA. To our knowledge, this is the first description of a cis-acting riboswitch capable of functioning as a small RNA in trans, regulating targets on distant sites.

    To date, there have been around 100 sRNAs identified in Listeria monocytogenes, but experimental data is still limited. We have characterized a blood induced sRNA, Rli38, which is important for full virulence during oral infection of mice. Our data suggest that Rli38 regulates the expression of at least two proteins; OppD (Oligopeptide transport protein) and IsdG (heme degrading monooxygenase). Both of these proteins have been implicated in the infectious cycle of L.m. We speculate that the virulence phenotype of an ∆rli38 mutant is possibly mediated through the effect of these proteins.

    L.m. is a complex pathogen, able to infect and replicate in a variety of organs and cause several distinctive forms of disease. These qualities of L.m. generate difficulties in simulating human listeriosis in animal models, as entailed by the multitude of models used in the field. In this work, we have evaluated the use of an alternative animal model in studying listeriosis. Our results describe the differentiated virulence potential of wildtype bacteria and a ∆prfA mutant strain in the chicken embryo by live/death screening and organ colonization. Large differences in mean time to death were found between wild-type and the ∆prfA strain and ∆prfA cells displayed a considerable defect in colonization of the embryonal liver. The results presented in this thesis show that the chicken embryo infection model is a valuable and convenient tool in studying end-outcome and organ colonization of Listeria monocytogenes.

    Taken together, this thesis describes the characterization of two previously unknown sRNAs in the human pathogen Listeria monocytogenes and the use of an alternative infection model for simulating listeriosis.

  • 192.
    Hall, Michael
    et al.
    Umeå universitet, Teknisk-naturvetenskapliga fakulteten, Kemiska institutionen. Umeå universitet, Medicinska fakulteten, Umeå Centre for Microbial Research (UCMR).
    Grundström, Christin
    Umeå universitet, Teknisk-naturvetenskapliga fakulteten, Kemiska institutionen. Umeå universitet, Medicinska fakulteten, Umeå Centre for Microbial Research (UCMR).
    Begum, Afshan
    Umeå universitet, Teknisk-naturvetenskapliga fakulteten, Kemiska institutionen. Umeå universitet, Medicinska fakulteten, Umeå Centre for Microbial Research (UCMR).
    Lindberg, Mikael J.
    Umeå universitet, Teknisk-naturvetenskapliga fakulteten, Kemiska institutionen. Umeå universitet, Medicinska fakulteten, Umeå Centre for Microbial Research (UCMR).
    Sauer, Uwe H.
    Umeå universitet, Teknisk-naturvetenskapliga fakulteten, Kemiska institutionen. Umeå universitet, Medicinska fakulteten, Umeå Centre for Microbial Research (UCMR).
    Almqvist, Fredrik
    Umeå universitet, Teknisk-naturvetenskapliga fakulteten, Kemiska institutionen. Umeå universitet, Medicinska fakulteten, Umeå Centre for Microbial Research (UCMR).
    Johansson, Jörgen
    Umeå universitet, Medicinska fakulteten, Umeå Centre for Microbial Research (UCMR). Umeå universitet, Medicinska fakulteten, Institutionen för molekylärbiologi (Medicinska fakulteten). Umeå universitet, Medicinska fakulteten, Molekylär Infektionsmedicin, Sverige (MIMS).
    Sauer-Eriksson, A. Elisabeth
    Umeå universitet, Teknisk-naturvetenskapliga fakulteten, Kemiska institutionen. Umeå universitet, Medicinska fakulteten, Umeå Centre for Microbial Research (UCMR).
    Structural basis for glutathione-mediated activation of the virulence regulatory protein PrfA in Listeria2016Inngår i: Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences of the United States of America, ISSN 0027-8424, E-ISSN 1091-6490, Vol. 113, nr 51, s. 14733-14738Artikkel i tidsskrift (Fagfellevurdert)
    Abstract [en]

    Infection by the human bacterial pathogen Listeria monocytogenes is mainly controlled by the positive regulatory factor A (PrfA), a member of the Crp/Fnr family of transcriptional activators. Published data suggest that PrfA requires the binding of a cofactor for full activity, and it was recently proposed that glutathione (GSH) could fulfill this function. Here we report the crystal structures of PrfA in complex with GSH and in complex with GSH and its cognate DNA, the hly operator PrfA box motif. These structures reveal the structural basis for a GSH-mediated allosteric mode of activation of PrfA in the cytosol of the host cell. The crystal structure of PrfAWT in complex only with DNA confirms that PrfAWT can adopt a DNA binding-compatible structure without binding the GSH activator molecule. By binding to PrfA in the cytosol of the host cell, GSH induces the correct fold of the HTH motifs, thus priming the PrfA protein for DNA interaction.

  • 193.
    Hauryliuk, Vasili
    et al.
    Umeå universitet, Medicinska fakulteten, Institutionen för molekylärbiologi (Medicinska fakulteten). Umeå universitet, Medicinska fakulteten, Molekylär Infektionsmedicin, Sverige (MIMS). University of Tartu, Institute of Technology, Tartu, Estonia.
    Atkinson, Gemma C.
    Umeå universitet, Medicinska fakulteten, Institutionen för molekylärbiologi (Medicinska fakulteten).
    Small Alarmone Synthetases as novel bacterial RNA-binding proteins2017Inngår i: RNA Biology, ISSN 1547-6286, E-ISSN 1555-8584, Vol. 14, nr 12, s. 1695-1699Artikkel, forskningsoversikt (Fagfellevurdert)
    Abstract [en]

    The alarmone nucleotides guanosine pentaphosphate (pppGpp) and tetraphosphate (ppGpp), collectively referred to as (p)ppGpp, are key regulators of bacterial growth, stress adaptation, antibiotic tolerance and pathogenicity. We have recently shown that the Small Alarmone Synthetase (SAS) RelQ from the Gram-positive pathogen Enterococcus faecalis has an RNA-binding activity (Beljantseva et al. 2017). RelQ's activities as an enzyme and as an RNA-binding protein are mutually incompatible: binding of single-stranded RNA potently inhibits (p)ppGpp synthesis in a sequence-specific manner, and RelQ's enzymatic activity destabilizes the RNA: RelQ complex. RelQ's allosteric regulator, pppGpp, destabilizes RNA binding and activates RelQ's enzymatic activity. Since SAS enzymes are widely distributed in bacteria, and, as has been discovered recently, are also mobilized by phages (Dedrick et al. 2017), RNA binding to SASs could be a widespread mechanism. The initial discovery raises numerous questions regarding RNA-binding function of the SAS enzymes: What is the molecular mechanism underlying the incompatibility of RNA: SAS complex formation with pppGpp binding and (p)ppGpp synthesis? What are the RNA targets in living cells? What is the regulatory output of the system - (p)ppGpp synthesis, modulation of RNA structure and function, or both?

  • 194.
    Hauryliuk, Vasili
    et al.
    Umeå universitet, Medicinska fakulteten, Institutionen för molekylärbiologi (Medicinska fakulteten). Umeå universitet, Medicinska fakulteten, Molekylär Infektionsmedicin, Sverige (MIMS). Institute of Technology, University of Tartu, Nooruse 1, Tartu 50411, Estonia.
    Atkinson, Gemma C.
    Umeå universitet, Medicinska fakulteten, Molekylär Infektionsmedicin, Sverige (MIMS). Umeå universitet, Medicinska fakulteten, Institutionen för molekylärbiologi (Medicinska fakulteten). Institute of Technology, University of Tartu, Nooruse 1, Tartu 50411, Estonia.
    Murakami, Katsuhiko S.
    Department of Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Center for RNA Molecular Biology, The Pennsylvania State University, University Park, Pennsylvania 16802, USA.
    Tenson, Tanel
    Institute of Technology, University of Tartu, Nooruse 1, Tartu 50411, Estonia.
    Gerdes, Kenn
    Department of Biology, University of Copenhagen, Ole Maaløes Vej 5, DK-2200 Copenhagen N, Denmark.
    Recent functional insights into the role of (p)ppGpp in bacterial physiology2015Inngår i: Nature Reviews Microbiology, ISSN 1740-1526, E-ISSN 1740-1534, Vol. 13, nr 5, s. 298-309Artikkel, forskningsoversikt (Fagfellevurdert)
    Abstract [en]

    The alarmones guanosine tetraphosphate and guanosine pentaphosphate (collectively referred to as (p) ppGpp) are involved in regulating growth and several different stress responses in bacteria. In recent years, substantial progress has been made in our understanding of the molecular mechanisms of (p) ppGpp metabolism and (p) ppGpp-mediated regulation. In this Review, we summarize these recent insights, with a focus on the molecular mechanisms governing the activity of the RelA/SpoT homologue (RSH) proteins, which are key players that regulate the cellular levels of (p) ppGpp. We also discuss the structural basis of transcriptional regulation by (p) ppGpp and the role of (p) ppGpp in GTP metabolism and in the emergence of bacterial persisters.

  • 195. Heckl, Dirk
    et al.
    Charpentier, Emmanuelle
    Umeå universitet, Medicinska fakulteten, Molekylär Infektionsmedicin, Sverige (MIMS). Umeå universitet, Medicinska fakulteten, Umeå Centre for Microbial Research (UCMR). Umeå universitet, Medicinska fakulteten, Institutionen för molekylärbiologi (Medicinska fakulteten). Department of Regulation in Infection Biology, Helmholtz Centre for Infection Research, Germany ; Department of Regulation in Infection Biology, Hannover Medical School, Hannover, Germany.
    Toward whole-transcriptome editing with CRISPR-Cas92015Inngår i: Molecular Cell, ISSN 1097-2765, E-ISSN 1097-4164, Vol. 58, nr 4, s. 560-562Artikkel i tidsskrift (Annet vitenskapelig)
    Abstract [en]

    Targeted regulation of gene expression holds huge promise for biomedical research. In a series of recent publications (Gilbert et al., 2014; Konermann et al., 2015; Zalatan et al., 2015), sophisticated, multiplex-compatible transcriptional activator systems based on the CRISPR-Cas9 technology and genome-scale libraries advance the field toward whole-transcriptome control.

  • 196.
    Henriksson, M L
    et al.
    Umeå universitet, Medicinska fakulteten, Institutionen för molekylärbiologi (Medicinska fakulteten).
    Rosqvist, Roland
    Umeå universitet, Teknisk-naturvetenskapliga fakulteten, Institutionen för molekylärbiologi (Teknisk-naturvetenskaplig fakultet).
    Telepnev, Maxim
    Umeå universitet, Medicinska fakulteten, Institutionen för molekylärbiologi (Medicinska fakulteten).
    Wolf-Watz, Hans
    Umeå universitet, Medicinska fakulteten, Molekylär Infektionsmedicin, Sverige (MIMS). Umeå universitet, Medicinska fakulteten, Institutionen för molekylärbiologi (Medicinska fakulteten).
    Hallberg, Bengt
    Umeå universitet, Medicinska fakulteten, Institutionen för molekylärbiologi (Medicinska fakulteten).
    Ras effector pathway activation by epidermal growth factor is inhibited in vivo by exoenzyme S ADP-ribosylation of Ras2000Inngår i: Biochemical Journal, ISSN 0264-6021, E-ISSN 1470-8728, Vol. 347, nr 1, s. 217-222Artikkel i tidsskrift (Fagfellevurdert)
  • 197.
    Hernández, Sara B
    et al.
    Umeå universitet, Medicinska fakulteten, Institutionen för molekylärbiologi (Medicinska fakulteten). Umeå universitet, Medicinska fakulteten, Molekylär Infektionsmedicin, Sverige (MIMS). Umeå universitet, Medicinska fakulteten, Umeå Centre for Microbial Research (UCMR).
    Cava, Felipe
    Umeå universitet, Medicinska fakulteten, Institutionen för molekylärbiologi (Medicinska fakulteten). Umeå universitet, Medicinska fakulteten, Molekylär Infektionsmedicin, Sverige (MIMS). Umeå universitet, Medicinska fakulteten, Umeå Centre for Microbial Research (UCMR).
    Environmental roles of microbial amino acid racemases2016Inngår i: Environmental Microbiology, ISSN 1462-2912, E-ISSN 1462-2920, Vol. 18, nr 6, s. 1673-1685Artikkel, forskningsoversikt (Fagfellevurdert)
    Abstract [en]

    Enzymes catalysing the stereo-chemical inter-conversion of amino acids are known as amino acid racemases. In bacteria, these enzymes are fundamental to synthesize the D-Ala and D-Glu that are critical components of the peptidoglycan. In addition to this structural function in cell wall assembly, D-amino acids produced by microbial amino acid racemases have been described as relevant constituents in other prokaryotic structures (e.g. capsule, non-ribosomal peptides) and have been associated to growth fitness and to processes such as biofilm development, spore germination, and signalling. The recent discovery of broad spectrum racemases able to produce and release several D-amino acids to the environment suggests that these enzymes might have a great impact in microbial ecology. Consequently, new data on the biochemistry and regulation of racemases is key to understand the biological significance of D-enantiomers in nature, in particular their effect on microbial social networks. This review summarizes current knowledge on the environmental roles of bacterial racemases with an emphasis on the potential roles of the new broad spectrum enzymes in natural environments.

  • 198. Hille, Frank
    et al.
    Charpentier, Emmanuelle
    Umeå universitet, Medicinska fakulteten, Molekylär Infektionsmedicin, Sverige (MIMS). Umeå universitet, Medicinska fakulteten, Umeå Centre for Microbial Research (UCMR). Umeå universitet, Medicinska fakulteten, Institutionen för molekylärbiologi (Medicinska fakulteten). Department of Regulation in Infection Biology, Max Planck Institute for Infection Biology, Berlin 10117, Germany.
    CRISPR-Cas: biology, mechanisms and relevance2016Inngår i: Philosophical Transactions of the Royal Society of London. Biological Sciences, ISSN 0962-8436, E-ISSN 1471-2970, Vol. 371, nr 1707, artikkel-id 20150496Artikkel, forskningsoversikt (Fagfellevurdert)
    Abstract [en]

    Prokaryotes have evolved several defence mechanisms to protect themselves from viral predators. Clustered regularly interspaced short palindromic repeats (CRISPR) and their associated proteins (Cas) display a prokaryotic adaptive immune system that memorizes previous infections by integrating short sequences of invading genomes-termed spacers-into the CRISPR locus. The spacers interspaced with repeats are expressed as small guide CRISPR RNAs (crRNAs) that are employed by Cas proteins to target invaders sequence-specifically upon a reoccurring infection. The ability of the minimal CRISPR-Cas9 system to target DNA sequences using programmable RNAs has opened new avenues in genome editing in a broad range of cells and organisms with high potential in therapeutical applications. While numerous scientific studies have shed light on the biochemical processes behind CRISPR-Cas systems, several aspects of the immunity steps, however, still lack sufficient understanding. This review summarizes major discoveries in the CRISPR-Cas field, discusses the role of CRISPR-Cas in prokaryotic immunity and other physiological properties, and describes applications of the system as a DNA editing technology and antimicrobial agent. This article is part of the themed issue 'The new bacteriology'.

  • 199. Hille, Frank
    et al.
    Richter, Hagen
    Wong, Shi Pey
    Umeå universitet, Medicinska fakulteten, Molekylär Infektionsmedicin, Sverige (MIMS). Umeå universitet, Medicinska fakulteten, Umeå Centre for Microbial Research (UCMR). Umeå universitet, Medicinska fakulteten, Institutionen för molekylärbiologi (Medicinska fakulteten). Department of Regulation in Infection Biology, Max Planck Institute for Infection Biology, Berlin, Germany; Institute for Biology, Humboldt University, Germany.
    Bratovic, Majda
    Ressel, Sarah
    Charpentier, Emmanuelle
    Umeå universitet, Medicinska fakulteten, Molekylär Infektionsmedicin, Sverige (MIMS). Umeå universitet, Medicinska fakulteten, Umeå Centre for Microbial Research (UCMR). Umeå universitet, Medicinska fakulteten, Institutionen för molekylärbiologi (Medicinska fakulteten). Department of Regulation in Infection Biology, Max Planck Institute for Infection Biology, Berlin, Germany; Institute for Biology, Humboldt University, Germany.
    The Biology of CRISPR-Cas: Backward and Forward2018Inngår i: Cell, ISSN 0092-8674, E-ISSN 1097-4172, Vol. 172, nr 6, s. 1239-1259Artikkel, forskningsoversikt (Fagfellevurdert)
    Abstract [en]

    In bacteria and archaea, clustered regularly interspaced short palindromic repeats (CRISPR) and CRISPR-associated (Cas) proteins constitute an adaptive immune system against phages and other foreign genetic elements. Here, we review the biology of the diverse CRISPR-Cas systems and the major progress achieved in recent years in understanding the underlying mechanisms of the three stages of CRISPR-Cas immunity: adaptation, crRNA biogenesis, and interference. The ecology and regulation of CRISPR-Cas in the context of phage infection, the roles of these systems beyond immunity, and the open questions that propel the field forward are also discussed.

  • 200. Hillier, Charles
    et al.
    Pardo, Mercedes
    Yu, Lu
    Bushell, Ellen
    Umeå universitet, Medicinska fakulteten, Institutionen för molekylärbiologi (Medicinska fakulteten). Umeå universitet, Medicinska fakulteten, Molekylär Infektionsmedicin, Sverige (MIMS).
    Sanderson, Theo
    Metcalf, Tom
    Herd, Colin
    Anar, Burcu
    Rayner, Julian C.
    Billker, Oliver
    Umeå universitet, Medicinska fakulteten, Molekylär Infektionsmedicin, Sverige (MIMS). Umeå universitet, Teknisk-naturvetenskapliga fakulteten, Institutionen för molekylärbiologi (Teknisk-naturvetenskaplig fakultet).
    Choudhary, Jyoti S.
    Landscape of the Plasmodium Interactome Reveals Both Conserved and Species-Specific Functionality2019Inngår i: Cell reports, ISSN 2211-1247, E-ISSN 2211-1247, Vol. 28, nr 6, s. 1635-1647Artikkel i tidsskrift (Fagfellevurdert)
    Abstract [en]

    Malaria represents a major global health issue, and the identification of new intervention targets remains an urgent priority. This search is hampered by more than one-third of the genes of malaria-causing Plasmodium parasites being uncharacterized. We report a large-scale protein interaction network in Plasmodium schizonts, generated by combining blue native-polyacrylamide electrophoresis with quantitative mass spectrometry and machine learning. This integrative approach, spanning 3 species, identifies > 20,000 putative protein interactions, organized into 600 protein clusters. We validate selected interactions, assigning functions in chromatin regulation to previously unannotated proteins and suggesting a role for an EELM2 domain-containing protein and a putative microrchidia protein as mechanistic links between AP2-domain transcription factors and epigenetic regulation. Our interactome represents a high-confidence map of the native organization of core cellular processes in Plasmodium parasites. The network reveals putative functions for uncharacterized proteins, provides mechanistic and structural insight, and uncovers potential alternative therapeutic targets.

1234567 151 - 200 of 522
RefereraExporteraLink til resultatlisten
Permanent link
Referera
Referensformat
  • apa
  • ieee
  • modern-language-association-8th-edition
  • vancouver
  • Annet format
Fler format
Språk
  • de-DE
  • en-GB
  • en-US
  • fi-FI
  • nn-NO
  • nn-NB
  • sv-SE
  • Annet språk
Fler språk
Utmatningsformat
  • html
  • text
  • asciidoc
  • rtf