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  • 201. Konrad, M.
    et al.
    Hörnell, Agneta
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Food and Nutrition.
    Gomes, A. M.
    Olsen, S.
    de Looy, A.
    DIETS2: EUROPEAN DIETETIC ADVANCED COMPETENCES-EDAC 20122013In: Annals of Nutrition and Metabolism, ISSN 0250-6807, E-ISSN 1421-9697, Vol. 63, p. 1736-1737Article in journal (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Background and objectives: DIETS2 (Dietitians ensuringeducation, teaching and professional quality) is an EU ThematicNetwork bring together an active network of dietetic (andnutrition) associations and higher education institutions. Theintention is to improve European nutritional health througheducation and practice. ‘Health 2020’ (WHO, 2012) calls fora new working culture fostering cooperation across Europe to enhance healthcare necessitating a great emphasis on lifelonglearning for health professionals. Advanced competencestandards for dietitians, which describe the higher levels ofknowledge and complex responsibilities required, have nowbeen developed.Methods: Invitation to access an on-line questionnaire(Lime-survey) was sent out via European Federation of Associationsof Dietitians (EFAD) and DIETS2 partners in 2011.The questionnaire collected information on demographics,working environments and identified second and third cycledietetic competences.Results: 2030 dietitians from 35 countries over a range ofoccupational fields; Clinical (66%), Public Health (35%), Administrative(30%), Higher Education Teaching (20%) and Research(18%) responded. Competences identified for working atadvanced level were Advanced Knowledge and Understandingof Dietetics; Dietetic Process and Professional Reasoning; ProfessionalRelationships; Professional Autonomy and Accountability;Educator Skills; Research and Development in Dieteticsand its Science; Leadership and Management of ProfessionalDietetics; Entrepreneurial Skills and Business Development ofDietetics. The identified advanced competences (EDAC, 2012)and their performance indicators are now accepted by EFADfor Pan-European application and form the basis for LifelongLearning for dietitians post qualification.Conclusions: The EDAC Framework represents the firstdefinition of the competences required by nutrition and dieteticprofessionals to meet the Health 2020 agenda and provides abenchmark against which health professionals and their clientscan judge their competence.

  • 202. Krogh, Line H.
    et al.
    Beck, Anne Marie
    Kristensen, Niels H.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Umeå University School of Restaurant and Culinary Arts.
    Hansen, Mette W.
    Handling the inpatient's hospital 'Career': Are nurses laying the groundwork for healthy meal and nutritional care transitions?2019In: Nursing Inquiry, ISSN 1320-7881, E-ISSN 1440-1800, Vol. 26, no 1, article id e12262Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This qualitative study examined hospital nurses' methods in handling meal and nutrition care during inpatient time, with an underlying focus on undernourished older adult. Observations and interviews were used to document nurses' methods through the span of a transition (defined by an entry, passage, and exit). The study finds inconsistencies in care methods due to institutional processes restricting both mealtime care and nutritional logging of information throughout hospitalization. It is concluded that the consequences of these inconsistencies must be recognized and that new approaches to meals and nutritional care should be introduced in order to provide greater flexibility. Based on the assumption that mobilizing patient resources is pivotal for meal and nutritional care, it is argued that it may be important to mobilize patient resources during mealtime and in nutritional logging of information in order to increase the visibility of meal and nutritional care in patient transitions within the institution and across settings. Both nurses' methods and institutions developmental initiatives regarding meal and nutritional care need to accommodate the differences between what in this paper is defined as social-bodily care and text-based care. This could be met through care methods that take place with, more than for the patient.

  • 203.
    Kröger, J
    et al.
    Department of Epidemiology, German Institute of Human Nutrition, Potsdam-Rehbrücke, Germany.
    Ferrari, P
    Dietary Exposure Assessment Group, International Agency for Research on Cancer, Lyon, France.
    Jenab, M
    Lifestyle and Cancer Group, International Agency for Research on Cancer, Lyon, France.
    Bamia, C
    Department of Hygiene, Epidemiology and Medical Statistics, University of Athens, Medical School, Athens, Greece.
    Touvier, M
    Inserm, ERI 20, Institut Gustave Roussy, Villejuif, France.
    Bueno-de-Mesquita, H B
    National Institute for Public Health and the Environment (RIVM), Bilthoven, The Netherlands.
    Fahey, M T
    Biostatistics Unit, Medical Research Council and University of Cambridge, Cambridge, UK.
    Benetou, V
    Department of Hygiene, Epidemiology and Medical Statistics, University of Athens, Medical School, Athens, Greece.
    Schulz, M
    Department of Epidemiology, German Institute of Human Nutrition, Potsdam-Rehbrücke, Germany.
    Wirfält, E
    Department of Clinical Sciences, Lund University, Malmö, Sweden.
    Boeing, H
    Department of Epidemiology, German Institute of Human Nutrition, Potsdam-Rehbrücke, Germany.
    Hoffmann, K
    Department of Epidemiology, German Institute of Human Nutrition, Potsdam-Rehbrücke, Germany.
    Schulze, M B
    Department of Epidemiology, German Institute of Human Nutrition, Potsdam-Rehbrücke, Germany.
    Orfanos, P
    Department of Hygiene, Epidemiology and Medical Statistics, University of Athens, Medical School, Athens, Greece.
    Oikonomou, E
    Department of Hygiene, Epidemiology and Medical Statistics, University of Athens, Medical School, Athens, Greece.
    Huybrechts, I
    Dietary Exposure Assessment Group, International Agency for Research on Cancer, Lyon, France.
    Rohrmann, S
    Division of Cancer Epidemiology, German Cancer Research Center, Heidelberg, Germany.
    Pischon, T
    Department of Epidemiology, German Institute of Human Nutrition, Potsdam-Rehbrücke, Germany.
    Manjer, J
    Department of Surgery, Malmö University Hospital, Malmö, Sweden.
    Ågren, Å
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine, Nutritional Research.
    Navarro, C
    Epidemiology Department, Murcia Health Council, Murcia and CIBER en Epidemiología y Salud Pública (CIBERESP), Spain.
    Jakszyn, P
    Unit of Nutrition, Environment and Cancer, Cancer Epidemiology Research Programme, Catalan Institute of Oncology (ICO), Barcelona, Spain.
    Boutron-Ruault, M C
    Inserm, ERI 20, Institut Gustave Roussy, Villejuif, France.
    Niravong, M
    Inserm, ERI 20, Institut Gustave Roussy, Villejuif, France.
    Khaw, K T
    University of Cambridge School of Clinical Medicine, Addenbrookes Hospital, Cambridge, UK.
    Crowe, F
    Cancer Epidemiology Unit, University of Oxford, Oxford, UK.
    Ocké, M C
    National Institute for Public Health and the Environment (RIVM), Bilthoven, The Netherlands.
    van der Schouw, Y T
    Julius Center for Health Sciences and Primary Care, University Medical Center, Utrecht, The Netherlands.
    Mattiello, A
    Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, University of Naples, Federico II, Naples, Italy.
    Bellegotti, M
    Nutritional Epidemiology Unit, Department of Preventive & Predictive Medicine, Fondazione IRCCS Istituto Nazionale dei Tumori, Milano, Italy.
    Engeset, D
    Institute of Community Medicine, University of Tromsø, Tromsø, Norway.
    Hjartåker, A
    Cancer Registry of Norway, Oslo, Norway.
    Egeberg, R
    Institute of Cancer Epidemiology, Danish Cancer Society, Copenhagen, Denmark.
    Overvad, K
    Department of Clinical Epidemiology, Aalborg Hospital, Aarhus University Hospital, Aalborg, Denmark.
    Riboli, E
    Department of Epidemiology, Public Health and Primary Care, Imperial College, London, UK.
    Bingham, S
    Department of Public Health and Primary Care, MRC Centre for Nutritional Epidemiology in Cancer Prevention and Survival, University of Cambridge, Cambridge, UK.
    Slimani, N
    Dietary Exposure Assessment Group, International Agency for Research on Cancer, Lyon, France.
    Specific food group combinations explaining the variation in intakes of nutrients and other important food components in the European prospective investigation into cancer and nutrition: an application of the reduced rank regression method2009In: European Journal of Clinical Nutrition, ISSN 0954-3007, E-ISSN 1476-5640, Vol. 63 Suppl 4, p. S263-S274Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    A combination of food groups was identified that explained a considerable proportion of the nutrient intake variation in 24-HDRs in every country-specific EPIC population in a similar manner. This indicates that, despite the large variability in food and nutrient intakes reported in the EPIC, the variance of intake of important nutrients is explained, to a large extent, by similar food group combinations across countries.

  • 204. Kylberg, Elisabeth
    et al.
    Hörnell, Agneta
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Food and Nutrition.
    Sahlstedt, L
    Bruce, Åke
    Kostmönster och näringsintag hos en grupp kosttillskottskonsumenter1991In: Vår föda, ISSN 0042-2657, Vol. 43, no 1, p. 16-22Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 205. Kyro, C.
    et al.
    Olsen, A.
    Landberg, R.
    Skeie, G.
    Loft, S.
    Aman, P.
    Leenders, M.
    Dik, V.
    Siersema, P.
    Pischon, T.
    Christensen, J.
    Overvad, K.
    Boutron-Ruault, M. C.
    Fagherazzi, G.
    Cottet, V.
    Kuehn, T.
    ChangClaude, J.
    Boeing, H.
    Trichopoulou, A.
    Bamia, C.
    Trichopoulos, D.
    Palli, D.
    Krogh, V.
    Tumino, R.
    Vineis, P.
    Panico, S.
    Peters, P.
    Weiderpass, E.
    Bakken, T.
    Asli, L.
    Argueelles, M.
    Jakszyn, P.
    Sanchez, M. J.
    Castano, J.
    Barricarte, A.
    Ljuslinder, Ingrid
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Radiation Sciences, Oncology.
    Palmqvist, Richard
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Biosciences, Pathology.
    Key, T.
    Travis, R.
    Ferrari, P.
    Freisling, H.
    Jenab, M.
    Tjonneland, A.
    Bueno-de-Mesquita, B.
    ALKYLRESORCINOLS (BIOMARKERS OF WHOLE-GRAIN INTAKE) AND RISK OF COLORECTAL CANCER IN THE EUROPEAN PROSPECTIVE INVESTIGATION INTO CANCER AND NUTRITION2013In: Annals of Nutrition and Metabolism, ISSN 0250-6807, E-ISSN 1421-9697, Vol. 63, no Supplement 1, p. 1207-1208Article in journal (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Background and objectives: Few studies have investigatedthe association between whole-grain intake and colorectal cancer.Whole-grain products are one of the dietary items proneto measurement errors, making the use of objective measures,such as biomarkers, highly relevant. The objective of the studywas to investigate the association between biomarkers ofwhole-grain intake, alkylresorcinols, and colorectal cancer ina nested case-control study within the European ProspectiveInvestigation into Cancer and Nutrition (EPIC). Methods: We included 1372 first incident colorectal cancercases and 1372 individually matched controls and calculatedthe incidence rate ratios (IRR) for overall and sub-sites of colorectalcancer using conditional logistic regression adjusted forpotential confounders.Results: Plasma total alkylresorcinol concentrations werenot associated with risk of overall colorectal cancer, proximalcolon cancer or rectal cancer. However, high plasma total alkylresorcinolconcentrations were statistically significantly associatedwith lower incidence of cancer located in the distal (leftor descending) part of the colon. Adjusted IRR of distal coloncancer for highest versus lowest quartile of plasma alkylresorcinolwas 0.48 (95% confidence interval = 0.28 to 0.83). Furthermore,we observed an inverse association with colon cancerfor the Scandinavian part of the participants. Alkylresorcinolsmay be more appropriate as biomarkers in Middle Europe andScandinavia i.e. in areas where whole grains are regularly consumed.Conclusions: Whole-grain intake, assessed by alkylresorcinols,was associated with a lower incidence of distal coloncancer. Alkylresorcinols seem useful as objective biomarkersof whole-grain intake in populations where whole-grains are astaple part of the diet. Acknowledgements: This work was supportedby World Cancer Research Fund International (WCRF)and WCRF Netherlands (WCRF NL) (2011/436), and NordForsk(Centre of Excellence programme HELGA (070015)).

  • 206. Kyrø, Cecilie
    et al.
    Skeie, Guri
    Dragsted, Lars O
    Christensen, Jane
    Overvad, Kim
    Hallmans, Göran
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine, Nutritional Research.
    Johansson, Ingegerd
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Odontology, Cariology.
    Lund, Eiliv
    Slimani, Nadia
    Johnsen, Nina F
    Halkjær, Jytte
    Tjønneland, Anne
    Olsen, Anja
    Intake of whole grains in Scandinavia is associated with healthy lifestyle, socio-economic and dietary factors2011In: Public Health Nutrition, ISSN 1368-9800, E-ISSN 1475-2727, Vol. 14, no 10, p. 1787-1795Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Objective: To identify the dietary, lifestyle and socio-economic factors associated with the intake of whole grains (WG) in Norway, Sweden and Denmark.

    Design: A cross-sectional study.

    Setting: Subsample of the Scandinavian cohort ‘HELGA’ consisting of three prospective cohorts: The Norwegian Women and Cancer Study; The Northern Sweden Health and Disease Study; and the Danish Diet, Cancer and Health Study.

    Subjects: A total of 8702 men and women aged 30–65 years. Dietary data are from one 24 h dietary recall and data on socio-economic status and lifestyle factors including anthropometric values are from the baseline collection of data.

    Results: Vegetables, fruits, dairy products, fish and shellfish, coffee, tea and margarine were directly associated with the intake of WG, whereas red meat, white bread, alcohol and cakes and biscuits were inversely associated. Smoking and BMI were consistently inversely associated with the intake of WG. Furthermore, length of education was directly associated with the intake of WG among women.

    Conclusions: The intake of WG was found to be directly associated with healthy diet, lifestyle and socio-economic factors and inversely associated with less healthy factors, suggesting that these factors are important for consideration as potential confounders when studying WG intake and disease associations.

  • 207. Laanpere, Margit
    et al.
    Altmäe, Signe
    Stavreus-Evers, Anneli
    Nilsson, Torbjörn K
    Department of Clinical Chemistry, Örebro University Hospital.
    Yngve, Agneta
    Salumets, Andres
    Folate-mediated one-carbon metabolism and its effect on female fertility and pregnancy viability2010In: Nutrition reviews, ISSN 0029-6643, E-ISSN 1753-4887, Vol. 68, no 2, p. 99-113Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This review summarizes current knowledge of the effect of folate-mediated one-carbon metabolism and related genetic variants on female fertility and pregnancy viability. Insufficient folate status disrupts DNA methylation and integrity and increases blood homocysteine levels. Elevated levels of follicular fluid homocysteine correlate with oocyte immaturity and poor early embryo quality, while methylenetetrahydrofolate reductase (MTHFR) gene variants are associated with lower ovarian reserves, diminished response to follicular stimulation, and reduced chance of live birth after in vitro fertilization. Embryos carrying multiple MTHFR variants appear to have a selective disadvantage; however, the heterozygous MTHFR 677CT genotype in the mother and fetus provides the greatest chance for a viable pregnancy and live birth, possibly due to a favorable balance in folate cofactor distribution between methyl donor and nucleotide synthesis. The results of previous studies clearly emphasize that imbalances in folate metabolism and related gene variants may impair female fecundity as well as compromise implantation and the chance of a live birth.

  • 208. Lachat, C
    et al.
    Hawwash, D
    Ocké, M C
    Berg, C
    Forsum, E
    Hörnell, Agneta
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Food and Nutrition.
    Larsson, C L
    Sonestedt, E
    Wirfält, E
    Åkesson, A
    Kolsteren, P
    Byrnes, G
    De Keyzer, W
    Van Camp, J
    Cade, J E
    Slimani, N
    Cevallos, M
    Egger, M
    Huybrechts, I
    Strengthening the Reporting of Observational Studies in Epidemiology - nutritional epidemiology (STROBE-nut): An extension of the STROBE statement2016In: Nutrition Bulletin, ISSN 1471-9827, E-ISSN 1467-3010, Vol. 41, no 3, p. 240-251Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Concerns have been raised about the quality of reporting in nutritional epidemiology. Research reporting guidelines such as the Strengthening the Reporting of Observational Studies in Epidemiology (STROBE) statement can improve quality of reporting in observational studies. Herein, we propose recommendations for reporting nutritional epidemiology and dietary assessment research by extending the STROBE statement into Strengthening the Reporting of Observational Studies in Epidemiology - Nutritional Epidemiology (STROBE-nut). Recommendations for the reporting of nutritional epidemiology and dietary assessment research were developed following a systematic and consultative process, co-ordinated by a multidisciplinary group of 21 experts. Consensus on reporting guidelines was reached through a three-round Delphi consultation process with 53 external experts. In total, 24 recommendations for nutritional epidemiology were added to the STROBE checklist. When used appropriately, reporting guidelines for nutritional epidemiology can contribute to improve reporting of observational studies with a focus on diet and health.

  • 209. Lachat, Carl
    et al.
    Hawwash, Dana
    Ocke, Marga C.
    Berg, Christina
    Forsum, Elisabet
    Hörnell, Agneta
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Food and Nutrition.
    Larsson, Christel
    Sonestedt, Emily
    Wirfalt, Elisabet
    Akesson, Agneta
    Kolsteren, Patrick
    Byrnes, Graham
    De Keyzer, Willem
    Van Camp, John
    Cade, Janet E.
    Slimani, Nadia
    Cevallos, Myriam
    Egger, Matthias
    Huybrechts, Inge
    Strengthening the Reporting of Observational Studies in Epidemiology-Nutritional Epidemiology (STROBE-nut): An Extension of the STROBE Statement2016In: PLoS Medicine, ISSN 1549-1277, E-ISSN 1549-1676, Vol. 13, no 6, article id e1002036Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: Concerns have been raised about the quality of reporting in nutritional epidemiology. Research reporting guidelines such as the Strengthening the Reporting of Observational Studies in Epidemiology (STROBE) statement can improve quality of reporting in observational studies. Herein, we propose recommendations for reporting nutritional epidemiology and dietary assessment research by extending the STROBE statement into Strengthening the Reporting of Observational Studies in Epidemiology—Nutritional Epidemiology (STROBE-nut).

    Methods and Findings: Recommendations for the reporting of nutritional epidemiology and dietary assessment research were developed following a systematic and consultative process, coordinated by a multidisciplinary group of 21 experts. Consensus on reporting guidelines was reached through a three-round Delphi consultation process with 53 external experts. In total, 24 recommendations for nutritional epidemiology were added to the STROBE checklist.

    Conclusion: When used appropriately, reporting guidelines for nutritional epidemiology can contribute to improve reporting of observational studies with a focus on diet and health.

  • 210.
    Lammi, Mikko
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Integrative Medical Biology (IMB). Key Laboratory of Trace Elements and Endemic Diseases, National Health and Family Planning, Institute of Endemic Diseases, School of Public Health of Health Science Center, Xi’an Jiaotong University, Xi’an, China.
    Qu, Chengjuan
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Integrative Medical Biology (IMB).
    Selenium-related transcriptional regulation of gene expression2018In: International Journal of Molecular Sciences, ISSN 1422-0067, E-ISSN 1422-0067, Vol. 19, no 9, article id 2665Article, review/survey (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The selenium content of the body is known to control the expression levels of numerous genes, both so-called selenoproteins and non-selenoproteins. Selenium is a trace element essential to human health, and its deficiency is related to, for instance, cardiovascular and myodegenerative diseases, infertility and osteochondropathy called Kashin⁻Beck disease. It is incorporated as selenocysteine to the selenoproteins, which protect against reactive oxygen and nitrogen species. They also participate in the activation of the thyroid hormone, and play a role in immune system functioning. The synthesis and incorporation of selenocysteine occurs via a special mechanism, which differs from the one used for standard amino acids. The codon for selenocysteine is a regular in-frame stop codon, which can be passed by a specific complex machinery participating in translation elongation and termination. This includes a presence of selenocysteine insertion sequence (SECIS) in the 3'-untranslated part of the selenoprotein mRNAs. Nonsense-mediated decay is involved in the regulation of the selenoprotein mRNA levels, but other mechanisms are also possible. Recent transcriptional analyses of messenger RNAs, microRNAs and long non-coding RNAs combined with proteomic data of samples from Keshan and Kashin⁻Beck disease patients have identified new possible cellular pathways related to transcriptional regulation by selenium.

  • 211. Landais, Edwige
    et al.
    Moskal, Aurelie
    Mullee, Amy
    Nicolas, Genevieve
    Gunter, Marc J.
    Huybrechts, Inge
    Overvad, Kim
    Roswall, Nina
    Affret, Aurelie
    Fagherazzi, Guy
    Mahamat-Saleh, Yahya
    Katzke, Verena
    Kuehn, Tilman
    La Vecchia, Carlo
    Trichopoulou, Antonia
    Valanou, Elissavet
    Saieva, Calogero
    de Magistris, Maria Santucci
    Sieri, Sabina
    Braaten, Tonje
    Skeie, Guri
    Weiderpass, Elisabete
    Ardanaz, Eva
    Chirlaque, Maria-Dolores
    Garcia, Jose Ramon
    Jakszyn, Paula
    Rodriguez-Barranco, Miguel
    Brunkwall, Louise
    Huseinovic, Ena
    Nilsson, Lena
    Umeå University, Arctic Research Centre at Umeå University. Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine, Nutritional Research.
    Wallström, Peter
    Bueno-de-Mesquita, Bas
    Peeters, Petra H.
    Aune, Dagfinn
    Key, Tim
    Lentjes, Marleen
    Riboli, Elio
    Slimani, Nadia
    Freisling, Heinz
    Coffee and Tea Consumption and the Contribution of Their Added Ingredients to Total Energy and Nutrient Intakes in 10 European Countries: Benchmark Data from the Late 1990s2018In: Nutrients, ISSN 2072-6643, E-ISSN 2072-6643, Vol. 10, no 6, article id 725Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: Coffee and tea are among the most commonly consumed nonalcoholic beverages worldwide, but methodological differences in assessing intake often hamper comparisons across populations. We aimed to (i) describe coffee and tea intakes and (ii) assess their contribution to intakes of selected nutrients in adults across 10 European countries.

    Method: Between 1995 and 2000, a standardized 24-h dietary recall was conducted among 36,018 men and women from 27 European Prospective Investigation into Cancer and Nutrition (EPIC) study centres. Adjusted arithmetic means of intakes were estimated in grams (=volume) per day by sex and centre. Means of intake across centres were compared by sociodemographic characteristics and lifestyle factors.

    Results: In women, the mean daily intake of coffee ranged from 94 g/day (similar to 0.6 cups) in Greece to 781 g/day (similar to 4.4 cups) in Aarhus (Denmark), and tea from 14 g/day (similar to 0.1 cups) in Navarra (Spain) to 788 g/day (similar to 4.3 cups) in the UK general population. Similar geographical patterns for mean daily intakes of both coffee and tea were observed in men. Current smokers as compared with those who reported never smoking tended to drink on average up to 500 g/day more coffee and tea combined, but with substantial variation across centres. Other individuals' characteristics such as educational attainment or age were less predictive. In all centres, coffee and tea contributed to less than 10% of the energy intake. The greatest contribution to total sugar intakes was observed in Southern European centres (up to similar to 20%).

    Conclusion: Coffee and tea intake and their contribution to energy and sugar intake differed greatly among European adults. Variation in consumption was mostly driven by geographical region.

  • 212. Landberg, R.
    et al.
    Aman, P.
    Hallmans, Göran
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine, Nutritional Research. Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Biobank Research.
    Johansson, Ingegerd
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine, Nutritional Research.
    Long-term reproducibility of plasma alkylresorcinols as biomarkers of whole-grain wheat and rye intake within Northern Sweden Health and Disease Study Cohort2013In: European Journal of Clinical Nutrition, ISSN 0954-3007, E-ISSN 1476-5640, Vol. 67, no 3, p. 259-263Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    BACKGROUND/OJBECTIVES: Alkylresorcinols (AR) have been suggested as specific biomarkers of whole-grain (WG) and bran intake from wheat and rye. Before using plasma AR as biomarkers in prospective cohort studies, the long-term reproducibility needs to be determined in order to judge how well a single plasma sample reflects the long-term concentration. The objective was therefore to estimate the reproducibility of plasma AR concentrations over 0.1-3.9 years. SUBJECTS/METHODS:The concentrations of AR homologues were analysed in plasma samples, drawn >8 h since last meal, 0.1-3.9 years apart (mean similar to 2 years) in 74 participants in the Swedish prospective Vasterbotten Intervention Project cohort. Reproducibility was estimated by calculating the intra class correlation coefficient (ICC). RESULTS: Fasting plasma AR concentrations were similar between the first and second measurements. The ICC for total AR was 0.54 (95% confidence interval (CI) = 0.38-0.69] overall, 0.34 (95% CI = 0.13-0.64) for men and 0.73 (95% CI = 0.56-0.85) for women, respectively. Somewhat higher ICCs were obtained for shorter AR homologues. CONCLUSION: In summary, the reproducibility of plasma AR over 0.1-3.9 years was high for women and moderate for men within this population. Together with previous data showing high validity of plasma AR as biomarkers of wheat and rye in different populations, the current finding suggest that this biomarker is stable over a long-time period and is therefore probably useful for assessment of long-term WG intake in populations with a wide intake range and a frequent intake.

  • 213.
    Lange Bålman, Miriam
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Food and Nutrition. Umeå universitet.
    GRAVIDA KVINNORS INTAG AV KOSTTILLSKOTT: En kvantitativ studie med fokus på järn och probiotika2019Independent thesis Basic level (degree of Bachelor), 10 credits / 15 HE creditsStudent thesis
    Abstract [en]

    Abstract 

    Background Vitamin and mineral deficiencies in pregnant women can lead to miscarriage and serious disturbances in children’s development. The intestinal flora of the mother is most likely transmitted to the child during childbirth and may lay the foundation for the child's health. One possible solution to ensure an adequate intake may be the consumption of dietary supplements and probiotics. At present, there is insufficient data on supplement consumption among pregnant women. 

    Objective The purpose of the study was to examine how many pregnant women in Västerbotten County chose to consume dietary supplements, mainly iron and probiotics, and whether there was a difference between different factors and intake. 

    Method A quantitative cross-sectional study where pregnant women (n=1473) from the Northpop-study in Västerbotten County responded to a questionnaire regarding consumption of dietary supplements and factors such as age, education, diet etc. The material was analyzed in SPSS with Chi-2-test, independent T-Test and Mann-Whitney U-Test. Using significance level <0.05. 

    Results The majority of participants, 90 percent, responded that they consumed dietary supplements. The factors that increased the intake of dietary supplements in pregnant women were higher age (p=0.030), higher education (p=0.006) and vegetarian/vegan diet (p=0.021). Iron was reported to be consumed by 804 people, 55 percent. The factors that increased the intake of iron supplement in pregnant women were vegetarian/vegan diet (p=0.001). Probiotics were consumed by 25 people, 2 percent. Living in urban areas (p=0.024) and eating vegetarian/vegan diet (p=0.002) increased consumption of probiotics. 

    Conclusion The majority of participants chose to consume some type of dietary supplement, half of the participants consumed iron supplements and a small part consumed probiotics. It appears that pregnant women who are low educated, younger, eating an omnivorous diet and living outside urban areas are in the risk zone for not consuming dietary supplements. 

  • 214. Langenberg, Claudia
    et al.
    Sharp, Stephen J.
    Schulze, Matthias B
    Rolandsson, Olov
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine, Family Medicine.
    Overvad, Kim
    Forouhi, Nita G
    Spranger, Joachim
    Drogan, Dagmar
    Maria Huerta, Jose
    Arriola, Larraitz
    de Lauzon-Guillan, Blandine
    Tormo, Maria-Jose
    Ardanaz, Eva
    Balkau, Beverley
    Beulens, Joline WJ
    Boeing, Heiner
    Bueno-de-Mesquita, H Bas
    Clavel-Chapelon, Francoise
    Crowe, Francesca L
    Franks, Paul W
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine, Medicine.
    Gonzalez, Carlos A
    Grioni, Sara
    Halkjaer, Jytte
    Hallmans, Göran
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine, Nutritional Research.
    Kaaks, Rudolf
    Kerrison, Nicola D
    Key, Timothy J
    Khaw, Kay Tee
    Mattiello, Amalia
    Nilsson, Peter
    Norat, Teresa
    Palla, Luigi
    Palli, Domenico
    Panico, Salvatore
    Ramon Quiros, J
    Romaguera, Dora
    Romieu, Isabelle
    Sacerdote, Carlotta
    Sanchez, Maria-Jose
    Slimani, Nadia
    Sluijs, Ivonne
    Spijkerman, Annemieke MW
    Teucher, Birgit
    Tjonneland, Anne
    Tumino, Rosario
    Daphne, L van der A
    van der Schouw, Yvonne T
    Feskens, Edith JM
    Riboli, Elio
    Wareham, Nicholas J
    Long-term risk of incident type 2 diabetes and measures of overall and regional obesity: the EPIC-interact case-cohort study2012In: PLoS Medicine, ISSN 1549-1277, E-ISSN 1549-1676, Vol. 9, no 6, p. e1001230-Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: Waist circumference (WC) is a simple and reliable measure of fat distribution that may add to the prediction of type 2 diabetes (T2D), but previous studies have been too small to reliably quantify the relative and absolute risk of future diabetes by WC at different levels of body mass index (BMI).

    Methods and Findings: The prospective InterAct case-cohort study was conducted in 26 centres in eight European countries and consists of 12,403 incident T2D cases and a stratified subcohort of 16,154 individuals from a total cohort of 340,234 participants with 3.99 million person-years of follow-up. We used Prentice-weighted Cox regression and random effects meta-analysis methods to estimate hazard ratios for T2D. Kaplan-Meier estimates of the cumulative incidence of T2D were calculated. BMI and WC were each independently associated with T2D, with WC being a stronger risk factor in women than in men. Risk increased across groups defined by BMI and WC; compared to low normal weight individuals (BMI 18.5-22.4 kg/m(2)) with a low WC (< 94/80 cm in men/women), the hazard ratio of T2D was 22.0 (95% confidence interval 14.3; 33.8) in men and 31.8 (25.2; 40.2) in women with grade 2 obesity (BMI >= 35 kg/m(2)) and a high WC (> 102/88 cm). Among the large group of overweight individuals, WC measurement was highly informative and facilitated the identification of a subgroup of overweight people with high WC whose 10-y T2D cumulative incidence (men, 70 per 1,000 person-years; women, 44 per 1,000 person-years) was comparable to that of the obese group (50-103 per 1,000 person-years in men and 28-74 per 1,000 person-years in women).

    Conclusions: WC is independently and strongly associated with T2D, particularly in women, and should be more widely measured for risk stratification. If targeted measurement is necessary for reasons of resource scarcity, measuring WC in overweight individuals may be an effective strategy, since it identifies a high-risk subgroup of individuals who could benefit from individualised preventive action.

  • 215. Lapillonne, Alexandre
    et al.
    Mis, Natasa Fidler
    Goulet, Olivier
    van den Akker, Chris H. P.
    Wu, Jennifer
    Koletzko, Berthold
    Braegger, Christian
    Bronsky, Jiri
    Cai, Wei
    Campoy, Cristina
    Carnielli, Virgilio
    Darmaun, Dominique
    Decsi, Tamas
    Domellöf, Magnus
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Clinical Sciences, Paediatrics.
    Embleton, Nicholas
    Fewtrell, Mary
    Fidler Mis, Natasa
    Franz, Axel
    Hartman, Corina
    Hill, Susan
    Hojsak, Iva
    Iacobelli, Silvia
    Jochum, Frank
    Joosten, Koen
    Kolacek, Sanja
    Ksiazyk, Janusz
    Lohner, Szimonetta
    Mesotten, Dieter
    Mihalyi, Krisztina
    Mihatsch, Walter A.
    Mimouni, Francis
    Molgaard, Christian
    Moltu, Sissel J.
    Nomayo, Antonia
    Picaud, Jean Charles
    Prell, Christine
    Puntis, John
    Riskin, Arieh
    Saenz De Pipaon, Miguel
    Senterre, Thibault
    Shamir, Raanan
    Simchowitz, Venetia
    Szitanyi, Peter
    Tabbers, Merit M.
    Van Goudoever, Johannes B.
    Van Kempen, Anne
    Verbruggen, Sascha
    Wu, Jiang
    Weihui, Yan
    ESPGHAN/ESPEN/ESPR/CSPEN guidelines on pediatric parenteral nutrition: Lipids2018In: Clinical Nutrition, ISSN 0261-5614, E-ISSN 1532-1983, Vol. 37, no 6, p. 2324-2336Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 216.
    Larsson, Christel
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Food and Nutrition.
    Challenges in assessing diet and validity of reported intake of children and adolescents.2012Conference paper (Other academic)
  • 217.
    Larsson, Christel
    Institutionen för kost och idrottsvetenskap, Göteborgs universitet.
    Forskarmöte om nutrition, fysisk aktivitet, hälsa och tillväxt bland skolbarn2011In: Dietistaktuellt, ISSN 1102-9285, Vol. 20, no 5, p. 40-41Article, book review (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
  • 218.
    Larsson, Christel
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Food and Nutrition.
    Mat,hälsa och identitet: Att övergå från blandkost till vegetarisk kost2004In: Thule. Kungliga Skytteanska Samfundets årsbok, ISSN 0280-8692, p. 39-44Article in journal (Other academic)
  • 219.
    Larsson, Christel
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Food and Nutrition.
    Metodrapport - svenska barns matvanor - nationell undersökning på 4, 8 och 11 åringar2004In: Statens LivsmedelsverkArticle in journal (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
  • 220.
    Larsson, Christel
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Food and Nutrition.
    Referat för sessionen "Obesity Governance Project" vid "The 10th Nordic nutrition conference"2012In: Nordisk nutritionArticle, book review (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
  • 221.
    Larsson, Christel
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Food and Nutrition.
    Så äter svenska barn2003In: Vår Föda, Vol. 3, no 6, p. 26-7Article in journal (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
  • 222.
    Larsson, Christel
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Food and Nutrition.
    Vegetarisk kost bland ungdomar2000In: Vegetar, Vol. December, p. 14-Article in journal (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
  • 223.
    Larsson, Christel
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Food and Nutrition.
    Young vegetarians and omnivores: dietary habits and other health-related aspects2002In: Scandinavian Journal of Nutrition/Næringsforskning, ISSN 1102-6480, E-ISSN 1651-2359, Vol. 46, no 1, p. 48-49Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 224.
    Larsson, Christel
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Food and Nutrition.
    Överviktiga barns hälsa: studier om effekten av levnadsvanor och matvanor2006In: Primärvårdens nyheter Pedistrik/nutrition, Vol. 6, p. 4-6Article in journal (Other academic)
  • 225.
    Larsson, Christel
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Food and Nutrition.
    Burgård Konde, Åsa
    Ryden, Petra
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Food and Nutrition.
    Maten efter ett år - vad barnen äter, vad kostråden säger och vad maten kostar2012In: Barnläkaren, Vol. 5, p. 8-11Article in journal (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
  • 226.
    Larsson, Christel
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Food and Nutrition.
    Haugejorden, Olle
    Johansson, Gunnar
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Food and Nutrition.
    Klock, Kristine
    Nordrehaug Åstrom, Anne
    Food habit characteristics of young vegetarians2000In: Swedish medical society conference 2000, 2000Conference paper (Other academic)
  • 227.
    Larsson, Christel
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Food and Nutrition.
    Johansson, Gunnar
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Food and Nutrition.
    Can food frequency questionnaire measure a difference in food intake of young vegans and omnivores?2003In: The fifth international conference on dietary assessment methods, 2003Conference paper (Other academic)
  • 228.
    Larsson, Christel
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Food and Nutrition.
    Johansson, Gunnar
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Food and Nutrition.
    Dietary intake and nutritional status of young vegans and omnivores in Sweden2001In: The proceedings of the nutrition society, 2001, p. 60; 69 A-Conference paper (Other academic)
  • 229.
    Larsson, Christel
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Food and Nutrition.
    Johansson, Gunnar
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Food and Nutrition.
     Dietary intake and nutritional status of young vegans and omnivores in Sweden2002In: American Journal of Clinical Nutrition, ISSN 0002-9165, E-ISSN 1938-3207, Vol. 76, no 1, p. 100-106Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 230.
    Larsson, Christel
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Food and Nutrition.
    Johansson, Gunnar
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Food and Nutrition.
    Food sources of young Swedish vegans and omnivores: Emphasis on fruit and vegetable intake as well as sources of nutrients2004In: Public Health Nutrition 8th Nordic Nutrition Conference, Tønsberg, Norway, 2004Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 231.
    Larsson, Christel
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Food and Nutrition.
    Johansson, Gunnar
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Food and Nutrition.
    Nutritional density of a vegan diet compared with an omnivorous diet eaten by adolescents2002In: Forth International Congress on Vegetarian Nutrition, 2002Conference paper (Other academic)
  • 232.
    Larsson, Christel
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Food and Nutrition.
    Johansson, Gunnar
    Prevalence of vegetarian school lunches in Swedish secondary schools1999In: American Journal of Clinical Nutrition, ISSN 0002-9165, E-ISSN 1938-3207, Vol. 70, p. 633-634Article in journal (Other academic)
  • 233.
    Larsson, Christel
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Food and Nutrition.
    Johansson, Gunnar
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Food and Nutrition.
    Prevalence of vegetarians in Swedish secondary schools1997In: Scandinavian Journal of Nutrition/Næringsforskning, ISSN 1102-6480, E-ISSN 1651-2359, Vol. 41, p. 117-20Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 234.
    Larsson, Christel
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Food and Nutrition.
    Johansson, Gunnar
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Food and Nutrition.
    Unga vegetarianer i svenska skolor: förekomst, kostvanor och livsstil2002In: Skolhälsovård, ISSN 1102-3112, Vol. 2001-2002, no 3, p. 6-9Article in journal (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
  • 235.
    Larsson, Christel
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Food and Nutrition.
    Johansson, Gunnar
    Vegetarian school lunches of Swedish secondary school students1996In: Swedish Medical Society Conference 1996, 1996Conference paper (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
  • 236.
    Larsson, Christel
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Food and Nutrition.
    Johansson, Gunnar
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Food and Nutrition.
    Young Swedish vegans have different sources of nutrients than young omnivores2005In: Journal of the American Dietetic Association, ISSN 0002-8223, E-ISSN 1878-3570, Vol. 105, no 9, p. 1438-41Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The aim of this study was to identify sources of nutrients in diets of young Swedish vegans and omnivores. Three months of dietary intakes were investigated by diet history interviews. Volunteers were recruited through advertising and visits to schools in the city of Umeå, Sweden. Thirty vegans, 15 female and 15 male, aged 17.5±1.0 years, were compared with 30 sex-, age-, and height-matched omnivores. Vegans had different sources of nutrients than young omnivores and relied to a great extent on dietary supplements as a source of vitamin B-12, vitamin D, calcium, and selenium. Dietary intake of vegetables, fruits, and berries exceeded 500 g/day for 21 of the 30 vegans, whereas the same held true for only 1 of the 30 omnivores. Instead of animal products, young vegans rely on dietary supplements, legumes, vegetables, fruits, and berries as sources of nutrients.

  • 237.
    Larsson, Christel
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Food and Nutrition.
    Johansson, Gunnar
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Food and Nutrition.
    Westerterp, K
    Validation of dietary intake of young vegans and omnivores in Sweden2000In: Scandinavian Journal of Nutrition/Næringsforskning, ISSN 1102-6480, E-ISSN 1651-2359, Vol. 44, p. 123-Article in journal (Other academic)
  • 238.
    Larsson, Christel
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Food and Nutrition.
    Klock, K
    Nordrehaug Åstrøm, A
    Johansson, Gunnar
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Food and Nutrition.
    Food habits of young Swedish and Norwegian vegetarians and omnivores2001In: Public Health Nutrition, ISSN 1368-9800, E-ISSN 1475-2727, Vol. 4, no 5, p. 1005-1014Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Objective: To determine the prevalence of vegetarianism and compare food habits among vegetarian and omnivorous adolescents in Sweden and Norway.

    Design: Cross-sectional study by questionnaire in Sweden and Norway to gather information about food habits.

    Setting: The municipalities of Umeå and Stockholm in Sweden, and Bergen in Norway.

    Subjects: In total 2041 ninth-grade students (578 from Umeå, 504 from Stockholm and 959 from Bergen), mean age 15.5 years, were included. The response rate was 95% in Umeå, 91% in Stockholm and 83% in Bergen.

    Results: There was a significantly higher prevalence of vegetarianism in Umeå (15.6%) than in Stockholm (4.8%) and Bergen (3.8%). Vegetarians generally wanted more information about a healthy diet and vegetarian females ate dietary supplements to prevent deficiencies more often than omnivorous females (P < 0.01). The young male vegetarians more or less excluded animal products from their diet without changing their food frequency intake or modifying their dietary habits in other respects, while the young female vegetarians more often consumed vegetables and dietary supplements (P < 0.05). However, there was no difference between the intake of fruits/berries, alcoholic beverages, ice cream, sweets/chocolates and fast foods by vegetarians compared with omnivores.

    Conclusions: There were three to four times more vegetarians in Umeå than in Stockholm and Bergen. The food habits of the young vegetarians differed from those of omnivorous adolescents and also in some respects from previously published comparative studies of vegetarians' and omnivores' food habits. It is uncertain whether the health benefits shown in previous studies on vegetarianism will be experienced by this young generation of vegetarians.

  • 239.
    Larsson, Christel
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Food and Nutrition.
    Klock, Kritine
    Department of Odontology-Community Dentistry (K.S.K., A.N.A., O.H.), University of Bergen, Bergen, Norway.
    Nordrehaug Åstrøm, Anne
    Department of Odontology-Community Dentistry (K.S.K., A.N.A., O.H.), University of Bergen, Bergen, Norway.
    Haugejorden, Olle
    Department of Odontology-Community Dentistry (K.S.K., A.N.A., O.H.), University of Bergen, Bergen, Norway.
    Johansson, Gunnar
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Food and Nutrition.
    Lifestyle-related characteristics of adolescent low-meat-consumers and omnivores in Sweden and Norway2002In: Journal of Adolescent Health, ISSN 1054-139X, E-ISSN 1879-1972, Vol. 31, no 2, p. 190-198Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Methods: A total of 2041 students (578 from Umeå, Sweden; 504 from Stockholm, Sweden; and 959 from Bergen, Norway), with a mean age of 15.5 years, completed a questionnaire. Information was collected about physical characteristics, and health, family situation, social, exercise, alcohol, and tobacco habits. The response rate was 95% in Umeå, 91% in Stockholm, and 83% in Bergen. Statistical analyses included Chi-square and Mann-Whitney U tests.

    Results: There was no reported difference between low-meat consumers and omnivores with respect to alcohol use, smoking, weight, or amount of exercise. Female low-meat consumers more frequently used smokeless tobacco, reported having more sick days during the last year, attached less importance to “being healthy,” and had been depressed more often than female omnivores. Male low-meat consumers reported, to a greater extent than male omnivores, having been tired without reason, having often had headaches and having been depressed. Female low-meat consumers had parents with a higher average level of education than did female omnivores and more often spent time with friends after school.

    Conclusions: Vegetarianism or low-meat consumption is mainly a female phenomenon among adolescents in this study. The study indicates that the lifestyle of young low-meat consumers differs from the lifestyle found in previous studies of vegetarians with respect to the respondents’ exercise habits, their perception of their own health, and their use of alcohol and tobacco. Contrary to findings from other studies, adherence to a low-meat diet may not correlate with other health promotion practices among adolescents in Sweden and Norway.

  • 240.
    Larsson, Christel
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Food and Nutrition.
    Lind, T
    Hernell, O
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Clinical Sciences, Paediatrics.
    Anthropometric data and metabolic risk factors in Swedish children2008In: The 9th Nordic Nutrition Conference, Copenhagen, Denmark, 2008Conference paper (Other academic)
  • 241.
    Larsson, Christel
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Food and Nutrition.
    Rönnlund, Ulla
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Food and Nutrition.
    Johansson, Gunnar
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Food and Nutrition.
    Dahlgren, Lars
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine. Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Sociology.
    Veganism a status passage: the process of becoming a vegan among youths in Sweden2003In: Appetite, ISSN 0195-6663, E-ISSN 1095-8304, Vol. 41, no 1, p. 61-67Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In a town in northern Sweden, 3.3% of the 15-year-old adolescents were vegans in 1996. This study describes the process of becoming a vegan among adolescents and interprets the informants' descriptions by constructing categories, which later on were related to relevant theories. Group interviews were conducted with three vegans and in-depth interviews were performed with three other vegan adolescents. The methodology was grounded theory and the adolescents' perceptions were analyzed in the framework of symbolic interactionism. Three types of vegans were identified: the Conformed Vegan, the Organized Vegan, and the Individualistic Vegan. The decision to become a vegan was reported to be influenced by perceived internal reasons such as ethics, health, distaste for meat, and preference for vegetarian food. In addition, friends, family, school, media, and music influenced the decision to become a vegan. The perceived consequences of becoming a vegan were positive as well as negative and differed between the three types of vegans. Veganism as a new type of status passage with specific characteristics was illustrated. No modifications or new properties were discovered that add to the theory of status passage which indicates that the general model is applicable also in a vegan context.

  • 242.
    Larsson, Christel
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Food and Nutrition.
    Rönnlund, Ulla
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Food and Nutrition.
    Johansson, Gunnar
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Food and Nutrition.
    Dahlgren, Lars
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine, Epidemiology and Global Health.
    Veganism as status passage: the process of becoming a vegan among youths in Sweden2002In: Fourth International Congress on Vegetarian Nutrition, Loma Linda, USA., 2002Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 243.
    Larsson, Christel
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Food and Nutrition.
    Westerterp, Klaas R
    Department of Human Biology, Maastricht University, Maastricht, Netherlands.
    Johansson, Gunnar
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Food and Nutrition.
    Validity of reported energy expenditure and energy and protein intakes of Swedish vegan and omnivore adolescents2002In: American Journal of Clinical Nutrition, ISSN 0002-9165, E-ISSN 1938-3207, Vol. 75, no 2, p. 268-274Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: It is difficult to obtain accurate reports of dietary intake; therefore, reported dietary intakes must be validated. Researchers need low-cost methods of estimating energy expenditure to validate reports of energy intake in groups with different lifestyles and eating habits.

    Objective: We sought to validate the reported energy expenditure and energy and protein intakes of Swedish adolescent vegans and omnivores.

    Design: We compared 16 vegans (7 females and 9 males; mean age: 17.4 ± 0.8 y) with 16 omnivores matched for sex, age, and height. Energy expenditure as reported in a physical activity interview and energy and protein intakes as reported by diet history were validated by using the doubly labeled water method and by measuring urinary nitrogen excretion.

    Results: The validity of reported energy expenditure and energy and protein intakes was not significantly different between vegans and omnivores. The physical activity interview had a bias toward underestimating energy expenditure by 1.4 ± 2.6 MJ/d (95% CI: 2.4, 0.5 MJ/d). The diet-history interview had a bias toward underestimating energy intake by 1.9 ± 2.7 MJ/d (95% CI: 2.9, 1.0 MJ/d) but showed good agreement with the validation method for nitrogen (protein) intake (underestimate of 0.40 ± 1.90 g N/d; 95% CI: 1.10, 0.29 g N/d).

    Conclusions: The physical activity and diet-history interviews underestimated energy expenditure and energy intake, respectively. Energy intake and expenditure were underestimated to the same extent, and the degree of underestimation was not significantly different between vegans and omnivores. Valid protein intakes were obtained with the diet-history method for both vegans and omnivores.

  • 244. Lassale, Camille
    et al.
    Gunter, Marc J.
    Romaguera, Dora
    Peelen, Linda M.
    Van der Schouw, Yvonne T.
    Beulens, Joline W. J.
    Freisling, Heinz
    Muller, David C.
    Ferrari, Pietro
    Huybrechts, Inge
    Fagherazzi, Guy
    Boutron-Ruault, Marie-Christine
    Affret, Aurelie
    Overvad, Kim
    Dahm, Christina C.
    Olsen, Anja
    Roswall, Nina
    Tsilidis, Konstantinos K.
    Katzke, Verena A.
    Kuehn, Tilman
    Buijsse, Brian
    Quiros, Jose-Ramon
    Sanchez-Cantalejo, Emilio
    Etxezarreta, Nerea
    Maria Huerta, Jose
    Barricarte, Aurelio
    Bonet, Catalina
    Khaw, Kay-Tee
    Key, Timothy J.
    Trichopoulou, Antonia
    Bamia, Christina
    Lagiou, Pagona
    Palli, Domenico
    Agnoli, Claudia
    Tumino, Rosario
    Fasanelli, Francesca
    Panico, Salvatore
    Bueno-de-Mesquita, H. Bas
    Boer, Jolanda M. A.
    Sonestedt, Emily
    Nilsson, Lena Maria
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine, Nutritional Research.
    Renström, Frida
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine, Nutritional Research.
    Weiderpass, Elisabete
    Skeie, Guri
    Lund, Eiliv
    Moons, Karel G. M.
    Riboli, Elio
    Tzoulaki, Ioanna
    Diet Quality Scores and Prediction of All-Cause, Cardiovascular and Cancer Mortality in a Pan-European Cohort Study2016In: PLoS ONE, ISSN 1932-6203, E-ISSN 1932-6203, Vol. 11, no 7, article id e0159025Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Scores of overall diet quality have received increasing attention in relation to disease aetiology; however, their value in risk prediction has been little examined. The objective was to assess and compare the association and predictive performance of 10 diet quality scores on 10-year risk of all-cause, CVD and cancer mortality in 451,256 healthy participants to the European Prospective Investigation into Cancer and Nutrition, followed-up for a median of 12.8y. All dietary scores studied showed significant inverse associations with all outcomes. The range of HRs (95% CI) in the top vs. lowest quartile of dietary scores in a composite model including non-invasive factors (age, sex, smoking, body mass index, education, physical activity and study centre) was 0.75 (0.72-0.79) to 0.88 (0.84-0.92) for all-cause, 0.76 (0.69-0.83) to 0.84 (0.76-0.92) for CVD and 0.78 (0.73-0.83) to 0.91 (0.85-0.97) for cancer mortality. Models with dietary scores alone showed low discrimination, but composite models also including age, sex and other non-invasive factors showed good discrimination and calibration, which varied little between different diet scores examined. Mean C-statistic of full models was 0.73, 0.80 and 0.71 for all-cause, CVD and cancer mortality. Dietary scores have poor predictive performance for 10-year mortality risk when used in isolation but display good predictive ability in combination with other non-invasive common risk factors.

  • 245. Leenders, Max
    et al.
    Siersema, Peter D
    Overvad, Kim
    Tjønneland, Anne
    Olsen, Anja
    Boutron-Ruault, Marie-Christine
    Bastide, Nadia
    Fagherazzi, Guy
    Katzke, Verena
    Kühn, Tilman
    Boeing, Heiner
    Aleksandrova, Krasimira
    Trichopoulou, Antonia
    Lagiou, Pagona
    Klinaki, Eleni
    Masala, Giovanna
    Grioni, Sara
    Santucci De Magistris, Maria
    Tumino, Rosario
    Ricceri, Fulvio
    Peeters, Petra H M
    Lund, Eiliv
    Skeie, Guri
    Weiderpass, Elisabete
    Quirós, J Ramón
    Agudo, Antonio
    Sánchez, María-José
    Dorronsoro, Miren
    Navarro, Carmen
    Ardanaz, Eva
    Ohlsson, Bodil
    Jirström, Karin
    Van Guelpen, Bethany
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Radiation Sciences, Oncology.
    Wennberg, Maria
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine, Nutritional Research.
    Khaw, Kay-Tee
    Wareham, Nick
    Key, Timothy J
    Romieu, Isabelle
    Huybrechts, Inge
    Cross, Amanda J
    Murphy, Neil
    Riboli, Elio
    Bueno-de-Mesquita, H Bas
    Subtypes of fruit and vegetables, variety in consumption and risk of colon and rectal cancer in the European Prospective Investigation into Cancer and Nutrition2015In: International Journal of Cancer, ISSN 0020-7136, E-ISSN 1097-0215, Vol. 137, no 11, p. 2705-2714Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Previously, a lower risk of colorectal cancer was observed with fruit and vegetable consumption in the European Prospective Investigation into Cancer and Nutrition within a follow-up period of 9 years which was not fully supported by a recent meta-analysis. Therefore, we were interested in the relation with extended follow-up, also focusing on single subtypes and a variety of intake of fruit and vegetables. Fruit and vegetable consumption was assessed at baseline. After an average of 13 years of follow-up, 3,370 participants were diagnosed with colon or rectal cancer. Diet diversity scores were constructed to quantify variety in fruit and vegetable consumption. A lower risk of colon cancer was observed with higher self-reported consumption of fruit and vegetable combined (HR Q4 vs. Q1 0.87, 95% CI 0.75-1.01, p for trend 0.02), but no consistent association was observed for separate consumption of fruits and vegetables. No associations with risk of rectal cancer were observed. The few observed associations for some fruit and vegetable subtypes with colon cancer risk may have been due to chance. Variety in consumption of fruits and vegetables was not associated with a lower risk of colon or rectal cancer. Although a lower risk of colon cancer is suggested with high consumption of fruit and vegetables, this study does not support a clear inverse association between fruit and vegetable consumption and colon or rectal cancer beyond a follow-up of more than 10 years. Attenuation of the risk estimates from dietary changes over time cannot be excluded, but appears unlikely.

  • 246. Leenders, Max
    et al.
    Sluijs, Ivonne
    Ros, Martine M
    Boshuizen, Hendriek C
    Siersema, Peter D
    Ferrari, Pietro
    Weikert, Cornelia
    Tjonneland, Anne
    Olsen, Anja
    Boutron-Ruault, Marie-Christine
    Clavel-Chapelon, Franoise
    Nailler, Laura
    Teucher, Birgit
    Li, Kuanrong
    Boeing, Heiner
    Bergmann, Manuela M
    Trichopoulou, Antonia
    Lagiou, Pagona
    Trichopoulos, Dimitrios
    Palli, Domenico
    Pala, Valeria
    Panico, Salvatore
    Tumino, Rosario
    Sacerdote, Carlotta
    Peeters, Petra HM
    van Gils, Carla H
    Lund, Eiliv
    Engeset, Dagrun
    Redondo, Maria Luisa
    Agudo, Antonio
    Sanchez, Maria Jose
    Navarro, Carmen
    Ardanaz, Eva
    Sonestedt, Emily
    Ericson, Ulrika
    Nilsson, Lena Maria
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine, Nutritional Research.
    Khaw, Kay-Tee
    Warcham, Nicholas J
    Key, Timothy J
    Crowe, Francesca L
    Romieu, Isabelle
    Gunter, Marc J
    Gallo, Valentina
    Overvad, Kim
    Riboli, Elio
    Bueno-de-Mesquita, H Bas
    Fruit and vegetable consumption and mortality European Prospective Investigation Into Cancer and Nutrition2013In: American Journal of Epidemiology, ISSN 0002-9262, E-ISSN 1476-6256, Vol. 178, no 4, p. 590-602Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 247. Li, Sherly X.
    et al.
    Imamura, Fumiaki
    Ye, Zheng
    Schulze, Matthias B.
    Zheng, Jusheng
    Ardanaz, Eva
    Arriola, Larraitz
    Boeing, Heiner
    Dow, Courtney
    Fagherazzi, Guy
    Franks, Paul W.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine, Medicine. Lund Univ, Sweden.
    Agudo, Antonio
    Grioni, Sara
    Kaaks, Rudolf
    Katzke, Verena A.
    Key, Timothy J.
    Khaw, Kay Tee
    Mancini, Francesca R.
    Navarro, Carmen
    Nilsson, Peter M.
    Onland-Moret, N. Charlotte
    Overvad, Kim
    Palli, Domenico
    Panico, Salvatore
    Quiros, J. Ramon
    Rolandsson, Olov
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine, Family Medicine.
    Sacerdote, Carlotta
    Sanchez, Maria-Jose
    Slimani, Nadia
    Sluijs, Ivonne
    Spijkerman, Annemieke M. W.
    Tjonneland, Anne
    Tumino, Rosario
    Sharp, Stephen J.
    Riboli, Elio
    Langenberg, Claudia
    Scott, Robert A.
    Forouhi, Nita G.
    Wareham, Nicholas J.
    Interaction between genes and macronutrient intake on the risk of developing type 2 diabetes: systematic review and findings from European Prospective Investigation into Cancer (EPIC)-InterAct2017In: American Journal of Clinical Nutrition, ISSN 0002-9165, E-ISSN 1938-3207, Vol. 106, no 1, p. 263-275Article, review/survey (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: Gene-diet interactions have been reported to contribute to the development of type 2 diabetes (T2D). However, to our knowledge, few examples have been consistently replicated to date. Objective: We aimed to identify existing evidence for genemacronutrient interactions and T2D and to examine the reported interactions in a large-scale study. Design: We systematically reviewed studies reporting genemacronutrient interactions and T2D. We searched the MEDLINE, Human Genome Epidemiology Network, and WHO International Clinical Trials Registry Platform electronic databases to identify studies published up to October 2015. Eligibility criteria included assessment of macronutrient quantity (e.g., total carbohydrate) or indicators of quality (e. g., dietary fiber) by use of self-report or objective biomarkers of intake. Interactions identified in the review were subsequently examined in the EPIC (European Prospective Investigation into Cancer)-InterAct case-cohort study (n = 21,148, with 9403 T2D cases; 8 European countries). Prentice-weighted Cox regression was used to estimate countryspecific HRs, 95% CIs, and P-interaction values, which were then pooled by random-effects meta-analysis. A primary model was fitted by using the same covariates as reported in the published studies, and a second model adjusted for additional covariates and estimated the effects of isocaloric macronutrient substitution. Results: Thirteen observational studies met the eligibility criteria (n < 1700 cases). Eight unique interactions were reported to be significant between macronutrients [carbohydrate, fat, saturated fat, dietary fiber, and glycemic load derived from self-report of dietary intake and circulating n-3 (v-3) polyunsaturated fatty acids] and genetic variants in or near transcription factor 7-like 2 (TCF7L2), gastric inhibitory polypeptide receptor (GIPR), caveolin 2 (CAV2), and peptidase D (PEPD) (P-interaction, 0.05). We found no evidence of interaction when we tried to replicate previously reported interactions. In addition, no interactions were detected in models with additional covariates. Conclusions: Eight gene-macronutrient interactions were identified for the risk of T2D from the literature. These interactions were not replicated in the EPIC-InterAct study, which mirrored the analyses undertaken in the original reports. Our findings highlight the importance of independent replication of reported interactions.

  • 248.
    Lif Holgerson, Pernilla
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Odontology, Pediatric Dentistry.
    Birkhed, Dowen
    Tema: kost och tandhälsa: Sockerersättningsmedel ger bättre tandhälsa2009In: Nordisk nutrition, ISSN 1654-8337, no 3, p. 19-21Article in journal (Other academic)
  • 249.
    Lind, Torbjörn
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Clinical Sciences, Paediatrics.
    Johansson, Ulrica
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Clinical Sciences, Paediatrics.
    Öhlund, Inger
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Clinical Sciences, Paediatrics.
    Lindberg, Lene
    Lonnerdal, Bo
    Tennefors, Catharina
    Hernell, Olle
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Clinical Sciences, Paediatrics.
    Study protocol: optimized complementary feeding study (OTIS): a randomized controlled trial of the impact of a protein-reduced complementary diet based on Nordic foods2019In: BMC Public Health, ISSN 1471-2458, E-ISSN 1471-2458, Vol. 19, article id 134Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: What we eat as infants and children carries long-term consequences. Apart from breastfeeding, the composition of the complementary diet, i.e. the foods given to the infant during the transition from breast milk/infant formula to regular family foods affects the child's future health. A high intake of protein, a low intake of fruits, vegetables and fish and an unfavorable distribution between polyunsaturated and saturated fats are considered to be associate with health risks, e.g. obesity, type 2 diabetes and dyslipidemia later in life.

    Methods: In a randomized, controlled study from 6 to 18months of age we will compare the currently recommended, Swedish complementary diet to one based on Nordic foods, i.e. an increased intake of fruits, berries, vegetables, tubers, whole-grain and game, and a lower intake of sweets, dairy, meat and poultry, with lower protein content (30% decrease), a higher intake of vegetable fats and fish and a systematic introduction of fruits and greens. The main outcomes are body composition (fat and fat-free mass measured with deuterium), metabolic and inflammatory biomarkers (associated with the amount of body fat) in blood and urine, gut microbiota (thought to be the link between early diet, metabolism and diseases such as obesity and insulin resistance) and blood pressure.We will also measure the participants' energy and nutrient intake, eating behavior and temperament through validated questionnaires, acceptance of new and unfamiliar foods through video-taped test meals and assessment of cognitive development, which we believe can be influenced through an increased intake of fish and milk fats, notably milk fat globule membranes (MFGM).

    Discussion: If the results are what we expect, i.e. improved body composition and a less obesogenic, diabetogenic and inflammatory metabolism and gut microbiota composition, a more sustainable nutrient intake for future health and an increased acceptance of healthy foods, they will have a profound impact on the dietary recommendations to infants in Sweden and elsewhere, their eating habits later in life and subsequently their long-term health.

    Trial registration: NCT02634749. Registration date 18 December 2015.

  • 250.
    Lind, Torbjörn
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine, Epidemiology and Public Health Sciences.
    Persson, Lars-Åke
    Lönnerdal, Bo
    Iron and zinc interactions: reply to FT Wieringa et al2004In: American Journal of Clinical Nutrition, ISSN 0002-9165, E-ISSN 1938-3207, Vol. 80, no 3, p. 789-790Article in journal (Refereed)
2345678 201 - 250 of 461
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