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  • 151. Murphy, Neil
    et al.
    Norat, Teresa
    Ferrari, Pietro
    Jenab, Mazda
    Bueno-de-Mesquita, Bas
    Skeie, Guri
    Olsen, Anja
    Tjonneland, Anne
    Dahm, Christina C.
    Overvad, Kim
    Boutron-Ruault, Marie Christine
    Clavel-Chapelon, Francoise
    Nailler, Laura
    Kaaks, Rudolf
    Teucher, Birgit
    Boeing, Heiner
    Bergmann, Manuela M.
    Trichopoulou, Antonia
    Lagiou, Pagona
    Trichopoulos, Dimitrios
    Palli, Domenico
    Pala, Valeria
    Tumino, Rosario
    Vineis, Paolo
    Panico, Salvatore
    Peeters, Petra H. M.
    Dik, Vincent K.
    Weiderpass, Elisabete
    Lund, Eiliv
    Quiros Garcia, Jose Ramon
    Zamora-Ros, Raul
    Sanchez Perez, Maria Jose
    Dorronsoro, Miren
    Navarro, Carmen
    Ardanaz, Eva
    Manjer, Jonas
    Almquist, Martin
    Johansson, Ingegerd
    Umeå universitet, Medicinska fakulteten, Institutionen för odontologi.
    Palmqvist, Richard
    Umeå universitet, Medicinska fakulteten, Institutionen för medicinsk biovetenskap, Patologi.
    Khaw, Kay-Tee
    Wareham, Nick
    Key, Timothy J.
    Crowe, Francesca L.
    Fedirko, Veronika
    Gunter, Marc J.
    Riboli, Elio
    Consumption of Dairy Products and Colorectal Cancer in the European Prospective Investigation into Cancer and Nutrition (EPIC)2013Inngår i: PLoS ONE, ISSN 1932-6203, E-ISSN 1932-6203, Vol. 8, nr 9, s. e72715-Artikkel i tidsskrift (Fagfellevurdert)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: Prospective studies have consistently reported lower colorectal cancer risks associated with higher intakes of total dairy products, total milk and dietary calcium. However, less is known about whether the inverse associations vary for individual dairy products with differing fat contents. Materials and Methods: In the European Prospective Investigation into Cancer and Nutrition (EPIC), we investigated the associations between intakes of total milk and milk subtypes (whole-fat, semi-skimmed and skimmed), yoghurt, cheese, and dietary calcium with colorectal cancer risk amongst 477,122 men and women. Dietary questionnaires were administered at baseline. Multivariable hazard ratios (HRs) and 95% confidence intervals (CIs) were estimated using Cox proportional hazards models, adjusted for relevant confounding variables. Results: During the mean 11 years of follow-up, 4,513 incident cases of colorectal cancer occurred. After multivariable adjustments, total milk consumption was inversely associated with colorectal cancer risk (HR per 200 g/day 0.93, 95% CI: 0.89-0.98). Similar inverse associations were observed for whole-fat (HR per 200 g/day 0.90, 95% CI: 0.82-0.99) and skimmed milk (HR per 200 g/day 0.90, 95% CI: 0.79-1.02) in the multivariable models. Inverse associations were observed for cheese and yoghurt in the categorical models; although in the linear models, these associations were non-significant. Dietary calcium was inversely associated with colorectal cancer risk (HR per 200 mg/day 0.95, 95% CI: 0.91-0.99); this association was limited to dairy sources of calcium only (HR per 200 mg/day 0.95, 95% CI: 0.91-0.99), with no association observed for non-dairy calcium sources (HR per 200 mg/day 1.00, 95% CI: 0.81-1.24). Conclusions: Our results strengthen the evidence for a possible protective role of dairy products on colorectal cancer risk. The inverse associations we observed did not differ by the fat content of the dairy products considered.

  • 152.
    Myte, Robin
    et al.
    Umeå universitet, Medicinska fakulteten, Institutionen för strålningsvetenskaper, Onkologi.
    Gylling, Björn
    Umeå universitet, Medicinska fakulteten, Institutionen för medicinsk biovetenskap, Patologi.
    Häggström, Jenny
    Umeå universitet, Samhällsvetenskapliga fakulteten, Handelshögskolan vid Umeå universitet, Statistik.
    Schneede, Jörn
    Umeå universitet, Medicinska fakulteten, Institutionen för farmakologi och klinisk neurovetenskap, Farmakologi.
    Löfgren-Burström, Anna
    Umeå universitet, Medicinska fakulteten, Institutionen för medicinsk biovetenskap, Patologi.
    Huyghe, Jeroen R.
    Hallmans, Göran
    Umeå universitet, Medicinska fakulteten, Enheten för biobanksforskning. Umeå universitet, Medicinska fakulteten, Institutionen för folkhälsa och klinisk medicin, Näringsforskning.
    Meyer, Klaus
    Johansson, Ingegerd
    Umeå universitet, Medicinska fakulteten, Institutionen för odontologi.
    Ueland, Per Magne
    Palmqvist, Richard
    Umeå universitet, Medicinska fakulteten, Institutionen för medicinsk biovetenskap, Patologi.
    Van Guelpen, Bethany
    Umeå universitet, Medicinska fakulteten, Institutionen för strålningsvetenskaper, Onkologi.
    One-carbon metabolism biomarkers and genetic variants in relation to colorectal cancer risk by KRAS and BRAF mutation status2018Inngår i: PLoS ONE, ISSN 1932-6203, E-ISSN 1932-6203, Vol. 13, nr 4, artikkel-id e0196233Artikkel i tidsskrift (Fagfellevurdert)
    Abstract [en]

    Disturbances in one-carbon metabolism, intracellular reactions involved in nucleotide synthesis and methylation, likely increase the risk of colorectal cancer (CRC). However, results have been inconsistent. To explore whether this inconsistency could be explained by intertumoral heterogeneity, we evaluated a comprehensive panel of one-carbon metabolism biomarkers and some single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) in relation to the risk of molecular subtypes of CRC defined by mutations in the KRAS and BRAF oncogenes. This nested case-control study included 488 CRC cases and 947 matched controls from two population-based cohorts in the Northern Sweden Health and Disease Study. We analyzed 14 biomarkers and 17 SNPs in prediagnostic blood and determined KRAS and BRAF mutation status in tumor tissue. In a multivariate network analysis, no variable displayed a strong association with the risk of specific CRC subtypes. A non-synonymous SNP in the CTH gene, rs1021737, had a stronger association compared with other variables. In subsequent univariate analyses, participants with variant rs1021737 genotype had a decreased risk of KRAS-mutated CRC (OR per allele = 0.72, 95% CI = 0.50, 1.05), and an increased risk of BRAF-mutated CRC (OR per allele = 1.56, 95% CI = 1.07, 2.30), with weak evidence for heterogeneity (Pheterogeneity = 0.01). This subtype-specific SNP association was not replicated in a case-case analysis of 533 CRC cases from The Cancer Genome Atlas (P = 0.85). In conclusion, we found no support for clear subtype-specific roles of one-carbon metabolism biomarkers and SNPs in CRC development, making differences in CRC molecular subtype distributions an unlikely explanation for the varying results on the role of one-carbon metabolism in CRC development across previous studies. Further investigation of the CTH gene in colorectal carcinogenesis with regards to KRAS and BRAF mutations or other molecular characteristics of the tumor may be warranted.

  • 153.
    Myte, Robin
    et al.
    Umeå universitet, Medicinska fakulteten, Institutionen för strålningsvetenskaper, Onkologi.
    Gylling, Björn
    Umeå universitet, Medicinska fakulteten, Institutionen för medicinsk biovetenskap, Patologi.
    Häggström, Jenny
    Umeå universitet, Samhällsvetenskapliga fakulteten, Handelshögskolan vid Umeå universitet, Statistik.
    Schneede, Jörn
    Umeå universitet, Medicinska fakulteten, Institutionen för farmakologi och klinisk neurovetenskap, Farmakologi.
    Ueland, Per Magne
    Hallmans, Göran
    Umeå universitet, Medicinska fakulteten, Enheten för biobanksforskning. Umeå universitet, Medicinska fakulteten, Institutionen för folkhälsa och klinisk medicin, Näringsforskning.
    Johansson, Ingegerd
    Umeå universitet, Medicinska fakulteten, Institutionen för odontologi.
    Palmqvist, Richard
    Umeå universitet, Medicinska fakulteten, Institutionen för medicinsk biovetenskap, Patologi.
    Van Guelpen, Bethany
    Umeå universitet, Medicinska fakulteten, Institutionen för strålningsvetenskaper, Onkologi.
    Untangling the role of one-carbon metabolism in colorectal cancer risk: a comprehensive Bayesian network analysis2017Inngår i: Scientific Reports, ISSN 2045-2322, E-ISSN 2045-2322, Vol. 7, artikkel-id 43434Artikkel i tidsskrift (Fagfellevurdert)
    Abstract [en]

    The role of one-carbon metabolism (1CM), particularly folate, in colorectal cancer (CRC) development has been extensively studied, but with inconclusive results. Given the complexity of 1CM, the conventional approach, investigating components individually, may be insufficient. We used a machine learning-based Bayesian network approach to study, simultaneously, 14 circulating one-carbon metabolites, 17 related single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs), and several environmental factors in relation to CRC risk in 613 cases and 1190 controls from the prospective Northern Sweden Health and Disease Study. The estimated networks corresponded largely to known biochemical relationships. Plasma concentrations of folate (direct), vitamin B6 (pyridoxal 5-phosphate) (inverse), and vitamin B2 (riboflavin) (inverse) had the strongest independent associations with CRC risk. Our study demonstrates the importance of incorporating B-vitamins in future studies of 1CM and CRC development, and the usefulness of Bayesian network learning for investigating complex biological systems in relation to disease.

  • 154.
    Myte, Robin
    et al.
    Umeå universitet, Medicinska fakulteten, Institutionen för strålningsvetenskaper, Onkologi.
    Gylling, Björn
    Umeå universitet, Medicinska fakulteten, Institutionen för medicinsk biovetenskap, Patologi.
    Schneede, Jörn
    Umeå universitet, Medicinska fakulteten, Institutionen för farmakologi och klinisk neurovetenskap, Farmakologi.
    Ueland, Per Magne
    Häggström, Jenny
    Umeå universitet, Samhällsvetenskapliga fakulteten, Handelshögskolan vid Umeå universitet, Statistik.
    Hultdin, Johan
    Umeå universitet, Medicinska fakulteten, Institutionen för medicinsk biovetenskap, Klinisk kemi.
    Hallmans, Göran
    Umeå universitet, Medicinska fakulteten, Enheten för biobanksforskning. Umeå universitet, Medicinska fakulteten, Institutionen för folkhälsa och klinisk medicin, Näringsforskning.
    Johansson, Ingegerd
    Umeå universitet, Medicinska fakulteten, Institutionen för odontologi.
    Palmqvist, Richard
    Umeå universitet, Medicinska fakulteten, Institutionen för medicinsk biovetenskap, Patologi.
    Van Guelpen, Bethany
    Umeå universitet, Medicinska fakulteten, Institutionen för strålningsvetenskaper, Onkologi.
    Components of One-carbon Metabolism Other than Folate and Colorectal Cancer Risk2016Inngår i: Epidemiology, ISSN 1044-3983, E-ISSN 1531-5487, Vol. 27, nr 6, s. 787-796Artikkel i tidsskrift (Fagfellevurdert)
    Abstract [en]

    BACKGROUND: Despite extensive study, the role of folate in colorectal cancer remains unclear. Research has therefore begun to address the role of other elements of the folate-methionine metabolic cycles. This study investigated factors other than folate involved in one-carbon metabolism, i.e., choline, betaine, dimethylglycine, sarcosine, and methionine and relevant polymorphisms, in relation to the risk of colorectal cancer in a population with low intakes and circulating levels of folate.

    METHODS: This was a prospective case-control study of 613 case subjects and 1,190 matched control subjects nested within the population-based Northern Sweden Health and Disease Study. We estimated odds ratios (OR) by conditional logistic regression, and marginal risk differences with weighted maximum likelihood estimation using incidence data from the study cohort.

    RESULTS: Higher plasma concentrations of methionine and betaine were associated with modest colorectal cancer risk reductions (OR [95% confidence interval {CI}] for highest versus lowest tertile: 0.76 [0.57, 0.99] and 0.72 [0.55, 0.94], respectively). Estimated marginal risk differences corresponded to approximately 200 fewer colorectal cancer cases per 100,000 individuals on average. We observed no clear associations between choline, dimethylglycine, or sarcosine and colorectal cancer risk. The inverse association of methionine was modified by plasma folate concentrations (OR [95% CI] for highest/lowest versus lowest/lowest tertile of plasma methionine/folate concentrations 0.39 [0.24, 0.64], Pinteraction = 0.06).

    CONCLUSIONS: In this population-based, nested case-control study with a long follow-up time from baseline to diagnosis (median: 8.2 years), higher plasma concentrations of methionine and betaine were associated with lower colorectal cancer risk. See Video Abstract at http://links.lww.com/EDE/B83.

  • 155. Naudin, Sabine
    et al.
    Li, Kuanrong
    Jaouen, Tristan
    Assi, Nada
    Kyrø, Cecilie
    Tjønneland, Anne
    Overvad, Kim
    Boutron-Ruault, Marie-Christine
    Rebours, Vinciane
    Védié, Anne-Laure
    Boeing, Heiner
    Kaaks, Rudolf
    Katzke, Verena
    Bamia, Christina
    Naska, Androniki
    Trichopoulou, Antonia
    Berrino, Franco
    Tagliabue, Giovanna
    Palli, Domenico
    Panico, Salvatore
    Tumino, Rosario
    Sacerdote, Carlotta
    Peeters, Petra H
    Bueno-de-Mesquita, Bas
    Weiderpass Vainio, Elisabete
    Gram, Inger Torhild
    Skeie, Guri
    Chirlaque, Maria-Dolores
    Rodríguez-Barranco, Miguel
    Barricarte, Aurelio
    Quirós, Jose Ramón
    Dorronsoro, Miren
    Johansson, Ingegerd
    Umeå universitet, Medicinska fakulteten, Institutionen för odontologi.
    Sund, Malin
    Umeå universitet, Medicinska fakulteten, Institutionen för kirurgisk och perioperativ vetenskap, Kirurgi.
    Sternby, Hanna
    Bradbury, Kathryn E
    Wareham, Nick
    Riboli, Elio
    Gunter, Marc
    Brennan, Paul
    Duell, Eric J
    Ferrari, Pietro
    Lifetime and baseline alcohol intakes and risk of pancreatic cancer in the European Prospective Investigation into Cancer and Nutrition study2018Inngår i: International Journal of Cancer, ISSN 0020-7136, E-ISSN 1097-0215, Vol. 143, nr 4, s. 801-812Artikkel i tidsskrift (Fagfellevurdert)
    Abstract [en]

    Recent evidence suggested a weak relationship between alcohol consumption and pancreatic cancer (PC) risk. In our study, the association between lifetime and baseline alcohol intakes and the risk of PC was evaluated, including the type of alcoholic beverages and potential interaction with smoking. Within the European Prospective Investigation into Cancer and Nutrition (EPIC) study, 1,283 incident PC (57% women) were diagnosed from 476,106 cancer-free participants, followed up for 14 years. Amounts of lifetime and baseline alcohol were estimated through lifestyle and dietary questionnaires, respectively. Cox proportional hazard models with age as primary time variable were used to estimate PC hazard ratios (HR) and their 95% confidence interval (CI). Alcohol intake was positively associated with PC risk in men. Associations were mainly driven by extreme alcohol levels, with HRs comparing heavy drinkers (>60 g/day) to the reference category (0.1-4.9 g/day) equal to 1.77 (95% CI: 1.06, 2.95) and 1.63 (95% CI: 1.16, 2.29) for lifetime and baseline alcohol, respectively. Baseline alcohol intakes from beer (>40 g/day) and spirits/liquors (>10 g/day) showed HRs equal to 1.58 (95% CI: 1.07, 2.34) and 1.41 (95% CI: 1.03, 1.94), respectively, compared to the reference category (0.1-2.9 g/day). In women, HR estimates did not reach statistically significance. The alcohol and PC risk association was not modified by smoking status. Findings from a large prospective study suggest that baseline and lifetime alcohol intakes were positively associated with PC risk, with more apparent risk estimates for beer and spirits/liquors than wine intake.

  • 156. Nettleton, Jennifer A
    et al.
    Follis, Jack L
    Ngwa, Julius S
    Smith, Caren E
    Ahmad, Shafqat
    Tanaka, Toshiko
    Wojczynski, Mary K
    Voortman, Trudy
    Lemaitre, Rozenn N
    Kristiansson, Kati
    Nuotio, Marja-Liisa
    Houston, Denise K
    Perälä, Mia-Maria
    Qi, Qibin
    Sonestedt, Emily
    Manichaikul, Ani
    Kanoni, Stavroula
    Ganna, Andrea
    Mikkilä, Vera
    North, Kari E
    Siscovick, David S
    Harald, Kennet
    Mckeown, Nicola M
    Johansson, Ingegerd
    Umeå universitet, Medicinska fakulteten, Institutionen för odontologi. Umeå universitet, Medicinska fakulteten, Institutionen för folkhälsa och klinisk medicin, Näringsforskning.
    Rissanen, Harri
    Liu, Yongmei
    Lahti, Jari
    Hu, Frank B
    Bandinelli, Stefania
    Rukh, Gull
    Rich, Stephen
    Booij, Lisanne
    Dmitriou, Maria
    Ax, Erika
    Raitakari, Olli
    Mukamal, Kenneth
    Männistö, Satu
    Hallmans, Göran
    Umeå universitet, Medicinska fakulteten, Enheten för biobanksforskning. Umeå universitet, Medicinska fakulteten, Institutionen för folkhälsa och klinisk medicin, Näringsforskning.
    Jula, Antti
    Ericson, Ulrika
    Jacobs, David R, Jr
    Van Rooij, Frank J A
    Deloukas, Panos
    Sjögren, Per
    Kähönen, Mika
    Djousse, Luc
    Perola, Markus
    Barroso, Inês
    Hofman, Albert
    Stirrups, Kathleen
    Viikari, Jorma
    Uitterlinden, André G
    Kalafati, Ioanna P
    Franco, Oscar H.
    Mozaffarian, Dariush
    Salomaa, Veikko
    Borecki, Ingrid B
    Knekt, Paul
    Kritchevsky, Stephen B
    Eriksson, Johan G
    Dedoussis, George V
    Qi, Lu
    Ferrucci, Luigi
    Orho-Melander, Marju
    Zillikens, M Carola
    Ingelsson, Erik
    Lehtimäki, Terho
    Renström, Frida
    Umeå universitet, Medicinska fakulteten, Enheten för biobanksforskning. Umeå universitet, Medicinska fakulteten, Institutionen för folkhälsa och klinisk medicin, Näringsforskning. Department of Clinical Sciences, Genetic and Molecular Epidemiology Unit, Lund University, Sweden.
    Cupples, L Adrienne
    Loos, Ruth J F
    Franks, Paul W
    Umeå universitet, Medicinska fakulteten, Institutionen för folkhälsa och klinisk medicin, Medicin. Department of Clinical Sciences, Genetic and Molecular Epidemiology Unit, Lund University, Sweden; Department of Nutrition, Harvard Chan School of Public Health, Boston, MA, USA.
    Gene x dietary pattern interactions in obesity: analysis of up to 68 317 adults of European ancestry2015Inngår i: Human Molecular Genetics, ISSN 0964-6906, E-ISSN 1460-2083, Vol. 24, nr 16, s. 4728-4738Artikkel i tidsskrift (Fagfellevurdert)
    Abstract [en]

    Obesity is highly heritable. Genetic variants showing robust associationswith obesity traits have been identified through genome wide association studies. We investigated whether a composite score representing healthy diet modifies associations of these variants with obesity traits. Totally, 32 body mass index (BMI)- and 14 waist-hip ratio (WHR)-associated single nucleotide polymorphismswere genotyped, and genetic risk scores (GRS) were calculated in 18 cohorts of European ancestry (n = 68 317). Diet score was calculated based on self-reported intakes of whole grains, fish, fruits, vegetables, nuts/seeds (favorable) and red/processed meats, sweets, sugar-sweetened beverages and fried potatoes (unfavorable). Multivariable adjusted, linear regression within each cohort followed by inverse variance-weighted, fixed-effects meta-analysis was used to characterize: (a) associations of each GRS with BMI and BMI-adjustedWHR and (b) diet score modification of genetic associations with BMI and BMI-adjusted WHR. Nominally significant interactions (P = 0.006-0.04) were observed between the diet score and WHR-GRS (but not BMI-GRS), two WHR loci (GRB14 rs10195252; LYPLAL1 rs4846567) and two BMI loci (LRRN6C rs10968576; MTIF3 rs4771122), for the respective BMI-adjustedWHR or BMI outcomes. Although the magnitudes of these select interactions were small, our data indicated that associations between genetic predisposition and obesity traits were stronger with a healthier diet. Our findings generate interesting hypotheses; however, experimental and functional studies are needed to determine their clinical relevance.

  • 157. Nettleton, Jennifer A.
    et al.
    Hivert, Marie-France
    Lemaitre, Rozenn N.
    McKeown, Nicola M.
    Mozaffarian, Dariush
    Tanaka, Toshiko
    Wojczynski, Mary K.
    Hruby, Adela
    Djousse, Luc
    Ngwa, Julius S.
    Follis, Jack L.
    Dimitriou, Maria
    Ganna, Andrea
    Houston, Denise K.
    Kanoni, Stavroula
    Mikkila, Vera
    Manichaikul, Ani
    Ntalla, Ioanna
    Renström, Frida
    Umeå universitet, Medicinska fakulteten, Institutionen för folkhälsa och klinisk medicin, Medicin.
    Sonestedt, Emily
    van Rooij, Frank J. A.
    Bandinelli, Stefania
    de Koning, Lawrence
    Ericson, Ulrika
    Hassanali, Neelam
    Kiefte-de Jong, Jessica C.
    Lohman, Kurt K.
    Raitakari, Olli
    Papoutsakis, Constantina
    Sjogren, Per
    Stirrups, Kathleen
    Ax, Erika
    Deloukas, Panos
    Groves, Christopher J.
    Jacques, Paul F.
    Johansson, Ingegerd
    Umeå universitet, Medicinska fakulteten, Institutionen för odontologi, Kariologi.
    Liu, Yongmei
    McCarthy, Mark I.
    North, Kari
    Viikari, Jorma
    Zillikens, M. Carola
    Dupuis, Josee
    Hofman, Albert
    Kolovou, Genovefa
    Mukamal, Kenneth
    Prokopenko, Inga
    Rolandsson, Olov
    Umeå universitet, Medicinska fakulteten, Institutionen för folkhälsa och klinisk medicin, Allmänmedicin.
    Seppala, Ilkka
    Cupples, L. Adrienne
    Hu, Frank B.
    Kahonen, Mika
    Uitterlinden, Andre G.
    Borecki, Ingrid B.
    Ferrucci, Luigi
    Jacobs, David R., Jr.
    Kritchevsky, Stephen B.
    Orho-Melander, Marju
    Pankow, James S.
    Lehtimaki, Terho
    Witteman, Jacqueline C. M.
    Ingelsson, Erik
    Siscovick, David S.
    Dedoussis, George
    Meigs, James B.
    Franks, Paul W.
    Umeå universitet, Medicinska fakulteten, Institutionen för folkhälsa och klinisk medicin, Medicin.
    Meta-analysis investigating associations between healthy diet and fasting glucose and insulin levels and modification by loci associated with glucose homeostasis in data from 15 cohorts2013Inngår i: American Journal of Epidemiology, ISSN 0002-9262, E-ISSN 1476-6256, Vol. 177, nr 2, s. 103-115Artikkel, forskningsoversikt (Fagfellevurdert)
    Abstract [en]

    Whether loci that influence fasting glucose (FG) and fasting insulin (FI) levels, as identified by genome-wide association studies, modify associations of diet with FG or FI is unknown. We utilized data from 15 US and European cohort studies comprising 51,289 persons without diabetes to test whether genotype and diet interact to influence FG or FI concentration. We constructed a diet score using study-specific quartile rankings for intakes of whole grains, fish, fruits, vegetables, and nuts/seeds (favorable) and red/processed meats, sweets, sugared beverages, and fried potatoes (unfavorable). We used linear regression within studies, followed by inverse-variance-weighted meta-analysis, to quantify 1) associations of diet score with FG and FI levels and 2) interactions of diet score with 16 FG-associated loci and 2 FI-associated loci. Diet score (per unit increase) was inversely associated with FG ( 0.004 mmol/L, 95 confidence interval: 0.005, 0.003) and FI ( 0.008 ln-pmol/L, 95 confidence interval: 0.009, 0.007) levels after adjustment for demographic factors, lifestyle, and body mass index. Genotype variation at the studied loci did not modify these associations. Healthier diets were associated with lower FG and FI concentrations regardless of genotype at previously replicated FG- and FI-associated loci. Studies focusing on genomic regions that do not yield highly statistically significant associations from main-effect genome-wide association studies may be more fruitful in identifying diet-gene interactions.

  • 158. Nettleton, Jennifer A
    et al.
    McKeown, Nicola M
    Kanoni, Stavroula
    Lemaitre, Rozenn N
    Hivert, Marie-France
    Ngwa, Julius
    van Rooij, Frank J A
    Sonestedt, Emily
    Wojczynski, Mary K
    Ye, Zheng
    Tanaka, Toshiko
    Garcia, Melissa
    Anderson, Jennifer S
    Follis, Jack L
    Djousse, Luc
    Mukamal, Kenneth
    Papoutsakis, Constantina
    Mozaffarian, Dariush
    Zillikens, M Carola
    Bandinelli, Stefania
    Bennett, Amanda J
    Borecki, Ingrid B
    Feitosa, Mary F
    Ferrucci, Luigi
    Forouhi, Nita G
    Groves, Christopher J
    Hallmans, Göran
    Umeå universitet, Medicinska fakulteten, Institutionen för folkhälsa och klinisk medicin, Näringsforskning.
    Harris, Tamara
    Hofman, Albert
    Houston, Denise K
    Hu, Frank B
    Johansson, Ingegerd
    Umeå universitet, Medicinska fakulteten, Institutionen för odontologi.
    Kritchevsky, Stephen B
    Langenberg, Claudia
    Launer, Lenore
    Liu, Yongmei
    Loos, Ruth J
    Nalls, Michael
    Orho-Melander, Marju
    Renström, Frida
    Umeå universitet, Medicinska fakulteten, Institutionen för folkhälsa och klinisk medicin, Medicin.
    Rice, Kenneth
    Riserus, Ulf
    Rolandsson, Olov
    Umeå universitet, Medicinska fakulteten, Institutionen för folkhälsa och klinisk medicin, Allmänmedicin.
    Rotter, Jerome I
    Saylor, Georgia
    Sijbrands, Eric JG
    Sjögren, Per
    Smith, Albert
    Steingrímsdóttir, Laufey
    Uitterlinden, André G
    Wareham, Nicholas J
    Prokopenko, Inga
    Pankow, James S
    van Duijn, Cornelia M
    Flores, Jose C
    Witteman, Jaqueline CM
    Dupuis, Josée
    Dedoussis, George V
    Ordovas, Jose M
    Ingelsson, Erik
    Cupples, L Adrienne
    Siscovick, David S
    Franks, Paul W
    Umeå universitet, Medicinska fakulteten, Institutionen för folkhälsa och klinisk medicin, Medicin.
    Meigs, James B
    Interactions of dietary whole-grain intake with fasting glucose- and insulin-related genetic loci in individuals of European descent: a meta-analysis of 14 cohort studies2010Inngår i: Diabetes Care, ISSN 0149-5992, E-ISSN 1935-5548, Vol. 33, nr 12, s. 2684-2691Artikkel i tidsskrift (Fagfellevurdert)
    Abstract [en]

    Our results support the favorable association of whole-grain intake with fasting glucose and insulin and suggest a potential interaction between variation in GCKR and whole-grain intake in influencing fasting insulin concentrations.

  • 159.
    Neumann, Anne
    et al.
    Umeå universitet, Medicinska fakulteten, Institutionen för folkhälsa och klinisk medicin, Epidemiologi och global hälsa. Cancer Epidemiology, University Cancer Center, University Hospital, Technische Universität Dresden, Germany.
    Norberg, Margareta
    Umeå universitet, Medicinska fakulteten, Institutionen för folkhälsa och klinisk medicin, Epidemiologi och global hälsa.
    Schoffer, Olaf
    Cancer Epidemiology, University Cancer Center, University Hospital, Technische Universität Dresden, Germany.
    Norström, Fredrik
    Umeå universitet, Medicinska fakulteten, Institutionen för folkhälsa och klinisk medicin, Epidemiologi och global hälsa.
    Johansson, Ingegerd
    Umeå universitet, Medicinska fakulteten, Institutionen för odontologi.
    Klug, Stefanie J.
    Cancer Epidemiology, University Cancer Center, University Hospital, Technische Universität Dresden, Germany.
    Lindholm, Lars
    Umeå universitet, Medicinska fakulteten, Institutionen för folkhälsa och klinisk medicin, Epidemiologi och folkhälsovetenskap.
    Risk equations for the development of worsened glucose status and type 2 diabetes mellitus in a Swedish intervention program2013Inngår i: BMC Public Health, ISSN 1471-2458, E-ISSN 1471-2458, Vol. 13, artikkel-id 1014Artikkel i tidsskrift (Fagfellevurdert)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: Several studies investigated transitions and risk factors from impaired glucose tolerance (IGT) to type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2D). However, there is a lack of information on the probabilities to transit from normal glucose tolerance (NGT) to different pre-diabetic states and from these states to T2D. The objective of our study is to estimate these risk equations and to quantify the influence of single or combined risk factors on these transition probabilities. Methods: Individuals who participated in the VIP program twice, having the first examination at ages 30, 40 or 50 years of age between 1990 and 1999 and the second examination 10 years later were included in the analysis. Participants were grouped into five groups: NGT, impaired fasting glucose (IFG), IGT, IFG&IGT or T2D. Fourteen potential risk factors for the development of a worse glucose state (pre-diabetes or T2D) were investigated: sex, age, education, perceived health, triglyceride, blood pressure, BMI, smoking, physical activity, snus, alcohol, nutrition and family history. Analysis was conducted in two steps. Firstly, factor analysis was used to find candidate variables; and secondly, logistic regression was employed to quantify the influence of the candidate variables. Bootstrap estimations validated the models. Results: In total, 29 937 individuals were included in the analysis. Alcohol and perceived health were excluded due to the results of the factor analysis and the logistic regression respectively. Six risk equations indicating different impacts of different risk factors on the transition to a worse glucose state were estimated and validated. The impact of each risk factor depended on the starting or ending pre-diabetes state. High levels of triglyceride, hypertension and high BMI were the strongest risk factors to transit to a worsened glucose state. Conclusions: The equations could be used to identify individuals with increased risk to develop any of the three pre-diabetic states or T2D and to adapt prevention strategies.

  • 160. Nieters, Alexandra
    et al.
    Rohrmann, Sabine
    Becker, Nikolaus
    Linseisen, Jakob
    Ruediger, Thomas
    Overvad, Kim
    Tjønneland, Anne
    Olsen, Anja
    Allen, Naomi E
    Travis, Ruth C
    Bingham, Sheila
    Khaw, Kay-Tee
    Ardanaz, Eva
    Redondo, M L
    Basterrechea, Mikel
    Martinez, Carmen
    Tormo, María-José
    Rosso, Stefano
    Tagliabue, Giovanna
    Masala, Giovanna
    Mattiello, Amalia
    Tumino, Rosario
    Boeing, Heiner
    Bergmann, Manuela
    Kaaks, Rudolf
    Trichopoulou, Antonia
    Trichopoulos, Dimitrios
    Peeters, Petra H
    Bueno-de-Mesquita, Bas
    Boffetta, Paolo
    Brennan, Paul
    Ferrari, Pietro
    Neasham, David
    Lund, Eiliv
    Berglund, Göran
    Manjer, Jonas
    Hallmans, Göran
    Umeå universitet, Medicinska fakulteten, Institutionen för folkhälsa och klinisk medicin, Näringsforskning.
    Johansson, Ingegerd
    Umeå universitet, Medicinska fakulteten, Institutionen för odontologi.
    Vineis, Paolo
    Riboli, Elio
    Smoking and Lymphoma Risk in the European Prospective Investigation into Cancer and Nutrition.2008Inngår i: Am J Epidemiol, ISSN 1476-6256Artikkel i tidsskrift (Fagfellevurdert)
    Abstract [en]

    Lymphomas are one of the few cancers that have been increasing in incidence over the past decades. So far, only a few established risk factors have been identified, including immunosuppression and viral infections. Recent evidence suggests etiologic heterogeneity of different lymphoma subtypes. Smoking may affect risk differently, depending on the lymphoma entity. The European Prospective Investigation into Cancer and Nutrition was used to study the role of smoking in the etiology of lymphomas and individual subtypes within a prospective study. Information on baseline and lifetime tobacco smoking by 478,590 participants was collected between 1992 and 2000. Cox proportional hazards regression was used to calculate multivariate-adjusted hazard ratios and 95% confidence intervals. During 3,567,410 person-years of follow-up, 1,371 lymphoma cases (1,304 non-Hodgkin's lymphomas and 67 Hodgkin's lymphomas) were identified. Relative risk for smokers at recruitment was more than twofold higher for Hodgkin's lymphoma (hazard ratio = 2.14, 95% confidence interval: 1.18, 3.87) but was not elevated for non-Hodgkin's lymphoma (hazard ratio = 1.06, 95% confidence interval: 0.94, 1.19) and individual B-cell non-Hodgkin's lymphoma subtypes. In this prospective study, smoking appeared to increase Hodgkin's lymphoma risk consistently in both genders, whereas B-cell non-Hodgkin's lymphoma risk was not associated. Future analysis should involve viral biomarkers and genetic susceptibility markers to elucidate potential mechanisms of smoking-induced carcinogenesis, particularly for Hodgkin's lymphoma.

  • 161.
    Nilsson, Lena Maria
    et al.
    Umeå universitet, Medicinska fakulteten, Institutionen för folkhälsa och klinisk medicin, Näringsforskning.
    Dahlgren, Lars
    Umeå universitet, Samhällsvetenskapliga fakulteten, Sociologiska institutionen.
    Johansson, Ingegerd
    Umeå universitet, Medicinska fakulteten, Institutionen för odontologi.
    Brustad, Magritt
    Sjölander, Per
    Van Guelpen, Bethany
    Umeå universitet, Medicinska fakulteten, Institutionen för medicinsk biovetenskap, Patologi.
    Diet and lifestyle of the Sami of southern Lapland in the 1930s - 1950s and today2011Inngår i: International Journal of Circumpolar Health, ISSN 1239-9736, E-ISSN 2242-3982, Vol. 70, nr 3, s. 301-318Artikkel i tidsskrift (Fagfellevurdert)
    Abstract [en]

    OBJECTIVES: To describe the lifestyle of the Sami of southern Lapland 50 to 70 years ago in relation to the present-day Sami and non-Sami populations and, thereby, to provide a basis for future studies of culturally related determinants of health and illness.

    STUDY DESIGN: A qualitative analysis, and a quantitative comparison of Sami and non-Sami groups.

    METHODS: Semi-structured interviews were conducted with 20 elderly Sami concerning their parents' lifestyle and diet 50 to 70 years ago. Questionnaire data from 81 reindeer-herding Sami, 226 non-reindeer-herding Sami and 1,842 sex-, age- and geographically matched non-Sami from the population-based Västerbotten Intervention Project were analysed by non-parametric tests and partial least squares methodology.

    RESULTS: Surprisingly, fatty fish may have been more important than reindeer meat for the Sami of southern Lapland in the 1930s to 1950s, and it is still consumed more frequently by reindeer-herding Sami than nonreindeer-herding Sami and non-Sami. Other dietary characteristics of the historical Sami and present-day reindeer-herding Sami were higher intakes of fat, blood and boiled coffee, and lower intakes of bread, fibre and cultivated vegetables, compared with present-day non-Sami. Physical activity was also a part of the daily life of the Sami to a greater extent in the 1930s to 1950s than today. Sami men often worked far from home, while the women were responsible for fishing, farming, gardening (which was introduced in the 1930-1950 period), as well as housework and childcare.

    CONCLUSIONS: For studies investigating characteristic lifestyle elements of specific ethnic groups, the elements of greatest acknowledged cultural importance today (in this case reindeer meat) may not be of the most objective importance traditionally.

  • 162.
    Nilsson, Lena Maria
    et al.
    Umeå universitet, Medicinska fakulteten, Institutionen för folkhälsa och klinisk medicin, Näringsforskning.
    Johansson, Ingegerd
    Umeå universitet, Medicinska fakulteten, Institutionen för odontologi.
    Lenner, Per
    Umeå universitet, Medicinska fakulteten, Institutionen för strålningsvetenskaper, Onkologi.
    Lindahl, Bernt
    Umeå universitet, Medicinska fakulteten, Institutionen för folkhälsa och klinisk medicin, Yrkes- och miljömedicin.
    Van Guelpen, Bethany
    Umeå universitet, Medicinska fakulteten, Institutionen för medicinsk biovetenskap, Patologi.
    Consumption of filtered and boiled coffee and the risk of incident cancer: a prospective cohort study2010Inngår i: Cancer Causes and Control, ISSN 0957-5243, E-ISSN 1573-7225, Vol. 21, nr 10, s. 1533-1544Artikkel i tidsskrift (Fagfellevurdert)
    Abstract [en]

    Background  Despite potentially relevant chemical differences between filtered and boiled coffee, this study is the first to investigate consumption in relation to the risk of incident cancer.

    Methods  Subjects were from the Västerbotten Intervention Project (64,603 participants, including 3,034 cases), with up to 15 years of follow-up. Hazard ratios (HR) were calculated by multivariate Cox regression.

    Results  No associations were found for all cancer sites combined, or for prostate or colorectal cancer. For breast cancer, boiled coffee ≥4 versus <1 occasions/day was associated with a reduced risk (HR = 0.52, CI = 0.30–0.88, p trend = 0.247). An increased risk of premenopausal and a reduced risk of postmenopausal breast cancer were found for both total (HRpremenopausal = 1.69, CI = 0.96–2.98, p trend = 0.015, HRpostmenopausal = 0.60, CI = 0.39–0.93, p trend = 0.006) and filtered coffee (HRpremenopausal = 1.76, CI = 1.04–3.00, p trend = 0.045, HRpostmenopausal = 0.52, CI = 0.30–0.88, p trend = 0.045). Boiled coffee was positively associated with the risk of respiratory tract cancer (HR = 1.81, CI = 1.06–3.08, p trend = 0.084), a finding limited to men. Main results for less common cancer types included total coffee in renal cell cancer (HR = 0.30, CI = 0.11–0.79, p trend = 0.009) and boiled coffee in pancreas cancer (HR = 2.51 CI = 1.15–5.50, p trend = 0.006).

    Conclusion  These findings demonstrate, for the first time, the potential relevance of brewing method in investigations of coffee consumption and cancer risk, but they must be confirmed in future studies.

  • 163.
    Nilsson, Lena Maria
    et al.
    Umeå universitet, Medicinska fakulteten, Institutionen för folkhälsa och klinisk medicin, Näringsforskning.
    Winkvist, A
    Clinical Nutrition, University of Gothenburg.
    Hallmans, Göran
    Umeå universitet, Medicinska fakulteten, Institutionen för folkhälsa och klinisk medicin, Näringsforskning. Umeå universitet, Medicinska fakulteten, Enheten för biobanksforskning.
    Johansson, Ingegerd
    Umeå universitet, Medicinska fakulteten, Institutionen för odontologi.
    Lindahl, Bernt
    Umeå universitet, Medicinska fakulteten, Institutionen för folkhälsa och klinisk medicin, Yrkes- och miljömedicin.
    Lenner, Per
    Umeå universitet, Medicinska fakulteten, Institutionen för strålningsvetenskaper, Onkologi.
    Van Guelpen, Bethany
    Umeå universitet, Medicinska fakulteten, Institutionen för medicinsk biovetenskap, Patologi.
    Low-carbohydrate, high-protein score and cancer incidence and mortality in a northern swedish population2011Inngår i: Abstract Book: 2011 European Multidisciplinary Cancer Congress, Oxford: Elsevier, 2011, Vol. 47, s. S249-S249Konferansepaper (Fagfellevurdert)
  • 164.
    Nilsson, Lena Maria
    et al.
    Umeå universitet, Medicinska fakulteten, Institutionen för folkhälsa och klinisk medicin, Näringsforskning.
    Winkvist, Anna
    Göteborgs universitet.
    Brustad, Magritt
    Sentrum for Samisk helseforskning, Tromsö universitet.
    Jansson, Jan-Håkan
    Umeå universitet, Medicinska fakulteten, Institutionen för folkhälsa och klinisk medicin, Medicin.
    Johansson, Ingegerd
    Umeå universitet, Medicinska fakulteten, Institutionen för odontologi.
    Lenner, Per
    Umeå universitet, Medicinska fakulteten, Institutionen för strålningsvetenskaper, Onkologi.
    Lindahl, Bernt
    Umeå universitet, Medicinska fakulteten, Institutionen för folkhälsa och klinisk medicin, Yrkes- och miljömedicin.
    Van Guelpen, Bethany
    Umeå universitet, Medicinska fakulteten, Institutionen för medicinsk biovetenskap, Patologi.
    A traditional Sami diet score as a determinant of mortality in a general northern Swedish population2012Inngår i: International Journal of Circumpolar Health, ISSN 2242-3982, E-ISSN 2242-3982, Vol. 71, artikkel-id 18537Artikkel i tidsskrift (Fagfellevurdert)
    Abstract [en]

    OBJECTIVES: To examine the relationship between "traditional Sami" dietary pattern and mortality in a general northern Swedish population.

    STUDY DESIGN: Population-based cohort study.

    METHODS: We examined 77,319 subjects from the Västerbotten Intervention Program (VIP) cohort. A traditional Sami diet score was constructed by adding 1 point for intake above the median level of red meat, fatty fish, total fat, berries and boiled coffee, and 1 point for intake below the median of vegetables, bread and fibre. Hazard ratios (HR) for mortality were calculated by Cox regression.

    RESULTS: Increasing traditional Sami diet scores were associated with slightly elevated all-cause mortality in men [Multivariate HR per 1-point increase in score 1.04 (95% CI 1.01-1.07), p=0.018], but not for women [Multivariate HR 1.03 (95% CI 0.99-1.07), p=0.130]. This increased risk was approximately equally attributable to cardiovascular disease and cancer, though somewhat more apparent for cardiovascular disease mortality in men free from diabetes, hypertension and obesity at baseline [Multivariate HR 1.10 (95% CI 1.01-1.20), p=0.023].

    CONCLUSIONS: A weak increased all-cause mortality was observed in men with higher traditional Sami diet scores. However, due to the complexity in defining a "traditional Sami" diet, and the limitations of our questionnaire for this purpose, the study should be considered exploratory, a first attempt to relate a "traditional Sami" dietary pattern to health endpoints. Further investigation of cohorts with more detailed information on dietary and lifestyle items relevant for traditional Sami culture is warranted.

  • 165.
    Nilsson, Lena Maria
    et al.
    Umeå universitet, Medicinska fakulteten, Institutionen för folkhälsa och klinisk medicin, Näringsforskning. Umeå universitet, Medicinska fakulteten, Enheten för biobanksforskning.
    Winkvist, Anna
    Göteborgs universitet.
    Eliasson, Mats
    Umeå universitet, Medicinska fakulteten, Institutionen för folkhälsa och klinisk medicin, Medicin.
    Jansson, Jan-Håkan
    Umeå universitet, Medicinska fakulteten, Institutionen för folkhälsa och klinisk medicin, Medicin.
    Hallmans, Göran
    Umeå universitet, Medicinska fakulteten, Institutionen för folkhälsa och klinisk medicin, Näringsforskning. Umeå universitet, Medicinska fakulteten, Enheten för biobanksforskning.
    Johansson, Ingegerd
    Umeå universitet, Medicinska fakulteten, Institutionen för odontologi, Kariologi.
    Lindahl, Bernt
    Umeå universitet, Medicinska fakulteten, Institutionen för folkhälsa och klinisk medicin, Yrkes- och miljömedicin.
    Lenner, Per
    Umeå universitet, Medicinska fakulteten, Institutionen för strålningsvetenskaper, Onkologi.
    Van Guelpen, Bethany
    Umeå universitet, Medicinska fakulteten, Institutionen för medicinsk biovetenskap, Patologi.
    Low-carbohydrate, high-protein score and mortality in a northern Swedish population2012Inngår i: European Journal of Clinical Nutrition, ISSN 0954-3007, E-ISSN 1476-5640, Vol. 66, nr 6, s. 694-700Artikkel i tidsskrift (Fagfellevurdert)
    Abstract [en]

    BACKGROUND/OBJECTIVE: Long-term effects of carbohydrate-restricted diets are unclear. We examined a low-carbohydrate, high-protein (LCHP) score in relation to mortality.

    SUBJECTS/METHODS: This is a population-based cohort study on adults in the northern Swedish county of Vasterbotten. In 37 639 men (1460 deaths) and 39 680 women (923 deaths) from the population-based Vasterbotten Intervention Program, deciles of energy-adjusted carbohydrate (descending) and protein (ascending) intake were added to create an LCHP score (2-20 points). Sex-specific hazard ratios (HR) were calculated by Cox regression.

    RESULTS: Median intakes of carbohydrates, protein and fat in subjects with LCHP scores 2-20 ranged from 61.0% to 38.6%, 11.3% to 19.2% and 26.6% to 41.5% of total energy intake, respectively. High LCHP score (14-20 points) did not predict all-cause mortality compared with low LCHP score (2-8 points), after accounting for saturated fat intake and established risk factors (men: HR for high vs low 1.03 (95% confidence interval (CI) 0.88-1.20), P for continuous 0.721; women: HR for high vs low 1.10 (95% CI 0.91-1.32), P for continuous 0.229). For cancer and cardiovascular disease, no clear associations were found. Carbohydrate intake was inversely associated with all-cause mortality, though only statistically significant in women (multivariate HR per decile increase 0.95 (95% CI 0.91-0.99), P = 0.010).

    CONCLUSION: Our results do not support a clear, general association between LCHP score and mortality. Studies encompassing a wider range of macronutrient consumption may be necessary to detect such an association.

  • 166.
    Nilsson, Lena Maria
    et al.
    Umeå universitet, Medicinska fakulteten, Institutionen för folkhälsa och klinisk medicin, Näringsforskning.
    Winkvist, Anna
    Esberg, Anders
    Umeå universitet, Medicinska fakulteten, Institutionen för odontologi.
    Jansson, Jan-Håkan
    Umeå universitet, Medicinska fakulteten, Institutionen för folkhälsa och klinisk medicin.
    Wennberg, Patrik
    Umeå universitet, Medicinska fakulteten, Institutionen för folkhälsa och klinisk medicin.
    van Guelpen, Bethany
    Umeå universitet, Medicinska fakulteten, Institutionen för strålningsvetenskaper, Onkologi. Umeå universitet, Medicinska fakulteten, Wallenberg centrum för molekylär medicin vid Umeå universitet (WCMM).
    Johansson, Ingegerd
    Umeå universitet, Medicinska fakulteten, Institutionen för odontologi. Umeå universitet, Medicinska fakulteten, Institutionen för folkhälsa och klinisk medicin.
    Dairy Products and Cancer Risk in a Northern Sweden Population2019Inngår i: Nutrition and Cancer, ISSN 0163-5581, E-ISSN 1532-7914Artikkel i tidsskrift (Fagfellevurdert)
    Abstract [en]

    The role of dairy products in cancer is unclear. We assessed consumption of fermented milk, non-fermented milk, cheese, and butter, estimated from semi-quantitative food frequency questionnaires, in relation to prospective risk of breast, prostate, colorectal, smoking-, and obesity-related cancers in 101,235 subjects, including 12,552 cancer cases, in the population-based Northern Sweden Health and Disease Study. Most analyses (n = 20) rendered null results. In men, we observed an increased prostate cancer risk among high-consumers of cheese (hazard ratio (HR) for highest vs. lowest quintile (Q5-Q1), 1.11; 95% CI, 0.97-1.27; Ptrend = 0.013). In women, high-consumers of cheese had a decreased risk of overall cancer (HR Q5-Q1, 0.95; 95% CI, 0.88-1.04; Ptrend = 0.039), smoking-related (HR Q5-Q1, 0.84; 95% CI, 0.72-0.97; Ptrend ≤ 0.001), and colorectal cancers (HR Q5-Q1, 0.82; 95% CI, 0.63-1.07; Ptrend = 0.048). Butter yielded a weak decreased obesity-related cancer risk in women (HR Q5-Q1, 0.91; 95% CI, 0.81-1.02; Ptrend = 0.049). Fermented milk yielded HRs below zero in women, but with no clear linear associations. In conclusion, this study does not support any major adverse or beneficial effects of fermented milk, non-fermented milk, cheese, and butter in the diet from a cancer risk perspective.

  • 167.
    Nilsson, Lena Maria
    et al.
    Umeå universitet, Medicinska fakulteten, Institutionen för folkhälsa och klinisk medicin, Näringsforskning. Umeå universitet, Arktiskt centrum vid Umeå universitet (Arcum).
    Winkvist, Anna
    Univ Gothenburg, Sahlgrenska Acad, Dept Internal Med & Clin Nutr, SE-40530 Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Johansson, Ingegerd
    Umeå universitet, Medicinska fakulteten, Institutionen för odontologi, Kariologi.
    Lindahl, Bernt
    Umeå universitet, Medicinska fakulteten, Institutionen för folkhälsa och klinisk medicin, Yrkes- och miljömedicin. Umeå universitet, Medicinska fakulteten, Institutionen för folkhälsa och klinisk medicin, Näringsforskning.
    Hallmans, Göran
    Umeå universitet, Medicinska fakulteten, Institutionen för folkhälsa och klinisk medicin, Näringsforskning. Umeå universitet, Medicinska fakulteten, Enheten för biobanksforskning.
    Lenner, Per
    Umeå universitet, Medicinska fakulteten, Institutionen för strålningsvetenskaper, Onkologi.
    Van Guelpen, Bethany
    Umeå universitet, Medicinska fakulteten, Institutionen för medicinsk biovetenskap, Patologi.
    Low-carbohydrate, high-protein diet score and risk of incident cancer: a prospective cohort study2013Inngår i: Nutrition Journal, ISSN 1475-2891, E-ISSN 1475-2891, Vol. 12, s. 58-Artikkel i tidsskrift (Fagfellevurdert)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: Although carbohydrate reduction of varying degrees is a popular and controversial dietary trend, potential long-term effects for health, and cancer in specific, are largely unknown. Methods: We studied a previously established low-carbohydrate, high-protein (LCHP) score in relation to the incidence of cancer and specific cancer types in a population-based cohort in northern Sweden. Participants were 62,582 men and women with up to 17.8 years of follow-up (median 9.7), including 3,059 prospective cancer cases. Cox regression analyses were performed for a LCHP score based on the sum of energy-adjusted deciles of carbohydrate (descending) and protein (ascending) intake labeled 1 to 10, with higher scores representing a diet lower in carbohydrates and higher in protein. Important potential confounders were accounted for, and the role of metabolic risk profile, macronutrient quality including saturated fat intake, and adequacy of energy intake reporting was explored. Results: For the lowest to highest LCHP scores, 2 to 20, carbohydrate intakes ranged from median 60.9 to 38.9% of total energy intake. Both protein (primarily animal sources) and particularly fat (both saturated and unsaturated) intakes increased with increasing LCHP scores. LCHP score was not related to cancer risk, except for a non-dose-dependent, positive association for respiratory tract cancer that was statistically significant in men. The multivariate hazard ratio for medium (9-13) versus low (2-8) LCHP scores was 1.84 (95% confidence interval: 1.05-3.23; p-trend = 0.38). Other analyses were largely consistent with the main results, although LCHP score was associated with colorectal cancer risk inversely in women with high saturated fat intakes, and positively in men with higher LCHP scores based on vegetable protein. Conclusion: These largely null results provide important information concerning the long-term safety of moderate carbohydrate reduction and consequent increases in protein and, in this cohort, especially fat intakes. In order to determine the effects of stricter carbohydrate restriction, further studies encompassing a wider range of macronutrient intakes are warranted.

  • 168.
    Nordlund, Åke
    et al.
    Umeå universitet, Medicinska fakulteten, Institutionen för odontologi, Kariologi.
    Johansson, Ingegerd
    Umeå universitet, Medicinska fakulteten, Institutionen för odontologi, Kariologi.
    Källestål, Carina
    Umeå universitet, Medicinska fakulteten, Institutionen för odontologi, Kariologi.
    Ericson, Thorild
    Umeå universitet, Medicinska fakulteten, Institutionen för odontologi, Kariologi.
    Sjöström, Michael
    Umeå universitet, Teknisk-naturvetenskapliga fakulteten, Kemiska institutionen.
    Strömberg, Nicklas
    Umeå universitet, Medicinska fakulteten, Institutionen för odontologi, Kariologi.
    Improved ability of biological and previous caries multimarkers to predict caries disease as revealed by multivariate PLS modelling2009Inngår i: BMC Oral Health, ISSN 1472-6831, E-ISSN 1472-6831, Vol. 9, nr 28Artikkel i tidsskrift (Fagfellevurdert)
    Abstract [en]

    BACKGROUND: Dental caries is a chronic disease with plaque bacteria, diet and saliva modifying disease activity. Here we have used the PLS method to evaluate a multiplicity of such biological variables (n=88) for ability to predict caries in a cross-sectional (baseline caries) and prospective (2-year caries development) setting. METHODS: Multivariate PLS modelling was used to associate the many biological variables with caries recorded in thirty 14-year-old children by measuring the numbers of incipient and manifest caries lesions at all surfaces. RESULTS: A wide but shallow gliding scale of one fifth caries promoting or protecting, and four fifths non-influential, variables occurred. The influential markers behaved in the order of plaque bacteria > diet > saliva, with previously known plaque bacteria/diet markers and a set of new protective diet markers. A differential variable patterning appeared for new versus progressing lesions. The influential biological multimarkers (n=18) predicted baseline caries better (ROC area 0.96) than five markers (0.92) and a single lactobacilli marker (0.7) with sensitivity/specificity of 1.87, 1.78 and 1.13 at 1/3 of the subjects diagnosed sick, respectively. Moreover, biological multimarkers (n=18) explained 2-year caries increment slightly better than reported before but predicted it poorly (ROC area 0.76). By contrast, multimarkers based on previous caries predicted alone (ROC area 0.88), or together with biological multimarkers (0.94), increment well with a sensitivity/specificity of 1.74 at 1/3 of the subjects diagnosed sick. CONCLUSION: Multimarkers behave better than single-to-five markers but future multimarker strategies will require systematic searches for improved saliva and plaque bacteria markers.

  • 169. Norlén, P
    et al.
    Johansson, Ingegerd
    Umeå universitet, Medicinsk fakultet, Odontologi, Kariologi.
    Birkhed, D
    Impact of medical and life-style factors on number of teeth in 68-year-old men in southern Sweden1996Inngår i: Acta Odontologica Scandinavica, ISSN 0001-6357, E-ISSN 1502-3850, Vol. 54, nr 1, s. 66-74Artikkel i tidsskrift (Fagfellevurdert)
    Abstract [en]

    The aim of the present study was to investigate the impact of general health and life-style factors on the number of remaining teeth in 68-year-old men living in the city of Malmö, Sweden. The study included 483 men (participation rate, 78%). Poor self-assessed health, frequent medical attendance, diabetes, and oral dryness were related to fewer remaining teeth. Number of teeth was negatively correlated to concentrations of triglycerides and alkaline phosphatases in serum and to glucose in blood but positively correlated to serum urea. Various dietary variables including consumption of sucrose-containing products and nutritional quality were not related either to number of teeth or to prevalence of edentulousness. Smoking and high consumption of coffee or alcohol were associated with fewer remaining teeth. Multiple logistic regression analyses showed that social class, frequency of dental attendance, smoking, and serum concentrations of triglycerides and urea had an independent effect on number of teeth.

  • 170. Nyholm, Maria
    et al.
    Lissner, Lauren
    Hörnell, Agneta
    Umeå universitet, Samhällsvetenskapliga fakulteten, Institutionen för kostvetenskap.
    Johansson, Ingegerd
    Umeå universitet, Medicinska fakulteten, Institutionen för odontologi, Tandläkarutbildning.
    Hallmans, Göran
    Umeå universitet, Medicinska fakulteten, Institutionen för folkhälsa och klinisk medicin, Näringsforskning. Umeå universitet, Medicinska fakulteten, Enheten för biobanksforskning.
    Weinehall, Lars
    Umeå universitet, Medicinska fakulteten, Institutionen för folkhälsa och klinisk medicin, Epidemiologi och global hälsa.
    Winkvist, Anna
    Exploring dietary patterns, obesity and sources of bias: the Västerbotten Intervention Programme (VIP)2013Inngår i: Public Health Nutrition, ISSN 1368-9800, E-ISSN 1475-2727, Vol. 16, nr 4, s. 631-638Artikkel i tidsskrift (Fagfellevurdert)
    Abstract [en]

    Objective: Dietary patterns capture the overall diet and thereby provide information on how nutrients are consumed in combinations, and have been suggested to be a better method than studying single nutrients. The present study explored the relationship between dietary patterns at baseline and incidence of obesity at 10-year follow-up in women.

    Design: A longitudinal study using baseline measurements from 1992-1996, including food intake, medication, heredity, socio-economic status, lifestyle and measured body composition, and follow-up data collected in 2002-2006 including measured body composition.

    Setting: Data from the Västerbotten Intervention Programme (VIP) in Sweden.

    Subjects: A total of 6545 initially non-obese women aged 30-50 years.

    Results: Among women reporting plausible energy intakes, the 'Fruit and vegetables cluster' predicted the highest incidence of obesity (OR = 1·76, 95 % CI 1·11, 2·76; P = 0·015) compared with women in the other food pattern groups combined. When adjusting for metabolic factors and BMI at baseline, the risk for obesity in the 'Fruit and vegetables cluster' was attenuated to non-significance. In contrast, high intake of fruit per se was associated with a decreased risk of developing obesity (OR = 0·69, 95 % CI 0·51, 0·91; P = 0·010).

    Conclusions: Dietary pattern groups identified by cluster analysis are likely to reflect characteristics in addition to diet, including lifestyle, previous and current health status and risk factors for future disease, whereas intake of fruit per se was a stable indicator and less affected by baseline characteristics. These results underscore the need for complementary methods in understanding diet-disease relationships.

  • 171. Nöthlings, Ute
    et al.
    Schulze, Matthias B
    Weikert, Cornelia
    Boeing, Heiner
    van der Schouw, Yvonne T
    Bamia, Christina
    Benetou, Vasiliki
    Lagiou, Pagona
    Krogh, Vittorio
    Beulens, Joline W J
    Peeters, Petra H M
    Halkjaer, Jytte
    Tjønneland, Anne
    Tumino, Rosario
    Panico, Salvatore
    Masala, Giovanna
    Clavel-Chapelon, Francoise
    de Lauzon, Blandine
    Boutron-Ruault, Marie-Christine
    Vercambre, Marie-Noël
    Kaaks, Rudolf
    Linseisen, Jakob
    Overvad, Kim
    Arriola, Larraitz
    Ardanaz, Eva
    Gonzalez, Carlos A
    Tormo, Marie-Jose
    Bingham, Sheila
    Khaw, Kay-Tee
    Key, Tim J A
    Vineis, Paolo
    Riboli, Elio
    Ferrari, Pietro
    Boffetta, Paolo
    Bueno-de-Mesquita, H Bas
    van der A, Daphne L
    Berglund, Göran
    Wirfält, Elisabet
    Hallmans, Göran
    Umeå universitet, Medicinska fakulteten, Institutionen för folkhälsa och klinisk medicin, Näringsforskning.
    Johansson, Ingegerd
    Umeå universitet, Medicinska fakulteten, Institutionen för odontologi, Kariologi.
    Lund, Eiliv
    Trichopoulo, Antonia
    Intake of vegetables, legumes, and fruit, and risk for all-cause, cardiovascular, and cancer mortality in a European diabetic population.2008Inngår i: Journal of Nutrition, ISSN 0022-3166, E-ISSN 1541-6100, Vol. 138, nr 4, s. 775-81Artikkel i tidsskrift (Fagfellevurdert)
  • 172. Orfanos, Philippos
    et al.
    Naska, Androniki
    Trichopoulos, Dimitrios
    Slimani, Nadia
    Ferrari, Pietro
    van Bakel, Marit
    Deharveng, Genevieve
    Overvad, Kim
    Tjønneland, Anne
    Halkjær, Jytte
    Santucci de Magistris, Maria
    Tumino, Rosario
    Pala, Valeria
    Sacerdote, Carlotta
    Masala, Giovanna
    Skeie, Guri
    Engeset, Dagrun
    Lund, Eiliv
    Jakszyn, Paula
    Barricarte, Aurelio
    Chirlaque, Maria-Dolores
    Martinez-Garcia, Carmen
    Amiano, Pilar
    Quirós, J Ramon
    Bingham, Sheila
    Welch, Ailsa
    Spencer, Elizabeth A
    Key, Timothy J
    Rohrmann, Sabine
    Linseisen, Jakob
    Ray, Jennifer
    Boeing, Heiner
    Peeters, Petra H
    Bueno-de-Mesquita, H Bas
    Ocke, Marga
    Johansson, Ingegerd
    Umeå universitet, Medicinsk fakultet, Odontologi, Kariologi.
    Johansson, Gerd
    Umeå universitet, Medicinsk fakultet, Folkhälsa och klinisk medicin, Näringsforskning.
    Berglund, Göran
    Manjer, Jonas
    Boutron-Ruault, Marie-Christine
    Touvier, Mathilde
    Clavel-Chapelon, Françoise
    Trichopoulou, Antonia
    Eating out of home and its correlates in 10 European countries. The European Prospective Investigation into Cancer and Nutrition (EPIC) study.2007Inngår i: Public Health Nutrition, ISSN 1368-9800, E-ISSN 1475-2727, Vol. 10, nr 12, s. 1515-1525Artikkel i tidsskrift (Fagfellevurdert)
    Abstract [en]

    OBJECTIVE: To compare the average out-of-home (OH) consumption of foods and beverages, as well as energy intake, among populations from 10 European countries and to describe the characteristics of substantial OH eaters, as defined for the purpose of the present study, in comparison to other individuals. DESIGN: Cross-sectional study. Dietary data were collected through single 24-hour dietary recalls, in which the place of consumption was recorded. For the present study, substantial OH eaters were defined as those who consumed more than 25% of total daily energy intake at locations other than the household premises. Mean dietary intakes and the proportion of substantial OH eaters are presented by food group and country. Logistic regression analyses were used to estimate the odds of being a substantial OH eater in comparison to not being one, using mutually adjusted possible non-dietary determinants. SETTING: Ten European countries participating in the European Prospective Investigation into Cancer and Nutrition (EPIC). SUBJECTS: The subjects were 34 270 individuals, 12 537 men and 21 733 women, aged 35-74 years. RESULTS: The fraction of energy intake during OH eating was generally higher in northern European countries than in the southern ones. Among the food and beverage groups, those selectively consumed outside the home were coffee/tea/waters and sweets and, to a lesser extent, cereals, meats, added lipids and vegetables. Substantial OH eating was positively associated with energy intake and inversely associated with age and physical activity. Substantial OH eating was less common among the less educated compared with the more educated, and more common during weekdays in central and north Europe and during the weekend in south Europe. CONCLUSIONS: Eating outside the home was associated with sedentary lifestyle and increased energy intake; it was more common among the young and concerned in particular coffee/tea/waters and sweets.

  • 173.
    Ou, Gangwei
    et al.
    Umeå universitet, Medicinska fakulteten, Institutionen för klinisk mikrobiologi, Immunologi/immunkemi.
    Hedberg, Maria
    Umeå universitet, Medicinska fakulteten, Institutionen för klinisk mikrobiologi, Immunologi/immunkemi.
    Hörstedt, Per
    Umeå universitet, Medicinska fakulteten, Institutionen för medicinsk biovetenskap, Patologi.
    Baranov, Vladimir
    Umeå universitet, Medicinska fakulteten, Institutionen för klinisk mikrobiologi, Klinisk immunologi.
    Forsberg, Göte
    Umeå universitet, Medicinska fakulteten, Institutionen för klinisk vetenskap, Pediatrik.
    Drobni, Mirva
    Umeå universitet, Medicinska fakulteten, Institutionen för odontologi, Kariologi.
    Sandström, Olof
    Umeå universitet, Medicinska fakulteten, Institutionen för klinisk vetenskap, Pediatrik.
    Wai, Sun Nyunt
    Umeå universitet, Medicinska fakulteten, Institutionen för molekylärbiologi (Medicinska fakulteten).
    Johansson, Ingegerd
    Umeå universitet, Medicinska fakulteten, Institutionen för odontologi, Kariologi.
    Hammarström, Marie-Louise
    Umeå universitet, Medicinska fakulteten, Institutionen för klinisk mikrobiologi, Immunologi/immunkemi.
    Hernell, Olle
    Umeå universitet, Medicinska fakulteten, Institutionen för klinisk vetenskap, Pediatrik.
    Hammarström, Sten
    Umeå universitet, Medicinska fakulteten, Institutionen för klinisk mikrobiologi, Immunologi/immunkemi.
    Proximal small intestinal microbiota and identification of rod-shaped bacteria associated with childhood celiac disease2009Inngår i: American Journal of Gastroenterology, ISSN 0002-9270, E-ISSN 1572-0241, Vol. 104, nr 12, s. 3058-3067Artikkel i tidsskrift (Fagfellevurdert)
    Abstract [en]

    OBJECTIVES: Alterations in the composition of the microbiota in the intestine may promote development of celiac disease (CD). Using scanning electron microscopy (SEM) we previously demonstrated that rod-shaped bacteria were present on the epithelium of proximal small intestine in children with CD but not in controls. In this study we characterize the microbiota of proximal small intestine in children with CD and controls and identify CD-associated rod-shaped bacteria. METHODS: Proximal small intestine biopsies from 45 children with CD and 18 clinical controls were studied. Bacteria were identified by 16S rDNA sequencing in DNA extracted from biopsies washed with buffer containing dithiothreitol to enrich bacteria adhering to the epithelial lining, by culture-based methods and by SEM and transmission electron microscopy. RESULTS: The normal, mucosa-associated microbiota of proximal small intestine was limited. It was dominated by the genera Streptococcus and Neisseria, and also contained Veillonella, Gemella, Actinomyces, Rothia, and Haemophilus. The proximal small intestine microbiota in biopsies from CD patients collected during 2004-2007 differed only marginally from that of controls, and only one biopsy (4%) had rod-shaped bacteria by SEM (SEM+). In nine frozen SEM+ CD biopsies from the previous study, microbiotas were significantly enriched in Clostridium, Prevotella, and Actinomyces compared with SEM- biopsies. Bacteria of all three genera were isolated from children born during the Swedish CD epidemic. New Clostridium and Prevotella species and Actinomyces graevenitzii were tentatively identified. CONCLUSIONS: Rod-shaped bacteria, probably of the indicated species, constituted a significant fraction of the proximal small intestine microbiota in children born during the Swedish CD epidemic and may have been an important risk factor for CD contributing to the fourfold increase in disease incidence in children below 2 years of age during that time.

  • 174. Papadimitriou, Nikos
    et al.
    Muller, David
    van den Brandt, Piet A.
    Geybels, Milan
    Patel, Chirag J.
    Gunter, Marc J.
    Lopez, David S.
    Key, Timothy J.
    Perez-Cornago, Aurora
    Ferrari, Pietro
    Vineis, Paolo
    Weiderpass, Elisabete
    Boeing, Heiner
    Agudo, Antonio
    Sanchez, Maria-Jose
    Overvad, Kim
    Kuehn, Tilman
    Fortner, Renee T.
    Palli, Domenico
    Drake, Isabel
    Bjartell, Anders
    Santiuste, Carmen
    Bueno-de-Mesquita, Bas H.
    Krogh, Vittorio
    Tjonneland, Anne
    Lauritzen, Dorthe Furstrand
    Gurrea, Aurelio Barricarte
    Quiros, Jose Ramon
    Stattin, Par
    Trichopoulou, Antonia
    Martimianaki, Georgia
    Karakatsani, Anna
    Thysell, Elin
    Umeå universitet, Medicinska fakulteten, Institutionen för medicinsk biovetenskap, Patologi. Umeå universitet, Medicinska fakulteten, Enheten för biobanksforskning.
    Johansson, Ingegerd
    Umeå universitet, Medicinska fakulteten, Institutionen för odontologi. Umeå universitet, Medicinska fakulteten, Enheten för biobanksforskning. Umeå universitet, Medicinska fakulteten, Institutionen för folkhälsa och klinisk medicin, Kardiologi.
    Ricceri, Fulvio
    Tumino, Rosario
    Larranaga, Nerea
    Khaw, Kay Tee
    Riboli, Elio
    Tzoulaki, Ioanna
    Tsilidis, Konstantinos K.
    A nutrient-wide association study for risk of prostate cancer in the European Prospective Investigation into Cancer and Nutrition and the Netherlands Cohort Study2019Inngår i: European Journal of Nutrition, ISSN 1436-6207, E-ISSN 1436-6215Artikkel i tidsskrift (Fagfellevurdert)
    Abstract [en]

    Purpose: The evidence from the literature regarding the association of dietary factors and risk of prostate cancer is inconclusive.

    Methods: A nutrient-wide association study was conducted to systematically and comprehensively evaluate the associations between 92 foods or nutrients and risk of prostate cancer in the European Prospective Investigation into Cancer and Nutrition (EPIC). Cox proportional hazard regression models adjusted for total energy intake, smoking status, body mass index, physical activity, diabetes and education were used to estimate hazard ratios and 95% confidence intervals for standardized dietary intakes. As in genome-wide association studies, correction for multiple comparisons was applied using the false discovery rate (FDR < 5%) method and suggested results were replicated in an independent cohort, the Netherlands Cohort Study (NLCS).

    Results: A total of 5916 and 3842 incident cases of prostate cancer were diagnosed during a mean follow-up of 14 and 20 years in EPIC and NLCS, respectively. None of the dietary factors was associated with the risk of total prostate cancer in EPIC (minimum FDR-corrected P, 0.37). Null associations were also observed by disease stage, grade and fatality, except for positive associations observed for intake of dry cakes/biscuits with low-grade and butter with aggressive prostate cancer, respectively, out of which the intake of dry cakes/biscuits was replicated in the NLCS.

    Conclusions: Our findings provide little support for an association for the majority of the 92 examined dietary factors and risk of prostate cancer. The association of dry cakes/biscuits with low-grade prostate cancer warrants further replication given the scarcity in the literature.

  • 175. Peagler, FD
    et al.
    Redman, RS
    NcNutt, RL
    Kruse, DH
    Johansson, Ingegerd
    Umeå universitet, Medicinsk fakultet, Odontologi, Kariologi.
    Enzyme histochemical and immunohistochemical localization of carbonic anhydrase as a marker of ductal differentiation in the developing rat parotid gland.1998Inngår i: Anatomical Record, ISSN 0003-276X, E-ISSN 1097-0185, Vol. 250, nr 2, s. 190-8Artikkel i tidsskrift (Fagfellevurdert)
    Abstract [en]

    BACKGROUND: Carbonic anhydrase has been localized to the acini and ducts of mature rat parotid glands. This enzyme has been associated with ion transport, a prominent function of striated and excretory ducts in salivary glands, suggesting that it might be used as a marker of ductal differentiation. The purpose of this study was histochemically to document developmental changes in carbonic anhydrase in the ducts of the rat parotid gland. METHODS: Parotid glands were excised from rats at representative developmental ages. Enzyme histochemistry was done on frozen sections fixed in acetone, and immunohistochemistry was performed with antibodies to human carbonic anhydrase isoenzymes I, II, and VI on paraffin sections of glands fixed in Helly's fluid. RESULTS: Carbonic anhydrase activity was weak until age 21 days after birth, when it had increased slightly in the acini and intercalated ducts and moderately in striated and excretory ducts. The adult pattern was attained by 28 days, in which reactions were moderate to strong in the striated and excretory ducts and modest in the acini and intercalated ducts. Immunohistochemical reactions were weak until 14 days, then increased rapidly, and by 28 days approached the adult pattern of virtually none in the acini and modest to moderately strong in the striated and excretory ducts. The order of reaction intensity of the antibodies was II > I > VI. CONCLUSIONS: Carbonic anhydrase is a useful marker of the functional differentiation of the striated and excretory ducts of the developing rat parotid gland.

  • 176. Poveda, Alaitz
    et al.
    Chen, Yan
    Brändström, Anders
    Umeå universitet, Samhällsvetenskapliga fakulteten, Enheten för demografi och åldrandeforskning (CEDAR).
    Engberg, Elisabeth
    Umeå universitet, Samhällsvetenskapliga fakulteten, Enheten för demografi och åldrandeforskning (CEDAR).
    Hallmans, Göran
    Umeå universitet, Medicinska fakulteten, Enheten för biobanksforskning.
    Johansson, Ingegerd
    Umeå universitet, Medicinska fakulteten, Enheten för biobanksforskning.
    Renström, Frida
    Umeå universitet, Medicinska fakulteten, Enheten för biobanksforskning. Genetic and Molecular Epidemiology Unit, Department of Clinical Sciences, Clinical Research Centre, Lund University, Jan Waldenströms gata 35, Building 91, Skåne University Hospital, SE-20502 Malmö, Sweden.
    Kurbasic, Azra
    Franks, Paul W.
    Umeå universitet, Medicinska fakulteten, Institutionen för folkhälsa och klinisk medicin, Medicin. Genetic and Molecular Epidemiology Unit, Department of Clinical Sciences, Clinical Research Centre, Lund University, Jan Waldenströms gata 35, Building 91, Skåne University Hospital, SE-20502 Malmö, Sweden; Department of Nutrition, Harvard T. H. Chan School of Public Health, Boston, MA, USA.
    The heritable basis of gene-environment interactions in cardiometabolic traits2017Inngår i: Diabetologia, ISSN 0012-186X, E-ISSN 1432-0428, Vol. 60, nr 3, s. 442-452Artikkel i tidsskrift (Fagfellevurdert)
    Abstract [en]

    Aims/hypothesis Little is known about the heritable basis of gene-environment interactions in humans. We therefore screened multiple cardiometabolic traits to assess the probability that they are influenced by genotype-environment interactions.

    Methods Fourteen established environmental risk exposures and 11 cardiometabolic traits were analysed in the VIKING study, a cohort of 16,430 Swedish adults from 1682 extended pedigrees with available detailed genealogical, phenotypic and demographic information, using a maximum likelihood variance decomposition method in Sequential Oligogenic Linkage Analysis Routines software.

    Results All cardiometabolic traits had statistically significant heritability estimates, with narrow-sense heritabilities (h (2)) ranging from 24% to 47%. Genotype-environment interactions were detected for age and sex (for the majority of traits), physical activity (for triacylglycerols, 2 h glucose and diastolic BP), smoking (for weight), alcohol intake (for weight, BMI and 2 h glucose) and diet pattern (for weight, BMI, glycaemic traits and systolic BP). Genotype-age interactions for weight and systolic BP, genotype-sex interactions for BMI and triacylglycerols and genotype-alcohol intake interactions for weight remained significant after multiple test correction.

    Conclusion/hypothesis Age, sex and alcohol intake are likely to be major modifiers of genetic effects for a range of cardiometabolic traits. This information may prove valuable for studies that seek to identify specific loci that modify the effects of lifestyle in cardiometabolic disease.

  • 177. Poveda, Alaitz
    et al.
    Koivula, Robert W.
    Ahmad, Shafqat
    Barroso, Ines
    Hallmans, Göran
    Umeå universitet, Medicinska fakulteten, Enheten för biobanksforskning.
    Johansson, Ingegerd
    Umeå universitet, Medicinska fakulteten, Institutionen för odontologi.
    Renstrom, Frida
    Umeå universitet, Medicinska fakulteten, Enheten för biobanksforskning. Lund Univ, Dept Clin Sci, Genet & Mol Epidemiol Unit, Malmö, Sweden.
    Franks, Paul W.
    Umeå universitet, Medicinska fakulteten, Institutionen för folkhälsa och klinisk medicin, Medicin.
    Innate biology versus lifestyle behaviour in the aetiology of obesity and type 2 diabetes: the GLACIER Study2016Inngår i: Diabetologia, ISSN 0012-186X, E-ISSN 1432-0428, Vol. 59, nr 3, s. 462-471Artikkel i tidsskrift (Fagfellevurdert)
    Abstract [en]

    Aims/hypothesis We compared the ability of genetic (established type 2 diabetes, fasting glucose, 2 h glucose and obesity variants) and modifiable lifestyle (diet, physical activity, smoking, alcohol and education) risk factors to predict incident type 2 diabetes and obesity in a population-based prospective cohort of 3,444 Swedish adults studied sequentially at baseline and 10 years later. Methods Multivariable logistic regression analyses were used to assess the predictive ability of genetic and lifestyle risk factors on incident obesity and type 2 diabetes by calculating the AUC. Results The predictive accuracy of lifestyle risk factors was similar to that yielded by genetic information for incident type 2 diabetes (AUC 75% and 74%, respectively) and obesity (AUC 68% and 73%, respectively) in models adjusted for age, age2 and sex. The addition of genetic information to the lifestyle model significantly improved the prediction of type 2 diabetes (AUC 80%; p = 0.0003) and obesity (AUC 79%; p < 0.0001) and resulted in a net reclassification improvement of 58% for type 2 diabetes and 64% for obesity. Conclusions/interpretation These findings illustrate that lifestyle and genetic information separately provide a similarly high degree of long-range predictive accuracy for obesity and type 2 diabetes.

  • 178. Prakobphol, A
    et al.
    Xu, F
    Hoang, VM
    Larsson, T
    Bergström, J
    Johansson, Ingegerd
    Umeå universitet, Medicinska fakulteten, Institutionen för odontologi, Kariologi.
    Frängsmyr, L
    Holmskov, U
    Leffler, H
    Nilsson, C
    Borén, Thomas
    Wright, JR
    Strömberg, Nicklas
    Umeå universitet, Medicinska fakulteten, Institutionen för odontologi, Kariologi.
    Fisher, SJ
    Salivary agglutinin, which binds Streptococcus mutans and Helicobacter pylori, is the lung scavenger receptor cysteine-rich protein gp-340.2000Inngår i: Journal of Biological Chemistry, ISSN 0021-9258, E-ISSN 1083-351X, Vol. 275, nr 51, s. 39860-6Artikkel i tidsskrift (Fagfellevurdert)
    Abstract [en]

    Salivary agglutinin is a high molecular mass component of human saliva that binds Streptococcus mutans, an oral bacterium implicated in dental caries. To study its protein sequence, we isolated the agglutinin from human parotid saliva. After trypsin digestion, a portion was analyzed by matrix-assisted laser/desorption ionization time-of-flight mass spectrometry (MALDI-TOF MS), which gave the molecular mass of 14 unique peptides. The remainder of the digest was subjected to high performance liquid chromatography, and the separated peptides were analyzed by MALDI-TOF/post-source decay; the spectra gave the sequences of five peptides. The molecular mass and peptide sequence information showed that salivary agglutinin peptides were identical to sequences in lung (lavage) gp-340, a member of the scavenger receptor cysteine-rich protein family. Immunoblotting with antibodies that specifically recognized either lung gp-340 or the agglutinin confirmed that the salivary agglutinin was gp-340. Immunoblotting with an antibody specific to the sialyl Le(x) carbohydrate epitope detected expression on the salivary but not the lung glycoprotein, possible evidence of different glycoforms. The salivary agglutinin also interacted with Helicobacter pylori, implicated in gastritis and peptic ulcer disease, Streptococcus agalactiae, implicated in neonatal meningitis, and several oral commensal streptococci. These results identify the salivary agglutinin as gp-340 and suggest it binds bacteria that are important determinants of either the oral ecology or systemic diseases.

  • 179. Prinelli, Federica
    et al.
    Fratiglioni, Laura
    Kalpouzos, Gregoria
    Musicco, Massimo
    Adorni, Fulvio
    Johansson, Ingegerd
    Umeå universitet, Medicinska fakulteten, Institutionen för odontologi.
    Marseglia, Anna
    Xu, Weili
    Specific nutrient patterns are associated with higher structural brain integrity in dementia-free older adults2019Inngår i: NeuroImage, ISSN 1053-8119, E-ISSN 1095-9572, Vol. 199, s. 281-288Artikkel i tidsskrift (Fagfellevurdert)
    Abstract [en]

    Optimal nutrition may play a beneficial role in maintaining a healthy brain. However, the relationship between nutrient intake and brain integrity is largely unknown. We investigated the association of specific nutrient dietary patterns with structural characteristics of the brain. Within the population-based Swedish National study on Aging and Care-Kungsholmen (SNAC-K), a cross-sectional study of 417 dementia-free participants aged >= 60 years who underwent structural magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) scans during 2001-2003, was carried-out. Data on dietary intake were collected using a food frequency questionnaire, from which intake of 21 nutrients was estimated. By principal component analysis, five nutrient patterns were extracted: (1) NP1 was characterized by fiber, vitamin C, E, beta-carotene, and folate [Fiber&Antioxidants], (2) NP2 by eicosapentaenoic (EPA, 20:5 omega-3) and docosahexaenoic (DHA, 22:6 omega-3) polyunsaturated fatty acids (PUFAs), proteins, cholesterol, vitamin B3, B12, and D [long chain (LC) omega-3PUFAs&Proteins], (3) NP3 by alpha-linoleic (18:2 omega-6) and alpha-linolenic (18:3 omega-3) PUFAs, monounsaturated fatty acids (MUFAs), and vitamin E [MUFAs &omega-3,6PUFAs], (4) NP4 by saturated fatty acids (SFAs), trans fats, MUFAs, and cholesterol [SFAs&Trans fats], (5) NP5 by B-vitamins, retinol, and proteins [B-Vitamins&Retinol]. Nutrient patterns scores were tertiled with the lowest tertile as reference, and were related to total brain volume (TBV) and white matter hyperintensities volume (WMHV) using linear regression models adjusting for potential confounders. In the multi-adjusted model, compared to the lowest intake for each pattern, the highest intake of NP1 (beta = 11.11, P = 0.009), NP2 (beta = 7.47, P = 0.052), and NP3 (beta = 10.54, P = 0.005) was associated with larger TBV whereas NP5 was related to smaller TBV (beta = -12.82, P = 0.001). The highest intake of NP1 was associated with lower WMHV (beta = -0.32, P = 0.049), whereas NP4 was associated with greater WMHV (beta = 0.31, P = 0.036). In sum, our results suggest that the identified brain-health specific nutrient combinations characterized by higher intake of fruit, vegetables, legumes, olive and seed oils, fish, lean red meat, poultry and low in milk and dairy products, cream, butter, processed meat and offal, were strongly associated with greater brain integrity among older adults.

  • 180.
    Qi, Qibin
    et al.
    Albert Einstein Coll Med, Dept Epidemiol, Bronx, NY 10467 USA.
    Kilpeläinen, Tuomas O
    Downer, Mary K
    Tanaka, Toshiko
    Smith, Caren E
    Sluijs, Ivonne
    Sonestedt, Emily
    Chu, Audrey Y
    Renström, Frida
    Lin, Xiaochen
    Angquist, Lars H
    Huang, Jinyan
    Liu, Zhonghua
    Li, Yanping
    Asif Ali, Muhammad
    Xu, Min
    Ahluwalia, Tarunveer Singh
    Boer, Jolanda M A
    Chen, Peng
    Daimon, Makoto
    Eriksson, Johan
    Perola, Markus
    Friedlander, Yechiel
    Gao, Yu-Tang
    Heppe, Denise H M
    Holloway, John W
    Houston, Denise K
    Kanoni, Stavroula
    Kim, Yu-Mi
    Laaksonen, Maarit A
    Jääskeläinen, Tiina
    Lee, Nanette R
    Lehtimäki, Terho
    Lemaitre, Rozenn N
    Lu, Wei
    Luben, Robert N
    Manichaikul, Ani
    Männistö, Satu
    Marques-Vidal, Pedro
    Monda, Keri L
    Ngwa, Julius S
    Perusse, Louis
    van Rooij, Frank J A
    Xiang, Yong-Bing
    Wen, Wanqing
    Wojczynski, Mary K
    Zhu, Jingwen
    Borecki, Ingrid B
    Bouchard, Claude
    Cai, Qiuyin
    Cooper, Cyrus
    Dedoussis, George V
    Deloukas, Panos
    Ferrucci, Luigi
    Forouhi, Nita G
    Hansen, Torben
    Christiansen, Lene
    Hofman, Albert
    Johansson, Ingegerd
    Umeå universitet, Medicinska fakulteten, Institutionen för odontologi.
    Jørgensen, Torben
    Karasawa, Shigeru
    Khaw, Kay-Tee
    Kim, Mi-Kyung
    Kristiansson, Kati
    Li, Huaixing
    Lin, Xu
    Liu, Yongmei
    Lohman, Kurt K
    Long, Jirong
    Mikkilä, Vera
    Mozaffarian, Dariush
    North, Kari
    Pedersen, Oluf
    Raitakari, Olli
    Rissanen, Harri
    Tuomilehto, Jaakko
    van der Schouw, Yvonne T
    Uitterlinden, André G
    Carola Zillikens, M
    Franco, Oscar H
    Shyong Tai, E
    Ou Shu, Xiao
    Siscovick, David S
    Toft, Ulla
    Monique Verschuren, W M
    Vollenweider, Peter
    Wareham, Nicholas J
    Witteman, Jacqueline C M
    Zheng, Wei
    Ridker, Paul M
    Kang, Jae H
    Liang, Liming
    Jensen, Majken K
    Curhan, Gary C
    Pasquale, Louis R
    Hunter, David J
    Mohlke, Karen L
    Uusitupa, Matti
    Adrienne Cupples, L
    Rankinen, Tuomo
    Orho-Melander, Marju
    Wang, Tao
    Chasman, Daniel I
    Franks, Paul
    Umeå universitet, Medicinska fakulteten, Institutionen för folkhälsa och klinisk medicin, Medicin. Harvard Univ, Sch Publ Hlth, Dept Nutr, Boston, MA 02115 USA; Harvard Univ, Sch Publ Hlth, Dept Epidemiol, Boston, MA 02115 USA; Lund Univ, Dept Clin Sci, Genet & Mol Epidemiol Unit, Malmo, Sweden.
    Sørensen, Thorkild I A
    Hu, Frank B
    Loos, Ruth J F
    Nettleton, Jennifer A
    Qi, Lu
    FTO genetic variants, dietary intake and body mass index: insights from 177 330 individuals2014Inngår i: Human Molecular Genetics, ISSN 0964-6906, E-ISSN 1460-2083, Vol. 23, nr 25, s. 6961-6972Artikkel i tidsskrift (Fagfellevurdert)
    Abstract [en]

    FTO is the strongest known genetic susceptibility locus for obesity. Experimental studies in animals suggest the potential roles of FTO in regulating food intake. The interactive relation among FTO variants, dietary intake and body mass index (BMI) is complex and results from previous often small-scale studies in humans are highly inconsistent. We performed large-scale analyses based on data from 177 330 adults (154 439 Whites, 5776 African Americans and 17 115 Asians) from 40 studies to examine: (i) the association between the FTO-rs9939609 variant (or a proxy single-nucleotide polymorphism) and total energy and macronutrient intake and (ii) the interaction between the FTO variant and dietary intake on BMI. The minor allele (A-allele) of the FTO-rs9939609 variant was associated with higher BMI in Whites (effect per allele = 0.34 [0.31, 0.37] kg/m(2), P = 1.9 × 10(-105)), and all participants (0.30 [0.30, 0.35] kg/m(2), P = 3.6 × 10(-107)). The BMI-increasing allele of the FTO variant showed a significant association with higher dietary protein intake (effect per allele = 0.08 [0.06, 0.10] %, P = 2.4 × 10(-16)), and relative weak associations with lower total energy intake (-6.4 [-10.1, -2.6] kcal/day, P = 0.001) and lower dietary carbohydrate intake (-0.07 [-0.11, -0.02] %, P = 0.004). The associations with protein (P = 7.5 × 10(-9)) and total energy (P = 0.002) were attenuated but remained significant after adjustment for BMI. We did not find significant interactions between the FTO variant and dietary intake of total energy, protein, carbohydrate or fat on BMI. Our findings suggest a positive association between the BMI-increasing allele of FTO variant and higher dietary protein intake and offer insight into potential link between FTO, dietary protein intake and adiposity.

  • 181. Ramne, Stina
    et al.
    Dias, Joana Alves
    González-Padilla, Esther
    Olsson, Kjell
    Lindahl, Bernt
    Umeå universitet, Medicinska fakulteten, Institutionen för folkhälsa och klinisk medicin, Yrkes- och miljömedicin.
    Engström, Gunnar
    Ericson, Ulrika
    Johansson, Ingegerd
    Umeå universitet, Medicinska fakulteten, Institutionen för odontologi. Umeå universitet, Medicinska fakulteten, Institutionen för folkhälsa och klinisk medicin, Näringsforskning.
    Sonestedt, Emily
    Association between added sugar intake and mortality is nonlinear and dependent on sugar source in 2 Swedish population-based prospective cohorts2019Inngår i: American Journal of Clinical Nutrition, ISSN 0002-9165, E-ISSN 1938-3207, Vol. 109, nr 2, s. 411-423Artikkel i tidsskrift (Fagfellevurdert)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: Although sugar consumption has been associated with several risk factors for cardiometabolic diseases, evidence for harmful long-term effects is lacking. In addition, most studies have focused on sugar-sweetened beverages (SSBs), not sugar per se.

    Objective: The aim of this study was to examine the associations between added and free sugar intake, intake of different sugar sources, and mortality risk.

    Methods: Two prospective population-based cohorts were examined: the Malmö Diet and Cancer Study (MDCS; n = 24,272), which collected dietary data by combining a food diary, interview, and food-frequency questionnaire (FFQ), and the Northern Swedish Health and Disease Study (NSHDS; n = 24,475), which assessed diet with an FFQ. Sugar intakes defined as both added and free sugar and different sugar sources were examined. The associations with mortality were examined using a multivariable Cox proportional hazards regression.

    Results: Higher sugar consumption was associated with a less favorable lifestyle in general. The lowest mortality risk was found with added sugar intakes between 7.5% and 10% of energy (E%) intake in both cohorts. Intakes >20E% were associated with a 30% increased mortality risk, but increased risks were also found at intakes <5E% [23% in the MDCS and 9% (nonsignificant) in the NSHDS]. Similar U-shaped associations were found for both cardiovascular and cancer mortality in the MDCS. By separately analyzing the different sugar sources, the intake of SSBs was positively associated with mortality, whereas the intake of treats was inversely associated.

    Conclusions: Our findings indicate that a high sugar intake is associated with an increased mortality risk. However, the risk is also increased among low sugar consumers, although they have a more favorable lifestyle in general. In addition, the associations are dependent on the type of sugar source.

  • 182. Redman, RS
    et al.
    Peagler, FD
    Johansson, Ingegerd
    Umeå universitet, Medicinsk fakultet, Odontologi, Kariologi.
    Immunohistochemical localization of carbonic anhydrases I, II, and VI in the developing rat sublingual and submandibular glands.2000Inngår i: Anatomical Record, ISSN 0003-276X, E-ISSN 1097-0185, Vol. 258, nr 3, s. 269-276Artikkel i tidsskrift (Fagfellevurdert)
    Abstract [en]

    Carbonic anhydrase has been localized to the acini and ducts of mature rat salivary glands. This enzyme has been associated with ion transport, a prominent function of striated and excretory ducts in salivary glands, suggesting that it might be used as a marker of ductal differentiation. The purpose of this study was to immunohistochemically document developmental changes in carbonic anhydrase in the ducts of the rat sublingual and submandibular glands. Immunohistochemistry was performed with antibodies to human carbonic anhydrase isoenzymes I, II and VI on sections of sublingual and submandibular glands from rats at representative postnatal developmental ages. Reactions were weak in the ducts of both glands at 1 day, then progressively increased. By 42 days, reactions had the adult pattern of virtually none in the mucous or seromucous acini, moderate to strong in the striated and excretory ducts, and none to weak in the intercalated ducts. Weak to moderate reactions were observed in the granular convoluted tubules of the submandibular gland as they became recognizable at age 42 days. Reactions to carbonic anhydrase I and II antibodies also increased from none (1 day) to modest (42 days) in the demilunes of the sublingual gland. The order of reaction intensity of the antibodies was II > I > VI. When localized via these anti-human antibodies, carbonic anhydrase is a useful marker of the functional differentiation of the striated and excretory ducts of the developing rat sublingual and submandibular glands. Copyright 2000 Wiley-Liss, Inc.

  • 183.
    Renström, Frida
    et al.
    Umeå universitet, Medicinska fakulteten, Institutionen för folkhälsa och klinisk medicin, Medicin.
    Shungin, Dmitry
    Umeå universitet, Medicinska fakulteten, Institutionen för folkhälsa och klinisk medicin, Medicin. Umeå universitet, Medicinska fakulteten, Institutionen för folkhälsa och klinisk medicin, Näringsforskning.
    Johansson, Ingegerd
    Umeå universitet, Medicinska fakulteten, Institutionen för odontologi, Kariologi.
    Florez, Jose C
    Massachusetts General Hospital, Harvard Medical School, Boston, Massachusetts.
    Hallmans, Göran
    Umeå universitet, Medicinska fakulteten, Institutionen för folkhälsa och klinisk medicin, Näringsforskning.
    Hu, Frank B
    Department of Nutrition, Harvard School of Public Health, Boston, Massachusetts.
    Franks, Paul W
    Umeå universitet, Medicinska fakulteten, Institutionen för folkhälsa och klinisk medicin, Medicin.
    Genetic predisposition to long-term nondiabetic deteriorations in glucose homeostasis: Ten-year follow-up of the GLACIER study.2011Inngår i: Diabetes, ISSN 0012-1797, E-ISSN 1939-327X, Vol. 60, nr 1, s. 345-54Artikkel i tidsskrift (Fagfellevurdert)
    Abstract [en]

    Our findings imply that genetic profiling might facilitate the early detection of persons who are genetically susceptible to deteriorating glucose control; studies of incident type 2 diabetes and discrete cardiovascular end points will help establish whether the magnitude of these changes is clinically relevant.

  • 184. Rohrmann, S.
    et al.
    Steinbrecher, A.
    Linseisen, J.
    Hermann, S.
    May, A.
    Luan, J.
    Ekelund, U.
    Overvad, K.
    Tjonneland, A.
    Halkjaer, J.
    Fagherazzi, G.
    Boutron-Ruault, M-C
    Clavel-Chapelon, F.
    Agnoli, C.
    Tumino, R.
    Masala, G.
    Mattiello, A.
    Ricceri, F.
    Travier, N.
    Amiano, P.
    Ardanaz, E.
    Chirlaque, M-D
    Sanchez, M-J
    Rodriguez, L.
    Nilsson, Lena Maria
    Umeå universitet, Medicinska fakulteten, Institutionen för folkhälsa och klinisk medicin, Näringsforskning.
    Johansson, Ingegerd
    Umeå universitet, Medicinska fakulteten, Institutionen för odontologi, Kariologi.
    Hedblad, B.
    Rosvall, M.
    Lund, E.
    Braaten, T.
    Naska, A.
    Orfanos, P.
    Trichopoulou, A.
    van den Berg, S.
    Bueno-de-Mesquita, H. B.
    Bergmann, M. M.
    Steffen, A.
    Kaaks, R.
    Teucher, B.
    Wareham, N. J.
    Khaw, K-T
    Crowe, F. L.
    Illner, A-K
    Slimani, N.
    Gallo, V.
    Mouw, T.
    Norat, T.
    Peeters, P. H. M.
    The association of education with long-term weight change in the EPIC-PANACEA cohort2012Inngår i: European Journal of Clinical Nutrition, ISSN 0954-3007, E-ISSN 1476-5640, Vol. 66, nr 8, s. 957-963Artikkel i tidsskrift (Fagfellevurdert)
    Abstract [en]

    BACKGROUND/OBJECTIVES: Cross-sectionally, educational attainment is strongly associated with the prevalence of obesity, but this association is less clear for weight change during adult life. The objective of this study is to examine the association between educational attainment and weight change during adult life in the European Prospective Investigation into Cancer and Nutrition (EPIC). SUBJECTS/METHODS: EPIC is a cohort study with 361 467 participants and up to 10 years of follow-up. Educational attainment was categorized according to the highest obtained school level (primary school or less, vocational secondary training, other secondary education and university). Multivariate mixed-effects linear regression models were used to study education in relation to weight at age 20 years (self-reported), to annual change in weight between age 20 years and measured weight at recruitment, and to annual change in weight during follow-up time. RESULTS: Higher educational attainment was associated with on average a lower body mass index (BMI) at age 20 years and a lower increase in weight up to recruitment (highest vs lowest educational attainment in men: -60 g per year (95% confidence interval (CI) -80; -40), women -110 g per year (95% CI -130; -80)). Although during follow-up after recruitment an increase in body weight was observed in all educational levels, gain was lowest in men and women with a university degree (high vs low education -120 g per year (95% CI -150; -90) and -70 g per year (95% CI -90; -60), respectively). CONCLUSIONS: Existing differences in BMI between higher and lower educated individuals at early adulthood became more pronounced during lifetime, which possibly impacts on obesity-related chronic disease risk in persons with lower educational attainment.

  • 185. Rohrmann, Sabine
    et al.
    Overvad, Kim
    Bueno-de-Mesquita, H Bas
    Jakobsen, Marianne U
    Egeberg, Rikke
    Tjonneland, Anne
    Nailler, Laura
    Boutron-Ruault, Marie-Christine
    Clavel-Chapelon, Francoise
    Krogh, Vittorio
    Palli, Domenico
    Panico, Salvatore
    Tumino, Rosario
    Ricceri, Fulvio
    Bergmann, Manuela M
    Boeing, Heiner
    Li, Kuanrong
    Kaaks, Rudolf
    Khaw, Kay-Tee
    Wareham, Nicholas J
    Crowe, Francesca L
    Key, Timothy J
    Naska, Androniki
    Trichopoulou, Antonia
    Trichopoulos, Dimitirios
    Leenders, Max
    Peeters, Petra HM
    Engeset, Dagrun
    Parr, Christine L
    Skeie, Guri
    Jakszyn, Paula
    Sanchez, Maria-Jose
    Huerta, Jose M
    Luisa Redondo, M
    Barricarte, Aurelio
    Amiano, Pilar
    Drake, Isabel
    Sonestedt, Emily
    Hallmans, Göran
    Umeå universitet, Medicinska fakulteten, Institutionen för folkhälsa och klinisk medicin, Näringsforskning. Umeå universitet, Medicinska fakulteten, Enheten för biobanksforskning.
    Johansson, Ingegerd
    Umeå universitet, Medicinska fakulteten, Institutionen för odontologi.
    Fedirko, Veronika
    Romieux, Isabelle
    Ferrari, Pietro
    Norat, Teresa
    Vergnaud, Anne C
    Riboli, Elio
    Linseisen, Jakob
    Meat consumption and mortality: results from the European Prospective Investigation into Cancer and Nutrition2013Inngår i: BMC Medicine, ISSN 1741-7015, E-ISSN 1741-7015, Vol. 11, s. 63-Artikkel i tidsskrift (Fagfellevurdert)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: Recently, some US cohorts have shown a moderate association between red and processed meat consumption and mortality supporting the results of previous studies among vegetarians. The aim of this study was to examine the association of red meat, processed meat, and poultry consumption with the risk of early death in the European Prospective Investigation into Cancer and Nutrition (EPIC).

    Methods: Included in the analysis were 448,568 men and women without prevalent cancer, stroke, or myocardial infarction, and with complete information on diet, smoking, physical activity and body mass index, who were between 35 and 69 years old at baseline. Cox proportional hazards regression was used to examine the association of meat consumption with all-cause and cause-specific mortality.

    Results: As of June 2009, 26,344 deaths were observed. After multivariate adjustment, a high consumption of red meat was related to higher all-cause mortality (hazard ratio (HR) = 1.14, 95% confidence interval (CI) 1.01 to 1.28, 160+ versus 10 to 19.9 g/day), and the association was stronger for processed meat (HR = 1.44, 95% CI 1.24 to 1.66, 160+ versus 10 to 19.9 g/day). After correction for measurement error, higher all-cause mortality remained significant only for processed meat (HR = 1.18, 95% CI 1.11 to 1.25, per 50 g/d). We estimated that 3.3% (95% CI 1.5% to 5.0%) of deaths could be prevented if all participants had a processed meat consumption of less than 20 g/day. Significant associations with processed meat intake were observed for cardiovascular diseases, cancer, and 'other causes of death'. The consumption of poultry was not related to all-cause mortality.

    Conclusions: The results of our analysis support a moderate positive association between processed meat consumption and mortality, in particular due to cardiovascular diseases, but also to cancer.

  • 186. Romaguera, Dora
    et al.
    Norat, Teresa
    Mouw, Traci
    May, Anne M
    Bamia, Christina
    Slimani, Nadia
    Travier, Noemie
    Besson, Herve
    Luan, Jian'an
    Wareham, Nick
    Rinaldi, Sabina
    Couto, Elisabeth
    Clavel-Chapelon, Françoise
    Boutron-Ruault, Marie-Christine
    Cottet, Vanessa
    Palli, Domenico
    Agnoli, Claudia
    Panico, Salvatore
    Tumino, Rosario
    Vineis, Paolo
    Agudo, Antonio
    Rodriguez, Laudina
    Sanchez, Maria Jose
    Amiano, Pilar
    Barricarte, Aurelio
    Huerta, Jose Maria
    Key, Timothy J
    Spencer, Elisabeth A
    Bueno-de-Mesquita, H Bas
    Büchner, Frederike L
    Orfanos, Philippos
    Naska, Androniki
    Trichopoulou, Antonia
    Rohrmann, Sabine
    Kaaks, Rudolf
    Bergmann, Manuela
    Boeing, Heiner
    Johansson, Ingegerd
    Umeå universitet, Medicinska fakulteten, Institutionen för folkhälsa och klinisk medicin, Näringsforskning.
    Hellström, Veronica
    Umeå universitet, Medicinska fakulteten, Institutionen för folkhälsa och klinisk medicin, Näringsforskning.
    Manjer, Jonas
    Wirfält, Elisabet
    Uhre Jacobsen, Marianne
    Overvad, Kim
    Tjonneland, Anne
    Halkjaer, Jytte
    Lund, Eiliv
    Braaten, Toni
    Engeset, Dragun
    Odysseos, Andreani
    Riboli, Elio
    Peeters, Petra H M
    Adherence to the Mediterranean diet is associated with lower abdominal adiposity in European men and women.2009Inngår i: Journal of Nutrition, ISSN 0022-3166, E-ISSN 1541-6100, Vol. 139, nr 9, s. 1728-1737Artikkel i tidsskrift (Fagfellevurdert)
    Abstract [en]

    Given the lack of consistent evidence of the relationship between Mediterranean dietary patterns and body fat, we assessed the cross-sectional association between adherence to a modified Mediterranean diet, BMI, and waist circumference (WC). A total of 497,308 individuals (70.7% women) aged 25-70 y from 10 European countries participated in this study. Diet was assessed at baseline using detailed validated country-specific questionnaires, and anthropometrical measurements were collected using standardized procedures. The association between the degree of adherence to the modified-Mediterranean Diet Score (mMDS) (including high consumption of vegetables, legumes, fruits and nuts, cereals, fish and seafood, and unsaturated:saturated fatty acids ratio; moderate alcohol intake; and low consumption of meat and meat products and dairy products) and BMI (kg.m(-2)) or WC (cm) was modeled through mixed-effects linear regression, controlling for potential confounders. Overall, the mMDS was not significantly associated with BMI. Higher adherence to the Mediterranean diet was significantly associated with lower WC, for a given BMI, in both men (-0.09; 95% CI -0.14 to -0.04) and women (-0.06; 95% CI -0.10 to -0.01). The association was stronger in men (-0.20; 95% CI -0.23 to -0.17) and women (-0.17; 95% CI -0.21 to -0.13) from Northern European countries. Despite the observed heterogeneity among regions, results of this study suggest that adherence to a modified Mediterranean diet, high in foods of vegetable origin and unsaturated fatty acids, is associated with lower abdominal adiposity measured by WC in European men and women.

  • 187. Romaguera, Dora
    et al.
    Norat, Teresa
    Vergnaud, Anne-Claire
    Mouw, Traci
    May, Anne M
    Agudo, Antonio
    Buckland, Genevieve
    Slimani, Nadia
    Rinaldi, Sabina
    Couto, Elisabeth
    Clavel-Chapelon, Françoise
    Boutron-Ruault, Marie-Christine
    Cottet, Vanessa
    Rohrmann, Sabine
    Teucher, Birgit
    Bergmann, Manuela
    Boeing, Heiner
    Tjønneland, Anne
    Halkjaer, Jytte
    Jakobsen, Marianne Uhre
    Dahm, Christina C
    Travier, Noemie
    Rodriguez, Laudina
    Sanchez, Maria José
    Amiano, Pilar
    Barricarte, Aurelio
    Huerta, José María
    Luan, Jian'an
    Wareham, Nick
    Key, Timothy J
    Spencer, Elisabeth A
    Orfanos, Philippos
    Naska, Androniki
    Trichopoulou, Antonia
    Palli, Domenico
    Agnoli, Claudia
    Mattiello, Amalia
    Tumino, Rosario
    Vineis, Paolo
    Bueno-de-Mesquita, H Bas
    Büchner, Frederike L
    Manjer, Jonas
    Wirfält, Elisabet
    Johansson, Ingegerd
    Umeå universitet, Medicinska fakulteten, Institutionen för odontologi, Kariologi.
    Hellström, Veronica
    Umeå universitet, Medicinska fakulteten, Institutionen för folkhälsa och klinisk medicin, Näringsforskning.
    Lund, Eiliv
    Braaten, Toni
    Engeset, Dagrun
    Odysseos, Andreani
    Riboli, Elio
    Peeters, Petra HM
    Mediterranean dietary patterns and prospective weight change in participants of the EPIC-PANACEA project2010Inngår i: American Journal of Clinical Nutrition, ISSN 0002-9165, E-ISSN 1938-3207, Vol. 92, nr 4, s. 912-921Artikkel i tidsskrift (Fagfellevurdert)
    Abstract [en]

    BACKGROUND: There is an association between a greater adherence to a Mediterranean diet and a reduced risk of developing chronic diseases. However, it is not clear whether this dietary pattern may be also protective against the development of obesity.

    OBJECTIVE: We assessed the association between the adherence to the Mediterranean dietary pattern (MDP), prospective weight change, and the incidence of overweight or obesity.

    DESIGN: We conducted a prospective cohort study [the European Prospective Investigation into Cancer and Nutrition-Physical Activity, Nutrition, Alcohol Consumption, Cessation of Smoking, Eating Out of Home, and Obesity (EPIC-PANACEA) project] in 373,803 individuals (103,455 men and 270,348 women; age range: 25-70 y) from 10 European countries. Anthropometric measurements were obtained at recruitment and after a median follow-up time of 5 y. The relative Mediterranean Diet Score (rMED; score range: 0-18) was used to assess adherence to the MDP according to the consumption of 9 dietary components that are characteristic of the Mediterranean diet. The association between the rMED and 5-y weight change was modeled through multiadjusted mixed-effects linear regression. RESULTS: Individuals with a high adherence to the MDP according to the rMED (11-18 points) showed a 5-y weight change of -0.16 kg (95% CI: -0.24, -0.07 kg) and were 10% (95% CI: 4%, 18%) less likely to develop overweight or obesity than were individuals with a low adherence to the MDP (0-6 points). The low meat content of the Mediterranean diet seemed to account for most of its positive effect against weight gain.

    CONCLUSION: This study shows that promoting the MDP as a model of healthy eating may help to prevent weight gain and the development of obesity.

  • 188. Romaguera, Dora
    et al.
    Vergnaud, Anne-Claire
    Peeters, Petra H.
    van Gils, Carla H.
    Chan, Doris S. M.
    Ferrari, Pietro
    Romieu, Isabelle
    Jenab, Mazda
    Slimani, Nadia
    Clavel-Chapelon, Francoise
    Fagherazzi, Guy
    Perquier, Florence
    Kaaks, Rudolf
    Teucher, Birgit
    Boeing, Heiner
    von Ruesten, Anne
    Tjonneland, Anne
    Olsen, Anja
    Dahm, Christina C.
    Overvad, Kim
    Ramon Quiros, Jose
    Gonzalez, Carlos A.
    Jose Sanchez, Maria
    Navarro, Carmen
    Barricarte, Aurelio
    Dorronsoro, Miren
    Khaw, Kay-Tee
    Wareham, Nicholas J.
    Crowe, Francesca L.
    Key, Timothy J.
    Trichopoulou, Antonia
    Lagiou, Pagona
    Bamia, Christina
    Masala, Giovanna
    Vineis, Paolo
    Tumino, Rosario
    Sieri, Sabina
    Panico, Salvatore
    May, Anne M.
    Bueno-de-Mesquita, H. Bas
    Buechner, Frederike L.
    Wirfaelt, Elisabet
    Manjer, Jonas
    Johansson, Ingegerd
    Umeå universitet, Medicinska fakulteten, Institutionen för odontologi, Kariologi.
    Hallmans, Göran
    Umeå universitet, Medicinska fakulteten, Institutionen för folkhälsa och klinisk medicin, Näringsforskning.
    Skeie, Guri
    Benjaminsen Borch, Kristin
    Parr, Christine L.
    Riboli, Elio
    Norat, Teresa
    Is concordance with World Cancer Research Fund/American Institute for Cancer Research guidelines for cancer prevention related to subsequent risk of cancer?: Results from the EPIC study2012Inngår i: American Journal of Clinical Nutrition, ISSN 0002-9165, E-ISSN 1938-3207, Vol. 96, nr 1, s. 150-163Artikkel i tidsskrift (Fagfellevurdert)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: In 2007 the World Cancer Research Fund (WCRF) and the American Institute of Cancer Research (AICR) issued 8 recommendations (plus 2 special recommendations) on diet, physical activity, and weight management for cancer prevention on the basis of the most comprehensive collection of available evidence. Objective: We aimed to investigate whether concordance with the WCRF/AICR recommendations was related to cancer risk in the European Prospective Investigation into Cancer and Nutrition (EPIC) study. Design: The present study included 386,355 EPIC participants from 9 European countries. At recruitment, dietary, anthropometric, and lifestyle information was collected. A score was constructed based on the WCRF/AICR recommendations on weight management, physical activity, foods and drinks that promote weight gain, plant foods, animal foods, alcoholic drinks, and breastfeeding for women; the score range was 0-6 for men and 0-7 for women. Higher scores indicated greater concordance with WCRF/AICR recommendations. The association between the score and cancer risk was estimated by using multivariable Cox regression models. Results: Concordance with the score was significantly associated with decreased risk of cancer. A 1-point increment in the score was associated with a risk reduction of 5% (95% Cl: 3%, 7%) for total cancer, 12% (95% CI: 9%, 16%) for colorectal cancer, and 16% (95% CI: 9%, 22%) for stomach cancer. Significant associations were also observed for cancers of the breast, endometrium, lung, kidney, upper aerodigestive tract, liver, and esophagus but not for prostate, ovarian, pancreatic, and bladder cancers. Conclusion: Adherence to the WCRF/AICR recommendations for cancer prevention may lower the risk of developing most types of cancer. Am J Clin Nutr 2012;96:150-63.

  • 189.
    Romani Vestman, Nelly
    et al.
    Umeå universitet, Medicinska fakulteten, Institutionen för odontologi, Tandläkarutbildning.
    Chen, Tsute
    Department of Microbiology, The Forsyth Institute, Cambridge, United States of America.
    Lif Holgerson, Pernilla
    Umeå universitet, Medicinska fakulteten, Institutionen för odontologi.
    Öhman, Carina
    Umeå universitet, Medicinska fakulteten, Institutionen för odontologi.
    Johansson, Ingegerd
    Umeå universitet, Medicinska fakulteten, Institutionen för odontologi.
    Oral Microbiota Shift after 12-Week Supplementation with Lactobacillus reuteri DSM 17938 and PTA 5289: A Randomized Control Trial2015Inngår i: PLoS ONE, ISSN 1932-6203, E-ISSN 1932-6203, Vol. 10, nr 5, artikkel-id e0125812Artikkel i tidsskrift (Fagfellevurdert)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: Lactobacillus spp. potentially contribute to health by modulating bacterial biofilm formation, but their effects on the overall oral microbiota remain unclear.

    Methods and Findings: Oral microbiota was characterized via 454-pyrosequencing of the 16S rDNA hypervariable region V3-V4 after 12 weeks of daily Lactobacillus reuteri DSM 17938 and PTA 5289 consumption. Forty-four adults were assigned to a test group (n = 22) that received lactobacilli lozenges (108 CFU of each strain/lozenge) or a control group that received placebo (n = 22). Presence of L. reuteri was confirmed by cultivation and species specific PCR. Tooth biofilm samples from 16 adults before, during, and after exposure were analyzed by pyrosequencing. A total of 1,310,292 sequences were quality filtered. After removing single reads, 257 species or phylotypes were identified at 98.5% identity in the Human Oral Microbiome Database. Firmicutes, Bacteroidetes, Fusobacteria, Proteobacteria, and Actinobacteria were the most abundant phyla. Streptococcus was the most common genus and the S. oralis/S. mitis/S. mitis bv2/S. infantis group comprised the dominant species. The number of observed species was unaffected by L. reuteri exposure. However, subjects who had consumed L. reuteri were clustered in a principal coordinates analysis relative to scattering at baseline, and multivariate modeling of pyrosequencing microbiota, and culture and PCR detected L. reuteri separated baseline from 12-week samples in test subjects. L. reuteri intake correlated with increased S. oralis/S. mitis/S. mitis bv2/S. infantis group and Campylobacter concisus, Granulicatella adiacens, Bergeyella sp. HOT322, Neisseria subflava, and SR1 [G-1] sp. HOT874 detection and reduced S. mutans, S. anginosus, N. mucosa, Fusobacterium periodicum, F. nucleatum ss vincentii, and Prevotella maculosa detection. This effect had disappeared 1 month after exposure was terminated.

    Conclusions: L. reuteri consumption did not affect species richness but induced a shift in the oral microbiota composition. The biological relevance of this remains to be elucidated.

    Trial Registration: ClinicalTrials.gov NCT02311218

  • 190. Romieu, Isabelle
    et al.
    Ferrari, Pietro
    Chajès, Veronique
    de Batlle, Jordi
    Biessy, Carine
    Scoccianti, Chiara
    Dossus, Laure
    Christine Boutron, Marie
    Bastide, Nadia
    Overvad, Kim
    Olsen, Anja
    Tjønneland, Anne
    Kaaks, Rudolf
    Boeing, Heiner
    Trichopoulou, Antonia
    Lagiou, Pagona
    Trichopoulos, Dimitrios
    Palli, Domenico
    Sieri, Sabina
    Tumino, Rosario
    Vineis, Paolo
    Panico, Salvatore
    Bueno-de-Mesquita, H B As
    Gils, Carla H
    Peeters, Petra H
    Lund, Eiliv
    Skeie, Guri
    Weiderpass, Elisabete
    Ramón Quirós, J
    Chirlaque, María-Dolores
    Ardanaz, Eva
    Sánchez, María-José
    Duell, Eric J
    Amiano Etxezarreta, Pilar
    Borgquist, Signe
    Hallmans, Göran
    Umeå universitet, Medicinska fakulteten, Institutionen för folkhälsa och klinisk medicin, Näringsforskning.
    Johansson, Ingegerd
    Umeå universitet, Medicinska fakulteten, Institutionen för odontologi.
    Maria Nilsson, Lena
    Umeå universitet, Medicinska fakulteten, Institutionen för folkhälsa och klinisk medicin, Näringsforskning.
    Khaw, Kay-Tee
    Wareham, Nick
    Key, Timothy J
    Travis, Ruth C
    Murphy, Neil
    Wark, Petra A
    Riboli, Elio
    Fiber intake modulates the association of alcohol intake with breast cancer2017Inngår i: International Journal of Cancer, ISSN 0020-7136, E-ISSN 1097-0215, Vol. 140, nr 2, s. 316-321Artikkel i tidsskrift (Fagfellevurdert)
    Abstract [en]

    Alcohol intake has been related to an increased risk of breast cancer (BC) while dietary fiber intake has been inversely associated to BC risk. A beneficial effect of fibers on ethanol carcinogenesis through their impact on estrogen levels is still controversial. We investigated the role of dietary fiber as a modifying factor of the association of alcohol and BC using data from the European Prospective Investigation into Cancer and Nutrition (EPIC). This study included 334,850 women aged 35-70 years at baseline enrolled in the ten countries of the EPIC study and followed up for 11.0 years on average. Information on fiber and alcohol intake at baseline and average lifetime alcohol intake were calculated from country-specific dietary and lifestyle questionnaires. Hazard ratios (HR) of developing invasive BC according to different levels of alcohol and fiber intake were computed. During 3,670,439 person-years, 11,576 incident BC cases were diagnosed. For subjects with low intake of fiber (<18.5 g/day), the risk of BC per 10 g/day of alcohol intake was 1.06 (1.03-1.08) while among subjects with high intake of fiber (>24.2 g/day) the risk of BC was 1.02 (0.99-1.05) (test for interaction p = 0.011). This modulating effect was stronger for fiber from vegetables. Our results suggest that fiber intake may modulate the positive association of alcohol intake and BC. Alcohol is well known to increase the risk for BC, while a fiber-rich diet has the opposite effect. Here the authors find a significant interaction between both lifestyle factors indicating that high fiber intake can ease the adverse effects associated with alcohol consumption. Consequently, women with high alcohol intake and low fiber intake (<18.5 g/day) had the highest risk for BC. Specific benefits were associated with fibers from vegetable, warranting further investigations into specific fiber sources and their mechanistic interactions with alcohol-induced BC risk.

  • 191. Romieu, Isabelle
    et al.
    Ferrari, Pietro
    Rinaldi, Sabina
    Slimani, Nadia
    Jenab, Mazda
    Olsen, Anja
    Tjonneland, Anne
    Overvad, Kim
    Boutron-Ruault, Marie-Christine
    Lajous, Martin
    Kaaks, Rudolf
    Teucher, Birgit
    Boeing, Heiner
    Trichopoulou, Antonia
    Naska, Androniki
    Vasilopoulo, Effie
    Sacerdote, Carlotta
    Tumino, Rosario
    Masala, Giovanna
    Sieri, Sabina
    Panico, Salvatore
    Bueno-de-Mesquita, H Bas
    Van-der-A, Daphne
    van Gils, Carla H
    Peeters, Petra HM
    Lund, Eiliv
    Skeie, Guri
    Asli, Lene Angell
    Rodriguez, Laudina
    Navarro, Carmen
    Amiano, Pilar
    Sanchez, Maria-Jose
    Barricarte, Aurelio
    Buckland, Genevieve
    Sonestedt, Emily
    Wirfalt, Elisabet
    Hallmans, Göran
    Umeå universitet, Medicinska fakulteten, Institutionen för folkhälsa och klinisk medicin, Näringsforskning.
    Johansson, Ingegerd
    Umeå universitet, Medicinska fakulteten, Institutionen för odontologi, Kariologi.
    Key, Timothy J
    Allen, Naomi E
    Khaw, Kay-Tee
    Wareham, Nicholas J
    Norat, Teresa
    Riboli, Elio
    Clavel-Chapelon, Francoise
    Dietary glycemic index and glycemic load and breast cancer risk in the European Prospective Investigation into Cancer and Nutrition (EPIC)2012Inngår i: American Journal of Clinical Nutrition, ISSN 0002-9165, E-ISSN 1938-3207, Vol. 96, nr 2, s. 345-355Artikkel i tidsskrift (Fagfellevurdert)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: The glycemic potential of a diet is associated with chronically elevated insulin concentrations, which may augment breast cancer (BC) risk by stimulating insulin receptor or by affecting insulin-like growth factor I (IGF-I)-mediated mitogenesis. It is unclear whether this effect differs by BC phenotype.

    Objective: The objective was to investigate the relation between glycemic index (GI), glycemic load (GL), and total carbohydrate intake with BC by using data from the European Prospective Investigation into Cancer and Nutrition (EPIC).

    Design: We identified 11,576 women with invasive BC among 334,849 EPIC women aged 34-66 y (5th to 95th percentiles) at baseline over a median follow-up of 11.5 y. Dietary GI and GL were calculated from country-specific dietary questionnaires. We used multivariable Cox proportional hazards models to quantify the association between GI. GL, and carbohydrate intake and BC risk. BC tumors were classified by receptor status.

    Results: Overall GI, GL, and carbohydrates were not related to BC. Among postmenopausal women, GL and carbohydate intake were significantly associated with an increased risk of estrogen receptor negative (ER-) BC when extreme quintiles (Q) were compared [multivariable HRQ5-Q1 (95% CI) = 1.36 (1.02, 1.82; P-trend = 0.010) and HRQ5-Q1 = 1.41 (1.05, 1.89; P-trend = 0.009), respectively]. Further stratification by progesterone receptor (PR) status showed slightly stronger associations with ER (-)/PR- BC [HRQ5-Q1 (95% CI) = 1.48 (1.07, 2.05; P-trend = 0.010) for GL and HRQ5-Q1 = 1.62 (1.15, 2.30; P-trend = 0.005) for carbohydrates]. No significant association with ER-positive BC was observed.

    Conclusion: Our results indicate that a diet with a high GL and carbohydrate intake is positively associated with an increased risk of developing ER- and ER-/PR- BC among postmenopausal women. Am J Clin Nutr 2012;96:345-55.

  • 192. Romieu, Isabelle
    et al.
    Scoccianti, Chiara
    Chajes, Veronique
    de Batlle, Jordi
    Biessy, Carine
    Dossus, Laure
    Baglietto, Laura
    Clavel-Chapelon, Françoise
    Overvad, Kim
    Olsen, Anja
    Tjønneland, Anne
    Kaaks, Rudolf
    Lukanova, Annekatrin
    Umeå universitet, Medicinska fakulteten, Institutionen för medicinsk biovetenskap, Patologi.
    Boeing, Heiner
    Trichopoulou, Antonia
    Lagiou, Pagona
    Trichopoulos, Dimitrios
    Palli, Domenico
    Sieri, Sabina
    Tumino, Rosario
    Vineis, Paolo
    Panico, Salvatore
    Bueno-de-Mesquita, H B As
    Gils, Carla H
    Peeters, Petra
    Lund, Eiliv
    Skeie, Guri
    Weiderpass, Elisabete
    Quirós, J Ramón
    Chirlaque, María-Dolores
    Ardanaz, Eva
    Sánchez, María-José
    Duell, Eric J
    Amiano, Pilar
    Borgquist, Signe
    Wirfält, Elisabet
    Hallmans, Göran
    Umeå universitet, Medicinska fakulteten, Institutionen för folkhälsa och klinisk medicin, Näringsforskning. Umeå universitet, Medicinska fakulteten, Enheten för biobanksforskning.
    Johansson, Ingegerd
    Umeå universitet, Medicinska fakulteten, Institutionen för odontologi. Umeå universitet, Medicinska fakulteten, Institutionen för folkhälsa och klinisk medicin, Näringsforskning.
    Nilsson, Lena Maria
    Umeå universitet, Medicinska fakulteten, Institutionen för folkhälsa och klinisk medicin, Näringsforskning.
    Khaw, Kay-Tee
    Wareham, Nick
    Key, Timothy J
    Travis, Ruth C
    Murphy, Neil
    Wark, Petra A
    Ferrari, Pietro
    Riboli, Elio
    Alcohol intake and breast cancer in the European Prospective investigation into Cancer and Nutrition: Short title2015Inngår i: International Journal of Cancer, ISSN 0020-7136, E-ISSN 1097-0215, Vol. 137, nr 8, s. 1921-1930Artikkel i tidsskrift (Fagfellevurdert)
    Abstract [en]

    Alcohol intake has been associated to breast cancer in pre and postmenopausal women; however results are inconclusive regarding tumor hormonal receptor status, and potential modifying factors like age at start drinking. Therefore, we investigated the relation between alcohol intake and the risk of breast cancer using prospective observational data from the European Prospective Investigation into Cancer and Nutrition (EPIC). Up to 334,850 women, aged 35-70 years at baseline, were recruited in ten European countries and followed up an average of 11 years. Alcohol intake at baseline and average lifetime alcohol intake were calculated from country-specific dietary and lifestyle questionnaires. The study outcomes were the Hazard ratios (HR) of developing breast cancer according to hormonal receptor status. During 3,670,439 person-years, 11,576 incident breast cancer cases were diagnosed. Alcohol intake was significantly related to breast cancer risk, for each 10 g/day increase in alcohol intake the HR increased by 4.2% (95% CI: 2.7-5.8%). Taking 0 to 5 g/day as reference, alcohol intake of >5 to 15 g/day was related to a 5.9% increase in breast cancer risk (95% CI: 1-11%). Significant increasing trends were observed between alcohol intake and ER+/PR+, ER-/PR-, HER2- and ER-/PR-HER2- tumors. Breast cancer risk was stronger among women who started drinking prior to first full-time pregnancy. Overall, our results confirm the association between alcohol intake and both hormone receptor positive and hormone receptor negative breast tumors, suggesting that timing of exposure to alcohol drinking may affect the risk. Therefore, women should be advised to control their alcohol consumption. What's new? Although it is now established that alcohol consumption increases breast cancer risk, many questions remain. Using a prospective study design with 11,576 incident breast cancer cases across 10 European countries, the authors confirmed the increased risk of alcohol on breast cancer development. They further show that women who started drinking before their first full-term pregnancy have a higher risk than women who started afterwards. These effects were observed in hormone-receptor positive and -negative tumors pointing to non-hormonal pathways that need to be further investigated.

  • 193. Rosengren, A
    et al.
    Stegmayr, B
    Johansson, Ingegerd
    Umeå universitet, Medicinsk fakultet, Odontologi. Cariologi.
    Huhtasaari, F
    Wilhelmsen, L
    Coronary risk factors, diet and vitamins as possible explanatory factors of the Swedish north-south gradient in coronary disease: a comparison between two MONICA centres.1999Inngår i: Journal of Internal Medicine, ISSN 0954-6820, E-ISSN 1365-2796, Vol. 246, nr 6, s. 577-86Artikkel i tidsskrift (Fagfellevurdert)
    Abstract [en]

    OBJECTIVE: To investigate whether differences in serum lipids, diet, plasma vitamins or other risk factors explain the higher incidence of cardiovascular disease in the northern parts of Sweden, compared to Göteborg on the west coast. DESIGN: A comparison between the two Swedish MONICA populations in northern Sweden (NSW) and in Göteborg (GOT) in 1990. SETTING: Norrbotten and Västerbotten counties in the north of Sweden and the city of Göteborg on the west coast. SUBJECTS: In the north 1583 men and women aged 25-64 years were investigated, and in Göteborg 1574 men and women. Plasma vitamins were examined in a subsample of men aged 40-49 (n = 259). MAIN OUTCOME MEASURES: Serum lipids, blood pressure, anthropometric measurements, smoking habits, physical activity, diet, education, and plasma vitamins. RESULTS: NSW men and women had mean serum total cholesterol of 6.30 (standard deviation 1.23) mmol L-1 and 6.12 (1. 33) mmol L-1, compared to 5.75 (1.14) mmol L-1 and 5.67 (1.24) mmol L-1 in GOT men and women (P = 0.0001). NSW men and women were shorter and had higher body mass index than in Göteborg. Cigarette smoking was slightly more prevalent amongst GOT men and women. Göteborg men and women more often had more than compulsory school education, compared to NSW men and women, whereas there were no differences in physical activity during leisure time. There were no differences in vegetable consumption, whereas fruit was consumed more frequently by NSW women compared to GOT women, with a higher intake of fibre and ascorbate. Consumption of wine and total alcohol consumption were higher in Göteborg, whereas NSW men and women drank significantly more coffee. In the subsample of men (aged 40-49) who had plasma vitamins measured, men in Göteborg had slightly higher mean retinol concentrations (P = 0.005) and lutein and zeaxanthine levels (P = 0.006 and 0.009, respectively) compared to northern men, but there were no differences with respect to alpha- or beta-carotene, ascorbic acid or lipid-adjusted vitamin E. NSW men had slightly higher plasma iron and magnesium concentrations (P = 0.005 and 0.001, respectively). CONCLUSION: The largest and most consistent differences between Göteborg and northern Sweden were found for serum cholesterol, probably reflecting differences in intake of saturated fat. The differences in serum cholesterol may explain a substantial part of the differences in coronary heart disease morbidity and mortality. We found no consistent differences concerning vegetable and fruit consumption. More alcohol was consumed in Göteborg. Differences in education and childhood conditions, as reflected in differences in height, may contribute to the north-south gradient with respect to CHD incidence and mortality.

  • 194. Roswall, Nina
    et al.
    Olsen, Anja
    Boll, Katja
    Christensen, Jane
    Halkjær, Jytte
    Sørensen, Thorkild Ia
    Dahm, Christina C
    Overvad, Kim
    Clavel-Chapelon, Françoise
    Boutron-Ruault, Marie C
    Cottet, Vanessa
    Teucher, Birgit
    Kaaks, Rudolf
    Boeing, Heiner
    von Ruesten, Anne
    Trichopoulou, Antonia
    Oikonomou, Eleni
    Vasilopoulou, Effie
    Pala, Valeria
    Sacerdote, Carlotta
    Mattiello, Amalia
    Masala, Giovanna
    Peeters, Petra Hm
    Bueno-de-Mesquita, H Bas
    Engeset, Dagrun
    Skeie, Guri
    Åsli, Lene A
    Amiano, Pilar
    Jakszyn, Paula
    Ardanaz, Eva
    Huerta, José M
    Quirós, José R
    Molina-Montes, Esther
    Nilsson, Lena Maria
    Umeå universitet, Medicinska fakulteten, Institutionen för folkhälsa och klinisk medicin, Näringsforskning.
    Johansson, Ingegerd
    Umeå universitet, Medicinska fakulteten, Institutionen för odontologi.
    Wirfält, Elisabet
    Drake, Isabel
    Mulligan, Angela A
    Khaw, Kay T
    Romaguera, Dora
    Vergnaud, Anne-Claire
    Key, Tim
    Riboli, Elio
    Tjønneland, Anne
    Consumption of predefined 'Nordic' dietary items in ten European countries: an investigation in the European Prospective Investigation into Cancer and Nutrition (EPIC) cohort2014Inngår i: Public Health Nutrition, ISSN 1368-9800, E-ISSN 1475-2727, Vol. 17, nr 12, s. 2650-2659Artikkel i tidsskrift (Fagfellevurdert)
    Abstract [en]

    OBJECTIVE: Health-beneficial effects of adhering to a healthy Nordic diet index have been suggested. However, it has not been examined to what extent the included dietary components are exclusively related to the Nordic countries or if they are part of other European diets as well, suggesting a broader preventive potential. The present study describes the intake of seven a priori defined healthy food items (apples/pears, berries, cabbages, dark bread, shellfish, fish and root vegetables) across ten countries participating in the European Prospective Investigation into Cancer and Nutrition (EPIC) and examines their consumption across Europe. DESIGN: Cross-sectional study. A 24 h dietary recall was administered through a software program containing country-specific recipes. Sex-specific mean food intake was calculated for each centre/country, as well as percentage of overall food groups consumed as healthy Nordic food items. All analyses were weighted by day and season of data collection. SETTING: Multi-centre, European study. SUBJECTS: Persons (n 36 970) aged 35-74 years, constituting a random sample of 519 978 EPIC participants. RESULTS: The highest intakes of the included diet components were: cabbages and berries in Central Europe; apples/pears in Southern Europe; dark bread in Norway, Denmark and Greece; fish in Southern and Northern countries; shellfish in Spain; and root vegetables in Northern and Central Europe. Large inter-centre variation, however, existed in some countries. CONCLUSIONS: Dark bread, root vegetables and fish are strongly related to a Nordic dietary tradition. Apples/pears, berries, cabbages, fish, shellfish and root vegetables are broadly consumed in Europe, and may thus be included in regional public health campaigns.

  • 195. Ryberg, M
    et al.
    Johansson, Ingegerd
    Umeå universitet, Medicinsk fakultet, Odontologi, Kariologi.
    The effects of long-term treatment with salmeterol and salbutamol on the flow rate and composition of whole saliva in the rat.1995Inngår i: Archives of Oral Biology, ISSN 0003-9969, E-ISSN 1879-1506, Vol. 40, nr 3, s. 187-191Artikkel i tidsskrift (Fagfellevurdert)
    Abstract [en]

    The effect of long-acting beta 2-adrenoceptor agonists on salivary glands and saliva secretion has not been studied before. Sprague-Dawley rats were given either the long-acting beta 2-agonist salmeterol, 1 mg/kg body wt per day or the short-acting agonist salbutamol, 5 mg/kg per day. Saline solution was used as control. After 18 days pilocarpine-stimulated saliva was collected, and after 21 days saliva was collected after stimulation with isoproterol and pilocarpine in combination. The saliva was analysed for total protein, amylase, hexosamine, sialic acid, sodium, potassium and calcium. At day 25 the salivary glands were extirpated and weighed. The weight of the parotid glands increased significantly after both salmeterol and salbutamol treatment, approx. 40%; the submandibular gland weights were not affected by either beta 2-agonist treatment. Pilocarpine-stimulated salivary flow rate was increased in the salbutamol, but not in the salmeterol, group. In the salmeterol group the concentration of sialic acid was increased and that of calcium was decreased. In saliva stimulated with pilocarpine and isoproterenol in combination, the concentrations of total protein, amylase and calcium were decreased after salmeterol. In the salbutamol group, total protein and potassium were decreased. The ratio sialic acid: total protein was increased at both saliva collections in both beta 2-agonist groups. It is concluded that rats treated chronically with the long-acting beta 2-adrenoceptor agonist salmeterol have an impaired secretion of salivary proteins and calcium and that the effect resembles that of salbutamol.

  • 196. Saadatian-Elahi, Mitra
    et al.
    Slimani, Nadia
    Chajès, Véronique
    Jenab, Mazda
    Goudable, Joëlle
    Biessy, Carine
    Ferrari, Pietro
    Byrnes, Graham
    Autier, Philippe
    Peeters, Petra H M
    Ocké, Marga
    Bueno de Mesquita, Bas
    Johansson, Ingegerd
    Umeå universitet, Medicinska fakulteten, Institutionen för odontologi.
    Hallmans, Göran
    Umeå universitet, Medicinska fakulteten, Institutionen för folkhälsa och klinisk medicin, Näringsforskning.
    Manjer, Jonas
    Wirfält, Elisabet
    González, Carlos A
    Navarro, Carmen
    Martinez, Carmen
    Amiano, Pilar
    Suárez, Laudina Rodriguez
    Ardanaz, Eva
    Tjønneland, Anne
    Halkjaer, Jytte
    Overvad, Kim
    Jakobsen, Marianne Uhre
    Berrino, Franco
    Pala, Valeria
    Palli, Domenico
    Tumino, Rosario
    Vineis, Paolo
    Santucci de Magistris, Maria
    Spencer, Elisabeth A
    Crowe, Francesca L
    Bingham, Sheila
    Khaw, Kay-Tee
    Linseisen, Jakob
    Rohrmann, Sabine
    Boeing, Heiner
    Noethlings, Ute
    Olsen, Karina Standahl
    Skeie, Guri
    Lund, Eiliv
    Trichopoulou, Antonia
    Oustoglou, Erifili
    Clavel-Chapelon, Françoise
    Riboli, Elio
    Plasma phospholipid fatty acid profiles and their association with food intakes: results from a cross-sectional study within the European Prospective Investigation into Cancer and Nutrition.2009Inngår i: Am J Clin Nutr, ISSN 0002-9165, Vol. 89, nr 1, s. 331-46Artikkel i tidsskrift (Fagfellevurdert)
  • 197.
    Sanikini, Harinakshi
    et al.
    The Netherlands; Paris, France.
    Dik, Vincent K
    The Netherlands.
    Siersema, Peter D
    The Netherlands.
    Bhoo-Pathy, Nirmala
    Kuala Lumpur, Malaysia.
    Uiterwaal, Cuno S P M
    Utrecht, The Netherlands.
    Peeters, Petra H M
    Utrecht, The Netherlands.
    González, Carlos A
    Barcelona, Spain.
    Zamora-Ros, Raul
    Barcelona, Spain; Lyon, France.
    Overvad, Kim
    Aarhus, Denmark.
    Tjønneland, Anne
    Copenhagen, Denmark.
    Roswall, Nina
    Copenhagen, Denmark.
    Boutron-Ruault, Marie-Christine
    Paris, France.
    Fagherazzi, Guy
    Paris, France.
    Racine, Antoine
    Paris, France.
    Kühn, Tilman
    Heidelberg, Germany.
    Katzke, Verena
    Heidelberg, Germany.
    Boeing, Heiner
    Nuthetal, Germany.
    Trichopoulou, Antonia
    Athens, Greece.
    Trichopoulos, Dimitrios
    Athens, Greece; Boston, MA.
    Lagiou, Pagona
    Athens, Greece; Boston, MA;.
    Palli, Domenico
    Florence, Italy.
    Grioni, Sara
    Milano, Italy.
    Vineis, Paolo
    Torino, Italy; London, United Kingdom.
    Tumino, Rosario
    Cancer Registry and Histopathology Unit, Civic—M.P. Arezzo Hospital, Italy.
    Panico, Salvatore
    Naples, Italy.
    Weiderpass, Elisabete
    Tromsø, Norway; Oslo, Norway; Stockholm, Sweden; Helsinki, Finland.
    Skeie, Guri
    Tromsø, Norway.
    Braaten, Tonje
    Tromsø, Norway.
    Huerta, José María
    Madrid, Spain; Murcia, Spain.
    Sánchez-Cantalejo, Emilio
    Madrid, Spain; Granada, Spain.
    Barricarte, Aurelio
    Madrid, Spain; Pamplona, Spain.
    Sonestedt, Emily
    Malmö, Sweden.
    Wallstrom, Peter
    Malmö, Sweden.
    Nilsson, Lena Maria
    Umeå universitet, Medicinska fakulteten, Institutionen för folkhälsa och klinisk medicin, Näringsforskning. Umeå universitet, Arktiskt centrum vid Umeå universitet (Arcum).
    Johansson, Ingegerd
    Umeå universitet, Medicinska fakulteten, Institutionen för odontologi.
    Bradbury, Kathryn E
    Oxford, United Kingdom.
    Khaw, Kay-Tee
    Cambridge, United Kingdom.
    Wareham, Nick
    Cambridge, United Kingdom.
    Huybrechts, Inge
    Lyon, France.
    Freisling, Heinz
    Lyon, France.
    Cross, Amanda J
    London, United Kingdom.
    Riboli, Elio
    London, United Kingdom.
    Bueno-de-Mesquita, H Bas
    London, United Kingdom; The Netherlands.
    Total, caffeinated and decaffeinated coffee and tea intake and gastric cancer risk: Results from the EPIC cohort study2015Inngår i: International Journal of Cancer, ISSN 0020-7136, E-ISSN 1097-0215, Vol. 136, nr 6, s. E720-E730Artikkel i tidsskrift (Fagfellevurdert)
    Abstract [en]

    Prospective studies examining the association between coffee and tea consumption and gastric cancer risk have shown inconsistent results. We investigated the association between coffee (total, caffeinated and decaffeinated) and tea consumption and the risk of gastric cancer by anatomical site and histological type in the European Prospective Investigation into Cancer and Nutrition study. Coffee and tea consumption were assessed by dietary questionnaires at baseline. Adjusted hazard ratios (HRs) were calculated using Cox regression models. During 11.6 years of follow up, 683 gastric adenocarcinoma cases were identified among 477,312 participants. We found no significant association between overall gastric cancer risk and consumption of total coffee (HR 1.09, 95%-confidence intervals [CI]: 0.84-1.43; quartile 4 vs. non/quartile 1), caffeinated coffee (HR 1.14, 95%-CI: 0.82-1.59; quartile 4 vs. non/quartile 1), decaffeinated coffee (HR 1.07, 95%-CI: 0.75-1.53; tertile 3 vs. non/tertile 1) and tea (HR 0.81, 95%-CI: 0.59-1.09; quartile 4 vs. non/quartile 1). When stratified by anatomical site, we observed a significant positive association between gastric cardia cancer risk and total coffee consumption per increment of 100 mL/day (HR 1.06, 95%-CI: 1.03-1.11). Similarly, a significant positive association was observed between gastric cardia cancer risk and caffeinated coffee consumption (HR 1.98, 95%-CI: 1.16-3.36, p-trend=0.06; quartile 3 vs. non/quartile 1) and per increment of 100 mL/day (HR 1.09, 95%-CI: 1.04-1.14). In conclusion, consumption of total, caffeinated and decaffeinated coffee and tea is not associated with overall gastric cancer risk. However, total and caffeinated coffee consumption may be associated with an increased risk of gastric cardia cancer. Further prospective studies are needed to rule out chance or confounding.

  • 198.
    Schläwicke Engström, Karin
    et al.
    Department of Occupational and Environmental Medicine, Lund University Hospital, Lund, Sweden.
    Strömberg, Ulf
    Department of Occupational and Environmental Medicine, Lund University Hospital, Lund, Sweden.
    Lundh, Thomas
    Department of Occupational and Environmental Medicine, Lund University Hospital, Lund, Sweden.
    Johansson, Ingegerd
    Umeå universitet, Medicinska fakulteten, Institutionen för odontologi.
    Vessby, Bengt
    Department of Public Health and Caring Sciences, Uppsala University, Uppsala, Sweden.
    Hallmans, Göran
    Umeå universitet, Medicinska fakulteten, Institutionen för folkhälsa och klinisk medicin, Näringsforskning.
    Skerfving, Staffan
    Department of Occupational and Environmental Medicine, Lund University Hospital, Lund, Sweden.
    Broberg, Karin
    Department of Occupational and Environmental Medicine, Lund University Hospital, Lund, Sweden.
    Genetic variation in glutathione-related genes and body burden of methylmercury2008Inngår i: Journal of Environmental Health Perspectives, ISSN 0091-6765, E-ISSN 1552-9924, Vol. 116, nr 6, s. 734-739Artikkel i tidsskrift (Fagfellevurdert)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: Exposure to toxic methylmercury (MeHg) through fish consumption is a large problem worldwide, and it has led to governmental recommendations of reduced fish consumption and blacklisting of mercury-contaminated fish. The elimination kinetics of MeHg varies greatly among individuals. Knowledge about the reasons for such variation is of importance for improving the risk assessment for MeHg. One possible explanation is hereditary differences in MeHg metabolism. MeHg is eliminated from the body as a glutathione (GSH) conjugate.

    Objectives: We conducted this study to assess the influence of polymorphisms in GSH-synthesizing [glutamyl-cysteine ligase modifier subunit (GCLM-588) and glutamyl-cysteine ligase catalytic subunit (GCLC-129)] or GSH-conjugating [glutathione S-transferase pi 1 (GSTP1–105 and GSTP1–114)] genes on MeHg retention.

    Methods: Based on information obtained from questionnaires, 292 subjects from northern Sweden had a high consumption of fish (lean/fat fish two to three times per week or more). We measured total Hg in erythrocytes (Ery-Hg) and long-chain n-3 polyunsaturated fatty acids in plasma (P-PUFA; an exposure marker for fish intake).

    Results: The GSTP1 genotype modified Ery-Hg; effects were seen for GSTP1–105 and −114 separately, and combining them resulted in stronger effects. We found evidence of effect modification: individuals with zero or one variant allele demonstrated a steeper regression slope for Ery-Hg (p = 0.038) compared with individuals with two or more variant alleles. The GCLM-588 genotype also influenced Ery-Hg (p = 0.035): Individuals with the GCLM-588 TT genotype demonstrated the highest Ery-Hg, but we saw no evidence of effect modification with increasing P-PUFA.

    Conclusions: These results suggest a role of GSH-related polymorphisms in MeHg metabolism.

  • 199. Scott, Robert A
    et al.
    Chu, Audrey Y
    Grarup, Niels
    Manning, Alisa K
    Hivert, Marie-France
    Shungin, Dmitry
    Umeå universitet, Medicinska fakulteten, Institutionen för odontologi. Umeå universitet, Medicinska fakulteten, Institutionen för folkhälsa och klinisk medicin, Medicin.
    Tönjes, Anke
    Yesupriya, Ajay
    Barnes, Daniel
    Bouatia-Naji, Nabila
    Glazer, Nicole L
    Jackson, Anne U
    Kutalik, Zoltán
    Lagou, Vasiliki
    Marek, Diana
    Rasmussen-Torvik, Laura J
    Stringham, Heather M
    Tanaka, Toshiko
    Aadahl, Mette
    Arking, Dan E
    Bergmann, Sven
    Boerwinkle, Eric
    Bonnycastle, Lori L
    Bornstein, Stefan R
    Brunner, Eric
    Bumpstead, Suzannah J
    Brage, Soren
    Carlson, Olga D
    Chen, Han
    Chen, Yii-Der Ida
    Chines, Peter S
    Collins, Francis S
    Couper, David J
    Dennison, Elaine M
    Dowling, Nicole F
    Egan, Josephine S
    Ekelund, Ulf
    Erdos, Michael R
    Forouhi, Nita G
    Fox, Caroline S
    Goodarzi, Mark O
    Grässler, Jürgen
    Gustafsson, Stefan
    Hallmans, Göran
    Umeå universitet, Medicinska fakulteten, Institutionen för folkhälsa och klinisk medicin, Näringsforskning.
    Hansen, Torben
    Hingorani, Aroon
    Holloway, John W
    Hu, Frank B
    Isomaa, Bo
    Jameson, Karen A
    Johansson, Ingegerd
    Umeå universitet, Medicinska fakulteten, Institutionen för odontologi, Kariologi.
    Jonsson, Anna
    Jørgensen, Torben
    Kivimaki, Mika
    Kovacs, Peter
    Kumari, Meena
    Kuusisto, Johanna
    Laakso, Markku
    Lecoeur, Cécile
    Lévy-Marchal, Claire
    Li, Guo
    Loos, Ruth J F
    Lyssenko, Valeri
    Marmot, Michael
    Marques-Vidal, Pedro
    Morken, Mario A
    Müller, Gabriele
    North, Kari E
    Pankow, James S
    Payne, Felicity
    Prokopenko, Inga
    Psaty, Bruce M
    Renström, Frida
    Rice, Ken
    Rotter, Jerome I
    Rybin, Denis
    Sandholt, Camilla H
    Sayer, Avan A
    Shrader, Peter
    Schwarz, Peter E H
    Siscovick, David S
    Stancáková, Alena
    Stumvoll, Michael
    Teslovich, Tanya M
    Waeber, Gérard
    Williams, Gordon H
    Witte, Daniel R
    Wood, Andrew R
    Xie, Weijia
    Boehnke, Michael
    Cooper, Cyrus
    Ferrucci, Luigi
    Froguel, Philippe
    Groop, Leif
    Kao, W H Linda
    Vollenweider, Peter
    Walker, Mark
    Watanabe, Richard M
    Pedersen, Oluf
    Meigs, James B
    Ingelsson, Erik
    Barroso, Inês
    Florez, Jose C
    Franks, Paul W
    Dupuis, Josée
    Wareham, Nicholas J
    Langenberg, Claudia
    No Interactions Between Previously Associated 2-Hour Glucose Gene Variants and Physical Activity or BMI on 2-Hour Glucose Levels2012Inngår i: Diabetes, ISSN 0012-1797, E-ISSN 1939-327X, Vol. 61, nr 5, s. 1291-1296Artikkel i tidsskrift (Fagfellevurdert)
    Abstract [en]

    Gene-lifestyle interactions have been suggested to contribute to the development of type 2 diabetes. Glucose levels 2 h after a standard 75-gram glucose challenge are used to diagnose diabetes and are associated with both genetic and lifestyle factors. However, whether these factors interact to determine 2-h glucose levels is unknown. We meta-analyzed single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) × BMI and SNP × Physical Activity (PA) interaction regression models for five SNPs previously associated with 2-h glucose levels from up to 22 studies comprising 54,884 individuals without diabetes. PA levels were dichotomized, with individuals below the first quintile classified as inactive (20%) and the remainder as active (80%). BMI was considered a continuous trait. Inactive individuals had higher 2-h glucose levels than active individuals (β = 0.22 mmol/L [95% CI 0.13-0.31], P = 1.63 × 10(-6)). All SNPs were associated with 2-h glucose (β = 0.06-0.12 mmol/allele, P ≤ 1.53 × 10(-7)), but no significant interactions were found with PA (P > 0.18) or BMI (P ≥ 0.04). In this large study of gene-lifestyle interaction, we observed no interactions between genetic and lifestyle factors, both of which were associated with 2-h glucose. It is perhaps unlikely that top loci from genome-wide association studies will exhibit strong subgroup-specific effects, and may not, therefore, make the best candidates for the study of interactions.

  • 200. Serafini, Mauro
    et al.
    Jakszyn, Paula
    Lujan-Barroso, Leila
    Agudo, Antonio
    Bueno-de-Mesquita, H. Bas
    van Duijnhoven, Franzel J. B.
    Jenab, Mazda
    Navarro, Carmen
    Palli, Domenico
    Boeing, Heiner
    Wallstrom, Peter
    Regner, Sara
    Numans, Mattijs E.
    Carneiro, Fatima
    Boutron-Ruault, Marie-Christine
    Clavel-Chapelon, Francoise
    Morois, Sophie
    Grioni, Sara
    Panico, Salvatore
    Tumino, Rosario
    Sacerdote, Carlotta
    Ramon Quiros, Jose
    Molina-Montes, Esther
    Huerta Castano, Jose M.
    Barricarte, Aurelio
    Amiano, Pilar
    Khaw, Kay-Tee
    Wareham, Nicholas
    Allen, Naomi E.
    Key, Timothy J.
    Jeurnink, Suzanne M.
    Peeters, Petra H. M.
    Bamia, Christina
    Valanou, Elisabeth
    Trichopoulou, Antonia
    Kaaks, Rudolf
    Lukanova, Annekatrin
    Bergmann, Manuela M.
    Lindkvist, Bjorn
    Stenling, Roger
    Umeå universitet, Medicinska fakulteten, Institutionen för medicinsk biovetenskap, Patologi.
    Johansson, Ingegerd
    Umeå universitet, Medicinska fakulteten, Institutionen för folkhälsa och klinisk medicin, Näringsforskning.
    Dahm, Christina C.
    Overvad, Kim
    Jensen, Majken
    Olsen, Anja
    Tjonneland, Anne
    Lund, Eiliv
    Rinaldi, Sabina
    Michaud, Dominique
    Mouw, Traci
    Riboli, Elio
    Gonzalez, Carlos A.
    Dietary total antioxidant capacity and gastric cancer risk in the European prospective investigation into cancer and nutrition study2012Inngår i: International Journal of Cancer, ISSN 0020-7136, E-ISSN 1097-0215, Vol. 131, nr 4, s. E544-E554Artikkel i tidsskrift (Fagfellevurdert)
    Abstract [en]

    A high intake of dietary antioxidant compounds has been hypothesized to be an appropriate strategy to reduce gastric cancer (GC) development. We investigated the effect of dietary total antioxidant capacity (TAC) in relation to GC in the European Prospective Investigation into Cancer (EPIC) study including 23 centers in 10 European countries. A total of 521,457 subjects (153,447 men) aged mostly 3570 years old, were recruited largely between 1992 and 1998. Ferric reducing antioxidant potential (FRAP) and total radical-trapping antioxidant parameter (TRAP), measuring reducing and chain-breaking antioxidant capacity were used to measure dietary TAC from plant foods. Dietary antioxidant intake is associated with a reduction in the risk of GC for both FRAP (adjusted HR 0.66; 95%CI (0.460.95) and TRAP (adjusted HR 0.61; 95%CI (0.430.87) (highest vs. lowest quintile). The association was observed for both cardia and noncardia cancers. A clear effect was observed in smokers with a significant reduction in GC risk for the fifth quintile of intake for both assays (highest vs. lowest quintile: adjusted HR 0.41; 95%CI (0.220.76) p for trend <0.001 for FRAP; adjusted HR 0.52; 95%CI (0.280.97) p for trend <0.001 for TRAP) but not in nonsmokers. In former smokers, the association with FRAP intake was statistically significant (highest vs. lowest quintile: adjusted HR 0.4; 95%CI (0.210.75) p < 0.05); no association was observed for TRAP. Dietary antioxidant capacity intake from different sources of plant foods is associated with a reduction in the risk of GC.

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