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  • 151. Campbell, D
    et al.
    Eriksson, Mats-Jerry
    Umeå universitet, Teknisk-naturvetenskapliga fakulteten, Institutionen för fysiologisk botanik. Umeå universitet, Teknisk-naturvetenskapliga fakulteten, Umeå Plant Science Centre (UPSC).
    Gustafsson, Petter
    Umeå universitet, Teknisk-naturvetenskapliga fakulteten, Institutionen för fysiologisk botanik. Umeå universitet, Teknisk-naturvetenskapliga fakulteten, Umeå Plant Science Centre (UPSC).
    Oquist, Gunnar
    Umeå universitet, Teknisk-naturvetenskapliga fakulteten, Institutionen för fysiologisk botanik. Umeå universitet, Teknisk-naturvetenskapliga fakulteten, Umeå Plant Science Centre (UPSC).
    Clarke, A K
    A cyanobacterium resists UV-B by exchanging Photosystem II D1 proteins.1997Inngår i: Plant Physiology, ISSN 0032-0889, E-ISSN 1532-2548, Vol. 114, nr 3, s. 30004-30004Artikkel i tidsskrift (Fagfellevurdert)
  • 152. Campbell, D
    et al.
    Eriksson, Mats-Jerry
    Umeå universitet, Teknisk-naturvetenskapliga fakulteten, Institutionen för fysiologisk botanik. Umeå universitet, Teknisk-naturvetenskapliga fakulteten, Umeå Plant Science Centre (UPSC).
    Oquist, Gunnar
    Umeå universitet, Teknisk-naturvetenskapliga fakulteten, Institutionen för fysiologisk botanik. Umeå universitet, Teknisk-naturvetenskapliga fakulteten, Umeå Plant Science Centre (UPSC).
    Gustafsson, Petter
    Umeå universitet, Teknisk-naturvetenskapliga fakulteten, Institutionen för fysiologisk botanik. Umeå universitet, Teknisk-naturvetenskapliga fakulteten, Umeå Plant Science Centre (UPSC).
    Clarke, A K
    The cyanobacterium Synechococcus resists UV-B by exchanging photosystem II reaction-center D1 proteins1998Inngår i: Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences of the United States of America, ISSN 0027-8424, E-ISSN 1091-6490, Vol. 95, nr 1, s. 364-369Artikkel i tidsskrift (Fagfellevurdert)
    Abstract [en]

    Current ambient UV-B levels can significantly depress productivity in aquatic habitats, largely because UV-B inhibits several steps of photosynthesis, including the photooxidation of water catalyzed by photosystem II, We show that upon UV-B exposure the cyanobacterium Synechococcus sp, PCC 7942 rapidly changes the expression of a family of three psbA genes encoding photosystem II D1 proteins, In wild-type cells the psbAI gene is expressed constitutively, but strong accumulations of psbAII and psbAIII transcripts are induced within 15 min of moderate UV-B exposure (0.4 W/m(2)), This transcriptional response causes an exchange of two distinct photosystem II D1 proteins, D1:1 is encoded by psbAI, but on UV-B exposure, it is largely replaced by the alternate D1:2 form, encoded by both psbAII and psbAIII, The total content of D1 and other photosystem II reaction center protein, D2, remained unchanged throughout the UV exposure, as did the content and composition of the phycobilisome, Wild-type cells suffered only slight transient inhibition of photosystem II function under UV-B exposure, In marked contrast, under the same UV-B treatment, a mutant strain expressing only psbAI suffered severe (40%) and sustained inhibition of photosystem II function, Another mutant strain with constitutive expression of psbAII and psbAIII was almost completely resistant to the UV-B treatment, showing no inhibition of photosystem II function and only a slight drop in electron transport, In Synechococcus the rapid exchange of alternate D1 forms, therefore, accounts for much of the cellular resistance to UV-B inhibition of photosystem II activity and photosynthetic electron transport, This molecular plasticity may be an important element in community-level responses to UV-B, where susceptibility to UV-B inhibition of photosynthesis changes diurnally.

  • 153. Campbell, D
    et al.
    Hurry, Vaughan
    Umeå universitet, Teknisk-naturvetenskapliga fakulteten, Institutionen för fysiologisk botanik. Umeå universitet, Teknisk-naturvetenskapliga fakulteten, Umeå Plant Science Centre (UPSC).
    Clarke, A K
    Gustafsson, Petter
    Umeå universitet, Teknisk-naturvetenskapliga fakulteten, Institutionen för fysiologisk botanik. Umeå universitet, Teknisk-naturvetenskapliga fakulteten, Umeå Plant Science Centre (UPSC).
    Oquist, Gunnar
    Umeå universitet, Teknisk-naturvetenskapliga fakulteten, Institutionen för fysiologisk botanik. Umeå universitet, Teknisk-naturvetenskapliga fakulteten, Umeå Plant Science Centre (UPSC).
    Chlorophyll fluorescence analysis of cyanobacterial photosynthesis and acclimation1998Inngår i: Microbiology and molecular biology reviews, ISSN 1092-2172, E-ISSN 1098-5557, Vol. 62, nr 3, s. 667-+Artikkel, forskningsoversikt (Fagfellevurdert)
    Abstract [en]

    Cyanobacteria are ecologically important photosynthetic prokaryotes that also serve as popular model organisms for studies of photosynthesis and gene regulation. Both molecular and ecological studies of cyanobacteria benefit from real-time information on photosynthesis and acclimation. Monitoring in vivo chlorophyll fluorescence can provide noninvasive measures of photosynthetic physiology in a wide range of cyanobacteria and cyanolichens and requires only small samples. Cyanobacterial fluorescence patterns are distinct from those of plants, because of key structural and functional properties of cyanobacteria. These include significant fluorescence emission from the light-harvesting phycobiliproteins; large and rapid changes in fluorescence yield (state transitions) which depend on metabolic and environmental conditions; and flexible, overlapping respiratory and photosynthetic electron transport chains. The fluorescence parameters F-V/F-M. F-V'/F-M', q(p),q(N), NPQ, and phi PS II were originally developed to extract information from the fluorescence signals of higher plants. In this review, we consider how the special properties of cyanobacteria can be accommodated and used to extract biologically useful information from cyanobacterial in vivo chlorophyll fluorescence signals. We describe how the pattern of fluorescence yield versus light intensity can be used to predict the acclimated light level for a cyanobacterial population, giving information valuable for both laboratory and field studies of acclimation processes. The size of the change in fluorescence yield during dark-to-light transitions can provide information on respiration and the iron status of the cyanobacteria. Finally, fluorescence parameters cart be used to estimate the electron transport rate at the acclimated growth light intensity.

  • 154. Campbell, D
    et al.
    OQUIST, Gunnar
    Umeå universitet, Teknisk-naturvetenskapliga fakulteten, Institutionen för fysiologisk botanik. Umeå universitet, Teknisk-naturvetenskapliga fakulteten, Umeå Plant Science Centre (UPSC).
    Predicting light acclimation in cyanobacteria from nonphotochemical quenching of photosystem II fluorescence, which reflects state transitions in these organisms1996Inngår i: Plant Physiology, ISSN 0032-0889, E-ISSN 1532-2548, Vol. 111, nr 4, s. 1293-1298Artikkel i tidsskrift (Fagfellevurdert)
    Abstract [en]

    An important factor in photosynthetic ecophysiology is the light regime that a photobiont is acclimated to exploit. In a wide range of cyanobacteria and cyano-lichens, the easily measured fluorescence parameters, coefficient of nonphotochemical quenching of photosystem II variable fluorescence (q(N)) and nonphotochemical quenching, decline to a minimum near the acclimated growth light intensity. This characteristic pattern predicts the integrated light regime to which populations are acclimated, information that is particularly useful for cyanobacteria or cyano-lichens from habitats with highly variable light intensities. q(N) reflects processes that compete with photosystem II photochemistry for absorbed excitation energy. In cyanobacteria, we find no evidence for energy-dependent quenching mechanisms, which are the predominant components of q(N) in higher plants. Instead, in cyanobacteria, q(N) correlates closely with the excitation flow from the phycobilisome to photosystem I, indicating that q(N) reflects the state transition mechanism for equilibration of excitation from the phycobilisome to the two photosystems.

  • 155. CAMPBELL, D
    et al.
    ZHOU, GQ
    Gustafsson, Petter
    Umeå universitet, Teknisk-naturvetenskapliga fakulteten, Institutionen för fysiologisk botanik. Umeå universitet, Teknisk-naturvetenskapliga fakulteten, Umeå Plant Science Centre (UPSC).
    Oquist, Gunnar
    Umeå universitet, Teknisk-naturvetenskapliga fakulteten, Institutionen för fysiologisk botanik. Umeå universitet, Teknisk-naturvetenskapliga fakulteten, Umeå Plant Science Centre (UPSC).
    CLARKE, AK
    ELECTRON-TRANSPORT REGULATES EXCHANGE OF 2 FORMS OF PHOTOSYSTEM-II D1 PROTEIN IN THE CYANOBACTERIUM SYNECHOCOCCUS1995Inngår i: EMBO Journal, ISSN 0261-4189, E-ISSN 1460-2075, Vol. 14, nr 22, s. 5457-5466Artikkel i tidsskrift (Fagfellevurdert)
    Abstract [en]

    Synechococcus sp, PCC 7942 modulates photosynthetic function by transiently replacing the constitutive D1 photosystem II protein, D1:1, with an alternate form, D1:2, to help counteract photoinhibition under excess light, We show that a temperature drop from 37 to 25 degrees C also drives D1:1/D1:2 exchange under constant, moderate light, Chilling or light-induced D1 exchange results from rapid loss of psbAI message coding for D1:1 and accumulation of psbAII and psbAIII messages coding for D1:2, During chilling, a large pool of a novel form, D1:2*, transiently accumulates, distinguishable from normal D1 by an increase in apparent molecular mass, D1:* is not phosphorylated and is probably a functionally inactive, incompletely processed precursor, After acclimation to 25 degrees C, D1:2* disappears and D1:1 again predominates, although substantial D1:2 remains, Partial inhibition of electron transport under constant, moderate light also triggers the D1 exchange process, These treatments all increase excitation pressure on photosystem II relative to electron transport, Therefore, information from photosynthetic electron transport regulates D1 exchange without any requirement for a change in light intensity or quality, possibly via a redox sensing mechanism proximal to photosystem II.

  • 156. Capovilla, Giovanna
    et al.
    Delhomme, Nicolas
    Collani, Silvio
    Umeå universitet, Teknisk-naturvetenskapliga fakulteten, Umeå Plant Science Centre (UPSC). Umeå universitet, Teknisk-naturvetenskapliga fakulteten, Institutionen för fysiologisk botanik. Max Planck Institute for Developmental Biology, Department of Molecular Biology, Tübingen, Germany.
    Shutava, Iryna
    Umeå universitet, Teknisk-naturvetenskapliga fakulteten, Institutionen för fysiologisk botanik. Umeå universitet, Teknisk-naturvetenskapliga fakulteten, Umeå Plant Science Centre (UPSC).
    Bezrukov, Ilja
    Symeonidi, Efthymia
    Amorim, Marcella de Francisco
    Laubinger, Sascha
    Schmid, Markus
    Umeå universitet, Teknisk-naturvetenskapliga fakulteten, Umeå Plant Science Centre (UPSC). Umeå universitet, Teknisk-naturvetenskapliga fakulteten, Institutionen för fysiologisk botanik. Max Planck Institute for Developmental Biology, Department of Molecular Biology, Tübingen, Germany.
    PORCUPINE regulates development in response to temperature through alternative splicing2018Inngår i: Nature plants, ISSN 2055-026X, Vol. 4, nr 8, s. 534-539Artikkel i tidsskrift (Fagfellevurdert)
    Abstract [en]

    Recent findings suggest that alternative splicing has a critical role in controlling the responses of plants to temperature variations. However, alternative splicing factors in plants are largely uncharacterized. Here we establish the putative splice regulator, PORCUPINE (PCP), as temperature-specific regulator of development in Arabidopsis thaliana. Our findings point to the misregulation of WUSCHEL and CLAVATA3 as the possible cause for the meristem defects affecting the pcp-1 loss-of-function mutants at low temperatures.

  • 157. Capovilla, Giovanna
    et al.
    Pajoro, Alice
    Immink, Richard GH
    Schmid, Markus
    Umeå universitet, Teknisk-naturvetenskapliga fakulteten, Institutionen för fysiologisk botanik. Umeå universitet, Teknisk-naturvetenskapliga fakulteten, Umeå Plant Science Centre (UPSC). Department of Molecular Biology, Max Planck Institute for Developmental Biology, 72074 Tübingen, Germany.
    Role of alternative pre-mRNA splicing in temperature signaling2015Inngår i: Current opinion in plant biology, ISSN 1369-5266, E-ISSN 1879-0356, Vol. 27, s. 97-103Artikkel, forskningsoversikt (Fagfellevurdert)
    Abstract [en]

    Developmental plasticity enables plants to respond rapidly to changing environmental conditions, such as temperature fluctuations. Understanding how plants measure temperature and integrate this information into developmental programs at the molecular level will be essential to breed thermo-tolerant crop varieties. Recent studies identified alternative splicing (AS) as a possible 'molecular thermometer', allowing plants to quickly adjust the abundance of functional transcripts to environmental perturbations. In this review, recent advances regarding the effects of temperature-responsive AS on plant development will be discussed, with emphasis on the circadian clock and flowering time control. The challenge for the near future will be to understand the molecular mechanisms by which temperature can influence AS regulation.

  • 158. Capovilla, Giovanna
    et al.
    Symeonidi, Efthymia
    Wu, Rui
    Schmid, Markus
    Umeå universitet, Teknisk-naturvetenskapliga fakulteten, Institutionen för fysiologisk botanik. Umeå universitet, Teknisk-naturvetenskapliga fakulteten, Umeå Plant Science Centre (UPSC). Max Planck Institute for Developmental Biology, Department of Molecular Biology, Spemannstr. 35, 72076 Tübingen, Germany.
    Contribution of major FLM isoforms to temperature-dependent flowering in Arabidopsis thaliana2017Inngår i: Journal of Experimental Botany, ISSN 0022-0957, E-ISSN 1460-2431, Vol. 68, nr 18, s. 5117-5127Artikkel i tidsskrift (Fagfellevurdert)
    Abstract [en]

    FLOWERING LOCUS M (FLM), a component of the thermosensory flowering time pathway in Arabidopsis thaliana, is regulated by temperature-dependent alternative splicing (AS). The main splicing variant, FLM-beta, is a well-documented floral repressor that is down-regulated in response to increasing ambient growth temperature. Two hypotheses have been formulated to explain how flowering time is modulated by AS of FLM. In the first model a second splice variant, FLM-delta, acts as a dominant negative isoform that competes with FLM-beta at elevated ambient temperatures, thereby indirectly promoting flowering. Alternatively, it has been suggested that the induction of flowering at elevated temperatures is caused only by reduced FLM-beta expression. To better understand the role of the two FLM splice forms, we employed CRISPR/Cas9 technology to specifically delete the exons that characterize each splice variant. Lines that produced repressive FLM-beta but were incapable of producing FLM-delta were late flowering. In contrast, FLM-beta knockout lines that still produced FLM-delta flowered early, but not earlier than the flm-3 loss of function mutant, as would be expected if FLM-delta had a dominant-negative effect on flowering. Our data support the role of FLM-beta as a flower repressor and provide evidence that a contribution of FLM-delta to the regulation of flowering time in wild-type A. thaliana seems unlikely.

  • 159.
    Carius, Anke B.
    et al.
    Umeå universitet, Teknisk-naturvetenskapliga fakulteten, Institutionen för fysiologisk botanik.
    Rogne, Per
    Umeå universitet, Teknisk-naturvetenskapliga fakulteten, Kemiska institutionen.
    Duchoslav, Miloš
    Charles University, Prague, Czech Republic.
    Wolf-Watz, Magnus
    Umeå universitet, Teknisk-naturvetenskapliga fakulteten, Kemiska institutionen.
    Samuelsson, Göran
    Umeå universitet, Teknisk-naturvetenskapliga fakulteten, Institutionen för fysiologisk botanik.
    Shutova, Tatiana
    Umeå universitet, Teknisk-naturvetenskapliga fakulteten, Institutionen för fysiologisk botanik.
    Dynamic pH‐induced conformational changes of the PsbO protein in the fluctuating acidity of the thylakoid lumen2019Inngår i: Physiologia Plantarum: An International Journal for Plant Biology, ISSN 0031-9317, E-ISSN 1399-3054, Vol. 166, nr 1, s. 288-299Artikkel i tidsskrift (Fagfellevurdert)
    Abstract [en]

    The PsbO protein is an essential extrinsic subunit of photosystem II, the pigment–protein complex responsible for light‐driven water splitting. Water oxidation in photosystem II supplies electrons to the photosynthetic electron transfer chain and is accompanied by proton release and oxygen evolution. While the electron transfer steps in this process are well defined and characterized, the driving forces acting on the liberated protons, their dynamics and their destiny are all largely unknown. It was suggested that PsbO undergoes proton‐induced conformational changes and forms hydrogen bond networks that ensure prompt proton removal from the catalytic site of water oxidation, i.e. the Mn4CaO5 cluster. This work reports the purification and characterization of heterologously expressed PsbO from green algae Chlamydomonas reinhardtii and two isoforms from the higher plant Solanum tuberosum (PsbO1 and PsbO2). A comparison to the spinach PsbO reveals striking similarities in intrinsic protein fluorescence and CD spectra, reflecting the near‐identical secondary structure of the proteins from algae and higher plants. Titration experiments using the hydrophobic fluorescence probe ANS revealed that eukaryotic PsbO proteins exhibit acid–base hysteresis. This hysteresis is a dynamic effect accompanied by changes in the accessibility of the protein's hydrophobic core and is not due to reversible oligomerization or unfolding of the PsbO protein. These results confirm the hypothesis that pH‐dependent dynamic behavior at physiological pH ranges is a common feature of PsbO proteins and causes reversible opening and closing of their β‐barrel domain in response to the fluctuating acidity of the thylakoid lumen.

  • 160. Carrasco-Lopez, Cristian
    et al.
    Hernandez-Verdeja, Tamara
    Umeå universitet, Teknisk-naturvetenskapliga fakulteten, Umeå Plant Science Centre (UPSC). Umeå universitet, Teknisk-naturvetenskapliga fakulteten, Institutionen för fysiologisk botanik. Departamento de Biolog´ıa Medioambiental, Centro de Investigaciones Biologicas, CSIC, 28040 Madrid, Spain.
    Perea-Resa, Carlos
    Abia, David
    Catala, Rafael
    Salinas, Julio
    Environment-dependent regulation of spliceosome activity by the LSM2-8 complex in Arabidopsis2017Inngår i: Nucleic Acids Research, ISSN 0305-1048, E-ISSN 1362-4962, Vol. 45, nr 12, s. 7416-7431Artikkel i tidsskrift (Fagfellevurdert)
    Abstract [en]

    Spliceosome activity is tightly regulated to ensure adequate splicing in response to internal and external cues. It has been suggested that core components of the spliceosome, such as the snRNPs, would participate in the control of its activity. The experimental indications supporting this proposition, however, remain scarce, and the operating mechanisms poorly understood. Here, we present genetic and molecular evidence demonstrating that the LSM2-8 complex, the protein moiety of the U6 snRNP, regulates the spliceosome activity in Arabidopsis, and that this regulation is controlled by the environmental conditions. Our results show that the complex ensures the efficiency and accuracy of constitutive and alternative splicing of selected pre-mRNAs, depending on the conditions. Moreover, miss-splicing of most targeted pre-mRNAs leads to the generation of nonsense mediated decay signatures, indicating that the LSM2-8 complex also guarantees adequate levels of the corresponding functional transcripts. Interestingly, the selective role of the complex has relevant physiological implications since it is required for adequate plant adaptation to abiotic stresses. These findings unveil an unanticipated function for the LSM2-8 complex that represents a new layer of posttranscriptional regulation in response to external stimuli in eukaryotes.

  • 161. Caseys, Celine
    et al.
    Glauser, Gaetan
    Stoelting, Kai N.
    Christe, Camille
    Albrectsen, Benedicte R.
    Umeå universitet, Teknisk-naturvetenskapliga fakulteten, Institutionen för fysiologisk botanik. Umeå universitet, Teknisk-naturvetenskapliga fakulteten, Umeå Plant Science Centre (UPSC).
    Lexer, Christian
    Effects of interspecific recombination on functional traits in trees revealed by metabolomics and genotyping-by-resequencing2012Inngår i: Plant Ecology & Diversity, ISSN 1755-0874, E-ISSN 1755-1668, Vol. 5, nr 4, s. 457-471Artikkel i tidsskrift (Fagfellevurdert)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: Understanding the potential and limits of recombination in adaptive evolution is of great interest to evolutionary biology. New (ultra-) high-throughput technologies in metabolomics and genomics hold great promise for addressing these questions, but their use in interspecific hybrids remains largely unexplored. Aims: Our goal was to test if recombination between the highly divergent genomes of Populus alba and P. tremula has the potential to contribute to the standing variation for functionally important chemical traits. Methods: We studied the metabolomes of interspecific hybrids by ultra-high-pressure liquid chromatography (UHPLC) coupled with quadrupole-time-of-flight (QTOF) mass spectrometry (MS) and initiated the characterisation of hybrid genomes by restriction site associated DNA (RAD) sequencing. Results: UHPLC-QTOF-MS indicated a complex 'mosaic' of chemical traits in recombinant hybrids and pointed to a heritable component for many of these. RAD sequencing confirmed the recombinant nature of natural hybrids previously characterised by microsatellites and suggested a complex history of recombination. Conclusions: It is likely that hybridisation has affected these species' genomes over several glacial cycles. Recombination holds great potential to create functionally relevant chemical variation in these trees. Nevertheless, correlations between chemical traits are not entirely broken up in recombinant hybrids, suggesting limits to adaptive evolution by genetic exchange.

  • 162. Castelain, Mathieu
    et al.
    Le Hir, Rozenn
    Bellini, Catherine
    Umeå universitet, Teknisk-naturvetenskapliga fakulteten, Institutionen för fysiologisk botanik. Umeå universitet, Teknisk-naturvetenskapliga fakulteten, Umeå Plant Science Centre (UPSC).
    The non-DNA-binding bHLH transcription factor PRE3/bHLH135/ATBS1/TMO7 is involved in the regulation of light signaling pathway in Arabidopsis2012Inngår i: Physiologia Plantarum: An International Journal for Plant Biology, ISSN 0031-9317, E-ISSN 1399-3054, Vol. 145, nr 3, s. 450-460Artikkel i tidsskrift (Fagfellevurdert)
    Abstract [en]

    Plant basic Helix-loop-helix (bHLH) proteins are transcription factors that are involved in many developmental mechanisms, including light signaling and hormone homeostasis. Some of them are non-DNA-binding proteins and could act as dominant negative regulators of other bHLH proteins by forming heterodimers, in a similar way to animal inhibitor of DNA-binding proteins. It has been recently reported that several non-DNA-binding bHLHs are involved in light signaling (KDR/PRE6), gibberellic acid signaling (PRE1/BNQ1/bHLH136) or brassinosteroid signaling (ATBS1). Here we report that Arabidopsis lines overexpressing the PRE3/bHLH135/ATBS1/TMO7 gene are less responsive to red, far-red and blue light than wild-type which is likely to explain the light hyposensitive phenotype displayed when grown under white light conditions. Using quantitative polymerase chain reaction, we show that the expression of PRE3 and KDR/PRE6 genes is regulated by light and that light-related genes are deregulated in the PRE3-ox lines. We show that PRE3 is expressed in the shoot and root meristems and that PRE3-ox lines also have a defect in lateral root development. Our results not only suggest that PRE3 is involved in the regulation of light signaling, but also support the hypothesis that non-DNA-binding bHLH genes are promiscuous genes regulating a wide range of both overlapping and specific regulatory pathways.

  • 163. Chahtane, Hicham
    et al.
    Zhang, Bo
    Norberg, Mikael
    LeMasson, Marie
    Thevenon, Emmanuel
    Bakó, László
    Umeå universitet, Teknisk-naturvetenskapliga fakulteten, Institutionen för fysiologisk botanik. Umeå universitet, Teknisk-naturvetenskapliga fakulteten, Umeå Plant Science Centre (UPSC).
    Benlloch, Reyes
    Holmlund, Mattias
    Parcy, Francois
    Nilsson, Ove
    Vachon, Gilles
    LEAFY activity is post-transcriptionally regulated by BLADE ON PETIOLE2 and CULLIN3 in Arabidopsis2018Inngår i: New Phytologist, ISSN 0028-646X, E-ISSN 1469-8137, Vol. 220, nr 2, s. 579-592Artikkel i tidsskrift (Fagfellevurdert)
    Abstract [en]

    The Arabidopsis LEAFY (LFY) transcription factor is a key regulator of floral meristem emergence and identity. LFY interacts genetically and physically with UNUSUAL FLORAL ORGANS, a substrate adaptor of CULLIN1-RING ubiquitin ligase complexes (CRL1). The functionally redundant genes BLADE ON PETIOLE1 (BOP1) and -2 (BOP2) are potential candidates to regulate LFY activity and have recently been shown to be substrate adaptors of CULLIN3 (CUL3)-RING ubiquitin ligases (CRL3). We tested the hypothesis that LFY activity is controlled by BOPs and CUL3s in plants and that LFY is a substrate for ubiquitination by BOP-containing CRL3 complexes. When constitutively expressed, LFY activity is fully dependent on BOP2 as well as on CUL3A and B to regulate target genes such as APETALA1 and to induce ectopic flower formation. We also show that LFY and BOP2 proteins interact physically and that LFY-dependent ubiquitinated species are produced invitro in a reconstituted cell-free CRL3 system in the presence of LFY, BOP2 and CUL3. This new post-translational regulation of LFY activity by CRL3 complexes makes it a unique transcription factor subjected to a positive dual regulation by both CRL1 and CRL3 complexes and suggests a novel mechanism for promoting flower development.

  • 164. Chardon, Fabien
    et al.
    Bedu, Magali
    Calenge, Fanny
    Klemens, Patrick A. W.
    Spinner, Lara
    Umeå universitet, Teknisk-naturvetenskapliga fakulteten, Umeå Plant Science Centre (UPSC).
    Clement, Gilles
    Chietera, Giorgiana
    Leran, Sophie
    Ferrand, Marina
    Lacombe, Benoit
    Loudet, Olivier
    Dinant, Sylvie
    Bellini, Catherine
    Umeå universitet, Teknisk-naturvetenskapliga fakulteten, Institutionen för fysiologisk botanik.
    Neuhaus, H. Ekkehard
    Daniel-Vedele, Francoise
    Krapp, Anne
    Leaf Fructose Content Is Controlled by the Vacuolar Transporter SWEET17 in Arabidopsis2013Inngår i: Current Biology, ISSN 0960-9822, E-ISSN 1879-0445, Vol. 23, nr 8, s. 697-702Artikkel i tidsskrift (Fagfellevurdert)
    Abstract [en]

    In higher plants, soluble sugars are mainly present as sucrose, glucose, and fructose [1]. Sugar allocation is based on both source-to-sink transport and intracellular transport between the different organelles [2,3] and depends on actual plant requirements [4]. Under abiotic stress conditions, such as nitrogen limitation, carbohydrates accumulate in plant cells [5]. Despite an increasing number of genetic studies [6, 7], the genetic architecture determining carbohydrate composition is poorly known. Using a quantitative genetics approach, we determined that the carrier protein SWEET17 is a major factor controlling fructose content in Arabidopsis leaves. We observed that when SWEET17 expression is reduced, either by induced or natural variation, fructose accumulates in leaves, suggesting an enhanced storage capacity. Subcellular localization of SWEET17-GFP to the tonoplast and functional expression in Xenopus oocytes showed that SWEET17 is the first vacuolar fructose transporter to be characterized in plants. Physiological studies in planta provide evidence that SWEET17 acts to export fructose out of the vacuole. Overall, our results suggest that natural variation in leaf fructose levels is controlled by the vacuolar fructose transporter SWEET17. SWEET17 is highly conserved across the plant kingdom; thus, these findings offer future possibilities to modify carbohydrate partitioning in crops.

  • 165. Chow, Wah Soon
    et al.
    Fan, Da-Yong
    Oguchi, Riichi
    Jia, Husen
    Losciale, Pasquale
    Park, Youn-Il
    He, Jie
    Öquist, Gunnar
    Umeå universitet, Teknisk-naturvetenskapliga fakulteten, Institutionen för fysiologisk botanik.
    Shen, Yun-Gang
    Anderson, Jan M.
    Quantifying and monitoring functional photosystem II and the stoichiometry of the two photosystems in leaf segments: approaches and approximations2012Inngår i: Photosynthesis Research, ISSN 0166-8595, E-ISSN 1573-5079, Vol. 113, nr 1-3, s. 63-74Artikkel, forskningsoversikt (Fagfellevurdert)
    Abstract [en]

    Given its unique function in light-induced water oxidation and its susceptibility to photoinactivation during photosynthesis, photosystem II (PS II) is often the focus of studies of photosynthetic structure and function, particularly in environmental stress conditions. Here we review four approaches for quantifying or monitoring PS II functionality or the stoichiometry of the two photosystems in leaf segments, scrutinizing the approximations in each approach. (1) Chlorophyll fluorescence parameters are convenient to derive, but the information-rich signal suffers from the localized nature of its detection in leaf tissue. (2) The gross O-2 yield per single-turnover flash in CO2-enriched air is a more direct measurement of the functional content, assuming that each functional PS II evolves one O-2 molecule after four flashes. However, the gross O-2 yield per single-turnover flash (multiplied by four) could over-estimate the content of functional PS II if mitochondrial respiration is lower in flash illumination than in darkness. (3) The cumulative delivery of electrons from PS II to P700(+) (oxidized primary donor in PS I) after a flash is added to steady background far-red light is a whole-tissue measurement, such that a single linear correlation with functional PS II applies to leaves of all plant species investigated so far. However, the magnitude obtained in a simple analysis (with the signal normalized to the maximum photo-oxidizable P700 signal), which should equal the ratio of PS II to PS I centers, was too small to match the independently-obtained photosystem stoichiometry. Further, an under-estimation of functional PS II content could occur if some electrons were intercepted before reaching PS I. (4) The electrochromic signal from leaf segments appears to reliably quantify the photosystem stoichiometry, either by progressively photoinactivating PS II or suppressing PS I via photo-oxidation of a known fraction of the P700 with steady far-red light. Together, these approaches have the potential for quantitatively probing PS II in vivo in leaf segments, with prospects for application of the latter two approaches in the field.

  • 166. Chow, Wah Soon
    et al.
    Lee, Hae-Youn
    He, Jie
    Hendrickson, Luke
    Umeå universitet, Teknisk-naturvetenskapliga fakulteten, Institutionen för fysiologisk botanik. Umeå universitet, Teknisk-naturvetenskapliga fakulteten, Umeå Plant Science Centre (UPSC). Research School of Biological Sciences, Australian National University, GPO Box 475, Canberra, ACT 2601, Australia.
    Hong, Young-Nam
    Matsubara, Shizue
    Photoinactivation of photosystem II in leaves2005Inngår i: Photosynthesis Research, ISSN 0166-8595, E-ISSN 1573-5079, Vol. 84, nr 1-3, s. 35-41Artikkel i tidsskrift (Fagfellevurdert)
    Abstract [en]

    Photoinactivation of Photosystem II (PS II), the light-induced loss of ability to evolve oxygen, inevitably occurs under any light environment in nature, counteracted by repair. Under certain conditions, the extent of photoinactivation of PS II depends on the photon exposure (light dosage, x), rather than the irradiance or duration of illumination per se, thus obeying the law of reciprocity of irradiance and duration of illumination, namely, that equal photon exposure produces an equal effect. If the probability of photoinactivation (p) of PS II is directly proportional to an increment in photon exposure (p = kDeltax, where k is the probability per unit photon exposure), it can be deduced that the number of active PS II complexes decreases exponentially as a function of photon exposure: N = Noexp(-kx). Further, since a photon exposure is usually achieved by varying the illumination time (t) at constant irradiance (I), N = Noexp(-kI t), i.e., N decreases exponentially with time, with a rate coefficient of photoinactivation kI, where the product kI is obviously directly proportional to I. Given that N = Noexp(-kx), the quantum yield of photoinactivation of PS II can be defined as -dN/dx = kN, which varies with the number of active PS II complexes remaining. Typically, the quantum yield of photoinactivation of PS II is ca. 0.1micromol PS II per mol photons at low photon exposure when repair is inhibited. That is, when about 10(7) photons have been received by leaf tissue, one PS II complex is inactivated. Some species such as grapevine have a much lower quantum yield of photoinactivation of PS II, even at a chilling temperature. Examination of the longer-term time course of photoinactivation of PS II in capsicum leaves reveals that the decrease in N deviates from a single-exponential decay when the majority of the PS II complexes are inactivated in the absence of repair. This can be attributed to the formation of strong quenchers in severely-photoinactivated PS II complexes, able to dissipate excitation energy efficiently and to protect the remaining active neighbours against damage by light.

  • 167.
    Christensen, Anna
    et al.
    Umeå universitet, Teknisk-naturvetenskapliga fakulteten, Institutionen för fysiologisk botanik. Umeå universitet, Teknisk-naturvetenskapliga fakulteten, Umeå Plant Science Centre (UPSC).
    Svensson, Karin
    Persson, Staffan
    Jung, Joanna
    Michalak, Marek
    Widell, Susanne
    Sommarin, Marianne
    Umeå universitet, Teknisk-naturvetenskapliga fakulteten, Institutionen för fysiologisk botanik. Umeå universitet, Teknisk-naturvetenskapliga fakulteten, Umeå Plant Science Centre (UPSC).
    Functional characterization of Arabidopsis calreticulin1a: a key alleviator of endoplasmic reticulum stress.2008Inngår i: Plant and Cell Physiology, ISSN 1471-9053, Vol. 49, nr 6, s. 912-24Artikkel i tidsskrift (Fagfellevurdert)
    Abstract [en]

    The chaperone calreticulin plays important roles in a variety of processes in the endoplasmic reticulum (ER) of animal cells, such as Ca2+ signaling and protein folding. Although the functions of calreticulin are well characterized in animals, only indirect evidence is available for plants. To increase our understanding of plant calreticulins we introduced one of the Arabidopsis isoforms, AtCRT1a, into calreticulin-deficient (crt–/–) mouse embryonic fibroblasts. As a result of calreticulin deficiency, the mouse crt–/– fibroblasts have decreased levels of Ca2+ in the ER and impaired protein folding abilities. Expression of the AtCRT1a in mouse crt–/– fibroblasts rescued these phenotypes, i.e. AtCRT1a restored the Ca2+-holding capacity and chaperone functions in the ER of the mouse crt–/– fibroblasts, demonstrating that the animal sorting machinery was also functional for a plant protein, and that basic calreticulin functions are conserved across the Kingdoms. Expression analyses using a β-glucuronidase (GUS)–AtCRT1a promoter construct revealed high expression of CRT1a in root tips, floral tissues and in association with vascular bundles. To assess the impact of AtCRT1a in planta, we generated Atcrt1a mutant plants. The Atcrt1a mutants exhibited increased sensitivity to the drug tunicamycin, an inducer of the unfolded protein response. We therefore conclude that AtCRT1a is an alleviator of the tunicamycin-induced unfolded protein response, and propose that the use of the mouse crt–/– fibroblasts as a calreticulin expression system may prove useful to assess functionalities of calreticulins from different species.

  • 168.
    Christensen, Anna
    et al.
    Umeå universitet, Teknisk-naturvetenskapliga fakulteten, Umeå Plant Science Centre (UPSC). Umeå universitet, Teknisk-naturvetenskapliga fakulteten, Institutionen för fysiologisk botanik.
    Svensson, Karin
    Thelin, Lisa
    Zhang, Wenjing
    Tintor, Nico
    Prins, Daniel
    Funke, Norma
    Michalak, Marek
    Schulze-Lefert, Paul
    Saijo, Yusuke
    Sommarin, Marianne
    Umeå universitet, Teknisk-naturvetenskapliga fakulteten, Institutionen för fysiologisk botanik. Umeå universitet, Teknisk-naturvetenskapliga fakulteten, Umeå Plant Science Centre (UPSC).
    Widell, Susanne
    Persson, Staffan
    Higher plant calreticulins have acquired specialized functions in arabidopsis2010Inngår i: PLoS ONE, ISSN 1932-6203, E-ISSN 1932-6203, Vol. 5, nr 6, s. e11342-Artikkel i tidsskrift (Fagfellevurdert)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: Calreticulin (CRT) is a ubiquitous ER protein involved in multiple cellular processes in animals, such as protein folding and calcium homeostasis. Like in animals, plants have evolved divergent CRTs, but their physiological functions are less understood. Arabidopsis contains three CRT proteins, where the two CRTs AtCRT1a and CRT1b represent one subgroup, and AtCRT3 a divergent member. Methodology/Principal Findings: Through expression of single Arabidopsis family members in CRT-deficient mouse fibroblasts we show that both subgroups have retained basic CRT functions, including ER Ca2+-holding potential and putative chaperone capabilities. However, other more general cellular defects due to the absence of CRT in the fibroblasts, such as cell adhesion deficiencies, were not fully restored. Furthermore, in planta expression, protein localization and mutant analyses revealed that the three Arabidopsis CRTs have acquired specialized functions. The AtCRT1a and CRT1b family members appear to be components of a general ER chaperone network. In contrast, and as recently shown, AtCRT3 is associated with immune responses, and is essential for responsiveness to the bacterial Pathogen-Associated Molecular Pattern (PAMP) elf18, derived from elongation factor (EF)-Tu. Whereas constitutively expressed AtCRT1a fully complemented Atcrt1b mutants, AtCRT3 did not. Conclusions/Significance: We conclude that the physiological functions of the two CRT subgroups in Arabidopsis have diverged, resulting in a role for AtCRT3 in PAMP associated responses, and possibly more general chaperone functions for AtCRT1a and CRT1b.

  • 169.
    Chrobok, Daria
    Umeå universitet, Teknisk-naturvetenskapliga fakulteten, Institutionen för fysiologisk botanik. Umeå universitet, Teknisk-naturvetenskapliga fakulteten, Umeå Plant Science Centre (UPSC).
    To “leaf” or not to “leaf”: Understanding the metabolic adjustments associated with leaf senescence2018Doktoravhandling, med artikler (Annet vitenskapelig)
    Abstract [en]

    The adequate execution of the final developmental stage of a leaf, leaf senescence, is crucial to the long-term survival of the plant. During senescence cellular structures like membranes, proteins, lipids and macromolecules are degraded and released nutrients are relocated to developing parts of the plant, such as young leaves, stems, flowers, siliques and ultimately seeds that are dependent on this nutrient remobilization. The first visible sign of senescence is the yellowing of leaves indicating the degradation of chlorophyll and the dismantling of chloroplasts. As a consequence, senescing leaves cannot perform photosynthesis anymore and the delivery of energy from the chloroplast is compromised. As chloroplasts lose their function, the course of the senescence program requires a stable alternative energy sources that support nutrient remobilization while simultaneously ensuring a basic metabolism.

    To study leaf senescence I used the model plant Arabidopsis thaliana and applied different experimental approaches: Developmental Leaf Senescence (DLS), individual darkened leaves (IDL), completely darkened plants (DP) and a stay-green mutant which displays a delayed senescence phenotype during IDL. Using a combination of physiological, microscopic, transcriptomic and metabolomic analyses similarities and differences between these experimental setups were investigated with focus on the functions of mitochondria during leaf senescence.

    The catabolism of amino acids and the subsequent release of glutamate into the mitochondrial matrix seem to play an important role for nitrogen remobilization during DLS and IDL. Glutamate is then transported to the cytoplasm and transformed into glutamine, which can serve as long distance nitrogen export metabolite in the plant. Furthermore, senescing leaves in IDL are not only source tissues for nutrient remobilization in the plant, but we also detected labelled carbon in the darkened leaves, indicating a communication between the IDL and leaves in light. In contrary to the senescence inducing systems of DLS and IDL, in DP and the stay-green mutant investigated here, senescence is not induced by dark treatment. In both experimental setups we measured an accumulation of amino acids in the darkened leaves, in particular those with high N content. This could make reduced carbon available as alternative energy source during darkness. In this thesis we observed that mitochondria play an important role in nutrient reallocation processes during leaf senescence. The overall energy status of senescing tissues depends on mitochondria and especially amino acid metabolism seems to have a vital role during the senescence processes both for energy supply and nutrient reallocation.

  • 170.
    Chrobok, Daria
    et al.
    Umeå universitet, Teknisk-naturvetenskapliga fakulteten, Institutionen för fysiologisk botanik. Umeå universitet, Teknisk-naturvetenskapliga fakulteten, Umeå Plant Science Centre (UPSC).
    Law, Simon R.
    Umeå universitet, Teknisk-naturvetenskapliga fakulteten, Institutionen för fysiologisk botanik. Umeå universitet, Teknisk-naturvetenskapliga fakulteten, Umeå Plant Science Centre (UPSC).
    Brouwer, Bastiaan
    Umeå universitet, Teknisk-naturvetenskapliga fakulteten, Institutionen för fysiologisk botanik. Umeå universitet, Teknisk-naturvetenskapliga fakulteten, Umeå Plant Science Centre (UPSC).
    Linden, Pernilla
    Ziolkowska, Agnieszka
    Umeå universitet, Teknisk-naturvetenskapliga fakulteten, Institutionen för fysiologisk botanik. Umeå universitet, Teknisk-naturvetenskapliga fakulteten, Umeå Plant Science Centre (UPSC).
    Liebsch, Daniela
    Umeå universitet, Teknisk-naturvetenskapliga fakulteten, Institutionen för fysiologisk botanik. Umeå universitet, Teknisk-naturvetenskapliga fakulteten, Umeå Plant Science Centre (UPSC).
    Narsai, Reena
    Szal, Bozena
    Moritz, Thomas
    Rouhier, Nicolas
    Whelan, James
    Gardeström, Per
    Umeå universitet, Teknisk-naturvetenskapliga fakulteten, Institutionen för fysiologisk botanik. Umeå universitet, Teknisk-naturvetenskapliga fakulteten, Umeå Plant Science Centre (UPSC).
    Keech, Olivier
    Umeå universitet, Teknisk-naturvetenskapliga fakulteten, Institutionen för fysiologisk botanik. Umeå universitet, Teknisk-naturvetenskapliga fakulteten, Umeå Plant Science Centre (UPSC).
    Dissecting the Metabolic Role of Mitochondria during Developmental Leaf Senescence2016Inngår i: Plant Physiology, ISSN 0032-0889, E-ISSN 1532-2548, Vol. 172, nr 4, s. 2132-2153Artikkel i tidsskrift (Fagfellevurdert)
    Abstract [en]

    The functions of mitochondria during leaf senescence, a type of programmed cell death aimed at the massive retrieval of nutrients from the senescing organ to the rest of the plant, remain elusive. Here, combining experimental and analytical approaches, we showed that mitochondrial integrity in Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana) is conserved until the latest stages of leaf senescence, while their number drops by 30%. Adenylate phosphorylation state assays and mitochondrial respiratory measurements indicated that the leaf energy status also is maintained during this time period. Furthermore, after establishing a curated list of genes coding for products targeted to mitochondria, we analyzed in isolation their transcript profiles, focusing on several key mitochondrial functions, such as the tricarboxylic acid cycle, mitochondrial electron transfer chain, iron-sulfur cluster biosynthesis, transporters, as well as catabolic pathways. In tandem with a metabolomic approach, our data indicated that mitochondrial metabolism was reorganized to support the selective catabolism of both amino acids and fatty acids. Such adjustments would ensure the replenishment of alpha-ketoglutarate and glutamate, which provide the carbon backbones for nitrogen remobilization. Glutamate, being the substrate of the strongly up-regulated cytosolic glutamine synthase, is likely to become a metabolically limiting factor in the latest stages of developmental leaf senescence. Finally, an evolutionary age analysis revealed that, while branched-chain amino acid and proline catabolism are very old mitochondrial functions particularly enriched at the latest stages of leaf senescence, auxin metabolism appears to be rather newly acquired. In summation, our work shows that, during developmental leaf senescence, mitochondria orchestrate catabolic processes by becoming increasingly central energy and metabolic hubs.

  • 171.
    Chuisseu Wandji, Josiane Laure
    Umeå universitet, Teknisk-naturvetenskaplig fakultet, Fysiologisk botanik.
    Expression and purification of plant proteins for functional studies2006Independent thesis Advanced level (degree of Master (One Year)), 30 poäng / 45 hpOppgave
    Abstract [en]

    Chloroplasts are cell organelles responsible for photosynthesis. Although chloroplast have their own genome it is not sufficient to encode all the proteins which are located there. Most of the proteins are imported from the cytosol through the so called toc/tic pathway. It has been recently showed that Arabidopsis CAH1 is transported to the chloroplast through the secretory route in a fully new pathway. It has also been demonstrated that the N-terminal signal peptide of CAH1 targets it to the ER where the protein gets glycosylated. Structure of the Arabidopsis CAH1 suggests that its C-terminus might be responsible for targeting the protein to the chloroplast. By expressing N- and C-terminal labeled CAH1 we show that the expression level of the N-terminal labeled form is high and the majority of the labeled protein is localized in the chloroplast. By contrast, the C-terminal labeled CAH1 expressed weakly if at all, and due to the low expression level immunolocalization of the protein is difficult. We also demonstrate that the strong expression level of the N-terminal labeled CAH1 makes it feasible to affinity purify the glycosylated protein for structural studies.

  • 172. Ciereszko, I
    et al.
    Johansson, H
    Umeå universitet, Teknisk-naturvetenskapliga fakulteten, Institutionen för fysiologisk botanik.
    Hurry, Vaughan
    Umeå universitet, Teknisk-naturvetenskapliga fakulteten, Institutionen för fysiologisk botanik. Umeå universitet, Teknisk-naturvetenskapliga fakulteten, Umeå Plant Science Centre (UPSC).
    Kleczkowski, L.A.
    Umeå universitet, Teknisk-naturvetenskapliga fakulteten, Institutionen för fysiologisk botanik. Umeå universitet, Teknisk-naturvetenskapliga fakulteten, Umeå Plant Science Centre (UPSC).
    Phosphate status affects the gene expression, protein content and enzymatic activity of UDP-glucose pyrophosphorylase in wild-type and pho mutants of Arabidopsis.2001Inngår i: Planta, ISSN 0032-0935, Vol. 212, nr 4, s. 598-605Artikkel i tidsskrift (Fagfellevurdert)
  • 173. Ciereszko, I
    et al.
    Johansson, H
    Umeå universitet, Teknisk-naturvetenskapliga fakulteten, Institutionen för fysiologisk botanik.
    Kleczkoski, L.A.
    Umeå universitet, Teknisk-naturvetenskapliga fakulteten, Institutionen för fysiologisk botanik. Umeå universitet, Teknisk-naturvetenskapliga fakulteten, Umeå Plant Science Centre (UPSC).
    Sucrose and light regulation of a cold-inducible UDP-glucose pyrophosphorylase gene via a hexokinase-independent and abscisic acid-insensitive pathway in Arabidopsis.2001Inngår i: Biochemical Journal, Vol. 354, nr 1, s. 67-72Artikkel i tidsskrift (Fagfellevurdert)
  • 174. Ciereszko, I
    et al.
    Johansson, H
    Umeå universitet, Teknisk-naturvetenskaplig fakultet, Fysiologisk botanik.
    Kleczkowski, L.A.
    Interactive effects of phosphate, sugar and light/ dark conditions on gene expression of UDP-glucose pyrophosphorylase in Arabidopsis.Manuskript (Annet vitenskapelig)
  • 175. Ciereszko, I
    et al.
    Kleczkowski, Leszek A
    Umeå universitet, Teknisk-naturvetenskapliga fakulteten, Institutionen för fysiologisk botanik. Umeå universitet, Teknisk-naturvetenskapliga fakulteten, Umeå Plant Science Centre (UPSC).
    Effects of phosphate deficiency and sugars on expression of rab18 in Arabidopsis: hexokinase-dependent and okadaic acid-sensitive transduction of the sugar signal2002Inngår i: Biochimica et Biophysica Acta, Gene Structure and Expression, ISSN 0167-4781, E-ISSN 1879-2634, Vol. 1579, nr 1, s. 43-49Artikkel i tidsskrift (Fagfellevurdert)
    Abstract [en]

    The lack of phosphorus in the nutrient medium increased the expression of rab18, an abscisic acid (ABA)-responsive gene, in leaves of Arabidopsis thaliana. The expression of this gene was also upregulated after feeding the excised leaves with D-mannose and sucrose for both wild-type (wt) and aba1 (ABA-deficient) mutant plants. For aba1 mutants, both the phosphate deficiency and sugar effects on rab18 were weaker than in wt plants, suggesting possible involvement of both ABA-dependent and ABA-independent components in signalling. Transgenic Arabidopsis plants with increased hexokinase (HXK) expression had a much higher sucrose-dependent level of rab18 mRNA, implying the HXK involvement in sensing/transmitting the sugar signal. Sucrose-related induction of rab18 was completely inhibited by okadaic acid (OKA), suggesting the involvement of specific protein phosphatase(s) in transduction of the sugar signal. The results suggest that rab18 is regulated via interaction of a plethora of signals, including ABA, sugar and phosphate deficiency, and that the sugar effect is transmitted via a HXK-pathway, involving OKA-sensitive component(s). The findings prompt caution in linking the expression of rab18 solely to ABA signalling. (C) 2002 Elsevier Science B.V. All rights reserved.

  • 176. Ciereszko, I
    et al.
    Kleczkowski, Leszek A
    Umeå universitet, Teknisk-naturvetenskapliga fakulteten, Institutionen för fysiologisk botanik. Umeå universitet, Teknisk-naturvetenskapliga fakulteten, Umeå Plant Science Centre (UPSC).
    Glucose and mannose regulate the expression of a major sucrose synthase gene in Arabidopsis via hexokinase-dependent mechanisms2002Inngår i: Plant physiology and biochemistry (Paris), ISSN 0981-9428, E-ISSN 1873-2690, Vol. 40, nr 11, s. 907-911Artikkel i tidsskrift (Fagfellevurdert)
    Abstract [en]

    Sucrose synthase (SuSy) is an important enzyme involved in sucrose synthesis/breakdown in all plants. Sus1, a major SuSy gene in Arabidopsis thaliana, was upregulated by sucrose, glucose and D-mannose, but not 3-O-methylglucose, when those compounds were fed to excised leaves. Mannos, was more effective than glucose or sucrose in the induction of Sus1, with strong effects observed at a concentration as low as 20, mM. When fed to the excised leaves, N-acetyl-glucosamine, an inhibitor of hexokinase (HXK) enzymatic activity, decreased sucrose- and glucose-dependent, but not mannose-dependent, upregulation of Sus1. The sucrose/glucose-dependent Sus1 expression was strongly induced in transgenic Arabidopsis HXK-overexpressing (OE) plants, whereas mannose-dependent Sus1 expression markedly decreased in OE, but not in HXK-"antisense", Arabidopsis plants. Feeding with sucrose resulted in a marked increase of glucose content in leaves, suggesting that it is glucose rather than sucrose that serves as a signal in upregulating Sus1 expression in sucrose-fed plants. The data suggest that Sus1 is regulated by a HXK-dependent pathway, with glucose and mannose effects differentially sensed/transmitted via the HXK step. (C) 2002 Editions scientifiques et medicales Elsevier SAS. All rights reserved.

  • 177. Ciereszko, Iwona
    et al.
    Johansson, Henrik
    Kleczkowski, Leszek
    Umeå universitet, Teknisk-naturvetenskapliga fakulteten, Institutionen för fysiologisk botanik. Umeå universitet, Teknisk-naturvetenskapliga fakulteten, Umeå Plant Science Centre (UPSC).
    Interactive effects of phosphate deficiency, sucrose and light/dark conditions on gene expression of UDP-glucose pyrophosphorylase in Arabidopsis.2005Inngår i: Journal of Plant Physiology, ISSN 0176-1617, Vol. 162, nr 3, s. 343-53Artikkel i tidsskrift (Fagfellevurdert)
    Abstract [en]

    The effects of inorganic phosphate (Pi) status, light/dark and sucrose on expression of UDP-glucose pyrophosphorylase (UGPase) gene (Ugp), which is involved in sucrose/ polysaccharides metabolism, were investigated using Arabidopsis wild-type (wt) plants and mutants impaired in Pi and carbohydrate status. Generally, P-deficiency resulted in increased Ugp expression and enhanced UGPase activity and protein content, as found for wt plants grown on P-deficient and complete nutrient solution, as well as for pho1 (P-deficient) mutants. Ugp was highly expressed in darkened leaves of pho1, but not wt plants, daily tight exposure enhanced Ugp expression both in wt and pho mutants. The pho1 and pho2 (Pi-accumulating) mutations had Little or no effect on leaf contents of glucose and fructose, regardless of light/dark conditions, whereas pho1 plants had much higher Levels of sucrose and starch in the dark than pho2 and wt plants. The Ugp was up-regutated when leaves were fed with sucrose in wt plants, but the expression in pho2 background was much less sensitive to sucrose supply than in wt and pho1 plants. Expression of Ugp in pgm1 and sex1 mutants (impaired in starch/sugar content) was not dependent on starch content, and not tightly correlated with soluble sugar status. Okadaic acid (OKA) effectively blocked the P-starvation and sucrose -dependent expression of Ugp in excised leaves, whereas staurosporine (STA) had only a small effect on both processes (especially in -P leaves), suggesting that P-starvation and sucrose effects on Ugp are transmitted by pathways that may share similar components with respect to their (in)sensitivity to OKA and STA. The results of this study suggest that Ugp expression is modulated by an interaction of signals derived from P-deficiency status, sucrose content and dark/ light conditions, and that light/ sucrose and P-deficiency may have additive effects on Ugp expression. (c) 2004 Elsevier GmbH. All rights reserved.

  • 178. Ciereszko, Iwona
    et al.
    Kleczkowski, Leszek
    Umeå universitet, Teknisk-naturvetenskapliga fakulteten, Institutionen för fysiologisk botanik. Umeå universitet, Teknisk-naturvetenskapliga fakulteten, Umeå Plant Science Centre (UPSC).
    Expression of several genes involved in sucrose/starch metabolism as affected by different strategies to induce phosphate deficiency in Arabidopsis2005Inngår i: Acta Physiologiae Plantarum, Vol. 27, s. 147-155Artikkel i tidsskrift (Fagfellevurdert)
    Abstract [en]

    The effects of inorganic phosphate (Pi) deficiency on expression of genes encoding ADP-glucose pyrophosphorylase small and large subunits (ApS and ApL1, ApL2, ApL3 genes), UDP-glucose pyrophosphorylase (Ugp gene), sucrose synthase (Sus1), soluble and insoluble acid invertases (Inv and Invcw) and hexokinase (Hxk1 gene), all involved in carbohydrate metabolism, were investigated in Arabidopsis thaliana (L.) Heynh. We used soil-grown pho mutants affected in Pi status, as well as wild-type (wt) plants grown under Pi deficiency conditions in liquid medium, and leaves of wt plants fed with D-mannose. Generally, ApS, ApL1, Ugp and Inv genes were upregulated, although to a varied degree, under conditions of Pi-stress. The applied conditions had differential effects on expression of other genes studied. For instance, Sus1 was downregulated in pho1 (Pi-deficient) mutant, but was unaffected in wt plants grown in liquid medium under P-deficiency. Mannose had distinct concentration-dependent effects on expression of genes under study, possibly reflecting a dual role of mannose as a sink for Pi and as glucose analog. Feeding Pi (at up to 200 mM) to the detached leaves of wt plants strongly affected the expression of ApL1, ApL2, Sus1 and Inv genes, possibly due to an osmotic effect exerted by Pi. The data suggest that ADP-glucose and UDP-glucose pyrophosphorylases (enzymes indirectly involved in Pi recycling) as well as invertases (sucrose hydrolysis) are transcriptionally regulated by Pi-deficiency, which may play a role in homeostatic mechanisms that acclimate the plant to the Pi-stress conditions.

  • 179. Ciereszko, Iwona
    et al.
    Kleczkowski, Leszek
    Umeå universitet, Teknisk-naturvetenskapliga fakulteten, Institutionen för fysiologisk botanik. Umeå universitet, Teknisk-naturvetenskapliga fakulteten, Umeå Plant Science Centre (UPSC).
    Phosphate deficiency dependent upregulation of UDP-glucose pyrophosphorylase genes is insensitive to ABA and ethylene status in Arabidopsis leaves2006Inngår i: Acta Physiologiae Plantarum, Vol. 28, s. 387-393Artikkel i tidsskrift (Fagfellevurdert)
    Abstract [en]

    The effects of inorganic phosphate (Pi) deficiency and ABA/ethylene status on expression of UDP-glucose pyrophosphorylase (UGPase) genes (Ugp), involved in sucrose/polysaccharide metabolism, were investigated. Both wild-type (wt), aba and abi mutants (ABA-deficient and -insensitive), etr, ein and eto (ethylene resistant and overproducing) grown on Pi-deficient and complete nutrient solution, as well as pho1 (Pi-deficient) mutants of Arabidopsis thaliana were used for experiments. Generally, Pi-deficiency conditions (including mannose feeding to decrease cytosolic Pi pool) resulted in an increase of Ugp expression in the leaves, under all experimental conditions. Mutant backgrounds reflecting differences in ABA or ethylene status/ sensitivity had no effect on the level of Ugp up-regulation by Pi-stress. Furthermore, feeding ABA to the leaves of wt and pho1 plants had no effect on Ugp expression, regardless of the sucrose status in the leaves. The data suggest that Pi deficiency leading to up-regulation of Ugp acts independently of ABA and ethylene status.

  • 180.
    Claes, Andrea
    Umeå universitet, Teknisk-naturvetenskapliga fakulteten, Institutionen för fysiologisk botanik.
    Characterization of mutants in the ACTIN-INTERACTING PROTEIN 1-2 (AIP1-2) gene of Arabidopsis thaliana and of AIP1-1 and AIP1-2 protein interactions2010Independent thesis Advanced level (degree of Master (Two Years)), 20 poäng / 30 hpOppgave
  • 181. CLARKE, AK
    et al.
    CAMPBELL, D
    Gustafsson, Petter
    Umeå universitet, Teknisk-naturvetenskapliga fakulteten, Institutionen för fysiologisk botanik. Umeå universitet, Teknisk-naturvetenskapliga fakulteten, Umeå Plant Science Centre (UPSC).
    Oquist, Gunnar
    Umeå universitet, Teknisk-naturvetenskapliga fakulteten, Institutionen för fysiologisk botanik. Umeå universitet, Teknisk-naturvetenskapliga fakulteten, Umeå Plant Science Centre (UPSC).
    DYNAMIC-RESPONSES OF PHOTOSYSTEM-II AND PHYCOBILISOMES TO CHANGING LIGHT IN THE CYANOBACTERIUM SYNECHOCOCCUS SP PCC-79421995Inngår i: Planta, ISSN 0032-0935, E-ISSN 1432-2048, Vol. 197, nr 3, s. 553-562Artikkel i tidsskrift (Fagfellevurdert)
    Abstract [en]

    We have examined the molecular and photosynthetic responses of a planktonic cyanobacterium to shifts in light intensity over periods up to one generation (7 h). Synechococcus sp. PCC 7942 possesses two functionally distinct forms of the D1 protein, D1:1 and D1:2. Photosystem II (PSII) centers containing D1:1 are less efficient and more susceptible to photoinhibition than are centers containing D1:2, Under 50 mu mol photons m(-2). s(-1), PSII centers contain D1:1, but upon shifts to higher light (200 to 1000 mu mol photons m(-2). s(-1)), D1:1 is rapidly replaced by D1:2, with the rate of interchange dependent on the magnitude of the light shift. This interchange is readily reversed when cells are returned to 50 mu mol photons m(-2). s(-1). If, however, incubation under 200 mu mol photons m(-2). s(-1) is extended, D1:1 content recovers and by 3 h after the light shift D1:1 once again predominates. Oxygen evolution and chlorophyll (Chi) fluorescence measurements spanning the light shift and D1 interchanges showed an initial inhibition of photosynthesis at 200 mu mol photons m(-2). s(-1), which correlates with a proportional loss of total D1 protein and a cessation of growth. This was followed by recovery in photosynthesis and growth as the maximum level of D1:2 is reached after 2 h at 200 mu mol photons m(-2). s(-1) Thereafter, photosynthesis steadily declines with the loss of D1:2 and the return of the less-efficient D1:1. During the D1:1/D1:2 interchanges, no significant change occurs in the level of phycocyanin (PC) and Chl a, nor of the phycobilisome rod linkers. Nevertheless, the initial PC/Chl a ratio strongly influences the magnitude of photoinhibition and recovery during the light shifts. In Synechococcus sp. PCC 7942, the PC/Chl a ratio responds only slowly to light intensity or quality, while the rapid but transient interchange between D1:1 and D1:2 modulates PSII activity to limit damage upon exposure to excess light.

  • 182. CLARKE, AK
    et al.
    Gustafsson, Petter
    Umeå universitet, Teknisk-naturvetenskapliga fakulteten, Institutionen för fysiologisk botanik. Umeå universitet, Teknisk-naturvetenskapliga fakulteten, Umeå Plant Science Centre (UPSC).
    LIDHOLM, JA
    IDENTIFICATION AND EXPRESSION OF THE CHLOROPLAST CLPP GENE IN THE CONIFER PINUS-CONTORTA1994Inngår i: Plant Molecular Biology, ISSN 0167-4412, E-ISSN 1573-5028, Vol. 26, nr 3, s. 851-862Artikkel i tidsskrift (Fagfellevurdert)
    Abstract [en]

    The clpP gene from the conifer Pinus contorta was identified and isolated from a chloroplast genomic library by heterologous hybridisation to the second exon of the chloroplast clpP gene in tobacco. DNA sequencing of two overlapping clones revealed an uninterrupted 615 bp open-reading frame with 41 to 65% similarity to the clpP genes in five other chloroplast genomes and Escherichia coli. The 615 bp sequence in P. contorta contained perfectly matched motifs for the serine and histidine active sites of the GlpP protease in E. coli. The location of the clpP gene was determined using a physical map of the P. contorta chloroplast genome, and was found to lie within a 10 kb region between the psbE/F and vpoB genes. Sequencing of the regions adjacent to the clpP gene revealed the first exon of the rps12 gene located 135 bp downstream. The genomic position of the first exon of the rps12 gene in relation to the clpP gene is conserved for all other chloroplast clpP genes identified so far. Northern blot analysis showed that the clpP gene in both P. contorta and P. sylvestris was present in several transcript of different length, ranging from 0.8 to 2.4 kb. The two longer transcripts in P. contorta also included the first exon of the rps12 gene. Mapping of the 5' end of the clpP transcripts by primer extension, however, revealed a single transcription initiation site 53 bp upstream of the first ATG codon. Analysis of total RNA isolated from The two pine species grown in darkness or moderate light conditions (250 mu mol photons m(-2) s(-1)) showed no significant difference in the level of expression of the clpP gene. The results suggest that the clpP gene in conifers is part of an operon which includes the first exon of the rps12 and the entire rp120 gene, and is expressed in a light-independent manner as a polycistronic precursor which later undergoes post-transcriptional processing to give the mature monocistronic clpP mRNA.

  • 183. CLARKE, AK
    et al.
    HURRY, VM
    Umeå universitet, Teknisk-naturvetenskapliga fakulteten, Institutionen för fysiologisk botanik. Umeå universitet, Teknisk-naturvetenskapliga fakulteten, Umeå Plant Science Centre (UPSC).
    Gustafsson, Petter
    Umeå universitet, Teknisk-naturvetenskapliga fakulteten, Institutionen för fysiologisk botanik. Umeå universitet, Teknisk-naturvetenskapliga fakulteten, Umeå Plant Science Centre (UPSC).
    Oquist, Gunnar
    Umeå universitet, Teknisk-naturvetenskapliga fakulteten, Institutionen för fysiologisk botanik. Umeå universitet, Teknisk-naturvetenskapliga fakulteten, Umeå Plant Science Centre (UPSC).
    2 FUNCTIONALLY DISTINCT FORMS OF THE PHOTOSYSTEM-II REACTION-CENTER PROTEIN D1 IN THE CYANOBACTERIUM SYNECHOCOCCUS SP PCC 79421993Inngår i: Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences of the United States of America, ISSN 0027-8424, E-ISSN 1091-6490, Vol. 90, nr 24, s. 11985-11989Artikkel i tidsskrift (Fagfellevurdert)
    Abstract [en]

    The cyanobacterium Synechococcus sp. PCC 7942 possesses a small psbA multigene family that codes for two distinct forms of the photosystem II reaction-center protein D1 (D1:1 and D1:2). We showed previously that the normally predominant D1 form (D1:1) was rapidly replaced with the alternative D1:2 when cells adapted to a photon irradiance of 50 mumol/m-2.s-1 are shifted to 500 mumol.m-2.s-1 and that this interchange was readily reversible once cells were allowed to recover under the original growth conditions. By using the psbA inactivation mutants R2S2C3 and R2K1 (which synthesize only D1:1 and D1:2, respectively), we showed that this interchange between D1 forms was essential for limiting the degree of photoinhibition as well as enabling a rapid recovery of photosynthesis. In this report, we have extended these findings by examining whether any intrinsic functional differences exist between the two D1 forms that may afford increased resistance to photoinhibition. Initial studies on the rate of D1 degradation at three photon-irradiances (50, 200, and 500 mumol.m-2.s-1) showed that the rates of degradation for both D1 forms increase with increasing photon flux density but that there was no significant difference between D1:1 and D1:2. Analysis of light-response curves for oxygen evolution for the mutants R2S2C3 and R2K1 revealed that cells with photosystem II reaction centers containing D1:2 have a higher apparent quantum yield (almost-equal-to 25%) than cells possessing D1:1. Further studies using chlorophyll a fluorescence measurements confirmed that R2K1 has a higher photochemical yield than R2S2C3; that is, a more efficient conversion of excitation energy from photon absorption into photochemistry. We believe that the higher photochemical efficiency of reaction centers containing D1:2 is causally related to the preferential induction of D1:2 at high light and thus may be an integral component of the protection mechanism within Synechococcus sp. PCC 7942 against photoinhibition.

  • 184. CLARKE, AK
    et al.
    SOITAMO, A
    Gustafsson, Petter
    Umeå universitet, Teknisk-naturvetenskapliga fakulteten, Institutionen för fysiologisk botanik. Umeå universitet, Teknisk-naturvetenskapliga fakulteten, Umeå Plant Science Centre (UPSC).
    Oquist, Gunnar
    Umeå universitet, Teknisk-naturvetenskapliga fakulteten, Institutionen för fysiologisk botanik. Umeå universitet, Teknisk-naturvetenskapliga fakulteten, Umeå Plant Science Centre (UPSC).
    RAPID INTERCHANGE BETWEEN 2 DISTINCT FORMS OF CYANOBACTERIAL PHOTOSYSTEM-II REACTION-CENTER PROTEIN-D1 IN RESPONSE TO PHOTOINHIBITION1993Inngår i: Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences of the United States of America, ISSN 0027-8424, E-ISSN 1091-6490, Vol. 90, nr 21, s. 9973-9977Artikkel i tidsskrift (Fagfellevurdert)
    Abstract [en]

    We have studied photoinhibition of photosynthesis in the cyanobacterium Synechococcus sp. PCC 7942, which possesses two distinct forms of the photosystem II reaction-center protein D1 (D1:1 and D1:2). We report here that when cells adapted to a growth irradiance of 50 mumol.m-2.s-1 are exposed to an irradiance of 500 mumol.m-2.s-1, the normally predominant D1 form (D1:1) is rapidly replaced with the alternative D1:2. This interchange is not only complete within the first hour of photoinhibition but is also fully reversible once cells are returned to 50 mumol.m-2.s-1. By using a mutant that synthesizes only D1:1, we show that the failure to replace D1:1 with D1:2 during photoinhibition results in severe loss of photosynthetic activity as well as a diminished capacity to recover after the stress period. We believe that this interchange between D1 forms may constitute an active component in a protection mechanism unique among photosynthetic organisms that enables cyanobacteria to effectively cope with and recover from photoinhibition.

  • 185. Coimbra, Sílvia
    et al.
    Jones, Brian
    Umeå universitet, Teknisk-naturvetenskaplig fakultet, Fysiologisk botanik. Umeå universitet, Teknisk-naturvetenskaplig fakultet, Umeå Plant Science Centre.
    Pereira, Luis Gustavo
    Arabinogalactan proteins (AGPs) related to pollen tube guidance into the embryo sac in Arabidopsis2008Inngår i: Plant Signaling & Behavior, Vol. 3, nr 7, s. 455-456Artikkel i tidsskrift (Fagfellevurdert)
    Abstract [en]

    Some AGP molecules or their sugar moieties are probably related to the guidance of the pollen tube into the embryo sac, in the final part of its pathway, when arriving at the ovules. The specific labelling of the synergid cells and its filiform apparatus, which are the cells responsible for pollen tube attraction, and also the specific labelling of the micropyle and micropylar nucellus, which constitutes the pollen tube entryway into the embryo sac, are quite indicative of this role. We also discuss the posibility that AGPs in the sperm cells are probably involved in the double fertilization process.

  • 186.
    Collani, Silvio
    et al.
    Umeå universitet, Teknisk-naturvetenskapliga fakulteten, Umeå Plant Science Centre (UPSC). Umeå universitet, Teknisk-naturvetenskapliga fakulteten, Institutionen för fysiologisk botanik. Max Planck Institute for Developmental Biology,Department of Molecular Biology, Tübingen, Germany.
    Neumann, Manuela
    Yant, Levi
    Schmid, Markus
    Umeå universitet, Teknisk-naturvetenskapliga fakulteten, Umeå Plant Science Centre (UPSC). Umeå universitet, Teknisk-naturvetenskapliga fakulteten, Institutionen för fysiologisk botanik. Max Planck Institute for Developmental Biology,Department of Molecular Biology, Tübingen, Germany; Beijing Advanced Innovation Centre for Tree Breeding by Molecular Design, Beijing Forestry University, Beijing, People’s Republic of China.
    FT Modulates Genome-Wide DNA-Binding of the bZIP Transcription Factor FD2019Inngår i: Plant Physiology, ISSN 0032-0889, E-ISSN 1532-2548, Vol. 180, nr 1, s. 367-380Artikkel i tidsskrift (Fagfellevurdert)
    Abstract [en]

    The transition to flowering is a crucial step in the plant life cycle that is controlled by multiple endogenous and environmental cues, including hormones, sugars, temperature, and photoperiod. Permissive photoperiod induces the expression of FLOWERING LOCUS T (FT) in the phloem companion cells of leaves. The FT protein then acts as a florigen that is transported to the shoot apical meristem, where it physically interacts with the Basic Leucine Zipper Domain transcription factor FD and 14-3-3 proteins. However, despite the importance of FD in promoting flowering, its direct transcriptional targets are largely unknown. Here, we combined chromatin immunoprecipitation sequencing and RNA sequencing to identify targets of FD at the genome scale and assessed the contribution of FT to DNA binding. We further investigated the ability of FD to form protein complexes with FT and TERMINAL FLOWER1 through interaction with 14-3-3 proteins. Importantly, we observed direct binding of FD to targets involved in several aspects of plant development. These target genes were previously unknown to be directly related to the regulation of flowering time. Our results confirm FD as a central regulator of floral transition at the shoot meristem and provide evidence for crosstalk between the regulation of flowering and other signaling pathways, such as pathways involved in hormone signaling.

  • 187. Concepcion Cruz-Santos, Maria
    et al.
    Aragon-Raygoza, Alejandro
    Espinal-Centeno, Annie
    Arteaga-Vazquez, Mario
    Cruz-Hernandez, Andres
    Bako, Laszlo
    Umeå universitet, Teknisk-naturvetenskapliga fakulteten, Institutionen för fysiologisk botanik.
    Cruz-Ramirez, Alfredo
    The Role of microRNAs in Animal Cell Reprogramming2016Inngår i: Stem Cells and Development, ISSN 1547-3287, E-ISSN 1557-8534, Vol. 25, nr 14, s. 1035-1049Artikkel, forskningsoversikt (Fagfellevurdert)
    Abstract [en]

    Our concept of cell reprogramming and cell plasticity has evolved since John Gurdon transferred the nucleus of a completely differentiated cell into an enucleated Xenopus laevis egg, thereby generating embryos that developed into tadpoles. More recently, induced expression of transcription factors, oct4, sox2, klf4, and c-myc has evidenced the plasticity of the genome to change the expression program and cell phenotype by driving differentiated cells to the pluripotent state. Beyond these milestone achievements, research in artificial cell reprogramming has been focused on other molecules that are different than transcription factors. Among the candidate molecules, microRNAs (miRNAs) stand out due to their potential to control the levels of proteins that are involved in cellular processes such as self-renewal, proliferation, and differentiation. Here, we review the role of miRNAs in the maintenance and differentiation of mesenchymal stem cells, epimorphic regeneration, and somatic cell reprogramming to induced pluripotent stem cells.

  • 188. Conn, Vanessa M.
    et al.
    Hugouvieux, Veronique
    Nayak, Aditya
    Conos, Stephanie A.
    Capovilla, Giovanna
    Cildir, Gokhan
    Jourdain, Agnes
    Tergaonkar, Vinay
    Schmid, Markus
    Umeå universitet, Teknisk-naturvetenskapliga fakulteten, Institutionen för fysiologisk botanik. Umeå universitet, Teknisk-naturvetenskapliga fakulteten, Umeå Plant Science Centre (UPSC).
    Zubieta, Chloe
    Conn, Simon J.
    A circRNA from SEPALLATA3 regulates splicing of its cognate mRNA through R-loop formation2017Inngår i: Nature Plants, ISSN 2055-026X, Vol. 3, nr 5, artikkel-id 17053Artikkel i tidsskrift (Fagfellevurdert)
    Abstract [en]

    Circular RNAs (circRNAs) are a diverse and abundant class of hyper-stable, non-canonical RNAs that arise through a form of alternative splicing (AS) called back-splicing. These single-stranded, covalently-closed circRNA molecules have been identified in all eukaryotic kingdoms of life(1), yet their functions have remained elusive. Here, we report that circRNAs can be used as bona fide biomarkers of functional, exon-skipped AS variants in Arabidopsis, including in the homeotic MADS-box transcription factor family. Furthermore, we demonstrate that circRNAs derived from exon 6 of the SEPALLATA3 (SEP3) gene increase abundance of the cognate exon-skipped AS variant (SEP3.3 which lacks exon 6), in turn driving floral homeotic phenotypes. Toward demonstrating the underlying mechanism, we show that the SEP3 exon 6 circRNA can bind strongly to its cognate DNA locus, forming an RNA: DNA hybrid, or R-loop, whereas the linear RNA equivalent bound significantly more weakly to DNA. R-loop formation results in transcriptional pausing, which has been shown to coincide with splicing factor recruitment and AS(2-4). This report presents a novel mechanistic insight for how at least a subset of circRNAs probably contribute to increased splicing efficiency of their cognate exon-skipped messenger RNA and provides the first evidence of an organismal-level phenotype mediated by circRNA manipulation.

  • 189. Cooke, Janice E. K.
    et al.
    Eriksson, Maria E.
    Umeå universitet, Teknisk-naturvetenskapliga fakulteten, Umeå Plant Science Centre (UPSC). Umeå universitet, Teknisk-naturvetenskapliga fakulteten, Institutionen för fysiologisk botanik.
    Junttila, Olavi
    The dynamic nature of bud dormancy in trees: environmental control and molecular mechanisms2012Inngår i: Plant, Cell and Environment, ISSN 0140-7791, E-ISSN 1365-3040, Vol. 35, nr 10, s. 1707-1728Artikkel i tidsskrift (Fagfellevurdert)
    Abstract [en]

    In tree species native to temperate and boreal regions, the activity-dormancy cycle is an important adaptive trait both for survival and growth. We discuss recent research on mechanisms controlling the overlapping developmental processes that define the activity-dormancy cycle, including cessation of apical growth, bud development, induction, maintenance and release of dormancy, and bud burst. The cycle involves an extensive reconfiguration of metabolism. Environmental control of the activity-dormancy cycle is based on perception of photoperiodic and temperature signals, reflecting adaptation to prevailing climatic conditions. Several molecular actors for control of growth cessation have been identified, with the CO/FT regulatory network and circadian clock having important coordinating roles in control of growth and dormancy. Other candidate regulators of bud set, dormancy and bud burst have been identified, such as dormancy-associated MADS-box factors, but their exact roles remain to be discovered. Epigenetic mechanisms also appear to factor in control of the activity-dormancy cycle. Despite evidence for gibberellins as negative regulators in growth cessation, and ABA and ethylene in bud formation, understanding of the roles that plant growth regulators play in controlling the activity-dormancy cycle is still very fragmentary. Finally, some of the challenges for further research in bud dormancy are discussed.

  • 190.
    Courtois-Moreau, Charleen L
    et al.
    Umeå universitet, Teknisk-naturvetenskapliga fakulteten, Umeå Plant Science Centre (UPSC). Umeå universitet, Teknisk-naturvetenskapliga fakulteten, Institutionen för fysiologisk botanik.
    Pesquet, Edouard
    Umeå universitet, Teknisk-naturvetenskapliga fakulteten, Umeå Plant Science Centre (UPSC). Umeå universitet, Teknisk-naturvetenskapliga fakulteten, Institutionen för fysiologisk botanik.
    Sjödin, Andreas
    Umeå universitet, Teknisk-naturvetenskapliga fakulteten, Umeå Plant Science Centre (UPSC). Umeå universitet, Teknisk-naturvetenskapliga fakulteten, Institutionen för fysiologisk botanik.
    Muñiz, Luis
    Umeå universitet, Teknisk-naturvetenskapliga fakulteten, Umeå Plant Science Centre (UPSC). Umeå universitet, Teknisk-naturvetenskapliga fakulteten, Institutionen för fysiologisk botanik.
    Bollhöner, Benjamin
    Umeå universitet, Teknisk-naturvetenskapliga fakulteten, Institutionen för fysiologisk botanik. Umeå universitet, Teknisk-naturvetenskapliga fakulteten, Umeå Plant Science Centre (UPSC).
    Kaneda, Minako
    Department of Botany, University of British Columbia, Vancouver, BC V6T 1Z4, Canada.
    Samuels, Lacey
    Department of Botany, University of British Columbia, Vancouver, BC V6T 1Z4, Canada.
    Jansson, Stefan
    Umeå universitet, Teknisk-naturvetenskapliga fakulteten, Institutionen för fysiologisk botanik. Umeå universitet, Teknisk-naturvetenskapliga fakulteten, Umeå Plant Science Centre (UPSC).
    Tuominen, Hannele
    Umeå universitet, Teknisk-naturvetenskapliga fakulteten, Institutionen för fysiologisk botanik. Umeå universitet, Teknisk-naturvetenskapliga fakulteten, Umeå Plant Science Centre (UPSC).
    A unique program for cell death in xylem fibers of Populus stem2009Inngår i: The Plant Journal, ISSN 0960-7412, E-ISSN 1365-313X, Vol. 58, nr 2, s. 260-274Artikkel i tidsskrift (Fagfellevurdert)
    Abstract [en]

    Maturation of the xylem elements involves extensive deposition of secondary cell-wall material and autolytic processes resulting in cell death. We describe here a unique type of cell-death program in xylem fibers of hybrid aspen (Populus tremula x P. tremuloides) stems, including gradual degradative processes in both the nucleus and cytoplasm concurrently with the phase of active cell-wall deposition. Nuclear DNA integrity, as determined by TUNEL (terminal deoxynucleotidyl transferase-mediated dUTP nick end labeling) and Comet (single-cell gel electrophoresis) assays, was compromised early during fiber maturation. In addition, degradation of the cytoplasmic contents, as detected by electron microscopy of samples fixed by high-pressure freezing/freeze substitution (HPF-FS), was gradual and resulted in complete loss of the cytoplasmic contents well before the loss of vacuolar integrity, which is considered to be the moment of death. This type of cell death differs significantly from that seen in xylem vessels. The loss of vacuolar integrity, which is thought to initiate cell degradative processes in the xylem vessels, is one of the last processes to occur before the final autolysis of the remaining cell contents in xylem fibers. High-resolution microarray analysis in the vascular tissues of Populus stem, combined with in silico analysis of publicly available data repositories, suggests the involvement of several previously uncharacterized transcription factors, ethylene, sphingolipids and light signaling as well as autophagy in the control of fiber cell death.

  • 191. Covey-Crump, Elizabeth M
    et al.
    Bykova, Natalia V
    Affourtit, Charles
    Hoefnagel, Marcel H N
    Gardeström, Per
    Umeå universitet, Teknisk-naturvetenskapliga fakulteten, Institutionen för fysiologisk botanik. Umeå universitet, Teknisk-naturvetenskapliga fakulteten, Umeå Plant Science Centre (UPSC).
    Atkin, Owen K
    Temperature-dependent changes in respiration rates and redox poise of the ubiquinone pool in protoplasts and isolated mitochondria of potato leaves2007Inngår i: Physiologia Plantarum, Vol. 129, s. 175-184Artikkel i tidsskrift (Fagfellevurdert)
    Abstract [en]

    In many environments, leaves experience large diurnal variations in temperature. Such short-term changes in temperature are likely to have important implications for respiratory metabolism in leaves. Here, we used intact leaf, protoplasts and isolated mitochondria to determine the impact of short-term changes in temperature on respiration rates (R), adenylate concentrations and the redox poise of the ubiquinone (UQ) pool in mitochondria of potato leaves. The Q10 (i.e. proportional change in R for each 10°C rise in temperature) of respiration was 1.8, both for intact leaves and protoplasts. In protoplasts, the redox poise of the extracted UQ pool (UQR/UQT) increased from 0.33 at 22°C, to 0.76 at 15°C. Further decreases in temperature (from 15 to 5°C) resulted in UQR/UQT decreasing to 0.40. Adenylate ratios in protoplasts were also temperature dependent. At high adenosine 5'-triphosphate (ATP) adenosine 5'-diphosphate (ADP) ratios (i.e. low ADP concentrations), UQR/UQT values were low, suggesting that adenylates restricted flux via the UQ-reducing pathways more than they restricted flux via pathways that oxidized UQH2. To assess whether high rates of alternative oxidase (AOX) activity could have uncoupled respiratory flux (and thus UQR/UQT) from adenylate restriction of the cytochrome (Cyt) pathway, we constructed kinetic curves of O2 uptake (via the two pathways) vs UQR/UQT in isolated mitochondria, measured at two temperatures (15 and 25°C); measurements were made for mitochondria operating under state 3 (i.e. +ADP) and state 4 (i.e. −ADP) conditions. In contrast to the Cyt pathway, flux via the AOX was temperature insensitive, with maximal rates of AOX activity representing 21–57% of total O2 uptake in isolated mitochondria. We conclude that temperature-dependent variations in UQR/UQT are largely dependent on temperature-dependent changes in adenylate ratios, and that flux via the AOX could in some circumstances help reduce maximal UQ values.

  • 192.
    Crawford, Tim
    et al.
    Umeå universitet, Teknisk-naturvetenskapliga fakulteten, Institutionen för fysiologisk botanik. Umeå universitet, Teknisk-naturvetenskapliga fakulteten, Umeå Plant Science Centre (UPSC).
    Lehotai, Nóra
    Umeå universitet, Teknisk-naturvetenskapliga fakulteten, Institutionen för fysiologisk botanik. Umeå universitet, Teknisk-naturvetenskapliga fakulteten, Umeå Plant Science Centre (UPSC).
    Strand, Åsa
    Umeå universitet, Teknisk-naturvetenskapliga fakulteten, Institutionen för fysiologisk botanik. Umeå universitet, Teknisk-naturvetenskapliga fakulteten, Umeå Plant Science Centre (UPSC).
    The role of retrograde signals during plant stress responses2018Inngår i: Journal of Experimental Botany, ISSN 0022-0957, E-ISSN 1460-2431, Vol. 69, nr 11, s. 2783-2795Artikkel, forskningsoversikt (Fagfellevurdert)
    Abstract [en]

    Chloroplast and mitochondria not only provide the energy to the plant cell but due to the sensitivity of organellar processes to perturbations caused by abiotic stress, they are also key cellular sensors of environmental fluctuations. Abiotic stresses result in reduced photosynthetic efficiency and thereby reduced energy supply for cellular processes. Thus, in order to acclimate to stress, plants must re-program gene expression and cellular metabolism to divert energy from growth and developmental processes to stress responses. To restore cellular energy homeostasis following exposure to stress, the activities of the organelles must be tightly co-ordinated with the transcriptional re-programming in the nucleus. Thus, communication between the organelles and the nucleus, so-called retrograde signalling, is essential to direct the energy use correctly during stress exposure. Stress-triggered retrograde signals are mediated by reactive oxygen species and metabolites including beta-cyclocitral, MEcPP (2-C-methyl-D-erythritol 2,4-cyclodiphosphate), PAP (3'-phosphoadenosine 5'-phosphate), and intermediates of the tetrapyrrole biosynthesis pathway. However, for the plant cell to respond optimally to environmental stress, these stress-triggered retrograde signalling pathways must be integrated with the cytosolic stress signalling network. We hypothesize that the Mediator transcriptional co-activator complex may play a key role as a regulatory hub in the nucleus, integrating the complex stress signalling networks originating in different cellular compartments.

  • 193. Creel, Scott
    et al.
    Spong, Göran
    Becker, Matthew
    Simukonda, Chuma
    Norman, Anita
    Schiffthaler, Bastian
    Umeå universitet, Teknisk-naturvetenskapliga fakulteten, Umeå Plant Science Centre (UPSC). Umeå universitet, Teknisk-naturvetenskapliga fakulteten, Institutionen för fysiologisk botanik.
    Chifunte, Clive
    Carnivores, competition and genetic connectivity in the Anthropocene2019Inngår i: Scientific Reports, ISSN 2045-2322, E-ISSN 2045-2322, Vol. 9, artikkel-id 16339Artikkel i tidsskrift (Fagfellevurdert)
    Abstract [en]

    Current extinction rates are comparable to five prior mass extinctions in the earth's history, and are strongly affected by human activities that have modified more than half of the earth's terrestrial surface. Increasing human activity restricts animal movements and isolates formerly connected populations, a particular concern for the conservation of large carnivores, but no prior research has used high throughput sequencing in a standardized manner to examine genetic connectivity for multiple species of large carnivores and multiple ecosystems. Here, we used RAD SNP genotypes to test for differences in connectivity between multiple ecosystems for African wild dogs (Lycaon pictus) and lions (Panthera leo), and to test correlations between genetic distance, geographic distance and landscape resistance due to human activity. We found weaker connectivity, a stronger correlation between genetic distance and geographic distance, and a stronger correlation between genetic distance and landscape resistance for lions than for wild dogs, and propose a new hypothesis that adaptations to interspecific competition may help to explain differences in vulnerability to isolation by humans.

  • 194. Crutsinger, G M
    et al.
    Sanders, N J
    Albrectsen, Benedicte R.
    Umeå universitet, Teknisk-naturvetenskapliga fakulteten, Institutionen för fysiologisk botanik. Umeå universitet, Teknisk-naturvetenskapliga fakulteten, Umeå Plant Science Centre (UPSC).
    Abreu, Ilka Nacif
    Umeå universitet, Teknisk-naturvetenskapliga fakulteten, Institutionen för fysiologisk botanik. Umeå universitet, Teknisk-naturvetenskapliga fakulteten, Umeå Plant Science Centre (UPSC).
    Wardle, D A
    Ecosystem retrogression leads to increased insect abundance and herbivory across an island chronosequence2008Inngår i: Functional Ecology, ISSN 0269-8463, E-ISSN 1365-2435, Vol. 22, nr 5, s. 816-823Artikkel i tidsskrift (Fagfellevurdert)
    Abstract [sv]

    1. Ecosystem retrogression, the decline-phase of ecosystem development, occurs during the long-term absence of catastrophic disturbance. It usually involves increased nutrient limitation over time, and leads to reductions in primary productivity, decomposition, and nutrient cycling.

    2. As a consequence, retrogression can alter the quality and abundance of host plants as food resources, but little is known about how these changes influence herbivore densities and foliage consumption.

    3. In this study, we used a 5000-year-old chronosequence of forested islands in northern Sweden on which retrogression occurs in the absence of lightning-induced wildfire. We asked whether retrogression affected the abundance and herbivory of a dominant herbivorous weevil (Deporaus betulae) and the quality and productivity of a dominant host-tree, mountain birch (Betula pubescens).

    4. Betula pubescens trees on retrogressed islands were less productive and produced smaller, tougher leaves that were lower in nutrients and higher in secondary metabolites than did those trees on earlier-successional islands.

    5. Despite the lower density and what ecologists might perceive as poorer quality of host plants, we observed several-fold higher weevil abundance and damage on retrogressed islands. This suggests that weevils might prefer the poorer quality leaves with higher secondary metabolites that occur on nutrient stressed host trees.

    6. Our results show that ecosystem retrogression increases susceptibility of B. pubescens trees to attack by herbivorous weevils.

    7. Our study provides evidence that ecosystem retrogression and associated shifts in the quantity and quality of available resources can operate as an important driver of abundance of a dominant insect herbivore.

  • 195. Cruz-Ramírez, Alfredo
    et al.
    Díaz-Triviño, Sara
    Blilou, Ikram
    Grieneisen, Verônica A.
    Sozzani, Rosangela
    Zamioudis, Christos
    Miskolczi, Pál
    Umeå universitet, Teknisk-naturvetenskapliga fakulteten, Institutionen för fysiologisk botanik. Umeå universitet, Teknisk-naturvetenskapliga fakulteten, Umeå Plant Science Centre (UPSC). Department of Forest Genetics and Plant Physiology, Umeå Plant Science Center, Swedish University of Agricultural Sciences, Umeå, Sweden.
    Nieuwland, Jeroen
    Benjamins, René
    Dhonukshe, Pankaj
    Caballero-Pérez, Juan
    Horvath, Beatrix
    Long, Yuchen
    Mähönen, Ari Pekka
    Zhang, Hongtao
    Xu, Jian
    Murray, James A. H.
    Benfey, Philip N.
    Bako, Laszlo
    Umeå universitet, Teknisk-naturvetenskapliga fakulteten, Institutionen för fysiologisk botanik. Umeå universitet, Teknisk-naturvetenskapliga fakulteten, Umeå Plant Science Centre (UPSC). Department of Forest Genetics and Plant Physiology, Umeå Plant Science Center, Swedish University of Agricultural Sciences, Umeå, Sweden.
    Marée, Athanasius F. M.
    Scheres, Ben
    A Bistable Circuit Involving SCARECROW-RETINOBLASTOMA Integrates Cues to Inform Asymmetric Stem Cell Division2012Inngår i: Cell, ISSN 0092-8674, E-ISSN 1097-4172, Vol. 150, nr 5, s. 1002-1015Artikkel i tidsskrift (Fagfellevurdert)
    Abstract [en]

    In plants, where cells cannot migrate, asymmetric cell divisions (ACDs) must be confined to the appropriate spatial context. We investigate tissue-generating asymmetric divisions in a stem cell daughter within the Arabidopsis root. Spatial restriction of these divisions requires physical binding of the stem cell regulator SCARECROW (SCR) by the RETINOBLASTOM-RELATED (RBR) protein. In the stem cell niche, SCR activity is counteracted by phosphorylation of RBR through a cyclinD6;1-CDK complex. This cyclin is itself under transcriptional control of SCR and its partner SHORT ROOT (SHR), creating a robust bistable circuit with either high or low SHR-SCR complex activity. Auxin biases this circuit by promoting CYCD6;1 transcription. Mathematical modeling shows that ACDs are only switched on after integration of radial and longitudinal information, determined by SHR and auxin distribution, respectively. Coupling of cell-cycle progression to protein degradation resets the circuit, resulting in a "flip flop" that constrains asymmetric cell division to the stem cell region.

  • 196.
    Dahrendorf, Julia
    Umeå universitet, Teknisk-naturvetenskapliga fakulteten, Institutionen för fysiologisk botanik. Umeå universitet, Teknisk-naturvetenskapliga fakulteten, Umeå Plant Science Centre (UPSC).
    Analysis of nitrogen utilization capability during proliferation and maturation of Norway spruce (Picea abies L. Karst) somatic embryogenesis2014Independent thesis Advanced level (degree of Master (Two Years)), 20 poäng / 30 hpOppgave
    Abstract [en]

    Around 70 % of the standing trees in northern Europe are conifers, with Norway spruce being most important. To meet future wood demands, vegetative propagation methods are offering a flexible and effective way to multiply superior genotypes. The development of nitrogen metabolism during embryogenesis is not well understood and only few studies cover conifers. Norway spruce plants prefer ammonium over nitrate as an inorganic nitrogen source. However, the proliferation of somatic embryo cultures requires organic nitrogen, and ammonium nitrate as sole nitrogen source limits somatic embryo development. This raises the question how nitrogen utilization capability advances throughout the embryo development and plant formation in Norway spruce and suggests a developmental switch in nitrogen utilization capability before the plant is fully developed. Of special interest in this context is the development and activity of three key enzymes of nitrogen metabolism: nitrate reductase (NR), glutamine synthetase (GS) and arginase.

    The aim of this study was to investigate the importance of L-glutamine as an organic nitrogen source and its impact on these key enzymes of nitrogen metabolism in the proliferation and maturation stage of Norway spruce somatic embryogenesis. Therefore media with modified nitrogen sources have been used to study the effects of presence and withdrawal of L-glutamine. Pro-embryogenic masses (PEMs) grown with L-glutamine (Gln) or L-glutamine and nitrate (Gln + NO3) showed a strongly improved proliferation rate in comparison to PEMs grown on ammonium nitrate (NH4NO3). Interestingly, GS and NR were inactive enzymatically in PEMs. Arginase activity was observed, and was unaffected by the presence or absence of L-glutamine. For analyzing the importance of L-glutamine as an organic nitrogen source during maturation, somatic embryos have been generated on media with modified nitrogen sources that included also autoclaved casein hydrolysate, an amino-acid mixture that lacks L-glutamine after autoclaving. Somatic embryos matured furthest regarding size and cotyledon development on Gln + NO3. Maturation on NH4NO3 resulted in well-developed cotyledonary stage somatic embryos that were smaller in size than in the presence of L-glutamine. In mature somatic embryos GS and NR were active. NR activity was highest, if embryos were matured on Gln + NO3 and notably lower if matured on Gln or NH4NO3. The tendentially highest GS activity was found if embryos were generated on NH4NO3. A striking change in nitrogen metabolism was the steady increase in GS activity from not detectable at proliferation stage, through easily detectable during maturation up to high activity in SE plantlets.

  • 197.
    Damkjaer, Jakob
    Umeå universitet, Teknisk-naturvetenskapliga fakulteten, Institutionen för fysiologisk botanik.
    Phosphorylation in State Transition: Less cause more effect2011Doktoravhandling, med artikler (Annet vitenskapelig)
    Abstract [en]

    Study of the Arabidopsis thaliana knockout mutant lacking Lhcb3 (koLhcb3) have revealed a close similarity to the wild type plants. Growth rate, NPQ, qP, Φ(PSII), circular dichroism spectra, pigment composition and content of LCHII trimers have been found to be unaffected by this mutation. The proteomic analysis shows only some minor increases in the amount of Lhcb1 and Lhcb2. PAM fluorometry revealed a significant increase in the rate of the state 1 to state 2 state transition in the koLhcb3. None the less, the extent of state transition is identical to wild type. Alterations in the PSII-LHCII supercomplex structure have been demonstrated as well. The M-trimer was found to be rotated ~21° CCW. This altered binding of the LHCII M-trimer is likely the cause of the altered affinity resulting in the increased rate of state transition. Proteomic analysis of the phosphorylation of LHCII revealed a significant increase in state 1 and 2 LHCII phosphorylation relative to wild type. Investigation whether phosphorylation or the altered LHCII binding is the cause of the accelerated rate of state transition have not been conclusive so far. A Lhcb6 depleted mutant (koLhcb6) showed a significant alteration of the PSII-LHCII supercomplex structure and photosynthetic acclimation processes. The LHCII M-trimer is depleted in the PSII-LHCII supercomplexes causing the state transition process to be “stuck” in state 2 and the mutants ability to preform NPQ is inhibited as well. The Lhcb6 protein was concluded to be essential for the binding of the LHCII M-trimer to the PSII core as well as energy transfer. The depletion of LHCII M-trimer was linked to the reduced ability to photoacclimate using NPQ as well.

  • 198.
    Damkjær, Jakob T
    et al.
    Umeå universitet, Teknisk-naturvetenskapliga fakulteten, Institutionen för fysiologisk botanik. Umeå universitet, Teknisk-naturvetenskapliga fakulteten, Umeå Plant Science Centre (UPSC).
    Kereïche, Sami
    Biophysical Chemistry, Groningen Biomolecular Sciences and Biotechnology Institute, University of Groningen, 9747 AG Groningen, The Netherlands.
    Johnson, Matthew P
    School of Biological and Chemical Sciences, Queen Mary University of London, London, E1 4NS, United Kingdom.
    Kovacs, Laszlo
    Institute of Plant Biology, Biological Research Center, Hungarian Academy of Sciences, H-6726 Szeged, Hungary.
    Kiss, Anett Z
    Umeå universitet, Teknisk-naturvetenskapliga fakulteten, Institutionen för fysiologisk botanik. Umeå universitet, Teknisk-naturvetenskapliga fakulteten, Umeå Plant Science Centre (UPSC).
    Boekema, Egbert J
    Biophysical Chemistry, Groningen Biomolecular Sciences and Biotechnology Institute, University of Groningen, 9747 AG Groningen, The Netherlands.
    Ruban, Alexander V
    School of Biological and Chemical Sciences, Queen Mary University of London, London, E1 4NS, United Kingdom.
    Horton, Peter
    Department of Molecular Biology and Biotechnology, University of Sheffield, Western Bank, Sheffield, S10 2TN, United Kingdom.
    Jansson, Stefan
    Umeå universitet, Teknisk-naturvetenskapliga fakulteten, Institutionen för fysiologisk botanik. Umeå universitet, Teknisk-naturvetenskapliga fakulteten, Umeå Plant Science Centre (UPSC).
    The photosystem II light-harvesting protein Lhcb3 affects the macrostructure of photosystem II and the rate of state transitions in Arabidopsis2009Inngår i: The Plant Cell, ISSN 1040-4651, E-ISSN 1532-298X, Vol. 21, s. 3245-3256Artikkel i tidsskrift (Fagfellevurdert)
    Abstract [en]

    The main trimeric light-harvesting complex of higher plants (LHCII) consists of three different Lhcb proteins (Lhcb1-3). We show that Arabidopsis thaliana T-DNA knockout plants lacking Lhcb3 (koLhcb3) compensate for the lack of Lhcb3 by producing increased amounts of Lhcb1 and Lhcb2. As in wild-type plants, LHCII-photosystem II (PSII) supercomplexes were present in Lhcb3 knockout plants (koLhcb3), and preservation of the LHCII trimers (M trimers) indicates that the Lhcb3 in M trimers has been replaced by Lhcb1 and/or Lhcb2. However, the rotational position of the M LHCII trimer was altered, suggesting that the Lhcb3 subunit affects the macrostructural arrangement of the LHCII antenna. The absence of Lhcb3 did not result in any significant alteration in PSII efficiency or qE type of nonphotochemical quenching, but the rate of transition from State 1 to State 2 was increased in koLhcb3, although the final extent of state transition was unchanged. The level of phosphorylation of LHCII was increased in the koLhcb3 plants compared with wild-type plants in both State 1 and State 2. The relative increase in phosphorylation upon transition from State 1 to State 2 was also significantly higher in koLhcb3. It is suggested that the main function of Lhcb3 is to modulate the rate of state transitions.

  • 199.
    De Bleser, Helena
    Umeå universitet, Teknisk-naturvetenskapliga fakulteten, Institutionen för fysiologisk botanik. Umeå universitet, Teknisk-naturvetenskapliga fakulteten, Umeå Plant Science Centre (UPSC).
    Crosstalk of ethylene and gibberellins during wood formation in hybridaspen2013Independent thesis Advanced level (degree of Master (Two Years)), 20 poäng / 30 hpOppgave
    Abstract [en]

    Both gibberellins (GAs) and ethylene (ET) or its in planta precursor 1‐Aminocyclopropane-1‐carboxylic acid (ACC) stimulate cambial cell division and modify wood development when exogenously applied to wood forming tissues of trees. Furthermore both hormones are involved in tension wood (TW) formation in leaned trees. In Arabidopsis a cross‐talk of ET and GA on a molecular level has been demonstrated. We have examined here the effects of GA and ACC, alone and in combination, on wood development in hybrid aspen (Populus tremula x tremuloides) to investigate their potential of cross-talk during wood development. The response of selected transcripts involved in GA, ET and auxin signaling, biosynthesis and transport was inspected in the total stem of T89 trees after 10 hours of treatment with quantitative real‐time PCR (qPCR). Analysis of the phenotype, anatomy and chemistry of wild-type, ethylene-insensitive and GA‐deficient trees after 2 weeks of treatment emphasized that a cross‐talk between GA and ACC is plausible. Based on primary growth characteristics, GA and ACC seemed to be partially redundant. Lignin stainings suggest antagonistic interactions, while fiber to vessel ratios and the distribution of G‐layers put forward a collaborating action. Diffuse reflectance FT‐IR demonstrates that functional GA and ACC signalling are needed to induce differences in chemical composition.

     

  • 200.
    de La Torre, Amanda R
    et al.
    Umeå universitet, Teknisk-naturvetenskapliga fakulteten, Institutionen för ekologi, miljö och geovetenskap.
    Birol, Inanc
    Bousquet, Jean
    Ingvarsson, Pär K
    Umeå universitet, Teknisk-naturvetenskapliga fakulteten, Institutionen för ekologi, miljö och geovetenskap. Umeå universitet, Teknisk-naturvetenskapliga fakulteten, Umeå Plant Science Centre (UPSC). Umeå universitet, Teknisk-naturvetenskapliga fakulteten, Institutionen för fysiologisk botanik.
    Jansson, Stefan
    Umeå universitet, Teknisk-naturvetenskapliga fakulteten, Umeå Plant Science Centre (UPSC). Umeå universitet, Teknisk-naturvetenskapliga fakulteten, Institutionen för fysiologisk botanik.
    Jones, Steven J. M
    Keeling, Christopher I
    MacKay, John
    Nilsson, Ove
    Umeå universitet, Teknisk-naturvetenskapliga fakulteten, Umeå Plant Science Centre (UPSC). Umeå universitet, Teknisk-naturvetenskapliga fakulteten, Institutionen för fysiologisk botanik.
    Ritland, Kermit
    Street, Nathaniel
    Umeå universitet, Teknisk-naturvetenskapliga fakulteten, Umeå Plant Science Centre (UPSC). Umeå universitet, Teknisk-naturvetenskapliga fakulteten, Institutionen för fysiologisk botanik.
    Yanchuk, Alvin
    Zerbe, Philipp
    Bohlmann, Jörg
    Insights into conifer giga-genomes2014Inngår i: Plant Physiology, ISSN 0032-0889, E-ISSN 1532-2548, Vol. 166, nr 4, s. 1724-1732Artikkel i tidsskrift (Fagfellevurdert)
    Abstract [en]

    Insights from sequenced genomes of major land plant lineages have advanced research in almost every aspect of plant biology. Until recently, however, assembled genome sequences of gymnosperms have been missing from this picture. Conifers of the pine family (Pinaceae) are a group of gymnosperms that dominate large parts of the world's forests. Despite their ecological and economic importance, conifers seemed long out of reach for complete genome sequencing, due in part to their enormous genome size (20-30 Gb) and the highly repetitive nature of their genomes. Technological advances in genome sequencing and assembly enabled the recent publication of three conifer genomes: white spruce (Picea glauca), Norway spruce (Picea abies), and loblolly pine (Pinus taeda). These genome sequences revealed distinctive features compared with other plant genomes and may represent a window into the past of seed plant genomes. This Update highlights recent advances, remaining challenges, and opportunities in light of the publication of the first conifer and gymnosperm genomes.

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