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  • 201.
    Peeters, Jeroen
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Informatics. Interactive Institute Swedish ICT.
    Trotto, Ambra
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Umeå School of Architecture. Interactive Institute Swedish ICT.
    Kuenen, Stoffel
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Umeå Institute of Design.
    Hummels, Caroline
    Eindhoven University of Technology.
    Papworth, Nigel
    Interactive Institute Swedish ICT.
    Touchme!, diffractme!2014In: Proceedings of Design Research Society Conference. "Design's Big Debates", 2014Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In this poster we present an engaging, interactive lighting installation entitled DiffractMe!. The design process for DiffractMe! was based on skill-based techniques, aiming to extract subtle yet profound experiential qualities from everyday perceptual motor-skills, in order to design and build engaging interactions. The installation consists of a frame and two interaction columns. The frame houses moveable transparent prisms, Rendering a complex and colourful light projection. Each interaction column features a transparent surface that visitors can manipulate, using their hands. These movements influence the movement of the prisms, and provide a type of force-feedback to the other interaction surface. This allows us to explore the qualities of engagement in this design on three levels: Firstly, visitors engage with the installation themselves, through a subtle, haptic interaction that allows them to play with light diffraction. Secondly, visitors at one installation engage with each other, in a subtle, haptic dialogue that makes them aware of, and involved in, each other’s movements. Thirdly, the dynamic and colourful light projection has a profound effect on the space surrounding the installation, enticing and engaging passers-by to become involved. 

  • 202. Peeters, Leroen
    et al.
    Trotto, Ambra
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Umeå School of Architecture. RISE Interactive.
    Designing Expressions of Movement Qualities2018In: DIS '18: Proceedings of the 2018 Designing Interactive Systems Conference / [ed] Koskinen, Ilpo; Lim, Youn-kyung; Cerratto-Pargman, Teresa; Chow, Kenny; Odom, William, Association for Computing Machinery (ACM), 2018, p. 679-690Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Tango is a form of partner dancing in which two bodies sense one another, and move accordingly, in a dynamic, physical dialogue that is known for its subtle complexities, beauty and intimate experience. In MoCap Tango, we explore how we can build on our skills as designers to highlight and unravel these embedded qualities and use them as inspiration in designing interactions. In this pictorial, we invite the reader to actively participate in the designerly engagement that turns objective data into subjective expressions; highlighting the qualities embedded in the movements of professional dancers.

  • 203.
    Penz, Marcel
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Umeå Institute of Design.
    Facets. A toolkit to start conversations about connected things with our clients: How can designers make the Internet of Things more tangible2016Independent thesis Advanced level (degree of Master (Two Years)), 20 credits / 30 HE creditsStudent thesis
    Abstract [en]

    The Internet of Things (IoT) is about connectedness between people and artefacts surrounding them. It is also about the transition between the physical and the digital when interacting with those artefacts. Adding a digital layer allows us to pair static artefacts (like products) with dynamic experiences (like services). This opens up for countless opportunities for product-service systems that help people in completely new ways. As a development of the internet IoT is a techno-social phenomenon that has the potential to reveal and help to solve large-scale problems that are created by our connected lifestyle.

    More companies than ever are creating connected product-service systems mostly to disrupt the market. This inspires people across companies from R&D to CEO level to explore the new market sector. However it is difficult to talk about abstract connections between things and user experiences that don’t exist yet. 

    FACETS is designed to be a supporting tool for the design and innovation consultancy Veryday and other designers to approach the topic of IoT together with their (to be) client. The toolkit consists of four box-like modules to be used in different phases of a client meeting. Here the toolkit in a nutshell:

    0. Prepare to Convince

    Change the look and feel of the tools to help you tell a story about connected products during the meeting with the client. 

    1. Inspire Stories

    Use the character boxes to inspire the client. The two modules communicate with each other to create a magical experience of connected objects. 

    2. Bridge to the client’s Context

    Once getting excited about the behavior of the modules the client might wonder how this could be useful for their product or service offering. The clip-on output module can be attached to any object to bridge between the toolkit and the client’s context.

    3. Co-Create Scenarios 

    A pre-defined behavior of the modules is not useful during meetings that are dynamic by nature. That’s why the action trigger module in combination with an app is used to quickly generate new scenarios on the fly.

  • 204.
    Persson, Linus
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Umeå Institute of Design.
    Open Sesame: An exploration of our haptic sense in everyday digital doors2014Independent thesis Advanced level (degree of Master (Two Years)), 20 credits / 30 HE creditsStudent thesis
    Abstract [en]

    The advent of electronics and digital technologies in the last century has brought some significant changes in how we use and behave around doors. In this development, progress seems to imply a use of automation or shying away from physical interaction, and consequently a subtle yet potentially rich channel of information.

    Open Sesame aims to explore and reason around an opportunity and complementary perspective of leveraging digital technology to enrich the use of our haptic sense in future doors. The project poses an example situated in an office environment and builds on methods of hardware sketching to design a set of haptic door behaviours that reflect the state of a space. The resulting perspective attempts to make digital information about a room accessible for the user at a glance whilst reimagining the role of the door as a more active representative of the rooms it connects.

  • 205.
    Pouliadou, Kallirroi
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Umeå Institute of Design.
    VR versus Phobias: An exploration of Virtual Reality in exposure therapy2017Independent thesis Advanced level (degree of Master (Two Years)), 20 credits / 30 HE creditsStudent thesis
    Abstract [en]

    Interest in Virtual Reality (VR) is growing fast. Tech companies are now starting to identify its most relevant application that will make it desireable. The use of VR in healthcare and mental health, has been proven through clinical research. Moreover, patient support programs extend treatment to people’s homes. An underlying opportunity was to envision a service for remote treatment of phobias with exposure therapy through VR. During the process, I conducted desk research, interviews, a workshop, prototyping and user testing. I collected evidence to lay out the service experience and communicate the key role of the therapist in the overall journey. My goal was to maximize the leaning outcome of exposure therapy and avoid the return of fear. Focusing on VR for the mobile phone, as the most accessible hardware for the broad audience, I created examples of exposure experience, that demonstrate the therapist’s presence and the user’s interactions with the environment. 

  • 206.
    Pruchnicka, Joanna
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Umeå Institute of Design.
    A BETTER WAY TO LIVE WITH A CHRONIC CONDITION: Envisioning transition kit for women living with endometriosis2018Independent thesis Advanced level (degree of Master (Two Years)), 20 credits / 30 HE creditsStudent thesis
    Abstract [en]

    This project explores the question of how to support women living with endometriosis in the transition into live with a chronic condition while maintaining the best possible quality of life.

    Design process was planned out and exercises in four steps - preparations and background research (outlining well-being perspective, desk research, research online via social media), design research (multiple surveys, interviews, reflections online, co-creation sessions, probing, interviews following probing with co-creation sessions, ideation sessions, analysis), explorations (creation of directions, analysis, initial concepts creation, feedback, synthesis, design proposal, feedback and evaluation sessions, design improvements) and final design proposal. Activities were aiming to repeatedly

    open up the scope of the project and then through the analysis of each phase narrow it down again following diamond shape.

    One important aspect of the process was to engage women living with endometriosis as well as their loved ones throughout the whole process and design together instead of designing for them. Of course, experts were consulted as well to make sure project is following standards of medical care, but the primary focus on the users was important since the product was shaped rather as a lifestyle change facilitator as well as data collection tool rather than a strictly medical solution.

    The outcome of the project is a flexible system VEA serving as a transition kit for women diagnosed with endometriosis, but also early detection screening tool and awareness platform for those who haven’t been diagnosed yet. Even though this might seem complicated I’ll try to explain why only this kind of a multifaceted approach can fully support women in their journey toward their best possible quality of life.

    VEA allows users to access Habit Nooks supporting them in introducing changes while guided by experts and supported by the community.

    Physical tracker allowing to track symptoms together with the Data Dashboard allow users to explore data patterns and make informed decisions. The system gives also an opportunity to get in touch with experts via calls or structured long-term programs.

    Beside the design proposal project was closed with a series of reflection touching on the bias in a medical field and how it might affect healthcare design, as well as designer’s experience of working on a project with a personal relevance. 

  • 207.
    Purohit, Tejas
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Umeå Institute of Design.
    NIO Horizon: Future autonomous flight experience2019Independent thesis Advanced level (degree of Master (Two Years)), 20 credits / 30 HE creditsStudent thesis
    Abstract [en]

    What if future air travel was highly sustainable and appealing? What if you could hop from building rooftop to rooftop or better, from a city to an island without the worries of ground congestion and gridlocks? And how would it look like if NIO decided to take this opportunity and broaden their product offerings? These were some of the initial question that guided the project towards a mode of mobility which is new and challenging to realise. Admittedly It was also exciting to imagine what would future of autonomy look like in something other that a car and to see if A.I. driven technologies and fresh architecture ideas could enhance this experience. And remove the safety and social acceptance stigmas from this type of mobility. Furthermore to see how the design would be influenced by specific target user group & their needs.

    From Post-it ideation to Alias mock-up and Virtual reality software to validate  ideas, the process saw use of several tools. Initial  stage included several basic  CAS layout  proposals which  allowed for  fresh  ideas which were translated into detailed sketches on paper and in Photoshop.  Two loops of mid-level detailed CAS were generated  and then  through  combination of both, and  additional  analogue  material  the  final  loop  of  Alias was completed and then  handed to  In-house  CAS team  for  refinement  and  physical  prototyping  support. Throughout  the  process there were several check  points with the mentor, interior  director  &  university tutors which gave valuable input & direction to the project.

    The  final  outcome  is  a  Vertical  take  off  landing  vehicle which shows a holistic idea of how future NIO products could  look  like.  A  small  fleet  and  a  shared  model make this realistic and accessible mode  of  mobility. Passengers  are  welcomed  to  a NIO  house  which  also acts as a sky-deck  for  the  vehicle. Open  interior  layout of  the  vehicle  poses unique  and  exciting  possibilities for  either  enjoying  personal  time  or  a  dialogue  during the journey. Key functions such as ambient air, music or photo-chromatic  glass can  be activated by interacting with  the  two  A.I.  units  placed on  top  of  each  seating zone.  Use of recycled & vegan materials and lightweight construction  of the seats allow for  a bigger surface area but optimized weight. The overall welcoming gesture of the  interior  space aims for  attracting  a wide group of passengers. 

  • 208.
    Qian, Yedan
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Umeå Institute of Design. Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Media Laboratory.
    Wonder-LAND: A Tangible Mixed-Reality Book System For Explorative Learning in Science2017Independent thesis Advanced level (degree of Master (Two Years)), 20 credits / 30 HE creditsStudent thesis
    Abstract [en]

    Every child is born a scientist, with curiosity to explore the environment through experimentation. However, in practice, science education still very focuses on transmitting facts instead of encouraging personal exploration. Conducting science exploration in a classroom can be complicated for kids and limited by safety, money and laboratory infrastructure. But what if we could create a middle ground between science and fiction, a world where kids discover and experiment in ways that could be impossible in real life but still true to science? This project is to design an imaginative and accessible tool to help kids develop a scientific mindset and practice through play.

    Wonder-LAND is a mixed reality book system that empowers kids to discover the unseen and experiment the impossible through play. The system combines AR and VR technology with various traditional paper-based mechanisms from pop-up book, cut-out toys and movable cards to bring a world alive. In such way, kids can interact with the tangible material, paper, to unlock amazing 3D virtual phenomena. They can discover things that are not visible to the naked eyes through metaphorical paper tools. And they can also conduct experiments that are impossible in reality by creating their own universe and controlling parameters in simulation. And those playful interactions spark their curiosity and passion for more scientific exploration.

  • 209.
    Rapakoulia, Klio
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Umeå Institute of Design.
    Unlocking your digital legacy: A perspective on immortality through our digital traces2019Independent thesis Advanced level (degree of Master (Two Years)), 20 credits / 30 HE creditsStudent thesis
    Abstract [en]

    Every day, we use technology. Online interactions leave traces and traces serves as portals into different aspects of our personalities, or how we want to be perceived by others. We are encouraged to record and express everything, from our most important moments to the least. However, the digital tools we use privilege only the moment, not the long term. They also tend to make everything feel equally important, thus giving us no incentive to go through our digital traces and decide what has lasting meaning and should be preserved and what we would like to be forgotten.The fabric of our lives is intertwined with our digital traces. What happens to them after the end of our lives? Just as our physical things live on past us, sometimes becoming a part of the lives of our family and friends this will surely be true for our data.How might we curate our digital legacy?

  • 210.
    Redström, Johan
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Umeå Institute of Design.
    Form-Acts: a critique of conceptual cores2013In: Share this book: critical perspectives and dialogues about design and sustainability / [ed] Ramia Mazé, Lisa Olausson, Matilda Plöjel, Johan Redström, Christina Zetterlund, Stockholm: Axl Books, 2013Chapter in book (Other academic)
  • 211.
    Redström, Johan
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Umeå Institute of Design.
    Former för hållbarhet = Forms of Sustainability2014In: Metod − Process − Redovisning: Artiklar och rapporter om den fortsatta utvecklingen av konstnärlig forskning = Method - process - reporting : articles, reviews and reports of the ongoing development on artistic research / [ed] Torbjörn Lind, Stockholm: Vetenskapsrådet , 2014, p. 112-129Chapter in book (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Forms of sustainability was a study of how questions of sustainable development affect the way we view design: what it is and what it does. The design field is to a large extent about problem solving, with a focus on use and the user, and in practice not least about the needs of industry and society. as such, the basic perspective is typically to start by asking what design and designers can do for someone or something, what value design can create and provide. The purpose of this project is to some extent the opposite: instead of asking what design can do to establish a more sustainable society, we asked what impact the problems surrounding sustainable development might have on design. Underpinning this is a desire for a critical practice in design research, a way to work with the disciplinary development of the field through experimental design.

  • 212.
    Redström, Johan
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Umeå Institute of Design.
    Making design theory2017Book (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Tendencies toward "academization" of traditionally practice-based fields have forced design to articulate itself as an academic discipline, in theoretical terms. In this book, Johan Redström offers a new approach to theory development in design research – one that is driven by practice, experimentation, and making. Redström does not theorize from the outside, but explores the idea that, just as design research engages in the making of many different kinds of things, theory might well be one of those things it is making.Redström proposes that we consider theory not as stable and constant but as something unfolding — something acted as much as articulated, inherently fluid and transitional. Redström describes three ways in which theory, in particular formulating basic definitions, is made through design: the use of combinations of fluid terms to articulate issues; the definition of more complex concepts through practice; and combining sets of definitions made through design into "programs." These are the building blocks for creating conceptual structures to support design. Design seems to thrive on the complexities arising from dichotomies: form and function, freedom and method, art and science. With his idea of transitional theory, Redström departs from the traditional academic imperative to pick a side — theory or practice, art or science. Doing so, he opens up something like a design space for theory development within design research.

  • 213.
    Redström, Johan
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Umeå Institute of Design.
    Wiltse, Heather
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Umeå Institute of Design.
    Changing Things: Innovation through Design Philosophy2019In: Academy for Design Innovation Management Conference 2019: Research Perspectives in the Era of Transformations, London: Loughborough University, , 2019Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Digital networked technologies are currently at the forefront of contemporary innovation, driving changes in sociotechnical practices across industrial sectors and in everyday life. Yet technical innovation has been outpacing our capacity to make sense of these technologies and the fundamental changes associated with them. This sense-making enterprise is the focus of our current research in developing a design philosophy for changing things. We describe a conceptual framework developed around the concept of things as fluid assemblages to investigate and articulate what is going on with things, and how their development might be (re)directed toward preferable futures. Specifically, we here examine the important role of design philosophy in innovation, using the conceptual framework developed as a way to point toward potential sites for innovation in the current sociotechnical landscape. The line of investigation we pursue suggests that doing philosophy should become a central part of innovative design practices.

  • 214.
    Redström, Johan
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Umeå Institute of Design.
    Wiltse, Heather
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Umeå Institute of Design.
    Changing things: the future of objects in a digital world2018Book (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Many of the things we now live with do not take a purely physical form. Objects such as smart phones, laptops and wearable fitness trackers are different from our things of the past. These new digital forms are networked, dynamic and contextually configured. They can be changeable and unpredictable, even inscrutable when it comes to understanding what they actually do and whom they really serve.

    In this compelling new volume, Johan Redstrom and Heather Wiltse address critical questions that have assumed a fresh urgency in the context of these rapidly-developing forms. Drawing on critical traditions from a range of disciplines that have been used to understand the nature of things, they develop a new vocabulary and a theoretical approach that allows us to account for and address the multi-faceted, dynamic, constantly evolving forms and functions of contemporary things. In doing so, the book prototypes a new design discourse around everyday things, and describes them as fluid assemblages.

    Redstrom and Wiltse explore how a new theoretical framework could enable a richer understanding of things as fluid and networked, with a case study of the evolution of music players culminating in an in-depth discussion of Spotify. Other contemporary 'things' touched on in their analysis include smart phones and watches, as well as digital platforms and applications such as Google, Facebook and Twitter.

  • 215.
    Redström, Johan
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Umeå Institute of Design.
    Wiltse, Heather
    Indiana university.
    On the multi-instabilities of assembled things2015Conference paper (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    One of the key features of a postphenomenological account is its attention to the multistability of artifacts and the many variations that are possible in use. In other words, any given artifact can be perceived and appropriated in a vast number of ways. Recognition and analysis of these multistabilities counters technologically-deterministic readings of artifacts that might see them in the more narrow light of intended use cases and dominant narratives around particular kinds of (technological) progress. It thus helps to ward off reductive approaches that can risk misunderstanding or not seeing what technologies actually do in the world in various contexts, and it does this by pointing to the rich variety of predispositions and possibilities that creative human beings bring to their engagements with the world.

    However, in addition to the possibilities around use, and especially when dealing with contemporary technologies, there is now what might be seen as another kind of destabilizing dynamic that is inherent in the technologies themselves. Many of the technologies that we now interact with on an everyday basis are digital products and services that are dynamic and unique in many ways—not only in the interactions and uses they support, but also in their very constitution as things assembled and made available for use. We here outline an account of the multi-instabilities of dynamically-assembled contemporary digital things, suggesting that such a framing and analysis is required in order to understand their character and the many roles they play in the world.

  • 216.
    Redström, Johan
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Umeå Institute of Design.
    Wiltse, Heather
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Umeå Institute of Design.
    Press Play: Acts of defining (in) fluid assemblages2015In: Nordes 2015: Design Ecologies, Stockholm: Nordes , 2015Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Although design continuously has been expanding its scope of concern and intervention from products to processes, experience, and entire product and service ecologies, ‘things’ remain central to how we think about design and use. but ‘things’ have changed. contemporary materials, technologies and contexts of design and use, we argue, now result in ‘things’ that need to be understood as fluid assemblages rather than traditional objects. these often combine a surface-level simplicity of use with dynamic, sophisticated, and hidden back- end complexity.

    In order to investigate these issues we consider a simple design case and how it has evolved over time and through technological developments: that of pressing play to listen to music. Noting the tendencies in the ongoing evolution, with focus on the simple design element of the ‘play’ button, we suggest that traditional distinctions between design and use are breaking down. coming to grips with the materials and ecologies of contemporary design practice thus requires the development of design theory and methodologies that allow us to articulate and bring into focus these significant new dynamics. 

  • 217. Reitsma, Lizzete
    et al.
    Torretta, Nicholas
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Umeå Institute of Design.
    de Jong, Annelise
    Önnevall, Elin
    Wessman, Stina
    Humble Designing: A Future Perspective on the Role of Design in Design for Sustainability2017In: Proceedings of the 18th European Roundtable on Sustainable Consumption and Production: Towards a Greener Challenge & Evolution in the Framework of the Circular Economy / [ed] Konstantinos Aravossis, 2017Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Design has the potential for addressing societal challenges including sustainability by highlighting certain societal issues or even changing existing structures of consumption. One of the primary concerns of design for sustainability (DfS) has been to bring about behavior change towards supporting more sustainable lifestyles. There are a number of potential problems however with this intention of DfS. Behavior change is highly normative, and potentially problematic to address, since there is no obvious agency of designing for norm setting in sustainability. As a reaction towards these concerns, we have been exploring an alternative perspective on DfS by challenging existing power structures and norm setting occurring among the various roles and relations between actors in design processes. We frame this perspective as humble designing to indicate an important yet modest role for design. In order to take this exploration further, we held two workshops with design practitioners and researchers working with DfS in the fields of interaction design, engineering, social sciences and anthropology. In this paper we reflect upon these two workshops in order to understand whether humble designing as an alternative perspective on DfS has potential to contribute in steering away from normative goal-setting so to diversify design for sustainability. The results indicated that there is a need for setting appropriate moments for applying humbleness in a design approach, but also that there is potential for moderating power structures within design processes in order to address normative intentions.

  • 218.
    Risager, Kim
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Umeå Institute of Design.
    Fastronomy: Everyday cooking in a one-persons houshold2013Independent thesis Advanced level (degree of Master (Two Years)), 20 credits / 30 HE creditsStudent thesis
    Abstract [en]

    In 2012, 40% of Scandinavian households had only one occupant and this trend continues to grow. Daily, these households face the challenges of cooking for one: shopping and preparing small portions while trying to minimize waste; motivating yourself to spend the time to cook and then eat alone; attempting not to eat the same leftovers for too many days in a row; resisting the temptation of consuming convenient ready-meals or going for take-away. Since 1980, the amount of home cooked meals has dropped from 72% to approximately 50%. But what if there was an alternative to ready-meals that had the same convenience while providing you with the freedom, variety and quality of traditional home cooking? What if cooking for yourself could be a convenient and enjoyable experience?

  • 219.
    Ritter, Robin
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Umeå Institute of Design.
    The 100 kW Sportscar: Experience-Oriented Performance through Reduction in Times of Excess2017Independent thesis Advanced level (degree of Master (Two Years)), 20 credits / 30 HE creditsStudent thesis
    Abstract [en]

    Problem Area

    With the introduction of the Bugatti Veyron in 2005, a new breed of sportscars was born: the hypercar. It was celebrated as a technological masterpiece, its todays hybrid counterparts, the McLaren P1, Ferrari LaFerrari and Porsche 918 Spyder were named the ‘holy trinity’ of sportscars. However, only a few hundreds of these cars will ever be built, and most enthusiasts will only be able to experience their performance in the virtual world in a racing simulator. The few lucky owners though face a similar problem: These machines are so fast and their traction limit is so high that they can hardly be driven flat-out on open roads, which turns many of them into a track-only toys or garage queens.

    Design process

    The design process used is fairly traditional, starting with a research phase, an ideation phase which is being followed by a refinement phase and ultimately the execution of the design in form of a physical scale model and digital renderings.

    However it needs to be stated that the availability of VR reviews already has a very positive impact on the design workflow. Many design solutions, ergonomics and proportions were modeled directly in 3D and immediately tested in VR, similar to a continously updated 1:1 clay model in the industry.

    Final result

    The final result is a lightweight sportscar that makes most out of its limited power resources. Not only does it use state-of-the art technologies and materials to be as efficient as possible, it also boosts the driving experience with several innovative design solutions.

    The styling is modern and in line with Porsche’s carefully developed current design DNA, but also links to the past. Connaisseurs of the Porsche heritage will find several references to models from the past, yet all these elements are respectfully interpreted in a contemporary yet timeless way.

    Other, more high-volume manufacturers also produce versions of their models with ridiculously powerful engines - similar to the era of the muscle cars in the late 60ies. In some cases, it seems that this is more of an engineers game of numbers, a marketing strategy or a method to please the ego of the companies’ board members.

    The fun of sportscar driving however is where the driver and or the machine reach their physical limits - in speed, revs, reaction time, grip and g-forces. Finding and riding along on this edge is the challenge of driving a sportscar, and this project claims that this can be brought back to a level that is far below that of hypercars.

    The challenge of this project is therefore to develop a car that can deliver an exciting, memorable driving experience with less financial, energy and material resources. At the same time, in an age of Uber, Lyft and the advent of autonomous vehicles, this car should attract younger customers to keep the following generations interested in the driving aspect of cars, a key factor in the emotionality that ultimately leads to higher profits for the manufacturer and above all, an exciting leisure time experience for the customer.

    Design process

    The design process used is fairly traditional, starting with a research phase, an ideation phase which is being followed by a refinement phase and ultimately the execution of the design in form of a physical scale model and digital renderings.

    However it needs to be stated that the availability of VR reviews already has a very positive impact on the design workflow. Many design solutions, ergonomics and proportions were modeled directly in 3D and immediately tested in VR, similar to a continously updated 1:1 clay model in the industry.

    Final result

    The final result is a lightweight sportscar that makes most out of its limited power resources. Not only does it use state-of-the art technologies and materials to be as efficient as possible, it also boosts the driving experience with several innovative design solutions.

    The styling is modern and in line with Porsche’s carefully developed current design DNA, but also links to the past. Connaisseurs of the Porsche heritage will find several references to models from the past, yet all these elements are respectfully interpreted in a contemporary yet timeless way.

  • 220. Rodgers, Paul
    et al.
    Innella, Giovanni
    Bremner, Craig
    Coxon, Ian
    Broadley, Cara
    Cadamuro, Alessia
    Carleklev, Stephanie
    Chan, Kwan
    Dilnot, Clive
    Fathers, James
    Fennell, Jac
    Fremantle, Chris
    French, Tara
    Henriques, Diogo
    Lloyd Jones, Peter
    Kettley, Richard
    Kettley, Sarah
    Khan, Mashal
    Logge, Karl
    Archer-Martin, Jen
    McHattie, Lynn-Sayers
    Pulley, Robert
    Shahar, Dina
    Teal, Gemma
    Tewari, Saurabh
    Treadaway, Cathy
    Tsekleves, Emmanuel
    Moradi Valadkeshyaei, Hamed
    Ventura, Jonathan
    Watt, Trudy A.
    Wiltse, Heather
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Umeå Institute of Design.
    Winton, Euan
    The Lancaster Care Charter2019In: Design Issues, ISSN 0747-9360, E-ISSN 1531-4790, Vol. 35, no 1, p. 73-77Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 221.
    Rosenbak, Søren
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Umeå Institute of Design.
    A Closer Look at the UrbanIxD Summer School Design Fictions through the Meta-Lens of Agonism and Dissensus2014In: The UrbanIxD Symposium Proceedings: City | Data | Future: Interactions in hybrid urban space, UrbanIxD , 2014, p. 1-6Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    By analyzing the collective output of interweaving design fictions from the UrbanIxD summer school, this paper explores the qualities in the creative process as well as the output through the meta-lens of agonism and dissensus. The understanding of these qualities and their interrelations is argued to present an opportunity for advancing urban interaction design as a hybrid discipline and design fiction as a design format.

  • 222.
    Rosenbak, Søren
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Umeå Institute of Design.
    Designing for a City of Lies: Designing for a City of Lies. How to Rethink Belgiums Smartest City Through Engaging the Imaginaries of Its Local Citizens2018In: Proceedings of the 15th Participatory Design Conference: Short Papers, Situated Actions, Workshops and Tutorial / [ed] Liesbeth Huybrechts, Maurizio Teli, Ann Light, Ann Light, Carl Di Salvo, Erik Grönvall, Anne Marie Kanstrup, Keld Bødker, New York, NY, USA: ACM Publications, 2018, Vol. 2, article id No. 38Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In order to meaningfully speculate on what a city could become, we need to first understand what a city currently is. Designing for a City of Lies is a project that sets out to answer this question, not through mapping what the city is, but what it is not. This is done by asking local citizens to tell lies about their city, and then feed these lies back to the city as designed urban interventions, prototyping new urban futures. Importantly, the project seeks to engage local citizens in new, more inclusive and playful ways throughout this process.

  • 223.
    Rosenbak, Søren
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Umeå Institute of Design.
    Exceptional futures vs. exceptions to the future: a pataphysical approach to design fiction2018In: NERD - New Experimental Research in Design: positions and perspectives / [ed] Michael Erlhoff, Wolfgang Jonas, Basel, Switzerland: Birkhäuser Verlag, 2018, p. 145-170Chapter in book (Refereed)
  • 224.
    Rosenbak, Søren
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Umeå Institute of Design.
    Fifty Years of Failures: Part of DRS 50th Anniversary Event panel: "Outside Looking in" (presentation of the three 50th Anniversary grant projects).2016Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 225.
    Rosenbak, Søren
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Umeå Institute of Design.
    Histories of Design Research Failures2017In: Writing Visual Culture, ISSN 2049-7180, Vol. 8Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Design Research Failures is a design research project that facilitates conversation, reflection and action around the question: “In what way has Design Research failed in the last 50 years?” In this article, the project is further discussed as a potential vehicle for making and unmaking design history in various ways. As a call for action for design historians to engage in this exploration, two examples of such possible engagements are included, one by Kaisu Savola and another by Ben Highmore.

  • 226. Rosenbak, Søren
    Krogseth, Ane Cecilie (Contributor, Editor, Designer)
    Michèle, Léa (Contributor, Editor, Designer)
    Scherer, Davis (Contributor, Editor, Designer)
    Zabeida, Orysia (Contributor, Editor, Designer)
    Hu, Eric (Editor)
    Gassel, Harry (Editor)
    OSLO magazine vol. 1+2+32016Other (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
  • 227.
    Rosenbak, Søren
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Umeå Institute of Design.
    PhD by Design Discussion Session 3 Notes2016Report (Other academic)
  • 228.
    Rosenbak, Søren
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Umeå Institute of Design.
    Prototyping a Useless Design Practice: What, Why & How?2015In: Artifact, ISSN 1749-3463, E-ISSN 1749-3471, Vol. 3, no 4, p. 5.1-5.18Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This essay sets out to rectify the false dichotomy between the notions of uselessness and usefulness in relation to design, in order to argue for a useless design practice. The argument is structured into three main parts.

    Part I opens with an introduction and goes on to frame design as a hybrid discipline that has been characterized by usefulness since it was born of the Industrial Revolution. The notion of useful design and its continuingly intimate relationship with the neoliberalist growth economy is subsequently unpacked through scrutinizing the basic demands for quantification & acceleration, conflicting use and temporality with special attention paid to the Anthropocene.

    Part II elucidates the ambiguous relationship between the useless and the useful through the related critical/conformist dichotomy present in Dunne & Raby’s A/B Manifesto as well as through useless and useful design fictions. From here the unuseless chindōgu by Kawakeni and the unfindable objects by Carelman together frame the useless as a “useful overdrive.” Additionally they illustrate the constant risk of assimilation, festishization and spectacle that disruptive useless design artifacts face within the neoliberalist growth economy. In the digital realm The Useless Web accentuate the post-ironic and absurd qualities in useless design.

    Part III asks: what is useless design, why do we need useless design and how could useless design exist? From five opening propositions, useless design is positioned among related concepts such as Redström’s “design after design” (2011), Hunt’s “tactical formlessness” (2003), Tonkinwise’s “designing things that are not finished” (2005), and Jones’ “pure design” (1984). Useless design is finally argued to find its value from its ability to valuate and actively traverse the growing chasm between the industrial and the post-industrial design paradigm.

    In essence useless design is an invitation to make useful, here “useful” understood in reappropriated terms, beyond its currently one dimensional, confined state. On that note, the essay concludes by shifting its gaze from the abstract insights gathered throughout the essay towards the concrete urgent task of prototyping a useless design practice.

  • 229.
    Rosenbak, Søren
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Umeå Institute of Design.
    Prototyping Design Research Tools: Workshop Reflection2016Report (Other academic)
  • 230.
    Rosenbak, Søren
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Umeå Institute of Design.
    Successfully Failing to Design the New Unit of Presence: A Design-based Research Exploration in-between the True and the Real2014Conference paper (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    This paper explores the methodological challenges, paradoxes and possibilities within the process of failing to design a physical, materialized unit of qualitative measurement: the new unit of presence (abbreviated NUP). The unit and its five constituent parts are discussed against the current shift from defining the kilogram through a material artifact to defining it through non-material invariable constants. The original international prototype of the kilogram and the meter are evaluated as designed artifacts and argued to inhabit a hybrid position between the true (the domain of science: abstraction, the universal) and the real (the domain of design: complexity, the ultimate particular). While the redefinition of the kilogram marks a movement towards the true end of this continuum, the NUP explores a counterbalancing move towards the real end. As a constructive design research project primarily aimed at design researchers as well as design professionals, the NUP is an invitation to join the exploration in-between the true and the real. The paper concludes by arguing that the kind of successful failure that the NUP demonstrates helps us navigate this peculiar hybrid space, in theory as well as in practice.

  • 231.
    Rosenbak, Søren
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Umeå Institute of Design.
    The Debtoscope: Transvaluation through Design2015In: Transvaluation Symposium Online Proceedings, Gothenburg: Department of Architecture, Chalmers University of Technology , 2015Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This paper discusses transvaluation through design from an analysis of the ‘Debtoscope’, a design intervention dealing with the issue of debt that took place in Brisbane, Australia, November 2012. Framed around the single question: “How does debt hurt you?” the project used a seven metre long stethoscope made of local recycled trash material to expose the invisible suffering from indebtedness in the public urban space. Through the unpacking of the stethoscope as a Nietzschean metaphor and the discussion of diagnosis as a tactic for hacking infrastructural space, the Debtoscope brings us closer, not only to what transvaluation through design could be like, but perhaps also to what it should be like. 

  • 232.
    Rosenbak, Søren
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Umeå Institute of Design.
    The science of imagining solutions: design becoming conscious of itself through design2018Doctoral thesis, monograph (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    This dissertation addresses a paradox in design: we currently live in a day and age that is fundamentally conditioned by artifice on all scales, and principled by a deep sense of contingency and possibility. In this world, anything could always be something else. Design is a discipline uniquely capable of configuring artifice, instantiating it into a stream of different design artefacts that we are able to interact with. Beyond the comfort, joy and meaning these artefacts might bring to our lives, design in this way uniquely captures and shows forth possibility, not only on the scale of individual products, services etc., but also on the level of the artificial, in other words speaking directly to our contemporary human existence, to the sense of possibility as such.

    We can say that—distinct from other disciplines—design contributes knowledge through this very practice of possibilizing. Strangely, design displays a curious lack of consciousness of itself with respect to this unique capability, preferring to instead put its growing array of design methods and design thinking tool kits to use in the latest problem areas, thereby implicitly affirming the lack of any distinct knowledge contribution at its core. With a commitment to reverse this dynamic by exploring this very capability, this dissertation concerns the prototyping of a pataphysically infused design practice, as a way of making design more conscious of itself.

    Pataphysics, articulated by the poet Alfred Jarry at the turn of the 20th century Paris, and popularly referred to as ‘the science of imaginary solutions’, is a no­toriously slippery substance, successfully eluding academic autopsy, let alone categorisation or definition. While critical design practice has extensively adopted methods and tactics from the avant-garde movements following and drawing on pataphysics—such as dadaism, surrealism and situationism—this dissertation seeks to rectify this incomplete lineage, by bringing out the timeless pataphysical impulse in design. This process of bringing out the pataphysical impulse, is what I discuss as an ‘infusion’ of pataphysics into my research practice.

    The research practice consists of a series of five different projects, carried out in the methodological tradition of research through design, where I explore pata­physics as a possible conceptual foundation for design. In each of the projects, design’s capability to possibilize, is brought out just beyond the edge of design’s disciplinary domain, making a self-conscious foray into contemporary problem areas: printmaking (Workcentre 7120), global mass surveillance (Meta(data) morphosis), smart cities (Designing for a City of Lies), future making (FutureDomestic Landscape), and design discourse building (Design Research Failures).

    By playing out across the material and immaterial, fluidly and consciously trans­gressing the actual and the imaginary in this range of different contexts, the dis­sertation shows what a pataphysically infused design practice is: a design that not only views its artefacts, experiments, and projects, but also itself, along with the world in which it operates, as imaginary solutions.

    In addition to the practice itself, one of the imaginary solutions produced through the research practice is the science of imagining solutions. This is a theory describ­ing the way in which a design conscious of itself is uniquely able to show forth possibility to the world and to knowledge as large. It discusses the study of this capability as an ‘epiphenomenology of design’, and offers ‘quantum poetics’ as a nascent vocabulary for describing the aesthetics of this capability. Further, it offers a reconception of criticality in design away from a historical perspective, arguing that a design consciously engaging with the edge of its own domain, understood as the space where it can comfortably possibilize, is a critical design practice.

    Finally, this dissertation does not only concern design itself as a discipline, but with its focus on design’s unique capability to show forth possibility as such, more broadly speaks to a world that currently sees the sense of possibility being curtailed in numerous ways.

  • 233.
    Rosenbak, Søren
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Umeå Institute of Design.
    Your Design Research Failures. An Hour of Catharsis Workshop: Reflection From the Workshop2017Report (Refereed)
  • 234.
    Rosenbak, Søren
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Umeå Institute of Design.
    Aditya, Pawar
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Umeå Institute of Design.
    Prototyping design research tools2016In: Instant Journal, ISSN 2396-846X, no 3, p. 35-36Article in journal (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
    Abstract [en]

    In this workshop, we propose that design research needs to actively think about designing research tools and procedures as part of the research process. Following from this a number of questions arise: How can we get a critical understanding of how research tools shape our research practices? How can we practice collaborative sharing, critiquing and making of tools? For example, in a setup using materials and manual making at the PhD by Design session. When engaging in experimental practice-based research, what capabilities do design researchers need to prototype and articulate their tool-making practices?

  • 235.
    Rosenbak, Søren
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Umeå Institute of Design.
    Feckenstedt, Henrike
    The Design of Digital Shadows: Co-Speculating Presents That Might Already Have Come True2016In: MEDIATIONS Conference Proceedings: Art & Design Agency and Participation in Public Space / [ed] Saba Golchehr, London: Royal College of Art , 2016, p. 13-25Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    As a response to the recent surveillance disclosures made by Edward Snowden and other whistleblowers, this paper presents and discusses a key experiment from Meta(data)morphosis, a design research project aimed at heightening public metadata awareness in a low-key, local setting. The paper begins by unpacking metadata and exploring the qualities of ‘the digital shadow’, and then goes on to describe the experiment. Based on the design ethnographic extraction of personal metadata from several members of the public, each metadata set is transformed into a short film script template through speculative design. In a concluding workshop, each participant co-speculates on top of someone else’s script template, producing a narrative of an alternative present which is finally read back to the participant whose metadata the template was based upon. This is the uncanny moment when participants face their digital shadows: plausible, perhaps more tedious, perhaps more disturbing, versions of themselves. Based on this experiment, the particular methodological bridging between the traditions of speculative and participatory design is traced. As part of the discussion of the workshop results, the paper concludes by outlining the characteristics of the agonistic space that was opened up in the process of co-designing and mediating the digital shadows. Building on the insights gathered through the experiment, the Design Theatre of the Absurd is finally imagined as a future venue for further explorations.

  • 236.
    Rosendahl, Viktor
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Umeå Institute of Design.
    Eldrivet röjverktyg för plantskogsröjning2012Independent thesis Basic level (degree of Bachelor), 10 credits / 15 HE creditsStudent thesis
    Abstract [sv]

    Sveaskog Norrbotten spenderar över 50.000 liter bensin/säsong bara på skogsröjning. Utsläppen från bensindrivna röjsågar skadar bådeanvändare och miljö.Den klassiska röjsågen orsakar en ojämn belastningsom, i kombination med den höga arbetstakten vidskogsröjning, är både skadlig och ineffektiv.Mitt fokus har varit att granska de tekniska, ergonomiskaoch planeringsmässiga aspekterna kring röjningsarbetetoch att utforma en röjverktyg som är både enkeltoch effektivt att arbeta med.Resultatet är en ryggmonterad såg som förflyttarbelastningen från sidan av användaren till ett mercentrerat läge.Batteridriften och elmotorn förkortar antalet laddningarvilket möjliggör ett mer flexibelt arbetsmönster.För att underlätta planeringen och se till att arbetetgörs enligt avtalet, samlar sågen in och distribuerarinformation mellan användaren och arbetsgivaren samtvisualiserar det för användaren med ett enkelt gränssnitt.

  • 237.
    Rosenlind, Rebecka
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Umeå Institute of Design.
    The Danger of Field Welding: Esab Exo2016Independent thesis Basic level (degree of Bachelor), 10 credits / 15 HE creditsStudent thesis
    Abstract [en]

    Welding is today seen as one of the most dangerous professions on earth, mostly because of the toxic fumes. These fumes can lead to a variety of diseases and in worst case death. Now imagine this problem when you are working at different places every day and you can not always bring the equipment needed to protect your health since they are either too big or does not have enough capacity. This is a problem which welders that work at temporary workplaces have to face every day. With this project I have looked into this problem and come up with a product that makes the temporary workplaces safer and at the same time keeps an efficient workflow.

  • 238.
    Ross, Nick
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Umeå Institute of Design.
    Giving Something Back2012Independent thesis Advanced level (degree of Master (Two Years)), 20 credits / 30 HE creditsStudent thesis
    Abstract [en]

    With the Axolotl harvester a tree can be separated onsite and its nutrients returned to the forest. In one single operation, Axolotl cuts a selected tree at ground level, avoiding exposed stumps. The tree is then feed into its body where it is separated. The needles are returned to enrich the soil, while the branches are bundled into a “bio-log” that can be easily collected. Axolotl was developed in collaboration with a cluster of nine Swedish forestry companies, based on on-site ethnography of machine operators, multiple interviews with environmental and forestry specialists and field visits to witness current damage and effects. 

  • 239.
    Russo L., Nancy
    et al.
    Northern Illinois University, DeKalb, IL, USA.
    Stolterman, Erik
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Umeå Institute of Design.
    Exploring the assumptions underlying information systems methodologies: their impact on past, present and future ISM research2000In: Information Technology and People, ISSN 0959-3845, E-ISSN 1758-5813, Vol. 13, no 4, p. 313-327Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Assumptions about an object under study can influence research in many ways. These preconceptions color the researcher’s perspective, and influence the research purpose, the research questions addressed, and the research methods used. This paper identifies and analyzes the following assumptions regarding information systems methodology (ISM) research: the positive impact of methodologies on the process and product of information system design; the irrationality of design practice; the existence of knowledge about good design practice; the ability to communicate design knowledge to practicing designers; and the ability to change the rationality of design practitioners. The impact of these assumptions on ISM research is examined for the purpose of highlighting limitations of past research and identifying more promising directions for the future.

  • 240.
    Russo, Nancy L.
    et al.
    Northern Illinois University, USA.
    Stolterman, Erik
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Umeå Institute of Design.
    Exploring the assumptions underlying information systems methodologies2000In: Information Technology and People, ISSN 0959-3845, E-ISSN 1758-5813, Vol. 13, no 4, p. 313-327Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Assumptions about an object under study can influence research in many ways. These preconceptions color the researcher?s perspective, and influence the research purpose, the research questions addressed, and the research methods used. This paper identifies and analyzes the following assumptions regarding information systems methodology (ISM) research: the positive impact of methodologies on the process and product of information system design; the irrationality of design practice; the existence of knowledge about good design practice; the ability to communicate design knowledge to practicing designers; and the ability to change the rationality of design practitioners. The impact of these assumptions on ISM research is examined for the purpose of highlighting limitations of past research and identifying more promising directions for the future.

  • 241.
    Rydell, Erik
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Umeå Institute of Design.
    The Virtual Donation Challenge: How might we increase the understanding of each other's wishes on organ donation?2012Independent thesis Advanced level (degree of Master (Two Years)), 20 credits / 30 HE creditsStudent thesis
    Abstract [en]

    Fifty percent of the Swedish population is not aware of their relatives’ wishes on organ donation. It happens that some family members use their veto when they are asked to confirm their dead family member’s wish on organ donation and thereby preventing a potential transplant. If more people would be aware of this issue and tell each other what their standpoint is, we could help the health care to identify more organ donors and thus help more people to a better life. The project lead to an educational and physical exercise based application for tablets aimed for sixteen years old pupils where they by walking around in the physical space, learn about the organs and get physical exercise at the same time. The app is meant for schools since the school has the responsible to educate the pupils about different types of physical exercise and lifestyle. Moreover, tablets are becoming increasingly common in the schools.

    I was influenced by an application called Zombies Run that focuses on creating a story by collecting virtual supplies while being running outside. Some statements from the research influenced me. A lady stated that she used to take her daughter out to walk the dog as much as possible because her daughter was at risk of becoming overweight. A Donor Coordinating Doctor stated a thoughtful sentence during a workshop “Would you be willing to receive an organ if you needed a transplant? Donate your organs after death so it is possible”

    The Virtual Donation Challenge is an application aimed at sixteen year old pupils for educational purposes. The school is responsible for giving the students education about lifestyles, different types of exercises and CPR education, I found it most appropriate to link the application to the Physical Education subject or even Natural Science subject. The application is a quiz and the questions are linked to local GPS coordinates which the users have to visit in order to answer the questions about organ donation and how the interdisciplinary processes in the body work.

  • 242.
    Rydningen, Lene Christin
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Umeå Institute of Design.
    Medicine Management and Administration: How might we improve patient safety through medicine management and administration in inpatient care units in somatic hospitals in Sweden and Norway?2018Independent thesis Advanced level (degree of Master (Two Years)), 20 credits / 30 HE creditsStudent thesis
  • 243.
    Räisänen, Viljami
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Umeå Institute of Design.
    Volvo Buro: Autonomous mobility enhancing the freedom at work2019Independent thesis Advanced level (degree of Master (Two Years)), 20 credits / 30 HE creditsStudent thesis
    Abstract [en]

    This Transportation Design thesis work goes through research of future work trends and relevant phenomenons among car industry. The conclusion of the research is used to define a car interior space for future telecommuter for the year 2042. The concept is branded for Volvo. Therefore Volvo's design heritage and philosophy was the other relevant part of a study in this degree project. Volvo has been used only as an inspiration for the concept, and it is not officially involved in the degree project. 

    The result is an actual interior space with an exposed chassis of an autonomous car in which the future remote worker dedicates the part of his daily work. This vehicle is used to be taken in peaceful spots in nature in which the one can concentrate better in her/his work. The final outcome is an interior design of a vehicle from which the user can have wide visibility to the outside. The end result consists of a digital 3D model of the interior space and 2D visualizations of it.

  • 244.
    Sabir, Ezgi
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Umeå Institute of Design.
    PEEK & BOOK: Transforming the outside into an imaginary playground2017Independent thesis Advanced level (degree of Master (Two Years)), 20 credits / 30 HE creditsStudent thesis
    Abstract [en]

    Today, urban children are spending time indoors more than ever before and getting away from phenomenas of the outdoor world, which creates a big concern on how they develop their senses and get physical exercise. The tools, games and devices they interact with are preventing their imagination rather than sparking, by making kids consume content rather than asking for their participation.

    Peek transforms the outside into an imaginary playground for children, where interacting with the natural world takes the focus and the child’s simple acts and explorations can turn into their own stories. It is an expressive digital tool that invites children to explore the outside, capture audio and visual snippets, and build stories around them. It comes together with a physical book which triggers child’s imagination through guided explorations and allows the child to keep the stories they created.

    The result is a play experience designed for children aged between 5 and 8 years old.

  • 245.
    Sabir Melldahl, Ezgi
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Umeå Institute of Design.
    PEEK & BOOK: Transforming the outside into an imaginary playground2017Independent thesis Advanced level (degree of Master (Two Years)), 20 HE creditsStudent thesis
    Abstract [en]

    Today, urban children are spending time indoors more than ever before and getting away from phenomenas of the outdoor world, which creates a big concern on how they develop their senses and get physical exercise. The tools, games and devices they interact with are preventing their imagination rather than sparking, by making kids consume content rather than asking for their participation.

    Peek transforms the outside into an imaginary playground for children, where interacting with the natural world takes the focus and the child’s simple acts and explorations can turn into their own stories. It is an expressive digital tool that invites children to explore the outside, capture audio and visual snippets, and build stories around them. It comes together with a physical book which triggers child’s imagination through guided explorations and allows the child to keep the stories they created.

    The result is a play experience designed for children aged between 5 and 8 years old. 

  • 246.
    Saletti, Liam
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Umeå Institute of Design.
    PublicPhoneCharge: För möjlighet till laddning av mobiltelefon och läsplatta  i publika sammanhang.2013Independent thesis Basic level (degree of Bachelor), 10 credits / 15 HE creditsStudent thesis
    Abstract [sv]

    Den här rapporten presenterar processen och resultatet av mitt examesarbete i Industridesign på bachelor-nivå vid Umeå Institute of Design. Projektet har handlat om att ta fram ett koncept för att ladda mobiltelefoner i offentliga miljöer som flygplatser och tågstationer. 

    Tänk dig in i scenariot att du är på flygplatsen, ditt flyg är försenat, du har slut på batteri i mobiltelefonen, du har glömt laddaren till telefonen hemma och du är dålig på att komma ihåg telefonnummer. Du ska träffa den du älskar när flyget landar, hur ska du lyckas med detta?

    Genom att använda mig av en kreativ designprocess har jag lyckats lösa problemet för framtida användare samt tillmötesgått önskemål från min samarbetspartner. 

    Projektet genomfördes under vårterminen 2013 och resulterade i en fullskalemodell, muntlig presentation, diskussion, argumentation och den här rapporten.

  • 247.
    Sanchez de La Barquera, Xaviera
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Umeå Institute of Design.
    B. Torretta, Nicholas
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Umeå Institute of Design.
    Journeys of Displacement Between South and North: Decolonizing a Designer Imaginary2018Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In a globalized world that promotes universal desires, southern epistemologies struggle to flourish against westernized notions of values, beauty and life goals. This manifestation of Coloniality (Grosfoguel, 2006) is strengthened by the mainstream systems of production and consumption of both goods and knowledge, where design is a driving force. Design, has been taught from generations in academy under the same Eurocentric canons that disseminate the values of capitalism and search for economic growth. Designers, have been worldwide trained to think, value and act according to the standards of aesthetics, progress and development set in the North. However, the current global unsustainability crises make more evident the global power dynamics, and the need to maintain diverse and contextualized forms of seeing and acting with the world.

    Our own experience of being trained as designers in the south, and now relocated to the north is making us aware of our life desires imposed by contemporary coloniality. However, this relocation also builds on the advantages of coloniality, for instance, by being in contexts that have a stronger voice in international disciplinary communities. As others in our situation, we don’t want to be colonizers by being the “north in the south”. In this presentation we show journeys of deconstructing design, sustainability and their values and worldviews through transitioning between south and north. These journeys are motivated by the intention of creating mutual learning between south and north. We aim at supporting the transition of our discipline from Eurocentric worldview to more diverse worldviews and systems of values.

  • 248.
    Sarabia, Jose Raul Salas
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Umeå Institute of Design.
    Human Crafted: A Vehicle as a Celebration of Humanity2018Independent thesis Advanced level (degree of Master (Two Years)), 20 credits / 30 HE creditsStudent thesis
    Abstract [en]

    With smart machines taking over each time more tasks, there is a risk of a future without relevant field for human action. In the 19th Century, the Arts and Crafts movement proposed a reaction against the alienation generated by industrial machines. Today, following the spirit of Arts and Crafts, this project intends to pose a reaction against the aesthetics of Artificial Intelligence by embracing human-crafted methods. Furthermore, to tell a complete story of humanizing experiences, the production and use of the vehicle are focused on human interaction; in the first case as a bespoke process and in the second as a vehicle interior that fosters human interaction. With Rolls-Royce Bespoke Design as collaborator for this thesis, the project has been branded after them, taking advantage of the company's hand-crafted approach as a positive value with humanistic potential.

    The main inspiration consisted of a reinterpretation of traditional artisan methods in order to design a vehicle with novel attributes. In contrast to the common practice of vehicle design where the generation of geometry rules the latter selection of materials and production process, for this project the early inspiration from hand-crafted methods dictated material and form, which could result in limitations during the form finding process, but which could also trigger unexpected results. At the same time, the simulation of the bespoke process with a relevant individual playing the role of the product's user had a major influence on the final outcome.

    The final result is a vehicle in which the main design focus lies on the interior, although the exterior had to be developed to some extent to provide a frame for development of the inside. The main design contribution is the proposal of structural elements with an aesthetic intention which was dictated by material properties and authenticity. As a story, the project intends to question the increasing presence of Artificial Intelligence and what could be an appropriate scenario for its usage (i.e. autonomous drive algorithms enabling human interaction inside the vehicle). So with the goal of providing humanizing experiences for makers and users of the product, even overlapping the role of makers and users during the bespoke process, the project tells a story of humanization through craftsmanship and dialogue.

  • 249.
    Sarich- Harvey, Jennifer
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Umeå Institute of Design.
    A Human-Driven Supportive Framework For The Personalized Delivery of Direct-to-Consumer Genetic Testing Data2012Independent thesis Advanced level (degree of Master (Two Years)), 20 credits / 30 HE creditsStudent thesis
    Abstract [en]

    We currently live in an era where the cost of sequencing a part of the personal human genome is becoming increasingly accessible to the average person. This project focuses on the near future increased accessibility of the Direct-to-Consumer (DTC) genetic testing services. It is an investigation of how we can challenge the way we currently interact with our personal genetic data and fundamentally what it means to know this type of information.

    It explores the personal, familial an societal interactions present and said to emerge through this increased accessibility. Starting from a personal experience with DTC genetic testing this project has widened it’s scope to look at how the average person might want discover themselves from the inside out.

    This is an interaction and experience design project that is grounded in research from both the field of genetics and medicine and everyday people. It addresses questions surrounding scientific knowledge, genetic connections, fear of the unfamiliar, the amount and type of information and lack of testing support infrastructure.

    Furthermore this project is about developing a framework for the everyday user to explore their personal genome in a more personalized and supportive way, while looking at things through a relatively near future and critical lens. It also hopes to provide a place where familial and close bond connections are cherished.

  • 250.
    Schneider, Anna-Maria
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Umeå Institute of Design.
    Personalized asthma medication2015Independent thesis Advanced level (degree of Master (Two Years)), 20 credits / 30 HE creditsStudent thesis
    Abstract [en]

    The aim of my master degree project of Advanced Product Design was to develop a monitoring and medication device to empower people who are suffering from asthma.

    Asthma is a major non-communicable disease characterized by recurrent attacks of breathlessness and wheezing. It is not possible to cure asthma, but appropriate management can control the disease and enable people to enjoy a good quality of life. Asthma varies in severity and frequency from person to person and not every asthmatic will require the same level of treatment. Also asthma conditions can vary over time and the level of airways inflammation has to be reviewed and medication has to be adjusted.

    Asthma diagnostic takes place at a point-of-care environment and is usually based on the pattern of symptoms, response to therapy over time and by objective parameters like lung function tests.

    My degree project was focused on a home used diagnostic and medication system in order to adjust the dosage of asthma medication on a more frequently basis.

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