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  • 201.
    Eriksson, Maria
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Arts, Department of culture and media studies. Umeå University, Faculty of Arts, Humlab.
    Johansson, Anna
    Umeå University, Faculty of Arts, Humlab.
    Tracking Gendered Streams2017In: Culture Unbound. Journal of Current Cultural Research, ISSN 2000-1525, E-ISSN 2000-1525, Vol. 9, no 2, p. 163-183Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    One of the most prominent features of digital music services is the provision of personalized music recommendations that come about through the profiling of users and audiences. Based on a range of “bot experiments,” this article investigates if, and how, gendered patterns in music recommendations are provided by the streaming service Spotify. While our experiments did not give any strong indications that Spotify assigns different taste profiles to male and female users, the study showed that male artists were highly overrepresented in Spotify’s music recommendations; an issue which we argue prompts users to cite hegemonic masculine norms within the music industries. Although the results should be approached as historically and contextually contingent, we argue that they point to how gender and gendered tastes may be constituted through the interplay between users and algorithmic knowledge-making processes, and how digital content delivery may maintain and challenge gender relations and gendered power differentials within the music industries. Seen through the lens of critical research on software, music and gender performativity, the experiments thus provide insights into how gender is shaped and attributed meaning as it materializes in contemporary music streams.

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  • 202.
    Evengård, Birgitta
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Clinical Microbiology.
    Paasche, Øyvind
    Nymand Larsen, Joan
    Paths to the new Arctic2015In: The new Arctic / [ed] Birgitta Evengård, Joan Nymand Larsen, Øyvind Paasche, Cham: Springer, 2015, p. 1-6Chapter in book (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In the late eighteenth century explorers and scientists started venturing into the Arctic beyond areas that were already populated by Indigenous peoples and a smaller number of new settlers, and ultimately towards the North Pole. It was about as far as anyone could get from civilization at the time, and in many respects it remains this way to this day. What the first explorers saw had not yet been seen and recorded by Western civilization. They were the first to tell the stories and document the state of the Arctic – its physical landscape and Indigenous cultures. The prosaic descriptions are many and colourful, moving and poetic, and they also soon began to provide detailed accounts of the state of Indigenous living conditions. A shared feature in these first accounts, in prints and in paintings, is the descriptions of a harsh and barren landscape frozen in time; static and unchangeable, except for the swift sways in weather. Fanciful images of indigenous communities in isolated settlements, without any contact with “western civilization” came to shape the following generations perception of the Arctic. While the Arctic gradually became a place where new maps and lines drawn became a reality to outsiders, it was also, and had been for thousands of years, the homeland for many and diverse groups of indigenous peoples, surviving in at times unforgiving conditions while developing vibrant cultures, including strong traditions for adapting to changing conditions. The storytelling is today highly valued by itself and for its importance as a complement to science. And northern art has become more vibrant than ever as shown in some chapters here integrating the changes occurring on so many grounds. It is time for new images of the region to be established. With this book we wish these new images and the new knowledge constantly being produced to reach a broad audience as the interested general public as well as policy-makers and scientific colleagues.

  • 203. Fahlgren, Siv
    et al.
    Sjöstedt Landén, Angelika
    När genusforskningen blir ett hot mot jämställdheten: en diskursanalys av en debattartikel2014In: Tidskrift för Genusvetenskap, ISSN 1654-5443, E-ISSN 2001-1377, Vol. 35, no 1, p. 7-26Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 204.
    Flodell, Gunvor
    Umeå University, Faculty of Arts, Comparative Literature and Scandinavian Languages.
    "Hon kom som en vind": Väderleksuttryck i emigrant- och dialektmaterial2002In: När språk och kulturer möts: festskrift till Tuuli Forsgren 2 november 2002 / [ed] Heidi Hansson, Raija Kangassalo & Daniel Lindmark, Umeå: Umeå universitet , 2002, p. 103-109Chapter in book (Other academic)
  • 205.
    Forsberg, Anette
    Umeå University, Faculty of Arts, Department of culture and media studies.
    Kamp för bygden: En etnologisk studie av lokalt utvecklingsarbete2010Doctoral thesis, monograph (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    When collective action for community is defined as local development or as a struggle for survival different understandings are in focus. Politically, this kind of community action is defined as local development and understood in terms of growth and economics. An economic approach to community action is also emphasised in the EU-programmes that support local development groups and projects. On the other hand local groups describe their activities as a struggle for community and community survival.

    Inspired by feministic research approaches and with an interest in human aspects and values this study investigates meanings of community action as experienced and expressed by rural inhabitants and activists. The study is based on fieldwork that was carried out in a small rural community in the northern inlands of Sweden: Trehörningsjö. Since the middle of the 1990s, the women in Trehörningsjö have driven collective action to uphold the community. With its point of departure in the community and expanding into the arenas of reserach and politics, the study takes on the form of a reflexive research process in which the researcher's former knowledge and new understandings are made visible and discussed parallel with the interpretations made. The main focus of the study is the activist's demand of voice, visibility and worth.

    The first chapter presents the local community and provides a background to the study. The chapter includes an account of the reflexive approach that widened the field of research from a local to a translocal study of community action. In chapters two, three, four and five the struggle for community is reflected through fieldwork experiences in Trehörningsjö and other arenas beyond the village. Situated events and instances of collective action such as the fight for the local health care centre, are analysed as symbolic expressions of community values and rural importance. From chapter two and onwards, the study follows the footsteps of the leading female activist in and beyond the community itself; that is, the day-to-day work, meetings, conferences and other places where community action is acted out. The struggle for community is proven to focus on translocal rather than local action. In chapter six the fieldwork experiences - that tell about resistance and a struggle for community values and perspectives - are placed in the wider context of the rural development movement, local development research and governmental rural policy in Sweden. On all these arenas community action tend to be interpreted as local development in line with a growth perspective, rather than as community protests and struggles that expresses other meanings. Chapter seven takes the analyses and discussion further, and relates community struggle to concepts such as civil society and social economy. Anthony Giddens concept of life politics and Alberto Meluccis concept of collective action are used to deepen the analysis on how humane meanings and relation based aspects of community action are made invisible on the political "growht and development" agenda. Community struggle presents a possibility for rural inhabitants to (re)define and reclaim their community and themselves as important and valuable. However, to be able to understand what the concept of community struggle expresses, and demands, it needs to be acknowledged as a form of action that has the potential to challenge established bureaucratic and political defintions, which, in practice, proves to be difficult.

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  • 206.
    Forslund, Jenny
    Umeå University, Faculty of Arts, Department of culture and media studies.
    Representationer av det fria teaterlivet.: En studie av de fria teatrarna i dags- och kvällstidningar2012Independent thesis Basic level (degree of Bachelor), 10 credits / 15 HE creditsStudent thesis
  • 207.
    Fredriksson, Daniel
    Umeå University, Faculty of Arts, Department of culture and media studies. Dalarna University, School of Humanities and Media Studies, Sound and Music Production.
    Musical collaboration – or cooperation?: Exploring newspeak in Swedish arts policy2017Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The recent years have seen a process of regionalisation in Swedish culture and arts policy. This change goes under the name Kultursamverkansmodellen, which on the government’s webpage translates to “the cultural cooperation model” (Government Offices of Sweden 2015).

    The way samverkan is used in daily talk it should rather translate to collaboration – discussions, exchange of ideas and mutually beneficial activities. However, my material suggests elements of hierarchy in the system of cultural policy and funding where the term samverkan seem to signify a logic of consensus, in effect making it hard for cultural actors to challenge a system where certain music and art forms hold a hegemonic position.

    Drawing on Michel De Certeau’s concept of tactics and strategy (1984) and Ruth Finnegan’s pathways (Finnegan 1989), this paper uses a discourse logics approach (Glynos and Howarth 2007) to disseminate the term samverkan in multiple musicking contexts: in policy, by musicians, regional government officials and concert organisers, as well as in connection with other nodes such as “quality” and “projects”.

    The paper is part of the author’s on-going PhD project, which aims to shed light on how conditions for music making are constructed, protected and challenged by studying the intersection between governing and musical processes.

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  • 208.
    Fredriksson, Daniel
    Umeå University, Faculty of Arts, Department of culture and media studies.
    Musiklandskap: musik och kulturpolitik i Dalarna2018Doctoral thesis, monograph (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    In this thesis, I study how conditions for music-making can be developed, maintained and challenged through government support processes in the Swedish region Dalarna. The research questions focus on the ways music, policy and governance relate to each other, what kinds of musicians and ways of making music are favored in these relations, and the agency and meaning of place. The study is made through participant observation of musical events, cultural policy meetings, and the everyday practice of cultural policy officials; interviews with musicians, organizers and cultural policy officials; cultural policy documents as well as musicians’ and organizers’ public documents such as concert posters and websites.

    The musical landscape of Dalarna is summarized as a complex web with pathways that reach far beyond the geographical borders of the region. The cultural cooperation model works as a hierarchy from center to periphery, from the national government, through agencies, regional government, musical institutions and organizers, musicians and audiences. We can analyze all these practices as being part of music, as musicking. But we could also describe them another way, where the practice of cultural policy is dependent on and conditioned by the musical practices it is set to govern. In this way, musicians are always in some way also creating policy.

    I discuss genre hierarchies and further argue that music can, or should, not always be motivated by its effects on regional development or its social impact, it also needs to be allowed to be unhealthy and unprofitable. When we support music, we should be aware that it can be a hobby as well as a business, a serious artistic endeavor as well as play. And more often than not, music is all of these things at the same time.

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  • 209.
    Fredriksson, Daniel
    Umeå University, Faculty of Arts, Department of culture and media studies. Dalarna University, School of Humanities and Media Studies, Sound and Music Production.
    Pathways of pop: Arts and educational policy, cultural industries and studieförbund2017In: Popular Music Studies Today: Abstracts for the conference of the International Association for the Study of Popular Music, June 26–30, Kassel, Germany / [ed] Julia Merrill, Jan Hemming, 2017Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Through the Swedish voluntary education organisations called studieförbund bands get access to musical education, rehearsal space, gear and gigs. It’s a modest but long time funding without any demands on return. Studieförbund are considered to be one of the most important factors for the success of the Swedish music industry due to the educational role it plays for amateur musicians. As musicians gain experience they tend to “outgrow” the studieförbund. There are often no institutional aids to continue their progress, since arts policy regards pop genres to be commercial by default. Recently, former musicians and festival arrangers have developed regional coaching programs for pop bands, leaning on policies of “cultural and creative industries” instead of arts policies. Drawing on Michel De Certeaus concept of tactics and strategy (1984), as well as Ruth Finnegans pathways (1989), this paper discusses these efforts as tactical manoeuvres by music creators as they navigate regional spaces of education, arts policies and industry strategies.

  • 210.
    Fredriksson, Daniel
    Umeå University, Faculty of Arts, Department of culture and media studies. Dalarna University, School of Humanities and Media Studies, Sound and Music Production.
    The Musical Landscape: Music and cultural policy in Dalarna2017Conference paper (Other academic)
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  • 211.
    Frykman, Jonas
    et al.
    Lunds universitet.
    Ehn, BillyUmeå University, Faculty of Arts, Culture and Media.
    Minnesmärken: att tolka det förflutna och besvärja framtiden2007Collection (editor) (Other academic)
  • 212.
    Frykman, Jonas
    et al.
    Lunds universitet.
    Ehn, Billy
    Umeå University, Faculty of Arts, Culture and Media.
    Minnesmärken: Inledning2007In: Minnesmärken: att tolka det förflutna och besvärja framtiden / [ed] Jonas Frykman & Billy Ehn, Stockholm: Carlsson Bokförlag, 2007, p. 9-58Chapter in book (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
  • 213.
    Gabrielsson, Daniel
    Umeå University, Faculty of Arts, Department of culture and media studies.
    ”Forget your sickness and dance”: En etnologisk studie om mötet med den medicinska föreställningsvärlden och musikens roll i en läkande process.2012Independent thesis Basic level (degree of Bachelor), 10 credits / 15 HE creditsStudent thesis
    Abstract [en]

    “Dance and forget your sickness” - An ethnological study of the interaction between patients and the medical conceptual world, and the role of music in a healing process.

    This study is based on interviews with four people. It describes their experiences with the health care system and the role of music in their lives. What these people have in common is that their illnesses are not verifiable from a normal medical perspective. The overall purpose is to describe this interaction with medical care and discuss what role music might have in the mitigation of the perceived illness.

    The patient-healthcare interaction is analysed from a theoretical discourse perspective. The analysis reveals some of the mechanisms in the medical establishment’s discourse that reinforce its own conclusions by simplifying what is actually quite complex; the inner world of the patient.

    Considering the powerful position medical science has taken in our modern world it is relevant for medicine to be able to respond to and manage health problems arising in complex personal processes, or what can be described as existential illness. This study describes how the current healthcare establishment has come to focus unilaterally on physical health, supplanting the existential dimension of health that it cannot respond to.

    The results of this study showed that all people experienced that (current established) healthcare alone could not cure their illness in a satisfactory manner. The study also showed that music played a major role in the relief of specific symptoms. Music also helped patients find meaning, despite their illness, as part of a greater cultural and social world. 

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  • 214.
    Gabrielsson, Daniel
    Umeå University, Faculty of Arts, Department of culture and media studies.
    "Forget your sickness and dance": En etnologisk studie om mötet med den medicinska föreställningsvärlden och musikens roll i en läkande process.2013Independent thesis Advanced level (professional degree), 10 credits / 15 HE creditsStudent thesis
    Abstract [en]

    Abstract

     

    “Dance and forget your sickness” - An ethnological study of the interaction between patients and the medical conceptual world, and the role of music in a healing process.

         This study is based on interviews with four people. It describes their experiences with the health care system and the role of music in their lives. What these people have in common is that their illnesses are not verifiable from a normal medical perspective. The overall purpose is to describe this interaction with medical care and discuss what role music might have in the mitigation of the perceived illness.

         The patient-healthcare interaction is analysed from a theoretical discourse perspective. The analysis reveals some of the mechanisms in the medical establishment’s discourse that reinforce its own conclusions by simplifying what is actually quite complex; the inner world of the patient.

        Considering the powerful position medical science has taken in our modern world it is relevant for medicine to be able to respond to and manage health problems arising in complex personal processes, or what can be described as existential illness. This study describes how the current healthcare establishment has come to focus unilaterally on physical health, supplanting the existential dimension of health that it cannot respond to.

          The results of this study showed that all people experienced that (current established) healthcare alone could not cure their illness in a satisfactory manner. The study also showed that music played a major role in the relief of specific symptoms. Music also helped patients find meaning, despite their illness, as part of a greater cultural and social world.

  • 215.
    Gabrielsson, Daniel
    Umeå University, Faculty of Arts, Department of culture and media studies.
    Kropp och musik: En etnologisk studie om psykisk ohälsa och musikens betydelse i vardagsmedicinsk praktik2013Independent thesis Advanced level (degree of Master (One Year)), 10 credits / 15 HE creditsStudent thesis
    Abstract [en]

    This study is based on eight interviews with six people. What these people have in common is that their illnesses are not verifiable from a normal medical perspective.

    The overall purpose of this study is to generally investigate the importance of music in everyday medical contexts, and specifically study how people with illness relate to their bodies, both in the encounter with standard medical care and with the use of music.

    The primary philosophical inspiration comes from Maurice Merleau-Ponty, while the theory owes much to phenomenology. The descriptions of subjects’ interaction with the healthcare system is also analysed from the perspective of discourse theory.

    The study shows that music ought to be understood holistically; a complex interplay between subject, object and context.

    When patients are treated in the established healthcare, they must consciously adjust their body with makeup, clothing, tone of voice, and gesture in order to be trusted. This leads to the embodiment of the idea of disease, which makes them feel even worse.

    The study also shows how music, when it’s chosen and enjoyed can actualize our healthy aspects. The use of music as self-treatment cultivates health-promoting habits which expand our worlds, and can thereby mitigate the illness we experience

     

     

     

     

     

     

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    Kropp och Musik, Daniel Gabrielsson
  • 216.
    Genrup, Kurt
    Umeå University, Faculty of Arts, Department of culture and media studies.
    Germania och Moder Svea: kulturella möten och gränser1997Report (Other academic)
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    Germania och Moder Svea: kulturella möten och gränser
  • 217. Gerber, Sofi
    et al.
    Gunnarsson Payne, Jenny
    Lundgren, Anna Sofia
    Umeå University, Faculty of Arts, Department of culture and media studies.
    Diskursetnologi2012In: Kulturella perspektiv - Svensk etnologisk tidskrift, ISSN 1102-7908, no 3–4, p. 2-6Article in journal (Other academic)
  • 218.
    Gisselberg, Kjell
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Umeå Centre for Evaluation Research (UCER).
    Lindström, Susanne
    Umeå University, Faculty of Arts, Department of culture and media studies.
    Mårald, Gunilla
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Umeå Centre for Evaluation Research (UCER).
    Utvärdering av projektet Idéskolor för mångfald: Delrapport 32008Report (Other academic)
  • 219.
    Granqvist, Raoul J.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Arts, Department of language studies.
    Erla Husgafvel, österbottnisk folklorist i två länder: närvarons problematik, nostalgins förförelse, exilens vemod2014In: Budkavlen, ISSN 0302-2447, Vol. 93, no 1, p. 86-100Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Erla Hovilainen-Husgafvel was born (Lund) in Gamlakarleby/Kokkola in 1907, moved with her family to Vasa/Vaasa while a child, and from there, in her teens, to Åbo/Turku where she attended Åbo svenska samskola. She graduated from Åbo Akademi in 1928 with a master's degree in ethnology ('folklore'), with Professor Gabriel Nikander as her supervisor. During the 1930s she participated in in all eleven ethnological expeditions in Ostrobothnia and Estland and also started her career as a multifaceted writer with its genesis in her fieldwork. Her academic work would terminate (more or less) by the time of her and her husband's emigration to Sweden (via Denmark) in 1946. She died in 1984 at Mariannelund, Småland, in southern Sweden.

    The chapter is structured along the three theoretical practices of bibliography, biography, and intellectual history. I have organized Husgafvel's written works chronologically (her newspaper articles written in Sweden appear separately). The bibliographical list of works serves also as tool to identify their generic affiliations (from the field work notes to the chronicle, the essay, the comedy, the radio program, the book/documentary) and their roles in her unconventional ethnological writing. The chapter features stations (personal and structural) in her life that were central for her intellectual formation: her family background, the Finnish wars, patriarchal academic patterns, and the strength/weakness of being alienated/in exile, as woman/ working class poor/ Ostrobothnian 'witch'. I associate the biographical perspective with that of intellectual history in order to understand or problematize three overlapping areas that possessed Husgafvel: 1. rebellion or assimilation, countryside conservatism, nationalism, transgression; 2. the myths about the Ostrobothnian community (the village) as an Edenic reservoir of knowledge; 3. the ideological melancholia of (e/im)migration.

    My intention is to introduce a relatively unknown Finland-Swedish ethnologist and to tell a story about a remarkable person who emigrated but never moved. 

  • 220.
    Granqvist, Raoul J.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Arts, Department of language studies.
    Utopi i krigets skugga: Erla Hovilainen i ett österbottniskt fiskesamhälle2013In: Horisont, ISSN 0439-5530, Vol. 60, no 4, p. 6-12Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Erla Hovilainen-Husgafvel (b. Lund), a Finland-Swede ethnologist (1907-1984) returned in June-July 1944 to the small fishing community of Tankar, an island in the outer archipelago off the city of Kokkola/Karleby, after many previous visits there, to finish the research for her book Ro, ro till fiskeskär ('Row, Row to the Fishermen's Island') that appeared the next year. Her documentary consists of two parts: the history of fishing on the island with the eighteenth-century wooden church and the lighthouse as its major narrative icons, and her interviews with three fishermen and their family members. Although the country is at war, it is only indirectly present in her account. I read Hovilainen's chronicle as an allegory of an ideal utopian world, where the politics is at the hands of the people, where pragmatism overrules both religious and secular conventions, where language is free from hierarchical structures. Hovilainen, I explain, transliterates the speech forms of her informants into distinct personal voices. It is an allegory of a community that should exist.

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    Erla Hovilainen
  • 221.
    Grape, Ove
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Social Work.
    Holst, Susanne
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Social Work. Umeå University, Faculty of Arts, Department of culture and media studies.
    Maktens ansikte i malmens rike - den perifera staten: om avveckling och utveckling i spåren av gruvornas expansion i Malmfälten2017In: Brännpunkt Norrland: perspektiv på en region i förändring / [ed] Anders Öhman & Bo Nilsson, Umeå: Bokförlaget h:ström - Text & Kultur, 2017, p. 180-208Chapter in book (Other academic)
  • 222.
    Gunnarsson Payne, Jenny
    et al.
    Institutionen för genus kultur och historia, Södertörns högskola.
    Gerber, SofiLundgren, Anna SofiaUmeå University, Faculty of Arts, Department of culture and media studies.
    Diskursetnologi2012Collection (editor) (Refereed)
  • 223.
    Hallqvist, Johan
    Umeå University.
    Digital Health and the Embodying of Professionalism: Avatars as Health Professionals in Sweden2019In: Professions & Professionalism, ISSN 1893-1049, E-ISSN 1893-1049, Vol. 9, no 1, article id e2847Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This paper explores virtual health professionals (VHPs), digital health technology software, in Swedish health care. The aim is to analyze how health professionalismis (re)negotiated through avatar embodiments of VHPs and to explore the informants’ notions of what a health professional is, behaves and looks like. The paper builds on ethnographic fieldwork with informants working directly or indirectly with questions of digital health technology and professionalism. Discourse theory is used to analyze the material. Subjectification, authenticity, and diversity were found to be crucial for informants to articulate health professionalism when discussing human avatars, professional attire, gendered and ethnified embodiments. The informants attempted to make the VHPs credibly professional but inauthentcally human. A discursive struggle over health professionalism between patient choice and diversity within health care was identified where the patient’s choice of avatars—if based on prejudices—might threaten healthcare professionalism and healthcare professionals by (re)producing racism and sexism.

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  • 224.
    Hallqvist, Johan
    Umeå University, Faculty of Arts, Department of culture and media studies. Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Umeå Centre for Gender Studies (UCGS).
    Negotiating humanity: anthropomorphic robots in the Swedish television series Real Humans2018In: Science Fiction Film and Television, ISSN 1754-3770, E-ISSN 1754-3789, Vol. 11, no 3, p. 449-467Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In this article I analyse the renegotiations and re-establishments of borders between humans and hubots (humanoid robots) in the Swedish sf television series Akta manniskor (Real Humans) through the concepts of trans-corporeality and recyclability, where the concept of being 'recyclable' prompts questions of life and death. The use of anthropomorphism and the recyclability of the characters paradoxically articulates sameness while referring to differences, and it suggests that humans and hubots are entangled and always composed, decomposed and recomposed by, and into, other bodies. This might have practical implications for modern society in terms of ethics and rights for anthropomorphic robots.

  • 225. Hansen, Ketil Lenert
    et al.
    Høgmo, Asle
    Lund, Eiliv
    Value Patterns in Four Dimensions among the Indigenous Sami Population in Norway: A Population-Based Survey2016In: Journal of Northern Studies, ISSN 1654-5915, Vol. 10, no 1, p. 39-66Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: This is a population-based study that explores and describes a set of personal values in indigenous Sami and non-Sami adults in Norway. Norway ratified the ILO convention no. 169 concerning indigenous and tribal peoples in independent countries in 1990. In accordance with the convention the integrity of the indigenous culture and values shall be respected. Our aim is to describe and explore value patterns among Sami and Norwegian populations.

    Method: Cross-sectional questionnaire. From 24 local authorities, a total of 12,623 subjects between the ages of 36 and 79 were included in the analysis. The survey instrument consisted of a 19-item questionnaire of personal values and the analysis was based on responses from 10,268 ethnic Norwegian (just 6 questions were asked to them) and 2,355 Sami participants (1,531 Sami and 824 mixed Sami/ethnic Norwegian participants).

    Results: From the 19 values, Sami respondents held the following five personal values in the highest regard: being in touch with nature; harnessing nature through fishing, hunting and berry-picking; preserving ancestral and family traditions; preserving traditional Sami industries and preserving and developing the Sami language. On the other hand, Sami respondents’ least important values included modern Sami art and the Sami Parliament (Sametinget). The ethnic Norwegians also held being in touch with nature as a very important value. Sami reported significantly higher scores for experience of ethnic discrimination and fear of losing their work/trade than ethnic Norwegians. The last 13 questions were just asked to Sami and mixed-Sami respondents. According to those questions four dimensions associated with personal values were identified among the indigenous Sami population: “Traditional Sami Values,” “Modern Sami Values,” “Contact with Nature” and “Feeling of Marginalisation.” Traditional and modern Sami values were both characterised by significantly higher scores among females, the lowest age bracket and those who considered themselves Sami. Within the Traditional Sami Values dimension, higher scores were also recorded in participants who were married or cohabiting, living in majority Sami areas, satisfied with “way of life” and members of the Læstadian Church. The Modern Sami Values dimension showed higher scores among participants with high household incomes. The Contact with Nature dimension had significantly higher proportions of Sami, married or cohabitants, and participants content with their way of life; age, geographical area and household income were found to be insignificant variables within this dimension. Feeling of Marginalisation was characterised by significantly greater proportions of males, individuals of working age, residence in Norwegian-dominated areas, self-perceived Sami ethnicity, low household income, poorer self-reported health and dissatisfaction with way of life.

    Conclusion: Four distinct value patterns and relationships to well-being and self-reported health were identified in the indigenous Sami population. The four dimensions reflect important aspects of present-day Sami society.

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  • 226.
    Hedqvist, Anette
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Arts, Department of culture and media studies.
    Moström, Ida
    Umeå University, Faculty of Arts, Department of culture and media studies.
    Ernestad, Malin
    Umeå University, Faculty of Arts, Department of culture and media studies.
    Umeå Kulturhuvudstad 2014: En kulturanalytisk studie av talet om kulturhuvudstadsarbetet2012Independent thesis Basic level (degree of Bachelor), 10 credits / 15 HE creditsStudent thesis
  • 227.
    Heith, Anne
    Umeå University, Faculty of Arts, Department of culture and media studies.
    Kerstin Monika Eidlitz Kuoljok2018In: Svenskt kvinnobiografiskt lexikon, Göteborg: Göteborgs universitet, 2018Chapter in book (Other academic)
  • 228.
    Heith, Anne
    Umeå University, Faculty of Arts, Department of culture and media studies.
    Populärfilm och kulturell homogenisering: Elina, som om jag inte fanns2017In: Brännpunkt Norrland: perspektiv på en region i förändring / [ed] Anders Öhman & Bo Nilsson, Umeå: Bokförlaget h:ström - Text & Kultur, 2017, p. 40-64Chapter in book (Other academic)
  • 229.
    Hendrick, Stephanie F.
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Arts, Department of culture and media studies. Umeå University, Faculty of Arts, Humlab.
    Lindgren, Simon
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Sociology.
    YouTube as a performative arena: how Swedish youth are negotiating space, community membership, and gender identities through the art of parkour2011In: Youth culture and net culture: online social practices / [ed] Drs. Elza Dunkels, Gun-Marie Frånberg and Camilla Hällgren, IGI Global , 2011Chapter in book (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    The YouTube video sharing site is used by huge numbers of young people in the roles of consumers as well as producers of content and meaning. The site hosts an extremely large amount of video clips, and its users represent a wide variety of nationalities, religions, ethnic backgrounds, identities and lifestyles. These facts make it hard to see how a tangible sense of actual community could be created within the site. Using on- and offline ethnographic data in the form of footage, interviews and patterns of community interaction (favoriting, subscribing, commenting, rating, and video replies), this chapter presents the results of a case study that aims to analyze how a specific interest group with a certain national anchoring (Swedish parkour youth) deal with the vastness and complexity of YouTube in creating a sense of identity and community in relation to their specialized interest.

  • 230.
    Hjortfors, Lis-Mari
    Árran julevsáme guovdásj/lulesamiskt center.
    Hur förs den samiska traditionella kunskapen vidare?2008In: Bårjås, populärvitenskapelig tidskrift fra Árran-lulesamisk senter, p. 72-78Article in journal (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
  • 231.
    Hjortfors, Lis-Mari
    Árran, julevsáme guovdásj/lulesamiskt center.
    Släktbildens baksida: Berajgåvå nievrep bielle2012In: Bårjås,populærvitenskapelig tidsskrift utgitt av Árran lulesamisk senter., ISSN 1502-0002, p. 48-58Article in journal (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
  • 232.
    Holmberg, Martin
    et al.
    Department of Medical Sciences, Uppsala University, Uppsala, Sweden.
    Lundgren, Britta
    Umeå University, Faculty of Arts, Department of culture and media studies.
    Framing post-pandemic preparedness: comparing eight European plans2018In: Global Public Health, ISSN 1744-1692, E-ISSN 1744-1706, Vol. 13, no 1, p. 99-114Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Framing has previously been studied in the field of pandemic preparedness and global health governance and influenza pandemics have usually been framed in terms of security and evidence-based medicine on a global scale. This paper is based on the pandemic preparedness plans, published after 2009, from eight European countries. We study how pandemic preparedness is framed and how pandemic influenza in general is narrated in the plans. All plans contain references to ‘uncertainty’, ‘pandemic phases’, ‘risk management’, ‘vulnerability’ and ‘surveillance’. These themes were all framed differently in the studied plans. The preparedness plans in the member states diverge in ways that will challenge the ambition of the European Union to make the pandemic preparedness plans interoperable and to co-ordinate the member states during future pandemics.

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  • 233.
    Holst, Susanne
    Umeå University, Faculty of Arts, Department of culture and media studies.
    Folk and world music festivals as interactive and participatory performance2013In: Taking part in music: case studies in ethnomusicology / [ed] Ian Russell & Catherine Ingram, Aberdeen: Aberdeen University Press , 2013, p. 282-287Chapter in book (Refereed)
  • 234.
    Ikonomidis Svedmark, Eva
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Informatics.
    Med nätet som fält: urvalstankar, känslostormar och etikproblem2011In: Kulturella perspektiv - Svensk etnologisk tidskrift, ISSN 1102-7908, no 2, p. 11-21Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Writing ethnography involves retelling a story and carrying the voices of others in order to describe and explain a cultural phenomenon. This article argues that the ethnographer cannot write in such a close manner without great difficulties when today's search engines operate with unprecedented vigour. Tracing a text string using Google takes less than a second and this has great implications for the ability to provide quotations if the researcher is to follow ethical guidelines to protect and to keep their informants anonymous. Further, this article discusses ethical implications involved in online studies of blogs where the content is of a sensitive and private nature. To undertake such research while showing respect for the informant is a challenging task, given the researchers need to adhere to the key issues in research ethics. This article specifically problematizes the ethics of informed consent and confidentiality as it provides a particular challenge for the researcher engaged in studies of affective online sharing.

  • 235.
    Ingridsdotter, Jenny
    et al.
    Södertörn University.
    Silow Kallenberg, Kim
    Södertörn University and Swedish Red Cross University College.
    Ethnography and the Arts: Examining Social Complexities through Ethnographic Fiction2018In: Etnofoor, ISSN 0921-5158, Vol. 30, no 1, p. 57-76Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 236.
    Ingridsdotter, Jenny
    et al.
    Historiska studier, Södertörns högskola, Stockholm; Mittuniversitetet, Sundsvall.
    Silow Kallenberg, Kim
    Södertörns högskola, Stockholm.
    Etnografisk fiktion: Introduktion2017In: Kulturella perspektiv - Svensk etnologisk tidskrift, ISSN 1102-7908, Vol. 26, no 2, p. 2-10Article in journal (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Introduction: ethnographic Fiction

    In this text we introduce this special issue of Kulturella Pesrpektiv that addresses the relationship between ethnography and fiction. Could ethnographic fiction serve as an alternative way to communicate research results? Can it help us to reach other audiences outside of academia? How can fantasy and fiction help us in the quest for new knowledge? These are the main questions posed and answered in this introductory article where we highlight some important contributions to this field in ethnology and anthropology. Revisiting concepts such as Clifford Geertz ’thick descriptions’ and ’faction’ the article suggests that ethnographic fiction is part of a tradition in ethnographic work that problematize the division between fact and fiction, reason and affect, as well as objectivity and subjectivity. Scholars that work in the ethnographic tradition has long since acknowledged researchers’ interpretations and subjectivity as a part of our knowledge production. Qualitative research in general, and ethnographic research in particular, would be impossible without an active research subject that thinks, feels and engages in the field of research. The article discusses examples of ethnographic research that engages with alternative ways of writing up the results and communicating the findings. We suggest that a creative approach to writing might reach a new and larger audience and help establish the importance of ethnographic work.

  • 237.
    Jacobsson, Roger
    Umeå University, Faculty of Arts, Department of culture and media studies.
    Den anonyma, laglösa kreativiteten i det offentliga rummet - att kommunicera med världen2010In: Kulturella perspektiv - Svensk etnologisk tidskrift, ISSN 1102-7908, Vol. 19, no 1, p. 51-52Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 238.
    Jacobsson, Roger
    Umeå University, Faculty of Arts, Department of culture and media studies.
    Från hypotext till hypertext: Den kulturella ikonen som instrument för kommunikation och reflektion kring samtiden2012In: Kulturella perspektiv - Svensk etnologisk tidskrift, ISSN 1102-7908, Vol. 21, no 2, p. 43-44Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 239.
    Jacobsson, Roger
    Umeå University, Faculty of Arts, Department of culture and media studies.
    Kommunikation från inre rum - Om Claude Lévi-Strauss och hundra år på egen fason2010In: Kulturella perspektiv - Svensk etnologisk tidskrift, ISSN 1102-7908, Vol. 19, no 2, p. 46-48Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 240.
    Jacobsson, Roger
    Umeå University, Faculty of Arts, Department of culture and media studies.
    Kommunikation om själslidande i folkhemmet2011In: Kulturella perspektiv - Svensk etnologisk tidskrift, ISSN 1102-7908, Vol. 20, no 1, p. 47-48Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 241.
    Jacobsson, Roger
    Umeå University, Faculty of Arts, Department of culture and media studies.
    Kulturella Perspektiv: Svensk etnologisk tidskrift2009Collection (editor) (Refereed)
  • 242.
    Jacobsson, Roger
    Umeå University, Faculty of Arts, Ethnology.
    Kulturella perspektiv.: Svensk etnologisk tidskrift2006Collection (editor) (Other academic)
  • 243.
    Jacobsson, Roger
    Umeå University, Faculty of Arts, Ethnology.
    Kulturella perspektiv: Svensk etnologisk tidskrift2007Collection (editor) (Other academic)
  • 244.
    Jacobsson, Roger
    Umeå University, Faculty of Arts, Ethnology.
    Kulturella perspektiv: Svensk etnologisk tidskrift2008Collection (editor) (Other academic)
  • 245.
    Jacobsson, Roger
    Umeå University, Faculty of Arts, Ethnology.
    Kulturella Perspektiv: Svensk etnologisk tidskrift2005Collection (editor) (Other academic)
  • 246.
    Jacobsson, Roger
    Umeå University, Faculty of Arts, Department of culture and media studies.
    Kulturella Perspektiv: Svensk etnologisk tidskrift2014Collection (editor) (Refereed)
  • 247.
    Jacobsson, Roger
    Umeå University, Faculty of Arts, Department of culture and media studies.
    Kulturella Perspektiv: Svensk etnologiskt tidskrift2010Collection (editor) (Refereed)
  • 248.
    Jacobsson, Roger
    Umeå University, Faculty of Arts, Department of culture and media studies.
    Musikliv och tidsanda i den lilla världen - om aspekter på glokalisering2010In: Kulturella perspektiv - Svensk etnologisk tidskrift, ISSN 1102-7908, Vol. 19, no 3, p. 77-78Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 249.
    Jacobsson, Roger
    Umeå University, Faculty of Arts, Department of culture and media studies.
    Tryckkultur i provinsen - några perspektiv2012In: Att läsa och skriva: två vågor av vardagligt skriftbruk i Norden 1800-2000 / [ed] Ann-Catrine Edlund, Umeå: Umeå universitet och Kungliga Skytteanska Samfundet , 2012, 1, p. 101-118Chapter in book (Refereed)
  • 250.
    Jacobsson, Roger
    Umeå University, Faculty of Arts, Department of culture and media studies.
    Typographic Man: Medielandskap i förändring - Studier i provinsens tryckkultur2009Doctoral thesis, monograph (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    The aim of the present thesis is to study how the media landscape of northern Sweden was shaped and transformed in the final years of the 18th century and first half of the nineteenth. This slowly-emerging new landscape brought with it new thoughts and new voices. Which individuals and institutions were involved in this process?

    Proceeding from a number of hypotheses and a variety of perspectives, the intention has been to study the type of printed matter being physically disseminated,how it came to be used and in what context by what people. The questions are in many ways interwoven and can be followed from chapter to chapter.

    The title of the dissertation underlines the fact that the media landscape under investigation is in fact populated. Through gradual changes in the media landscape, the people of the province became ”typographic”, i.e. dependent onprinted matter.

    The interdisciplinary nature of this dissertation, embracing media history,book history, ethnology, communications and cultural history, leaves ample room for aspects and inspiration culled from a broad variety of sources. By embarking from concepts including mediascape, province, print culture, networks,voluntary associations and various manifestations of reading culture, it has been possible to sketch the outlines of the development and dynamism of the media landscape during the period under investigation.

    A region long considered to be a remote outpost was in fact at the begin-ning of the nineteenth century well on its way to making its voice heard more clearly in the national conversation. Contacts and connection within the province also changed character as new forms of conversation emerged. Those which previously had been conducted in church, at the barbershop, in the market square or in the reading societies were now being conducted in locally-produced newspapers and pamphlets. The means of communication had changed. A new age needed to be dealt with and discussed, and that discussion could now take place in print.

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