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  • 201. Weiste, Christoph
    et al.
    Pedrotti, Lorenzo
    Selvanayagam, Jebasingh
    Muralidhara, Prathibha
    Fröschel, Christian
    Novák, Ondřej
    Ljung, Karin
    Hanson, Johannes
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Department of Plant Physiology. Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Umeå Plant Science Centre (UPSC).
    Dröge-Laser, Wolfgang
    The Arabidopsis bZIP11 transcription factor links low-energy signalling to auxin-mediated control of primary root growth2017In: PLoS Genetics, ISSN 1553-7390, E-ISSN 1553-7404, Vol. 13, no 2Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Plants have to tightly control their energy homeostasis to ensure survival and fitness under constantly changing environmental conditions. Thus, it is stringently required that energy-consuming stress-adaptation and growth-related processes are dynamically tuned according to the prevailing energy availability. The evolutionary conserved SUCROSE NON-FERMENTING1 RELATED KINASES1 (SnRK1) and the downstream group C/S1 basic leucine zipper (bZIP) transcription factors (TFs) are well-characterised central players in plants' low-energy management. Nevertheless, mechanistic insights into plant growth control under energy deprived conditions remains largely elusive. In this work, we disclose the novel function of the low-energy activated group S1 bZIP11-related TFs as regulators of auxin-mediated primary root growth. Whereas transgenic gain-of-function approaches of these bZIPs interfere with the activity of the root apical meristem and result in root growth repression, root growth of loss-of-function plants show a pronounced insensitivity to low-energy conditions. Based on ensuing molecular and biochemical analyses, we propose a mechanistic model, in which bZIP11-related TFs gain control over the root meristem by directly activating IAA3/SHY2 transcription. IAA3/SHY2 is a pivotal negative regulator of root growth, which has been demonstrated to efficiently repress transcription of major auxin transport facilitators of the PIN-FORMED (PIN) gene family, thereby restricting polar auxin transport to the root tip and in consequence auxin-driven primary root growth. Taken together, our results disclose the central low-energy activated SnRK1-C/S1-bZIP signalling module as gateway to integrate information on the plant's energy status into root meristem control, thereby balancing plant growth and cellular energy resources.

  • 202. Wellenreuther, M.
    et al.
    Rosenquist, H.
    Jaksons, P.
    Larson, Keith W
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Department of Ecology and Environmental Sciences.
    Local adaptation along an environmental cline in a species with an inversion polymorphism2017In: Journal of Evolutionary Biology, ISSN 1010-061X, E-ISSN 1420-9101, Vol. 30, no 6, p. 1068-1077Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Polymorphic inversions are ubiquitous across the animal kingdom and are frequently associated with clines in inversion frequencies across environmental gradients. Such clines are thought to result from selection favouring local adaptation; however, empirical tests are scarce. The seaweed fly Coelopa frigida has an alpha/beta inversion polymorphism, and previous work demonstrated that the alpha inversion frequency declines from the North Sea to the Baltic Sea and is correlated with changes in tidal range, salinity, algal composition and wrackbed stability. Here, we explicitly test the hypothesis that populations of C. frigida along this cline are locally adapted by conducting a reciprocal transplant experiment of four populations along this cline to quantify survival. We found that survival varied significantly across treatments and detected a significant Location x Substrate interaction, indicating local adaptation. Survival models showed that flies from locations at both extremes had highest survival on their native substrates, demonstrating that local adaptation is present at the extremes of the cline. Survival at the two intermediate locations was, however, not elevated at the native substrates, suggesting that gene flow in intermediate habitats may override selection. Together, our results support the notion that population extremes of species with polymorphic inversions are often locally adapted, even when spatially close, consistent with the growing view that inversions can have direct and strong effects on the fitness of species.

  • 203.
    Wikström, P
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Department of Molecular Biology (Faculty of Science and Technology).
    O'Neill, E
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Department of Molecular Biology (Faculty of Science and Technology).
    Ng, L C
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Department of Molecular Biology (Faculty of Science and Technology).
    Shingler, V
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Department of Molecular Biology (Faculty of Science and Technology).
    The regulatory N-terminal region of the aromatic-responsive transcriptional activator DmpR constrains nucleotide-triggered multimerisation.2001In: Journal of Molecular Biology, ISSN 0022-2836, E-ISSN 1089-8638, Vol. 314, no 5Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The transcriptional promoting activity of DmpR is under the strict control of its aromatic effector ligands that are bound by its regulatory N-terminal domain. The positive control function of DmpR resides within the central C-domain that is highly conserved among activators of sigma(54)-RNA polymerase. The C-domain mediates ATP hydrolysis and interaction with sigma(54)-RNA polymerase that are essential for open-complex formation and thus initiation of transcription. Wild-type and loss-of-function derivatives of DmpR, which are defective in distinct steps in nucleotide catalysis, were used to address the consequences of nucleotide binding and hydrolysis with respect to the multimeric state of DmpR and its ability to promote in vitro transcription. Here, we show that DmpR derivatives deleted of the regulatory N-terminal domain undergo an aromatic-effector independent ATP-binding triggered multimerisation as detected by cross-linking. In the intact protein, however, aromatic effector activation is required before ATP-binding can trigger an apparent dimer-to-hexamer switch in subunit conformation. The data suggest a model in which the N-terminal domain controls the transcriptional promoting property of DmpR by constraining ATP-mediated changes in its oligomeric state. The results are discussed in the light of recent mechanistic insights from the AAA(+) superfamily of ATPases that utilise nucleotide hydrolysis to restructure their substrates.

  • 204. Willems, Sara M.
    et al.
    Wright, Daniel J.
    Day, Felix R.
    Trajanoska, Katerina
    Joshi, Peter K.
    Morris, John A.
    Matteini, Amy M.
    Garton, Fleur C.
    Grarup, Niels
    Oskolkov, Nikolay
    Thalamuthu, Anbupalam
    Mangino, Massimo
    Liu, Jun
    Demirkan, Ayse
    Lek, Monkol
    Xu, Liwen
    Wang, Guan
    Oldmeadow, Christopher
    Gaulton, Kyle J.
    Lotta, Luca A.
    Miyamoto-Mikami, Eri
    Rivas, Manuel A.
    White, Tom
    Loh, Po-Ru
    Aadahl, Mette
    Amin, Najaf
    Attia, John R.
    Austin, Krista
    Benyamin, Beben
    Brage, Soren
    Cheng, Yu-Ching
    Cieszczyk, Pawel
    Derave, Wim
    Eriksson, Karl-Fredrik
    Eynon, Nir
    Linneberg, Allan
    Lucia, Alejandro
    Massidda, Myosotis
    Mitchell, Braxton D.
    Miyachi, Motohiko
    Murakami, Haruka
    Padmanabhan, Sandosh
    Pandey, Ashutosh
    Papadimitriou, Loannis
    Rajpal, Deepak K.
    Sale, Craig
    Schnurr, Theresia M.
    Sessa, Francesco
    Shrine, Nick
    Tobin, Martin D.
    Varley, Ian
    Wain, Louise V.
    Wray, Naomi R.
    Lindgren, Cecilia M.
    MacArthur, Daniel G.
    Waterworth, Dawn M.
    McCarthy, Mark I.
    Pedersen, Oluf
    Khaw, Kay-Tee
    Kie, Douglas P.
    Pitsiladis, Yannis
    Fuku, Noriyuki
    Franks, Paul W.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine, Medicine. Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Biobank Research. Genetic and Molecular Epidemiology Unit, Department of Clinical Sciences, Lund University, Skånes University Hospital, 222 41 Lund, Sweden.
    North, Kathryn N.
    van Duijn, Cornelia M.
    Mather, Karen A.
    Hansen, Torben
    Hansson, Ola
    Spector, Tim
    Murabito, Joanne M.
    Richards, J. Brent
    Rivadeneira, Fernando
    Langenberg, Claudia
    Perry, John R. B.
    Wareham, Nick J.
    Scott, Robert A.
    Large-scale GWAS identifies multiple loci for hand grip strength providing biological insights into muscular fitness2017In: Nature Communications, ISSN 2041-1723, E-ISSN 2041-1723, Vol. 8, article id 16015Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Hand grip strength is a widely used proxy of muscular fitness, a marker of frailty, and predictor of a range of morbidities and all-cause mortality. To investigate the genetic determinants of variation in grip strength, we perform a large-scale genetic discovery analysis in a combined sample of 195,180 individuals and identify 16 loci associated with grip strength (P<5 x 10(-8)) in combined analyses. A number of these loci contain genes implicated in structure and function of skeletal muscle fibres (ACTG1), neuronal maintenance and signal transduction (PEX14, TGFA, SYT1), or monogenic syndromes with involvement of psychomotor impairment (PEX14, LRPPRC and KANSL1). Mendelian randomization analyses are consistent with a causal effect of higher genetically predicted grip strength on lower fracture risk. In conclusion, our findings provide new biological insight into the mechanistic underpinnings of grip strength and the causal role of muscular strength in age-related morbidities and mortality.

  • 205. Williams, Jessica S
    et al.
    Clausen, Anders R
    Nick McElhinny, Stephanie A
    Watts, Brian E
    Johansson, Erik
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Biochemistry and Biophysics.
    Kunkel, Thomas A
    Proofreading of ribonucleotides inserted into DNA by yeast DNA polymerase ɛ.2012In: DNA Repair, ISSN 1568-7864, E-ISSN 1568-7856, Vol. 11, no 8, p. 649-656Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    We have investigated the ability of the 3' exonuclease activity of Saccharomyces cerevisiae DNA polymerase ɛ (Pol ɛ) to proofread newly inserted ribonucleotides (rNMPs). During DNA synthesis in vitro, Pol ɛ proofreads ribonucleotides with apparent efficiencies that vary from none at some locations to more than 90% at others, with rA and rU being more efficiently proofread than rC and rG. Previous studies show that failure to repair ribonucleotides in the genome of rnh201Δ strains that lack RNase H2 activity elevates the rate of short deletions in tandem repeat sequences. Here we show that this rate is increased by 2-4-fold in pol2-4 rnh201Δ strains that are also defective in Pol ɛ proofreading. In comparison, defective proofreading in these same strains increases the rate of base substitutions by more than 100-fold. Collectively, the results indicate that although proofreading of an 'incorrect' sugar is less efficient than is proofreading of an incorrect base, Pol ɛ does proofread newly inserted rNMPs to enhance genome stability.

  • 206. Wind, Julia J.
    et al.
    Peviani, Alessia
    Snel, Berend
    Hanson, Johannes
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Umeå Plant Science Centre (UPSC). Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Department of Plant Physiology.
    Smeekens, Sjef C.
    ABI4: versatile activator and repressor2013In: Trends in Plant Science, ISSN 1360-1385, E-ISSN 1878-4372, Vol. 18, no 3, p. 125-132Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The ABSCISIC ACID INSENSITIVE4 (ABI4) gene was discovered to be an abscisic acid (ABA) signaling responsive transcription factor active during seed germination. The evolutionary history of the ABI4 gene supports its role as an ABA signaling intermediate in land plants. Investigating the ABI4 protein-cis element interaction supports the proposal that ABI4 binding to its known CE1 cis-element competes with transcription factor binding to the overlapping G-Box element. Recent publications report on ABI4 as a regulatory factor in diverse processes. In developing seedlings, ABI4 mediates sugar signaling, lipid breakdown, and plastid-to-nucleus signaling. Moreover, ABI4 is a regulator of rosette growth, redox signaling, cell wall metabolism and the effect of nitrate on lateral root development.

  • 207. Wrzaczek, Michael
    et al.
    Vainonen, Julia P.
    Stael, Simon
    Tsiatsiani, Liana
    Help-Rinta-Rahko, Hanna
    Gauthier, Adrien
    Kaufholdt, David
    Bollhöner, Benjamin
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Department of Plant Physiology. Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Umeå Plant Science Centre (UPSC).
    Lamminmaki, Airi
    Staes, An
    Gevaert, Kris
    Tuominen, Hannele
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Department of Plant Physiology. Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Umeå Plant Science Centre (UPSC).
    Van Breusegem, Frank
    Helariutta, Yka
    Kangasjarvi, Jaakko
    GRIM REAPER peptide binds to receptor kinase PRK5 to trigger cell death in Arabidopsis2015In: EMBO Journal, ISSN 0261-4189, E-ISSN 1460-2075, Vol. 31, no 1, p. 55-66Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Recognition of extracellular peptides by plasma membrane-localized receptor proteins is commonly used in signal transduction. In plants, very little is known about how extracellular peptides are processed and activated in order to allow recognition by receptors. Here, we show that induction of cell death in planta by a secreted plant protein GRIM REAPER (GRI) is dependent on the activity of the type II metacaspase METACASPASE-9. GRI is cleaved by METACASPASE-9 in vitro resulting in the release of an 11 amino acid peptide. This peptide bound in vivo to the extracellular domain of the plasma membrane-localized, atypical leucine-rich repeat receptor-like kinase POLLEN-SPECIFIC RECEPTOR-LIKE KINASE 5 (PRK5) and was sufficient to induce oxidative stress/ROS-dependent cell death. This shows a signaling pathway in plants from processing and activation of an extracellular protein to recognition by its receptor.

  • 208.
    Wu, Cuiyan
    et al.
    School of Public Health, Health Science Center of Xi'an Jiaotong University; Key Laboratory of Trace Elements and Endemic Diseases, National Health and Family Planning Commission of the People's Republic of China, Xi'an, P.R. China.
    Liu, Huan
    School of Public Health, Health Science Center of Xi'an Jiaotong University; Key Laboratory of Trace Elements and Endemic Diseases, National Health and Family Planning Commission of the People's Republic of China, Xi'an, P.R. China.
    Zhang, Feng'e
    School of Public Health, Health Science Center of Xi'an Jiaotong University; Key Laboratory of Trace Elements and Endemic Diseases, National Health and Family Planning Commission of the People's Republic of China, Xi'an, P.R. China.
    Shao, Wanzhen
    School of Public Health, Health Science Center of Xi'an Jiaotong University; Key Laboratory of Trace Elements and Endemic Diseases, National Health and Family Planning Commission of the People's Republic of China, Xi'an, P.R. China.
    Yang, Lei
    School of Public Health, Health Science Center of Xi'an Jiaotong University; Key Laboratory of Trace Elements and Endemic Diseases, National Health and Family Planning Commission of the People's Republic of China, Xi'an, P.R. China.
    Ning, Yujie
    School of Public Health, Health Science Center of Xi'an Jiaotong University; Key Laboratory of Trace Elements and Endemic Diseases, National Health and Family Planning Commission of the People's Republic of China, Xi'an, P.R. China.
    Wang, Sen
    School of Public Health, Health Science Center of Xi'an Jiaotong University; Key Laboratory of Trace Elements and Endemic Diseases, National Health and Family Planning Commission of the People's Republic of China, Xi'an, P.R. China.
    Zhao, Guanghui
    Department of Knee Joint, Xi'an Hong Hui Hospital, Xi'an, P.R. China.
    Lee, Byeong Jae
    Institute of Molecular Biology and Genetics, School of Biological Sciences, Seoul National University, Seoul, Korea.
    Lammi, Mikko
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Integrative Medical Biology (IMB).
    Guo, Xiong
    Long noncoding RNA expression profile reveals lncRNAs signature associated with extracellular matrix degradation in kashin-beck disease2017In: Scientific Reports, ISSN 2045-2322, E-ISSN 2045-2322, Vol. 7, article id 17553Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Kashin-Beck disease (KBD) is a deformative, endemic osteochondropathy involving degeneration and necrosis of growth plates and articular cartilage. The pathogenesis of KBD is related to gene expression and regulation mechanisms, but long noncoding RNAs (lncRNAs) in KBD have not been investigated. In this study, we identified 316 up-regulated and 631 down-regulated lncRNAs (≥ 2-fold change) in KBD chondrocytes using microarray analysis, of which more than three-quarters were intergenic lncRNAs and antisense lncRNAs. We also identified 232 up-regulated and 427 down-regulated mRNAs (≥ 2-fold change). A lncRNA-mRNA correlation analysis combined 343 lncRNAs and 292 mRNAs to form 509 coding-noncoding gene co-expression networks (CNC networks). Eleven lncRNAs were predicted to have cis-regulated target genes, including NAV2 (neuron navigator 2), TOX (thymocyte selection-associated high mobility group box), LAMA4 (laminin, alpha 4), and DEPTOR (DEP domain containing mTOR-interacting protein). The differentially expressed mRNAs in KBD significantly contribute to biological events associated with the extracellular matrix. Meanwhile, 34 mRNAs and 55 co-expressed lncRNAs constituted a network that influences the extracellular matrix. In the network, FBLN1 and LAMA 4 were the core genes with the highest significance. These novel findings indicate that lncRNAs may play a role in extracellular matrix destruction in KBD.

  • 209.
    Wuolikainen, Anna
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Department of Chemistry. Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Pharmacology and Clinical Neuroscience, Clinical Neuroscience.
    Moritz, Thomas
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Umeå Plant Science Centre (UPSC).
    Marklund, Stefan L
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Biosciences, Clinical chemistry.
    Antti, Henrik
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Department of Chemistry.
    Andersen, Peter M
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Pharmacology and Clinical Neuroscience, Clinical Neuroscience.
    ALS patients with mutations in the SOD1 gene have an unique metabolomic profile in the cerebrospinal fluid compared with ALS patients without mutations2012In: Molecular Genetics and Metabolism, ISSN 1096-7192, E-ISSN 1096-7206, Vol. 105, no 3, p. 472-478Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    A specific biochemical marker for early diagnosing and for monitoring disease progression in amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS) will have important clinical applications. ALS is a heterogeneous syndrome with multiple subtypes with ill-defined borders. A minority of patients carries mutations in the Cu/Zn-superoxide dismutase (SOD1) gene but the disease mechanism remains unknown for all types of ALS. Using a GC-TOFMS platform we studied the cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) metabolome in 16 ALS patients with six different mutations in the SOD1 gene and compared with ALS-patients without such mutations. OPLS-DA was used for classification modeling. We find that patients with a SOD1 mutation have a distinct metabolic profile in the CSF. In particular, the eight patients homozygous for the D90A SOD1 mutation showed a distinctively different signature when modeled against ALS patients with other SOD1 mutations and sporadic and familial ALS patients without a SOD1 gene mutation. This was found irrespective of medication with riluzole and survival time. Among the metabolites that contributed most to the CSF signature were arginine, lysine, ornithine, serine, threonine and pyroglutamic acid, all found to be reduced in patients carrying a D90A SOD1 mutation. ALS-patients with a SOD1 gene mutation appear as a distinct metabolic entity in the CSF, in particular in patients with the D90A mutation, the most frequently identified cause of ALS. The findings suggest that metabolomic profiling using GC-TOFMS and multivariate data analysis may be a future tool for diagnosing and monitoring disease progression, and may cast light on the disease mechanisms in ALS.

  • 210. Xia, Hanhan
    et al.
    Wang, Baosheng
    Zhao, Wei
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Department of Ecology and Environmental Sciences.
    Pan, Jin
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Department of Ecology and Environmental Sciences.
    Mao, Jian-Feng
    Wang, Xiao-Ru
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Department of Ecology and Environmental Sciences. Advanced Innovation Center for Tree Breeding by Molecular Design, National Engineering Laboratory for Tree Breeding, College of Biological Sciences and Technology, Beijing Forestry University, Beijing, China.
    Combining mitochondrial and nuclear genome analyses to dissect the effects of colonization, environment, and geography on population structure in Pinus tabuliformis2018In: Evolutionary Applications, ISSN 1752-4571, E-ISSN 1752-4571, Vol. 11, no 10, p. 1931-1945Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The phylogeographic histories of plants in East Asia are complex and shaped by both past large‐scale climatic oscillations and dramatic tectonic events. The impact of these historic events, as well as ecological adaptation, on the distribution of biodiversity remains to be elucidated. Pinus tabuliformis is the dominant coniferous tree in northern China, with a large distribution across wide environmental gradients. We examined genetic variation in this species using genotyping‐by‐sequencing and mitochondrial (mt) DNA markers. We found population structure on both nuclear and mt genomes with a geographic pattern that corresponds well with the landscape of northern China. To understand the contributions of environment, geography, and colonization history to the observed population structure, we performed ecological niche modeling and partitioned the among‐population genomic variance into isolation by environment (IBE), isolation by distance (IBD), and isolation by colonization (IBC). We used mtDNA, which is transmitted by seeds in pine, to reflect colonization. We found little impact of IBE, IBD, and IBC on variation in neutral SNPs, but significant impact of IBE on a group of outlier loci. The lack of IBC illustrates that the maternal history can be quickly eroded from the nuclear genome by high rates of gene flow. Our results suggest that genomic variation in P. tabuliformis is largely affected by neutral and stochastic processes, and the signature of local adaptation is visible only at robust outlier loci. This study enriches our understanding on the complex evolutionary forces that shape the distribution of genetic variation in plant taxa in northern China, and guides breeding, conservation, and reforestation programs for P. tabuliformis.

  • 211. Xing, Fangqian
    et al.
    Mao, Jian-Feng
    Meng, Jingxiang
    Dai, Jianfeng
    Zhao, Wei
    Liu, Hao
    Xing, Zhen
    Zhang, Hua
    Wang, Xiao-Ru
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Department of Ecology and Environmental Sciences.
    Li, Yue
    Needle morphological evidence of the homoploid hybrid origin of Pinus densata based on analysis of artificial hybrids and the putative parents, Pinus tabuliformis and Pinus yunnanensis2014In: Ecology and Evolution, ISSN 2045-7758, E-ISSN 2045-7758, Vol. 4, no 10, p. 1890-1902Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Genetic analyses indicate that Pinus densata is a natural homoploid hybrid originating from Pinus tabuliformis and Pinus yunnanensis. Needle morphological and anatomical features show relative species stability and can be used to identify coniferous species. Comparative analyses of these needle characteristics and phenotypic differences between the artificial hybrids, P.densata, and parental species can be used to determine the genetic and phenotypic evolutionary consequences of natural hybridization. Twelve artificial hybrid families, the two parental species, and P.densata were seeded in a high-altitude habitat in Linzhi, Tibet. The needles of artificial hybrids and the three pine species were collected, and 24 needle morphological and anatomical traits were analyzed. Based on these results, variations in 10 needle traits among artificial hybrid families and 22 traits among species and artificial hybrids were predicted and found to be under moderate genetic control. Nineteen needle traits in artificial hybrids were similar to those in P.densata and between the two parental species, P.tabuliformis and P.yunnanensis. The ratio of plants with three needle clusters in artificial hybrids was 22.92%, which was very similar to P.densata. The eight needle traits (needle length, the mean number of stomata in sections 2mm in length of the convex and flat sides of the needle, mean stomatal density, mesophyll/vascular bundle area ratio, mesophyll/resin canal area ratio, mesophyll/(resin canals and vascular bundles) area ratio, vascular bundle/resin canal area ratio) relative to physiological adaptability were similar to the artificial hybrids and P.densata. The similar needle features between the artificial hybrids and P.densata could be used to verify the homoploid hybrid origin of P.densata and helps to better understand of the hybridization roles in adaptation and speciation in plants.

  • 212. Xu, Chao-Qun
    et al.
    Liu, Hui
    Zhou, Shan-Shan
    Zhang, Dong-Xu
    Zhao, Wei
    Wang, Sihai
    Chen, Fu
    Sun, Yan-Qiang
    Nie, Shuai
    Jia, Kai-Hua
    Jiao, Si-Qian
    Zhang, Ren-Gang
    Yun, Quan-Zheng
    Guan, Wenbin
    Wang, Xuewen
    Gao, Qiong
    Bennetzen, Jeffrey L.
    Maghuly, Fatemeh
    Porth, Ilga
    Van de Peer, Yves
    Wang, Xiao-Ru
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Department of Ecology and Environmental Sciences. Beijing Advanced Innovation Center for Tree Breeding by Molecular Design, National Engineering Laboratory for Tree Breeding, School of Nature Conservation, College of Biological Sciences and Technology, Beijing Forestry University, Beijing, 100083, China.
    Ma, Yongpeng
    Mao, Jian-Feng
    Genome sequence of Malania oleifera, a tree with great value for nervonic acid production2019In: GigaScience, ISSN 2047-217X, E-ISSN 2047-217X, Vol. 8, no 2, article id giy164Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background Malania oleifera, a member of the Olacaceae family, is an IUCN red listed tree, endemic and restricted to the Karst region of southwest China. This tree's seed is valued for its high content of precious fatty acids (especially nervonic acid). However, studies on its genetic makeup and fatty acid biogenesis are severely hampered by a lack of molecular and genetic tools. Findings We generated 51 Gb and 135Gb of raw DNA sequences, using Pacific Biosciences (PacBio) single-molecule real-time and 10x Genomics sequencing, respectively. A final genome assembly, with a scaffold N50 size of 4.65 Mb and a total length of 1.51Gb, was obtained by primary assembly based on PacBio long reads plus scaffolding with 10x Genomics reads. Identified repeats constituted approximate to 82% of the genome, and 24,064 protein-coding genes were predicted with high support. The genome has low heterozygosity and shows no evidence for recent whole genome duplication. Metabolic pathway genes relating to the accumulation of long-chain fatty acid were identified and studied in detail. Conclusions Here, we provide the first genome assembly and gene annotation for M. oleifera. The availability of these resources will be of great importance for conservation biology and for the functional genomics of nervonic acid biosynthesis.

  • 213. Xue, Weiya
    et al.
    Ruprecht, Colin
    Street, Nathaniel
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Department of Plant Physiology. Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Umeå Plant Science Centre (UPSC).
    Hematy, Kian
    Chang, Christine
    Frommer, Wolf B
    Persson, Staffan
    Niittyla, Totte
    Paramutation-like interaction of T-DNA loci in arabidopsis2012In: PLoS ONE, ISSN 1932-6203, E-ISSN 1932-6203, Vol. 7, no 12, p. e51651-Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In paramutation, epigenetic information is transferred from one allele to another to create a gene expression state which is stably inherited over generations. Typically, paramutation describes a phenomenon where one allele of a gene down-regulates the expression of another allele. Paramutation has been described in several eukaryotes and is best understood in plants. Here we describe an unexpected paramutation-like trans SALK T-DNA interaction in Arabidopsis. Unlike most of the previously described paramutations, which led to gene silencing, the trans SALK T-DNA interaction caused an increase in the transcript levels of the endogenous gene (COBRA) where the T-DNA was inserted. This increased COBRA expression state was stably inherited for several generations and led to the partial suppression of the cobra phenotype. DNA methylation was implicated in this trans SALK T-DNA interaction since mutation of the DNA methyltransferase 1 in the suppressed cobra caused a reversal of the suppression. In addition, null mutants of the DNA demethylase ROS1 caused a similar COBRA transcript increase in the cobra SALK T-DNA mutant as the trans T-DNA interaction. Our results provide a new example of a paramutation-like trans T-DNA interaction in Arabidopsis, and establish a convenient hypocotyl elongation assay to study this phenomenon. The results also alert to the possibility of unexpected endogenous transcript increase when two T-DNAs are combined in the same genetic background. Citation: Xue W, Ruprecht C, Street N, Hematy K, Chang C, et al. (2012) Paramutation-Like Interaction of T-DNA Loci in Arabidopsis. PLoS ONE 7(12): e51651. doi:10.1371/journal.pone.0051651

  • 214. Xun, Wei Wei
    et al.
    Brennan, Paul
    Tjonneland, Anne
    Vogel, Ulla
    Overvad, Kim
    Kaaks, Rudolf
    Canzian, Federico
    Boeing, Heiner
    Trichopoulou, Antonia
    Oustoglou, Erifili
    Giotaki, Zoi
    Johansson, Mattias
    Palli, Domenico
    Agnoli, Claudia
    Tumino, Rosario
    Sacerdote, Carlotta
    Panico, Salvatore
    Bueno-de-Mesquita, H Bas
    Peeters, Petra H M
    Lund, Eiliv
    Kumle, Merethe
    Rodríguez, Laudina
    Agudo, Antonio
    Sánchez, Maria-José
    Arriola, Larraitz
    Chirlaque, María-Dolores
    Barricarte, Aurelio
    Hallmans, Göran
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine, Nutritional Research.
    Rasmuson, Torgny
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Radiation Sciences, Oncology.
    Khaw, Kay-Tee
    Wareham, Nicholas
    Key, Tim
    Riboli, Elio
    Vineis, Paolo
    Single-nucleotide polymorphisms (5p15.33, 15q25.1, 6p22.1, 6q27 and 7p15.3) and lung cancer survival in the European Prospective Investigation into Cancer and Nutrition (EPIC).2011In: Mutagenesis, ISSN 0267-8357, E-ISSN 1464-3804, Vol. 26, no 5, p. 657-666Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) rs402710 (5p15.33), rs16969968 and rs8034191 (15q25.1) have been consistently identified by genome-wide association studies (GWAS) as significant predictors of lung cancer risk, while rs4324798 (6p22.1) was previously found to influence survival time in small-cell lung cancer (SCLC) patients. Using the same population of one of the original GWAS, we investigated whether the selected SNPs and 31 others (also identified in GWAS) influence survival time, assuming an additive model. The effect of each polymorphism on all cause survival was estimated in 1094 lung cancer patients, and lung cancer-specific survival in 763 patients, using Cox regression adjusted for a priori confounders and competing causes of death where appropriate. Overall, after 1558 person-years of post-diagnostic follow-up, 874 deaths occurred from all causes, including 690 from lung cancer. In the lung cancer-specific survival analysis (1102 person-years), only rs7452888 (6q27) and rs2710994 (7p15.3) modified survival, with adjusted hazard ratios of 1.19 (P = 0.009) and 1.32 (P = 0.011) respectively, taking competing risks into account. Some weak associations were identified in subgroup analysis for rs16969968 and rs8034191 (15q25.1) and rs4324798 (6p22.1) and survival in never-smokers, as well as for rs402710 in current smokers and SCLC patients. In conclusion, rs402710 (5p15.33), rs16969968 and rs8034191 (both 15q25.1) and rs4324798 (6p22.1) were found to be unrelated to survival times in this large cohort of lung cancer patients, regardless of whether the cause of death was from lung cancer or not. However, rs7452888 (6q27) was identified as a possible candidate SNP to influence lung cancer survival, while stratified analysis hinted at a possible role for rs8034191, rs16969968 (15q25.1) and rs4324798 (6p22.1) in influencing survival time in lung cancer patients who were never-smokers, based on a small sample.

  • 215.
    Zare, Aman
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Department of Molecular Biology (Faculty of Science and Technology).
    Johansson, Anna-Mia
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Department of Molecular Biology (Faculty of Science and Technology).
    Karlsson, Edvin
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Department of Molecular Biology (Faculty of Science and Technology). Division of CBRN Security and Defence, FOI-Swedish, Defence Research Agency, Umeå, Sweden.
    Delhomme, Nicolas
    Stenberg, Per
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Department of Ecology and Environmental Sciences. Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Department of Molecular Biology (Faculty of Science and Technology). Division of CBRN Security and Defence, FOI-Swedish, Defence Research Agency, Umeå, Sweden.
    The gut microbiome participates in transgenerational inheritance of low temperature responses in Drosophila melanogaster2018In: FEBS Letters, ISSN 0014-5793, E-ISSN 1873-3468, Vol. 592, no 24, p. 4078-4086Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Environmental perturbations induce transcriptional changes, some of which may be inherited even in the absence of the initial stimulus. Previous studies have focused on transfers through the germ-line although microbiota is also passed on to the offspring. Thus, we inspected the involvement of the gut microbiome in transgenerational inheritance of environmental exposures in Drosophila melanogaster. We grew flies in the cold versus control temperatures and compared their transcriptional patterns in both conditions as well as in their offspring. F2 flies grew in control temperature while we controlled their microbiota acquisition from either F1 sets. Transcriptional status of some genes was conserved transgenerationally, and a subset of these genes, mainly expressed in the gut, was transcriptionally dependent on the acquired microbiome. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved.

  • 216. Zas, Rafael
    et al.
    Björklund, Niklas
    Sampedro, Luis
    Hellqvist, Claes
    Karlsson, Bo
    Jansson, Stefan
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Department of Plant Physiology. Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Umeå Plant Science Centre (UPSC).
    Nordlander, Göran
    Genetic variation in resistance of Norway spruce seedlings to damage by the pine weevil Hylobius abietis2017In: Tree Genetics & Genomes, ISSN 1614-2942, E-ISSN 1614-2950, Vol. 13, no 5, article id 111Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Regeneration of northern conifer forests is commonly performed by reforestation with genetically improved materials obtained from long-term breeding programs focused on productivity and timber quality. Sanitary threats can, however, compromise the realization of the expected genetic gain. Including pest resistance traits in the breeding programs may contribute to a sustainable protection. Here we quantified the variation in different components of resistance of Norway spruce to its main pest, the pine weevil Hylobius abietis. We followed insect damage in two large progeny trials (52 open-pollinated families with 100-200 individuals per family and trial) naturally infested by the pine weevil. Pine weevils damaged between 17 and 48% of the planted seedlings depending on the trial and year, and mortality due to weevil damage was up to 11.4%. The results indicate significant genetic variation in resistance to the pine weevil, and importantly, the variation was highly consistent across trials irrespective of contrasting incidence levels. Individual heritability estimates for the different components of seedling resistance were consistently low, but family heritabilities were moderate (0.53 to 0.81). While forward selections and breeding for higher resistance seem not feasible, backwards selections of the best parent trees emerge as a putative alternative to reduce weevil damage. A positive genetic correlation between early growth potential and probability of being attacked by the weevil was also observed, but the relationship was weak and appeared only in one of the trials. Overall, results presented here open the door to a new attractive way for reducing damage caused by this harmful pest.

  • 217.
    Zhang, Jingpu
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Molecular Biology (Faculty of Science and Technology).
    Larsson, Jan
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Molecular Biology (Faculty of Science and Technology).
    Rasmuson-Lestander, Åsa
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Molecular Biology (Faculty of Science and Technology).
    Expression preference of the S-adenosylmethionine synthetase (SamS) gene in Drosophila melanogaster1997In: Dev Rep Biol, Vol. 6, p. 7-17Article in journal (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
  • 218. Zhou, G Q
    et al.
    Zhang, Y
    Hammarström, Sten
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Clinical Microbiology, Immunology/Immunchemistry.
    The carcinoembryonic antigen (CEA) gene family in non-human primates.2001In: Gene, ISSN 0378-1119, E-ISSN 1879-0038, Vol. 264, no 1, p. 105-12Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Carcinoembryonic antigen (CEA) is a tumor marker of wide clinical use though its function remains unknown. The CEA counterpart and some related macromolecules cannot be demonstrated in mice, thus prohibiting studies of CEA function by gene disruption strategies. In an attempt to find a relevant animal model for functional studies of CEA we have investigated the occurrence of CEA subgroup members in baboon and African green monkey at the genomic and mRNA levels. The investigation was focused on the characteristic immunoglobulin-variable region-like (IgV-like) N-terminal domain of the family members. Based on N-domain sequences 3 and 4 different CEA subgroup genes, respectively, were identified. One sequence in each monkey species corresponded to human CEACAM8, while it was not possible to assign an obvious human counterpart for the other N-domain sequences. However, studies of cDNAs from African green monkey COS-1 cells identified one of the sequences as CEACAM1. Expression of CEACAM1 mRNA and protein was upregulated by IFNgamma as has previously been demonstrated for human CEACAM1. Presence of GPI-linked CEA subgroup members in African green monkey was suggested by sequencing. Both monkey species would thus seem suitable for functional studies of selected CEA subgroup members.

  • 219. Zulfugarov, Ismayil S.
    et al.
    Tovuu, Altanzaya
    Eu, Young-Jae
    Dogsom, Bolormaa
    Poudyal, Roshan Sharma
    Nath, Krishna
    Hall, Michael
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Department of Plant Physiology. Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Umeå Plant Science Centre (UPSC).
    Banerjee, Mainak
    Yoon, Ung Chan
    Moon, Yong-Hwan
    An, Gynheung
    Jansson, Stefan
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Department of Plant Physiology. Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Umeå Plant Science Centre (UPSC).
    Lee, Choon-Hwan
    Production of superoxide from Photosystem II in a rice (Oryza sativa L.) mutant lacking PsbS2014In: BMC Plant Biology, ISSN 1471-2229, E-ISSN 1471-2229, Vol. 14, p. 242-Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: PsbS is a 22-kDa Photosystem (PS) II protein involved in non-photochemical quenching (NPQ) of chlorophyll fluorescence. Rice (Oryza sativa L.) has two PsbS genes, PsbS1 and PsbS2. However, only inactivation of PsbS1, through a knockout (PsbS1-KO) or in RNAi transgenic plants, results in plants deficient in qE, the energy-dependent component of NPQ. Results: In studies presented here, under fluctuating high light, growth of young seedlings lacking PsbS is retarded, and PSII in detached leaves of the mutants is more sensitive to photoinhibitory illumination compared with the wild type. Using both histochemical and fluorescent probes, we determined the levels of reactive oxygen species, including singlet oxygen, superoxide, and hydrogen peroxide, in leaves and thylakoids. The PsbS-deficient plants generated more superoxide and hydrogen peroxide in their chloroplasts. PSII complexes isolated from them produced more superoxide compared with the wild type, and PSII-driven superoxide production was higher in the mutants. However, we could not observe such differences either in isolated PSI complexes or through PSI-driven electron transport. Time-course experiments using isolated thylakoids showed that superoxide production was the initial event, and that production of hydrogen peroxide proceeded from that. Conclusion: These results indicate that at least some of the photoprotection provided by PsbS and qE is mediated by preventing production of superoxide released from PSII under conditions of excess excitation energy.

  • 220. Zulfugarov, Ismayil S.
    et al.
    Tovuu, Altanzaya
    Kim, Chi-Yeol
    Vo, Kieu Thi Xuan
    Ko, Soo Yeon
    Hall, Michael
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Umeå Plant Science Centre (UPSC). Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Department of Plant Physiology.
    Seok, Hye-Yeon
    Kim, Yeon-Ki
    Skogström, Oscar
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Umeå Plant Science Centre (UPSC). Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Department of Plant Physiology.
    Moon, Yong-Hwan
    Jansson, Stefan
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Umeå Plant Science Centre (UPSC). Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Department of Plant Physiology.
    Jeon, Jong-Seong
    Lee, Choon-Hwan
    Enhanced resistance of PsbS-deficient rice (Oryza sativa L.) to fungal and bacterial pathogens2016In: Journal of Plant Biology, ISSN 1226-9239, Vol. 59, no 6, p. 616-626Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The 22-kDa PsbS protein of Photosystem II is involved in nonphotochemical quenching (NPQ) of chlorophyll fluorescence. Genome-wide analysis of the expression pattern in PsbS knockout (KO) rice plants showed that a lack of this protein led to changes in the transcript levels of 406 genes, presumably a result of superoxide produced in the chloroplasts. The top Gene Ontology categories, in which expression was the most differential, included 'Immune response', 'Response to jasmonic acid', and 'MAPK cascade'. From those genes, we randomly selected nine that were up-regulated. Our microarray results were confirmed by quantitative RT-PCR analysis. The KO and PsbS RNAi (knockdown) plants were more resistant to pathogens Magnaporthe oryzae PO6-6 and Xanthomonas oryzae pv. oryzae than either the wild-type plants or PsbS-overexpressing transgenic line. These findings suggest that superoxide production might be the reason that these plants have greater pathogen resistance to fungal and bacterial pathogens in the absence of energy-dependent NPQ. For example, a high level of cell wall lignification in the KO mutants was possibly due to enhanced superoxide production. Our data indicate that certain abiotic stress-induced reactive oxygen species can promote specific signaling pathways, which then activate a defense mechanism against biotic stress in PsbS-KO rice plants.

  • 221.
    Åslund, Sven-Eric
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Biosciences, Medical and Clinical Genetics.
    Mating behaviour in Drosophila melanogaster and its implication to genetic variation1978Doctoral thesis, comprehensive summary (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Not much is known about the mechanisms affecting the genetic composition of populations of different species. To investi­gate one of these potential mechanisms, mating behaviour, the fruit fly Drosophila melanogaster, was chosen as an experimen­tal animal.

    To quantify mating behaviour in easily measurable parameters, it was subdivided into several distinct components; mating activity, mating time, mating competition ability and male mating capacity. As behavioural components to a great extent are influenced by environmental conditions all experiments were performed under controlled temperature and humidity. All components of mating behaviour were estimated by introducing females and males into mating chambers.

    Mating behaviour seems to be one of the major factors affect­ing the genetic composition of Drosophila melanogaster popula­tions. The experiments performed showed that differences in mating properties led to a substantial sexual selection among the genotypes. This selection was of a stabilizing type with regard to characters associated to bristle number and Y chromo­somal chromatin. This selection situation seems to warrant the retention of intermediate phenotypes in a population and will therefore contribute to the genetic variation present. Differences in mating properties were also shown to be able to maintain a balanced polymorphism for allozyme variants in populations. This maintenance was obtained through different forms of balancing selection as heterozygous superiority in sexual activity and balancing selection between female and male genotypes. Heterozygous superiority or overdominance in fitness always leads to balanced polymorphism through segre­gation of individuals with lowered fitness. The balancing selection between the female and male genotypes is best looked upon as a form of marginal overdominance, conferring the aver­aged highest fitness to the heterozygous genotype, thereby maintaining the polymorphism of the population.

2345 201 - 221 of 221
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