umu.sePublications
Change search
Refine search result
2345 201 - 215 of 215
CiteExportLink to result list
Permanent link
Cite
Citation style
  • apa
  • ieee
  • modern-language-association-8th-edition
  • vancouver
  • Other style
More styles
Language
  • de-DE
  • en-GB
  • en-US
  • fi-FI
  • nn-NO
  • nn-NB
  • sv-SE
  • Other locale
More languages
Output format
  • html
  • text
  • asciidoc
  • rtf
Rows per page
  • 5
  • 10
  • 20
  • 50
  • 100
  • 250
Sort
  • Standard (Relevance)
  • Author A-Ö
  • Author Ö-A
  • Title A-Ö
  • Title Ö-A
  • Publication type A-Ö
  • Publication type Ö-A
  • Issued (Oldest first)
  • Issued (Newest first)
  • Created (Oldest first)
  • Created (Newest first)
  • Last updated (Oldest first)
  • Last updated (Newest first)
  • Disputation date (earliest first)
  • Disputation date (latest first)
  • Standard (Relevance)
  • Author A-Ö
  • Author Ö-A
  • Title A-Ö
  • Title Ö-A
  • Publication type A-Ö
  • Publication type Ö-A
  • Issued (Oldest first)
  • Issued (Newest first)
  • Created (Oldest first)
  • Created (Newest first)
  • Last updated (Oldest first)
  • Last updated (Newest first)
  • Disputation date (earliest first)
  • Disputation date (latest first)
Select
The maximal number of hits you can export is 250. When you want to export more records please use the Create feeds function.
  • 201.
    Wang, Sen
    et al.
    School of Public Health, Health Science Center of Xi'an Jiaotong University; Key Laboratory of Trace Elements and Endemic Diseases, National Health and Family Planning Commission, Xi'an, Shaanxi, China.
    Yan, Rui
    Department of Cardiology, the Second Affiliated Hospital, Health Science Center of Xi'an Jiaotong University, Xi'an, Shaanxi, China.
    Wang, Bin
    Ordance Industrial Hygiene Research Institute, Xi'an, Shaanxi, China.
    Du, Peiru
    School of Public Health, Health Science Center of Xi'an Jiaotong University; Key Laboratory of Trace Elements and Endemic Diseases, National Health and Family Planning Commission, Xi'an, Shaanxi, China.
    Tan, Wuhong
    School of Public Health, Health Science Center of Xi'an Jiaotong University; Key Laboratory of Trace Elements and Endemic Diseases, National Health and Family Planning Commission, Xi'an, Shaanxi, China.
    Lammi, Mikko J.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Integrative Medical Biology (IMB). School of Public Health, Health Science Center of Xi'an Jiaotong University; Key Laboratory of Trace Elements and Endemic Diseases, National Health and Family Planning Commission, Xi'an, Shaanxi, China.
    Guo, Xiong
    School of Public Health, Health Science Center of Xi'an Jiaotong University; Key Laboratory of Trace Elements and Endemic Diseases, National Health and Family Planning Commission, Xi'an, Shaanxi, China.
    Prediction of co-expression genes and integrative analysis of gene microarray and proteomics profile of Keshan disease2018In: Scientific Reports, ISSN 2045-2322, E-ISSN 2045-2322, Vol. 8, article id 231Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Keshan disease (KD) is a kind of endemic cardiomyopathy which has a high mortality. However, molecular mechanism in the pathogenesis of KD remains poorly understood. Serum samples were collected from 112 KD patients and 112 normal controls. Gene microarray was used to screen differently expressed genes. Genevestigator was applied to forecast co-expression genes of significant gene. iTRAQ proteomics analysis was used to verify significant genes and their co-expression genes. GO, COG, IPA and STRING were applied to undertake function categorization, pathway and network analysis separately. We identified 32 differentially expressed genes; IDH2, FEM1A, SSPB1 and their respective 30 co-expression genes; 68 differential proteins in KD. Significant proteins were categorized into 23 biological processes, 16 molecular functions, 16 cellular components, 15 function classes, 13 KD pathways and 1 network. IDH2, FEM1A, SSBP1, CALR, NDUFS2, IDH3A, GAPDH, TCA Cycle II (Eukaryotic) pathway and NADP repair pathway may play important roles in the pathogenesis of KD.

  • 202. Wen, Wanqing
    et al.
    Kato, Norihiro
    Hwang, Joo-Yeon
    Guo, Xingyi
    Tabara, Yasuharu
    Li, Huaixing
    Dorajoo, Rajkumar
    Yang, Xiaobo
    Tsai, Fuu-Jen
    Li, Shengxu
    Wu, Ying
    Wu, Tangchun
    Kim, Soriul
    Guo, Xiuqing
    Liang, Jun
    Shungin, Dmitry
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine, Medicine.
    Adair, Linda S.
    Akiyama, Koichi
    Allison, Matthew
    Cai, Qiuyin
    Chang, Li-Ching
    Chen, Chien-Hsiun
    Chen, Yuan-Tsong
    Cho, Yoon Shin
    Choi, Bo Youl
    Gao, Yutang
    Go, Min Jin
    Gu, Dongfeng
    Han, Bok-Ghee
    He, Meian
    Hixson, James E.
    Hu, Yanling
    Huang, Tao
    Isono, Masato
    Jung, Keum Ji
    Kang, Daehee
    Kim, Young Jin
    Kita, Yoshikuni
    Lee, Juyoung
    Lee, Nanette R.
    Lee, Jeannette
    Wang, Yiqin
    Liu, Jian-Jun
    Long, Jirong
    Moon, Sanghoon
    Nakamura, Yasuyuki
    Nakatochi, Masahiro
    Ohnaka, Keizo
    Rao, Dabeeru
    Shi, Jiajun
    Sull, Jae Woong
    Tan, Aihua
    Ueshima, Hirotsugu
    Wu, Chen
    Xiang, Yong-Bing
    Yamamoto, Ken
    Yao, Jie
    Ye, Xingwang
    Yokota, Mitsuhiro
    Zhang, Xiaomin
    Zheng, Yan
    Qi, Lu
    Rotter, Jerome I.
    Jee, Sun Ha
    Lin, Dongxin
    Mohlke, Karen L.
    He, Jiang
    Mo, Zengnan
    Wu, Jer-Yuarn
    Tai, E. Shyong
    Lin, Xu
    Miki, Tetsuro
    Kim, Bong-Jo
    Takeuchi, Fumihiko
    Zheng, Wei
    Shu, Xiao-Ou
    Genome-wide association studies in East Asians identify new loci for waist-hip ratio and waist circumference2016In: Scientific Reports, ISSN 2045-2322, E-ISSN 2045-2322, Vol. 6, article id 17958Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Sixty genetic loci associated with abdominal obesity, measured by waist circumference (WC) and waist-hip ratio (WHR), have been previously identified, primarily from studies conducted in Europeanancestry populations. We conducted a meta-analysis of associations of abdominal obesity with approximately 2.5 million single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) among 53,052 (for WC) and 48,312 (for WHR) individuals of Asian descent, and replicated 33 selected SNPs among 3,762 to 17,110 additional individuals. We identified four novel loci near the EFEMP1, ADAMTSL3, CNPY2, and GNAS genes that were associated with WC after adjustment for body mass index (BMI); two loci near the NID2 and HLA-DRB5 genes associated with WHR after adjustment for BMI, and three loci near the CEP120, TSC22D2, and SLC22A2 genes associated with WC without adjustment for BMI. Functional enrichment analyses revealed enrichment of corticotropin-releasing hormone signaling, GNRH signaling, and/or CDK5 signaling pathways for those newly-identified loci. Our study provides additional insight on genetic contribution to abdominal obesity.

  • 203. Wendler, Judith
    et al.
    Schröder, Björn
    Dr. Margarete FischerBosch-Institute of Clinical Pharmacology, Stuttgart and University of Tuebingen, Tuebingen, Germany; Present address: Wallenberg Laboratory, University of Gothenburg, Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Ehmann, Dirk
    Koeninger, Louis
    Mailänder-Sánchez, Daniela
    Lemberg, Christina
    Wanner, Stephanie
    Schaller, Martin
    Stange, Eduard F
    Malek, Nisar P.
    Weidenmaier, Christopher
    LeibundGut-Landmann, Salomé
    Wehkamp, Jan
    Proteolytic Degradation of reduced Human Beta Defensin 1 generates a Novel Antibiotic Octapeptide2019In: Scientific Reports, ISSN 2045-2322, E-ISSN 2045-2322, Vol. 9, article id 3640Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Microbial resistance against clinical used antibiotics is on the rise. Accordingly, there is a high demand for new innovative antimicrobial strategies. The host-defense peptide human beta-defensin 1 (hBD-1) is produced continuously by epithelial cells and exhibits compelling antimicrobial activity after reduction of its disulphide bridges. Here we report that proteolysis of reduced hBD-1 by gastrointestinal proteases as well as human duodenal secretions produces an eight-amino acid carboxy-terminal fragment. The generated octapeptide retains antibiotic activity, yet with distinct characteristics differing from the full-length peptide. We modified the octapeptide by stabilizing its termini and by using non-natural D-amino acids. The native and modified peptide variants showed antibiotic activity against pathogenic as well as antibiotic-resistant microorganisms, including E. coli, P. aeruginosa and C. albicans. Moreover, in an in vitro C. albicans infection model the tested peptides demonstrated effective amelioration of C. albicans infection without showing cytotoxity on human cells. In summary, protease degradation of hBD-1 provides a yet unknown mechanism to broaden antimicrobial host defense, which could be used to develop defensin-derived therapeutic applications.

  • 204. Westerståhl, M.
    et al.
    Jansson, E.
    Barnekow-Bergkvist, M.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine, Epidemiology and Global Health.
    Aasa, Ulrika
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Community Medicine and Rehabilitation.
    Longitudinal changes in physical capacity from adolescence to middle age in men and women2018In: Scientific Reports, ISSN 2045-2322, E-ISSN 2045-2322, Vol. 8, article id 14767Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The aim was to investigate how physical capacity changes from adolescence through early adulthood to middle age with focus on early aging. The aim was also to study if physical capacity in middle age could be predicted by factors in adolescence or early adulthood. A cohort of men and women in Sweden (SPAF-1958, n = 425) have been followed for 36 years, at 16, 34, and 52 years of age. The study includes, among other variables, objective measures of physical capacity. At age 52, 50% of the original cohort participated in exercise testing. Physical capacity increased from 16 to 34 years. From 34 to 52 years, physical capacity decreased in both genders by 15-20% in all but one test. Physical capacity at 16 and 34 years of age were better predictors of physical capacity at age 52 than body dimensions, school grades and life style factors. In conclusion, present data confirm earlier cross-sectional studies regarding the decrease in aerobic capacity and muscular strength during the early ageing period in both genders. The study has also generated novel data that show a smaller decline in muscular endurance than previously reported. Finally, physical capacity is fairly stable from adolescence to middle age.

  • 205.
    Westman, Sara
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Umeå Plant Science Centre (UPSC). Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Department of Plant Physiology.
    Kloth, Karen J.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Umeå Plant Science Centre (UPSC). Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Department of Plant Physiology. Laboratory of Entomology, Wageningen University, Wageningen, The Netherlands.
    Hanson, Johannes
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Department of Plant Physiology. Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Umeå Plant Science Centre (UPSC).
    Ohlsson, Anna B.
    Albrectsen, Benedicte Riber
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Department of Plant Physiology. Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Umeå Plant Science Centre (UPSC).
    Defence priming in Arabidopsis: a Meta-Analysis2019In: Scientific Reports, ISSN 2045-2322, E-ISSN 2045-2322, Vol. 9, article id 13309Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Defence priming by organismal and non-organismal stimulants can reduce effects of biotic stress in plants. Thus, it could help efforts to enhance the sustainability of agricultural production by reducing use of agrochemicals in protection of crops from pests and diseases. We have explored effects of applying this approach to both Arabidopsis plants and seeds of various crops in meta-analyses. The results show that its effects on Arabidopsis plants depend on both the priming agent and antagonist. Fungi and vitamins can have strong priming effects, and priming is usually more effective against bacterial pathogens than against herbivores. Moreover, application of bio-stimulants (particularly vitamins and plant defence elicitors) to seeds can have promising defence priming effects. However, the published evidence is scattered, does not include Arabidopsis, and additional studies are required before we can draw general conclusions and understand the molecular mechanisms involved in priming of seeds' defences. In conclusion, defence priming of plants has clear potential and application of bio-stimulants to seeds may protect plants from an early age, promises to be both labour- and resource-efficient, poses very little environmental risk, and is thus both economically and ecologically promising.

  • 206.
    Wieloch, Thomas
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Biochemistry and Biophysics.
    Ehlers, Ina
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Biochemistry and Biophysics.
    Yu, Jun
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Department of Mathematics and Mathematical Statistics.
    Frank, David
    Grabner, Michael
    Gessler, Arthur
    Schleucher, Jürgen
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Biochemistry and Biophysics.
    Intramolecular 13C analysis of tree rings provides multiple plant ecophysiology signals covering decades2018In: Scientific Reports, ISSN 2045-2322, E-ISSN 2045-2322, Vol. 8, article id 5048Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Measurements of carbon isotope contents of plant organic matter provide important information in diverse fields such as plant breeding, ecophysiology, biogeochemistry and paleoclimatology. They are currently based on 13C/12C ratios of specific, whole metabolites, but we show here that intramolecular ratios provide higher resolution information. In the glucose units of tree-ring cellulose of 12 tree species, we detected large differences in 13C/12C ratios (>10‰) among carbon atoms, which provide isotopically distinct inputs to major global C pools, including wood and soil organic matter. Thus, considering position-specific differences can improve characterisation of soil-to-atmosphere carbon fluxes and soil metabolism. In a Pinus nigra tree-ring archive formed from 1961 to 1995, we found novel 13C signals, and show that intramolecular analysis enables more comprehensive and precise signal extraction from tree rings, and thus higher resolution reconstruction of plants’ responses to climate change. Moreover, we propose an ecophysiological mechanism for the introduction of a 13C signal, which links an environmental shift to the triggered metabolic shift and its intramolecular 13C signature. In conclusion, intramolecular 13C analyses can provide valuable new information about long-term metabolic dynamics for numerous applications.

  • 207.
    Wirebrand, Lisa
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Department of Molecular Biology (Faculty of Science and Technology).
    Österberg, Sofia
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Department of Molecular Biology (Faculty of Science and Technology).
    López-Sánchez, Aroa
    Govantes, Fernando
    Shingler, Victoria
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Department of Molecular Biology (Faculty of Science and Technology).
    PP4397/FlgZ provides the link between PP2258 c-di-GMP signalling and altered motility in Pseudomonas putida2018In: Scientific Reports, ISSN 2045-2322, E-ISSN 2045-2322, Vol. 8, article id 12205Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Bacteria swim and swarm using rotating fagella that are driven by a membrane-spanning motor complex. Performance of the fagella motility apparatus is modulated by the chemosensory signal transduction system to allow navigation through physico-chemical gradients – a process that can be fne-tuned by the bacterial second messenger c-di-GMP. We have previously analysed the Pseudomonas putida signalling protein PP2258 that has the capacity to both synthesize and degrade c-di-GMP. A PP2258 null mutant displays reduced motility, implicating the c-di-GMP signal originating from this protein in control of P. putida motility. In Escherichia coli and Salmonella, the PilZ-domain protein YcgR mediates c-di-GMP responsive control of motility through interaction with the fagellar motors. Here we provide genetic evidence that the P. putida protein PP4397 (also known as FlgZ), despite low sequence homology and a diferent genomic context to YcgR, functions as a c-di-GMP responsive link between the signal arising from PP2258 and alterations in swimming and swarming motility in P. putida.

  • 208.
    Wu, Cuiyan
    et al.
    School of Public Health, Health Science Center of Xi'an Jiaotong University; Key Laboratory of Trace Elements and Endemic Diseases, National Health and Family Planning Commission of the People's Republic of China, Xi'an, P.R. China.
    Liu, Huan
    School of Public Health, Health Science Center of Xi'an Jiaotong University; Key Laboratory of Trace Elements and Endemic Diseases, National Health and Family Planning Commission of the People's Republic of China, Xi'an, P.R. China.
    Zhang, Feng'e
    School of Public Health, Health Science Center of Xi'an Jiaotong University; Key Laboratory of Trace Elements and Endemic Diseases, National Health and Family Planning Commission of the People's Republic of China, Xi'an, P.R. China.
    Shao, Wanzhen
    School of Public Health, Health Science Center of Xi'an Jiaotong University; Key Laboratory of Trace Elements and Endemic Diseases, National Health and Family Planning Commission of the People's Republic of China, Xi'an, P.R. China.
    Yang, Lei
    School of Public Health, Health Science Center of Xi'an Jiaotong University; Key Laboratory of Trace Elements and Endemic Diseases, National Health and Family Planning Commission of the People's Republic of China, Xi'an, P.R. China.
    Ning, Yujie
    School of Public Health, Health Science Center of Xi'an Jiaotong University; Key Laboratory of Trace Elements and Endemic Diseases, National Health and Family Planning Commission of the People's Republic of China, Xi'an, P.R. China.
    Wang, Sen
    School of Public Health, Health Science Center of Xi'an Jiaotong University; Key Laboratory of Trace Elements and Endemic Diseases, National Health and Family Planning Commission of the People's Republic of China, Xi'an, P.R. China.
    Zhao, Guanghui
    Department of Knee Joint, Xi'an Hong Hui Hospital, Xi'an, P.R. China.
    Lee, Byeong Jae
    Institute of Molecular Biology and Genetics, School of Biological Sciences, Seoul National University, Seoul, Korea.
    Lammi, Mikko
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Integrative Medical Biology (IMB).
    Guo, Xiong
    Long noncoding RNA expression profile reveals lncRNAs signature associated with extracellular matrix degradation in kashin-beck disease2017In: Scientific Reports, ISSN 2045-2322, E-ISSN 2045-2322, Vol. 7, article id 17553Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Kashin-Beck disease (KBD) is a deformative, endemic osteochondropathy involving degeneration and necrosis of growth plates and articular cartilage. The pathogenesis of KBD is related to gene expression and regulation mechanisms, but long noncoding RNAs (lncRNAs) in KBD have not been investigated. In this study, we identified 316 up-regulated and 631 down-regulated lncRNAs (≥ 2-fold change) in KBD chondrocytes using microarray analysis, of which more than three-quarters were intergenic lncRNAs and antisense lncRNAs. We also identified 232 up-regulated and 427 down-regulated mRNAs (≥ 2-fold change). A lncRNA-mRNA correlation analysis combined 343 lncRNAs and 292 mRNAs to form 509 coding-noncoding gene co-expression networks (CNC networks). Eleven lncRNAs were predicted to have cis-regulated target genes, including NAV2 (neuron navigator 2), TOX (thymocyte selection-associated high mobility group box), LAMA4 (laminin, alpha 4), and DEPTOR (DEP domain containing mTOR-interacting protein). The differentially expressed mRNAs in KBD significantly contribute to biological events associated with the extracellular matrix. Meanwhile, 34 mRNAs and 55 co-expressed lncRNAs constituted a network that influences the extracellular matrix. In the network, FBLN1 and LAMA 4 were the core genes with the highest significance. These novel findings indicate that lncRNAs may play a role in extracellular matrix destruction in KBD.

  • 209. Xu, Jingying
    et al.
    Buck, Moritz
    Eklöf, Karin
    Ahmed, Omneya O.
    Schaefer, Jeffra K.
    Bishop, Kevin
    Skyllberg, Ulf
    Björn, Erik
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Department of Chemistry.
    Bertilsson, Stefan
    Bravo, Andrea G.
    Mercury methylating microbial communities of boreal forest soils2019In: Scientific Reports, ISSN 2045-2322, E-ISSN 2045-2322, Vol. 9, article id 518Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The formation of the potent neurotoxic methylmercury (MeHg) is a microbially mediated process that has raised much concern because MeHg poses threats to wildlife and human health. Since boreal forest soils can be a source of MeHg in aquatic networks, it is crucial to understand the biogeochemical processes involved in the formation of this pollutant. High-throughput sequencing of 16S rRNA and the mercury methyltransferase, hgcA, combined with geochemical characterisation of soils, were used to determine the microbial populations contributing to MeHg formation in forest soils across Sweden. The hgcA sequences obtained were distributed among diverse clades, including Proteobacteria, Firmicutes, and Methanomicrobia, with Deltaproteobacteria, particularly Geobacteraceae, dominating the libraries across all soils examined. Our results also suggest that MeHg formation is also linked to the composition of non-mercury methylating bacterial communities, likely providing growth substrate (e.g. acetate) for the hgcA-carrying microorganisms responsible for the actual methylation process. While previous research focused on mercury methylating microbial communities of wetlands, this study provides some first insights into the diversity of mercury methylating microorganisms in boreal forest soils.

  • 210.
    Yang, Hairu
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Molecular Biology (Faculty of Medicine).
    Hultmark, Dan
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Molecular Biology (Faculty of Medicine). Institute of Biomedical Technology, University of Tampere, Tampere, Finland.
    Drosophila muscles regulate the immune response against wasp infection via carbohydrate metabolism2017In: Scientific Reports, ISSN 2045-2322, E-ISSN 2045-2322, Vol. 7, article id 15713Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    We recently found that JAK/STAT signaling in skeletal muscles is important for the immune response of Drosophila larvae against wasp infection, but it was not clear how muscles could affect the immune response. Here we show that insulin signaling is required in muscles, but not in fat body or hemocytes, during larval development for an efficient encapsulation response and for the formation of lamellocytes. This effect requires TOR signaling. We show that muscle tissue affects the immune response by acting as a master regulator of carbohydrate metabolism in the infected animal, via JAK/STAT and insulin signaling in the muscles, and that there is indirect positive feedback between JAK/STAT and insulin signaling in the muscles. Specifically, stimulation of JAK/STAT signaling in the muscles can rescue the deficient immune response when insulin signaling is suppressed. Our results shed new light on the interaction between metabolism, immunity, and tissue communication.

  • 211. Yeh, Johannes T. -H.
    et al.
    Nam, Kwangho
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Department of Chemistry. Department of Chemistry and Biochemistry, University of Texas at Arlington, Arlington, TX, 76019-0065, USA.
    Yeh, Joshua T. -H.
    Perrimon, Norbert
    eUnaG: a new ligand-inducible fluorescent reporter to detect drug transporter activity in live cells2017In: Scientific Reports, ISSN 2045-2322, E-ISSN 2045-2322, Vol. 7, article id 41619Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The absorption, distribution, metabolism and excretion (ADME) of metabolites and toxic organic solutes are orchestrated by the ATP-binding cassette (ABC) transporters and the organic solute carrier family (SLC) proteins. A large number of ABC and SLC transpoters exist; however, only a small number have been well characterized. To facilitate the analysis of these transporters, which is important for drug safety and physiological studies, we developed a sensitive genetically encoded bilirubin (BR)-inducible fluorescence sensor (eUnaG) to detect transporter-coupled influx/efflux of organic compounds. This sensor can be used in live cells to measure transporter activity, as excretion of BR depends on ABC and SLC transporters. Applying eUnaG in functional RNAi screens, we characterize l(2) 03659 as a Drosophila multidrug resistant-associated ABC transporter.

  • 212. Yeung, A T Y
    et al.
    Hale, C
    Xia, J
    Tate, P H
    Goulding, D
    Keane, J A
    Mukhopadhyay, S
    Forrester, L
    Billker, Oliver
    Wellcome Trust Sanger Institute, Wellcome Trust Genome Campus, Hinxton, Cambridge, United Kingdom.
    Skarnes, W C
    Hancock, R E W
    Dougan, G
    Conditional-ready mouse embryonic stem cell derived macrophages enable the study of essential genes in macrophage function2015In: Scientific Reports, ISSN 2045-2322, E-ISSN 2045-2322, Vol. 5, article id 8908Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The ability to differentiate genetically modified mouse embryonic stem (ES) cells into functional macrophages provides a potentially attractive resource to study host-pathogen interactions without the need for animal experimentation. This is particularly useful in instances where the gene of interest is essential and a knockout mouse is not available. Here we differentiated mouse ES cells into macrophages in vitro and showed, through a combination of flow cytometry, microscopic imaging and RNA-Seq, that ES cell-derived macrophages responded to S. Typhimurium, in a comparable manner to mouse bone marrow derived macrophages. We constructed a homozygous mutant mouse ES cell line in the Traf2 gene that is known to play a role in tumour necrosis factor-α signalling but has not been studied for its role in infections or response to Toll-like receptor agonists. Interestingly, traf2-deficient macrophages produced reduced levels of inflammatory cytokines in response to lipopolysaccharide (LPS) or flagellin stimulation and exhibited increased susceptibility to S. Typhimurium infection.

  • 213.
    Yeşilbaş, Merve
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Department of Chemistry.
    Boily, Jean-Francois
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Department of Chemistry.
    Particle Size Controls on Water Adsorption and Condensation Regimes at Mineral Surfaces2016In: Scientific Reports, ISSN 2045-2322, E-ISSN 2045-2322, Vol. 6, article id 32136Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Atmospheric water vapour interacting with hydrophilic mineral surfaces can produce water films of various thicknesses and structures. In this work we show that mineral particle size controls water loadings achieved by water vapour deposition on 21 contrasting mineral samples exposed to atmospheres of up to ~16 Torr water (70% relative humidity at 25 °C). Submicrometer-sized particles hosted up to ~5 monolayers of water, while micrometer-sized particles up to several thousand monolayers. All films exhibited vibrational spectroscopic signals akin to liquid water, yet with a disrupted network of hydrogen bonds. Water adsorption isotherms were predicted using models (1- or 2- term Freundlich and Do-Do models) describing an adsorption and a condensation regime, respectively pertaining to the binding of water onto mineral surfaces and water film growth by water-water interactions. The Hygroscopic Growth Theory could also account for the particle size dependence on condensable water loadings under the premise that larger particles have a greater propensity of exhibiting of surface regions and interparticle spacings facilitating water condensation reactions. Our work should impact our ability to predict water film formation at mineral surfaces of contrasting particle sizes, and should thus contribute to our understanding of water adsorption and condensation reactions occuring in nature.

  • 214.
    Zhang, Zhen
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Molecular Biology (Faculty of Medicine). Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Molecular Infection Medicine Sweden (MIMS).
    Aung, Kyaw Min
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Molecular Infection Medicine Sweden (MIMS). Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Molecular Biology (Faculty of Medicine).
    Uhlin, Bernt Eric
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Molecular Infection Medicine Sweden (MIMS). Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Molecular Biology (Faculty of Medicine).
    Wai, Sun Nyunt
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Molecular Biology (Faculty of Medicine). Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Molecular Infection Medicine Sweden (MIMS).
    Reversible senescence of human colon cancer cells after blockage of mitosis/cytokinesis caused by the CNF1 cyclomodulin from Escherichia coli2018In: Scientific Reports, ISSN 2045-2322, E-ISSN 2045-2322, Vol. 8, article id 17780Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Cytotoxic necrotizing factor 1 (CNF1), a protein toxin produced by extraintestinal pathogenic Escherichia coli, activates the Rho-family small GTPases in eukaryotic cell, thereby perturbing multiple cellular functions. Increasing epidemiological evidence suggests a link between CNF1 and human inflammatory bowel disease and colorectal cancer. At the cellular level, CNF1 has been hypothesized to reprogram cell fate towards survival due to the role in perturbing cell cycle and apoptosis. However, it remains undetermined how cells survive from CNF1 intoxication. In this work, we show that CNF1 treatment blocks mitosis/cytokinesis, elicits endoreplication and polyploidisation in cultured human colon cancer cells, and drives them into reversible senescence, which provides a survival route for cells via depolyploidisation. Senescence in CNF1-treated cells is demonstrated with upregulation of several senescence markers including senescence-associated β-galactosidase activity, p53, p21 and p16, and concomitant inhibition of the retinoblastoma protein phosphorylation. Importantly, progeny derived from CNF1 treatment exhibit genomic instability exemplified by increased aneuploidy and become more resistant to CNF1, but not to 5-fluorouracil and oxaliplatin, the two agents commonly used in chemotherapeutic treatment for colorectal cancer. These observations display survival features of the cell after CNF1 treatment that may have implications for the potential role of CNF1 in carcinogenesis.

  • 215. Zhao, Jing
    et al.
    Lee, Sang Hoon
    Huss, Mikael
    Holme, Petter
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Department of Physics.
    The network organization of cancer-associated protein complexes in human tissues2013In: Scientific Reports, ISSN 2045-2322, E-ISSN 2045-2322, Vol. 3, article id 1583Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Differential gene expression profiles for detecting disease genes have been studied intensively in systems biology. However, it is known that various biological functions achieved by proteins follow from the ability of the protein to form complexes by physically binding to each other. In other words, the functional units are often protein complexes rather than individual proteins. Thus, we seek to replace the perspective of disease-related genes by disease-related complexes, exemplifying with data on 39 human solid tissue cancers and their original normal tissues. To obtain the differential abundance levels of protein complexes, we apply an optimization algorithm to genome-wide differential expression data. From the differential abundance of complexes, we extract tissue- and cancer-selective complexes, and investigate their relevance to cancer. The method is supported by a clustering tendency of bipartite cancer-complex relationships, as well as a more concrete and realistic approach to disease-related proteomics.

2345 201 - 215 of 215
CiteExportLink to result list
Permanent link
Cite
Citation style
  • apa
  • ieee
  • modern-language-association-8th-edition
  • vancouver
  • Other style
More styles
Language
  • de-DE
  • en-GB
  • en-US
  • fi-FI
  • nn-NO
  • nn-NB
  • sv-SE
  • Other locale
More languages
Output format
  • html
  • text
  • asciidoc
  • rtf