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  • 201.
    Olsson, Fredrik
    Umeå University, Faculty of Arts, Department of historical, philosophical and religious studies, Environmental Archaeology Lab.
    Makrofossilanalys av 6 jordprover från Torsby 381, Torsby sn, Kungälvs kommun, Västra Götaland.2012Report (Other academic)
  • 202.
    Olsson, Fredrik
    Umeå University, Faculty of Arts, Department of historical, philosophical and religious studies, Environmental Archaeology Lab.
    Makrofossilundersökning från en slutundersökning av SU Järnbrott, Västra Frölunda 192, Rio Projekt nr 1149.2012Report (Other academic)
    Abstract [sv]

    De tre prover (MAL nr. 12_0002:1-3) som erhölls för makrofossilanalys kommer från en arkeologisk slutundersökning av en förmodad grav, SU Järnbrott, Göteborgs kommun (N 57° 39' 51,75", E 11° 56' 2,01" (WGS84)).

    Flintmaterial från utgrävningsplatsen har sorterats och tolkningen blev att det har slagits flinta vid minst tre tillfällen. Bland annat består materialet av bifaciala avslag från senneolitikum. Då ben även har hittats kan det peka mot en grav.

    Syftet med makrofossilanalysen är att undersöka om det finns något som indikerar att det funnits en grav och/eller något annat på platsen.

  • 203.
    Olsson, Fredrik
    Umeå University, Faculty of Arts, Department of historical, philosophical and religious studies, Environmental Archaeology Lab.
    Miljöarkeologisk analys av prover från mesolitiska lokalen Stora Holm (Raä Tuve 134, 197 och 199), Tuve socken, Göteborgs kommun. MAL nr 13_0172013Report (Other academic)
  • 204.
    Olsson, Fredrik
    Umeå University, Faculty of Arts, Department of historical, philosophical and religious studies, Environmental Archaeology Lab.
    Miljöarkeologisk analys av Raä 837 vid Kaptensdalen i Nolby, Njurunda socken, Medelpad2013Report (Other academic)
  • 205.
    Olsson, Fredrik
    Umeå University, Faculty of Arts, Department of historical, philosophical and religious studies, Environmental Archaeology Lab.
    Miljöarkeologisk analys av RAÄ 846 Nolby, Njurunda socken, Medelpad2013Report (Other academic)
  • 206.
    Olsson, Fredrik
    Umeå University, Faculty of Arts, Department of historical, philosophical and religious studies, Environmental Archaeology Lab.
    Miljöarkeologisk analys av RAÄ Silje 246, Selånger socken, Medelpad2013Report (Other academic)
  • 207.
    Olsson, Fredrik
    Umeå University, Faculty of Arts, Department of historical, philosophical and religious studies, Environmental Archaeology Lab.
    Miljöarkeologisk analys av RAÄ Tanum 1796, Tanums kommun, Bohuslän.2013Report (Other academic)
  • 208.
    Olsson, Fredrik
    Umeå University, Faculty of Arts, Department of historical, philosophical and religious studies, Environmental Archaeology Lab.
    Miljöarkeologisk analys av röset från RAÄ Tanum 1910, Tanums kommun, Västergötlands län.2012Report (Other academic)
  • 209.
    Olsson, Fredrik
    Umeå University, Faculty of Arts, Department of historical, philosophical and religious studies, Environmental Archaeology Lab.
    Miljöarkeologisk analys från Stora Holm Metalltid (Raä Tuve 199), Tuve socken, Göteborgs kommun.2013Report (Other academic)
  • 210.
    Olsson, Fredrik
    Umeå University, Faculty of Arts, Department of historical, philosophical and religious studies, Environmental Archaeology Lab.
    Miljöarkeologisk analys från Stora Holm (Raä Tuve 134, 197 och 199), Tuve socken, Göteborgs kommun. MAL nr 13_0032013Report (Other academic)
  • 211.
    Olsson, Fredrik
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Arts, Department of historical, philosophical and religious studies, Environmental Archaeology Lab.
    Viklund, Karin
    Umeå University, Faculty of Arts, Department of historical, philosophical and religious studies, Environmental Archaeology Lab.
    Makrofossilanalys av ett jordprov från Alnösundet, Maland-Västland, Sköns sn, Sundsvalls kommun, Västernorrlands län.2012Report (Other academic)
  • 212.
    Sadler, Jon P.
    et al.
    School of Geography, Earth and Environmental Sciences, University of Birmingham, UK.
    Buckland, Philip I.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Arts, Department of historical, philosophical and religious studies, Environmental Archaeology Lab.
    Buckland, Paul C.
    Sixteenth to early-nineteenth century deposits2012In: Reykholt: archaeological investigations at a high status farm in Western Iceland / [ed] Gudrún Sveinbjarnardóttir, Reykjavik: National Museum of Iceland & Snorrastofa , 2012, p. 226-240Chapter in book (Refereed)
  • 213.
    Sciuto, Claudia
    Umeå University, Faculty of Arts, Department of historical, philosophical and religious studies, Environmental Archaeology Lab.
    Carved Mountains and Moving Stones: applications of Near Infrared Spectroscopy for Mineral Characterisation in Provenance Studies2018Doctoral thesis, comprehensive summary (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    The study of stone artefacts is a combination of anthropological archaeology and geology, rooted in analytical techniques for determining the materials’ composition, typological stylistic classification and interpretation of cultural patterns. In this thesis, the archaeology of materials is considered in the context of sites- and landscape transformation, economic history and development of techniques. Focus has been on applications of near infrared spectroscopy (NIR) for characterising minerals in different case studies. Interdisciplinary protocols are implemented in order to account for the various aspects of stone artefacts, merging geochemical investigation and digital documentation.

    This thesis consists of two parts: an introductory text and five research publications. In the first paper, a NIR portable probe is tested to measure iron oxide-based pigments in rock paintings in Flatruet (Sweden). The study demonstrates that the probe is useful for characterising different sections of paint in-situ and pinpointing similarities and dissimilarities in the pigments used for the figures. The second and third papers are aimed at studying the use of raw materials for tool production in a Mesolithic settlement in Northern Sweden. In the second paper is shown that hyperspectral imaging helps characterise the mineral composition of a selected group of tools and the spectral signature of quartz, quartzite, and flint are examined. In the third paper, hyperspectral imaging-based classification is applied to the entire dataset of lithic tools and flakes collected during excavation of the site. The objects are divided into categories of raw materials according to their spectral features and the distribution is visualised on a 3D GIS platform. The fourth paper deals with the application of hyperspectral imaging, a field probe (MicroNIR) and portable Energy-Dispersive X-Ray Fluorescence (ED-XRF), for in-situ characterisation of building materials on the inner wall of the fortified citadel of Carcassonne (France). The research shows how the combination of these analytical methods in conjunction with a stratigraphic study of the architecture helps to understand the use and re-use of materials in different construction phases. The last paper shows how an in-field NIR-probe may be used in landscape surveys for instant characterisations of different stone types. This study was carried out in the district of Montescaglioso, Southern Italy, to highlight patterns of use and distribution of artefacts made of local calcarenite (limestone) in the period between the 6th and 3rd century BC.

  • 214.
    Sciuto, Claudia
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Arts, Department of historical, philosophical and religious studies, Environmental Archaeology Lab.
    Allios, Dominique
    LAHM University of Rennes 2, France.
    Bendoula, Ryad
    ITAP, Irstea, Montepllier Sup Agro, Université de Montpellier, IRSTEA, France.
    Cocoual, Antoine
    W3DS, Rennes, France.
    Gardel, Marie-Elise
    Amicale Laïque de Carcassonne, France.
    Geladi, Paul
    SLU, Swedish university of Agricultural Sciences, Umeå, Sweden.
    Gobrecht, Alexia
    ITAP, Irstea, Montepllier Sup Agro, Université de Montpellier, IRSTEA, France.
    Gorretta, Natalie
    ITAP, Irstea, Montepllier Sup Agro, Université de Montpellier, IRSTEA, France.
    Guermeur, Nominoe
    LAHM University of Rennes 2, France.
    Jay, Sylvain
    ITAP, Irstea, Montepllier Sup Agro, Université de Montpellier, IRSTEA, France.
    Linderholm, Johan
    Umeå University, Faculty of Arts, Department of historical, philosophical and religious studies, Environmental Archaeology Lab.
    Thyrel, Mikael
    SLU, Swedish university of Agricultural Sciences, Umeå, Sweden.
    Characterization of building materials by means of spectral remote sensing: the example of Carcassonne's defensive wall (Aude, France)2019In: Journal of Archaeological Science: Reports, ISSN 2352-409X, E-ISSN 2352-4103, p. 396-405Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Geological and archaeological analysis of stone masonries in standing structures helps reveal information aboutuse of natural resources. At the same time, the study of historical materials is useful for conservators and culturalheritage management. Geochemical and petrographic analysis of building material types is usually done throughdestructive analysis on a few selected samples and can be problematic due to the costs of operations and the sizeof buildings themselves. This paper demonstrates that the combination of hyperspectral imaging portable NearInfrared (NIR) spectroscopy and Energy Dispersive X-ray Fluorescence (ED-XRF) spectroscopy can be useful foranalysing types of raw materials used in distinct construction phases of the inner defensive wall in the citadel ofCarcassonne (Aude, France). Stratigraphic analysis of the architecture, short-range spectral remote sensing andportable ED-XRF measurements were combined in an interdisciplinary approach to classify sandstone elements.The experimental protocol for in situ non-destructive analysis and classification of the masonry types allows theinvestigation of the monument in a diachronic perspective, collecting information to delineate raw materialsvarieties and their use or re-use through time.

  • 215.
    Sciuto, Claudia
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Arts, Department of historical, philosophical and religious studies, Environmental Archaeology Lab.
    Geladi, Paul
    SLU Swedish University of Agricultural Sciences, Umeå, Sweden.
    La Rosa, Lorenza
    Department of Archaeology, Conservation and History, University of Oslo, Oslo, Norway.
    Linderholm, Johan
    Umeå University, Faculty of Arts, Department of historical, philosophical and religious studies, Environmental Archaeology Lab.
    Thyrel, Mikael
    SLU Swedish University of Agricultural Sciences, Umeå, Sweden.
    Hyperspectral Imaging for Characterization of Lithic Raw Materials: the Case of aMesolithic Dwelling in Northern Sweden2019In: Lithic Technology, ISSN 2051-6185, Vol. 44, no 1, p. 22-35Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This study proposes a method for the classification of lithic raw materials by means of hyperspectralimaging, a non-destructive fast analytical technique. The information potential of this approach wastested on a dwelling site dated to mid-late Mesolithic (7200–5800 BP) at Lillsjön, Ångermanland,Sweden. A dataset of lithic tools and flakes (2612 objects) made of quartz and quartzite, wasanalyzed using a shortwave infrared hyperspectral imaging system. The classification of the rawmaterials was performed applying multivariate statistical models. A random test set of 55artefacts was selected, classified according to spectral signature and divided into categoriescorresponding to different geological materials. The same test set was analyzed with EnergyDispersive X-Ray Fluorescence (ED XRF) to validate the classification. The entire dataset of lithicscollected on the site was then classified applying a SIMCA model. The distribution of items onthe site was visualized in a 3D GIS platform according to their geological characteristics tohighlight patterns that could indicate different use of the space and dynamics of raw materialssupply over time.

  • 216.
    Sciuto, Claudia
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Arts, Department of historical, philosophical and religious studies, Environmental Archaeology Lab.
    Linderholm, Johan
    Umeå University, Faculty of Arts, Department of historical, philosophical and religious studies, Environmental Archaeology Lab.
    Geladi, Paul
    Umeå University, Faculty of Arts, Department of historical, philosophical and religious studies, Environmental Archaeology Lab. SLU.
    Near Infrared imaging spectroscopy for raw materials characterization: the example of a mesolithic dwelling site in Northern Sweden2017In: The exploitation of raw materials in prehistory: sourcing, processing and distribution / [ed] Telmo Pereira, Xavier Terradas, Nuno Bicho, Newcastle upon Tyne: Cambridge Scholars Publishing, 2017, p. 113-120Chapter in book (Refereed)
  • 217.
    Sciuto, Claudia
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Arts, Department of historical, philosophical and religious studies, Environmental Archaeology Lab.
    Roubis, Dimitris
    2IBAM-CNR; Scuola di Specializzazione in Beni Archeologici-Unibas, Matera, Italy.
    Combining Archaeological Surveys and Provenance of Raw Materials by Means of Portable Near Infrared Spectroscopy.: the example of Montescaglioso (Basilicata, Italy)Manuscript (preprint) (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    In this paper we explore the potentialities of near infrared (NIR) portable spectroscopy in survey activities for in situ non-destructive analysis of stone artefacts. We argue that this method is useful for achieving screening analysis for materials that cannot be moved or sampled. NIR spectra describe the textural and molecular characteristics of the materials and can be matched to classify lithic objects according to their mineral characteristics. We present a case study from the territory of Montescaglioso (Matera, Italy), where we analysed a calcarenite (limestone) quarry in Masseria D’Alessio, which has been exploited since the 6th century BC, as well as artefacts of the same chronology (stone coffins, fortification walls, a stone mortar and amillstone) found in surveys or excavations in the nearby sites of Masseria Lollo, Difes San Biagio and Montescaglioso. The aim was to determine the distribution of the particular calcarenite extracted from the quarry and identify exploitation, production and trade patterns. Documentation of toolmarks and the process of stone working were combined with the spectral signature of the artefacts in order to associate mineral characteristics of the stone types and extraction/carving techniques. The spectral data collected were processed using multivariate statistics to highlight clustering and conduct supervised classification.

  • 218.
    Sjölander, Mattias
    Umeå University, Faculty of Arts, Department of historical, philosophical and religious studies, Environmental Archaeology Lab.
    Den ena boplatsvallen är den andra lik?: Miljöarkeologisk intra-site studie av boplatsvallar vid Lillsjön, Anundsjö sn., Ångermanland2014Independent thesis Advanced level (degree of Master (Two Years)), 20 credits / 30 HE creditsStudent thesis
    Abstract [en]

    Boplatsvallar, often translated as semi-subterranean settlements, is an ancient monument with a diffuse definition. Defined as –embankments that partially or completely surround a often lowered/dug down surface- this category of ancient monuments is also made up of a former category which traditionally was interpreted as winter settlements from the late Stone age in Sweden. This view of the ancient monuments carried over, to a certain extent, to this new definition. Should this be the case, that this category of ancient monuments are remains of winter settlements,  used recurringly over an extended period of time, then they should exhibit similar signals in regards to the distribution of the anthropogenically altered soil chemical and soil physical properties at the sites.The area around Lillsjön, Anundsjö parish in Ångermanland, have four boplatsvallar located separately in the regional area. This means that they can be considered single contexts suitable to test the aforementioned hypothesis.The result of the intra-site study indicates that the sites have been used differently. Two of the sites exhibit a more local distribution of the heightened values of phosphates and magnetic susceptibility, distributed close around the ancient monument itself. The other two sites have a distribution of heightened values spread over a larger area around the ancient monuments, where one of the ancient monuments shows no particular difference from the background values at the site.This results thus suggests that there is a difference in how these boplatsvallar have been used prehistorically.

  • 219. Stephens, Lucas
    et al.
    Fuller, Dorian
    Boivin, Nicole
    Rick, Torben
    Gauthier, Nicolas
    Kay, Andrea
    Marwick, Ben
    Geralda, Chelsey
    Armstrong, Denise
    Barton, C. Michael
    Denham, Tim
    Douglass, Kristina
    Driver, Jonathan
    Janz, Lisa
    Roberts, Patrick
    Rogers, J. Daniel
    Thakar, Heather
    Altaweel, Mark
    Johnson, Amber L.
    Sampietro Vattuone, Maria Marta
    Aldenderfer, Mark
    Archila, Sonia
    Artioli, Gilberto
    Bale, Martin T.
    Beach, Timothy
    Borrell, Ferran
    Braje, Todd
    Buckland, Philip I.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Arts, Department of historical, philosophical and religious studies, Environmental Archaeology Lab.
    Jiménez Cano, Nayeli Guadalupe
    Capriles, José M.
    Diez Castillo, Agustín
    \c Cilingiro\u glu, \c Ciler
    Negus Cleary, Michelle
    Conolly, James
    Coutros, Peter R.
    Covey, R. Alan
    Cremaschi, Mauro
    Crowther, Alison
    Der, Lindsay
    di Lernia, Savino
    Doershuk, John F.
    Doolittle, William E.
    Edwards, Kevin J.
    Erlandson, Jon M.
    Evans, Damian
    Fairbairn, Andrew
    Faulkner, Patrick
    Feinman, Gary
    Fernandes, Ricardo
    Fitzpatrick, Scott M.
    Fyfe, Ralph
    Garcea, Elena
    Goldstein, Steve
    Goodman, Reed Charles
    Dalpoim Guedes, Jade
    Herrmann, Jason
    Hiscock, Peter
    Hommel, Peter
    Horsburgh, K. Ann
    Hritz, Carrie
    Ives, John W.
    Junno, Aripekka
    Kahn, Jennifer G.
    Kaufman, Brett
    Kearns, Catherine
    Kidder, Tristram R.
    Lanoë, Fran\c cois
    Lawrence, Dan
    Lee, Gyoung-Ah
    Levin, Maureece J.
    Lindskoug, Henrik B.
    López-Sáez, José Antonio
    Macrae, Scott
    Marchant, Rob
    Marston, John M.
    McClure, Sarah
    McCoy, Mark D.
    Miller, Alicia Ventresca
    Morrison, Michael
    Motuzaite Matuzeviciute, Giedre
    Müller, Johannes
    Nayak, Ayushi
    Noerwidi, Sofwan
    Peres, Tanya M.
    Peterson, Christian E.
    Proctor, Lucas
    Randall, Asa R.
    Renette, Steve
    Robbins Schug, Gwen
    Ryzewski, Krysta
    Saini, Rakesh
    Scheinsohn, Vivian
    Schmidt, Peter
    Sebillaud, Pauline
    Seitsonen, Oula
    Simpson, Ian A.
    So\ltysiak, Arkadiusz
    Speakman, Robert J.
    Spengler, Robert N.
    Steffen, Martina L.
    Storozum, Michael J.
    Strickland, Keir M.
    Thompson, Jessica
    Thurston, T. L.
    Ulm, Sean
    Ustunkaya, M. Cemre
    Welker, Martin H.
    West, Catherine
    Williams, Patrick Ryan
    Wright, David K.
    Wright, Nathan
    Zahir, Muhammad
    Zerboni, Andrea
    Beaudoin, Ella
    Munevar Garcia, Santiago
    Powell, Jeremy
    Thornton, Alexa
    Kaplan, Jed O.
    Gaillard, Marie-José
    Klein Goldewijk, Kees
    Ellis, Erle
    Archaeological assessment reveals Earth’s early transformation through land use2019In: Science, ISSN 0036-8075, E-ISSN 1095-9203, Vol. 365, no 6456, p. 897-902Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Humans began to leave lasting impacts on Earth’s surface starting 10,000 to 8000 years ago. Through a synthetic collaboration with archaeologists around the globe, Stephens et al. compiled a comprehensive picture of the trajectory of human land use worldwide during the Holocene (see the Perspective by Roberts). Hunter-gatherers, farmers, and pastoralists transformed the face of Earth earlier and to a greater extent than has been widely appreciated, a transformation that was essentially global by 3000 years before the present.Science, this issue p. 897; see also p. 865Environmentally transformative human use of land accelerated with the emergence of agriculture, but the extent, trajectory, and implications of these early changes are not well understood. An empirical global assessment of land use from 10,000 years before the present (yr B.P.) to 1850 CE reveals a planet largely transformed by hunter-gatherers, farmers, and pastoralists by 3000 years ago, considerably earlier than the dates in the land-use reconstructions commonly used by Earth scientists. Synthesis of knowledge contributed by more than 250 archaeologists highlighted gaps in archaeological expertise and data quality, which peaked for 2000 yr B.P. and in traditionally studied and wealthier regions. Archaeological reconstruction of global land-use history illuminates the deep roots of Earth’s transformation and challenges the emerging Anthropocene paradigm that large-scale anthropogenic global environmental change is mostly a recent phenomenon.

  • 220.
    Strawhacker, Colleen
    et al.
    University of Colorado, Boulder, CO USA.
    Buckland, Philip I.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Arts, Department of historical, philosophical and religious studies, Environmental Archaeology Lab. Umeå University, Faculty of Arts, Humlab.
    Palsson, Gisli
    Umeå University, Faculty of Arts, Department of historical, philosophical and religious studies, Environmental Archaeology Lab. Umeå University, Faculty of Arts, Humlab.
    Fridrikkson, Adolf
    Institute of Archaeology, Reykjavik, Iceland.
    Lethbridge, Emily
    Centre for Medieval Studies, University of Iceland, Reykjavik, Iceland.
    Brin, Adam
    Arizona State University, Tempe, USA.
    Opitz, Rachel
    University of Arkansas, Fayetteville, USA.
    Dawson, Thomas
    School of History, St. Andrews University, Scotland.
    Building Cyberinfrastructure from the Ground Up for the North Atlantic Biocultural Organization: Introducing the cyberNABO Project2015In: 2015 Digital Heritage: Volume 2 / [ed] Gabriele Guidi, Roberto Scopigno, Juan Carlos Torres, Holger Graf et al., Institute of Electrical and Electronics Engineers (IEEE), 2015, Vol. 2, p. 457-460, article id 7419547Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The cyberNABO Project is designed to solidify a developing multidisciplinary community through the development of cyberinfrastructure (CI) to study the long-term human ecodynamics of North Atlantic, a region that is especially vulnerable to ongoing climate and environmental change. It builds build upon prior sustained field and laboratory research, rich and diverse datasets, and a strong involvement by local communities and institutions. cyberNABO is currently hosting a series of workshops aimed at taking these collaborators and stakeholder communities to a new level of integration and to develop capacity for building CI and visualizations in subsequent funding cycles. Research on the long-term sustainability in the Arctic requires compiling data from over thousands of square miles, hundreds of years, and multiple disciplines, from climatology to archaeology to folklore. The complexity of datasets of this scale presents a unique challenge to create a CI system that results in interoperability and accessibility of data – a task that needs an explicit plan and extensive expertise from a variety of fields. Investing in a comprehensive CI system provides the opportunity to integrate collaborators and data from the natural sciences, social sciences, and the humanities, thus providing the opportunity for a holistic approach to long-term human ecodynamics in the context of rapid social and environmental change and for the creation of digital tools for expanded northern community involvement in global change research. In order to address questions of this scale, however, this collaborative group needs to integrate multiple sources, types, and formats of data to address multidisciplinary questions and provide effective support for visualization and modeling efforts that can connect knowledge systems.

  • 221. Svedberg, Stig
    et al.
    Jerand, Philip
    Umeå University, Faculty of Arts, Department of historical, philosophical and religious studies.
    Linderholm, Johan
    Umeå University, Faculty of Arts, Department of historical, philosophical and religious studies, Environmental Archaeology Lab.
    Spelar det någon roll hur vi tar prover?: en provtagningsstrategisk och markkemisk samt markfysikalisk fallstudie av en boplats, 1750-300 f.Kr. RAÄ Tanum 1821:12016In: Arkeologi i Tanums världsarv: åttatusen år I Tanum utifrån sex arkeologiska undersökningar för väg E6 / [ed] Christina Toreld, Uddevalla: Bohusläns museums förlag , 2016, p. 147-165Chapter in book (Other academic)
  • 222.
    Vanhanen, Santeri
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Arts, Department of historical, philosophical and religious studies, Environmental Archaeology Lab.
    Östman, Sofi
    Umeå University, Faculty of Arts, Department of historical, philosophical and religious studies, Environmental Archaeology Lab.
    Olsson, Fredrik
    Umeå University, Faculty of Arts, Department of historical, philosophical and religious studies, Environmental Archaeology Lab.
    Falun, Egnellska husets gård: miljöarkeologisk analys av fyra jordprover2011Report (Other academic)
  • 223.
    Vickers, Kim
    et al.
    Department of Archaeology, University of Sheffield, UK.
    Buckland, Philip I
    Umeå University, Faculty of Arts, Department of historical, philosophical and religious studies, Environmental Archaeology Lab.
    Predicting island beetle faunas by their climate ranges: the tabula rasa/refugia theory in the North Atlantic2015In: Journal of Biogeography, ISSN 0305-0270, E-ISSN 1365-2699, Vol. 42, no 11, p. 2031-2048Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Aim: This paper addresses two opposing theories put forward for the origins of the beetle fauna of the North Atlantic islands. The first is that the biota of the isolated oceanic islands of the Faroes, Iceland and Greenland immigrated across a Palaeogene–Neogene land bridge from Europe, and survived Pleistocene glaciations in ameliorated refugia. The second argues for a tabula rasa in which the biota of the islands was exterminated during glaciations and is Holocene in origin. The crux of these theories lies in the ability of the flora and fauna to survive in a range of environmental extremes. This paper sets out to assess the viability of the refugia hypothesis using the climatic tolerances of one aspect of the biota: the beetle fauna. Location: The paper focuses on Iceland, the Faroe Islands and Greenland. Methods: The known temperature requirements of the recorded beetle faunas of the North Atlantic islands were compared with published proxy climate reconstructions for successive climate periods since the severing of a North Atlantic land bridge. We used the MCR (mutual climatic range) method available in the open access BugsCEP database software. Results: We show that most of the MCR faunas of the North Atlantic islands could not have survived in situ since the Palaeogene–Neogene, and are likely to have been exterminated by the Pleistocene glaciations. Main conclusions: The discrepancy between the climatic tolerances of the North Atlantic beetle fauna and the estimated climatic regimes since the severing of a land bridge strongly support the tabula rasa theory and suggests that the North Atlantic coleopteran fauna is Holocene in origin.

  • 224.
    Viklund, Karin
    Umeå University, Faculty of Arts, Department of historical, philosophical and religious studies, Environmental Archaeology Lab.
    Analys av makrofossil från E18-prosjektet Gulli-Langåker, lokalitet 12, Hesby, Tønsberg kommun,Vestfold2011Report (Other academic)
  • 225.
    Viklund, Karin
    Umeå University, Faculty of Arts, Department of historical, philosophical and religious studies, Environmental Archaeology Lab.
    Analys av makrofossil från E18-prosjektet Gulli-Langåker, lokalitet 222011Report (Other academic)
  • 226.
    Viklund, Karin
    Umeå University, Faculty of Arts, Department of historical, philosophical and religious studies, Environmental Archaeology Lab.
    Analys av makrofossil från E18-prosjektet Gulli-Langåker, lokalitet 50, Hördalen, Sandefjord, Vestfold2011Report (Other academic)
  • 227.
    Viklund, Karin
    Umeå University, Faculty of Arts, Department of historical, philosophical and religious studies, Environmental Archaeology Lab.
    Analys av makrofossil från E18-prosjektet Gulli-Langåker, lokalitet 7, Åmot 94/3 gnr/bnr 94/3, Stokke kommun, Vestfold2011Report (Other academic)
  • 228.
    Viklund, Karin
    Umeå University, Faculty of Arts, Department of historical, philosophical and religious studies, Environmental Archaeology Lab.
    Analys av makrofossil från E18-prosjektet Gulli-Langåker, lokalitet 9, Jarlsberg, Tönsbergs kommun,Vestfold2011Report (Other academic)
  • 229.
    Viklund, Karin
    Umeå University, Faculty of Arts, Department of historical, philosophical and religious studies, Environmental Archaeology Lab.
    Arkeobotanisk analys av 20 jordprover tagna vid grävningar för Västra länken (klockaråkern, Umedalen-Prästsjön), Umeå 20122013Report (Other academic)
  • 230.
    Viklund, Karin
    Umeå University, Faculty of Arts, Department of historical, philosophical and religious studies, Environmental Archaeology Lab.
    Arkeobotanisk analys av ett jordprov från Solberg, raä 455,  Njurunda sn, Medelpad.2010Report (Other academic)
  • 231.
    Viklund, Karin
    Umeå University, Faculty of Arts, Department of historical, philosophical and religious studies, Environmental Archaeology Lab.
    Arkeobotanisk analys av jordprover från Raä 1821:1, Tanum sn och kn, Bohuslän (MAL-nr 12-011)2013Report (Other academic)
  • 232.
    Viklund, Karin
    Umeå University, Faculty of Arts, Department of historical, philosophical and religious studies, Environmental Archaeology Lab.
    Arkeobotanisk analys av jordprover tagna vid grävningar i Ytterby sn, Kungälvs kommun, Bohuslän,  20122013Report (Other academic)
  • 233.
    Viklund, Karin
    Umeå University, Faculty of Arts, Department of historical, philosophical and religious studies, Environmental Archaeology Lab.
     Beer brewing in medieval Sweden: archaeobotanical and documentary evidence2011In: Ruralia, ISSN 1280-374X, E-ISSN 1777-5434, no 8, p. 235-243Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 234.
    Viklund, Karin
    Umeå University, Faculty of Arts, Department of historical, philosophical and religious studies, Environmental Archaeology Lab.
    Bure kloster, Bureå sn, Skellefteå kn, Västerbotten Analys av jordprover från utgrävning 19812010Report (Other academic)
  • 235.
    Viklund, Karin
    Umeå University, Faculty of Arts, Department of historical, philosophical and religious studies, Environmental Archaeology Lab.
    Early farming at Umeå in Västerbotten: charred cereal grains dated to the bronze age2011In: Fornvännen, ISSN 0015-7813, E-ISSN 1404-9430, Vol. 106, no 3, p. 238-242Article in journal (Other academic)
  • 236.
    Viklund, Karin
    Umeå University, Faculty of Arts, Department of historical, philosophical and religious studies, Environmental Archaeology Lab.
    Flax in Sweden: the archaeobotanical, archaeological and historical evidence2011In: Vegetation History and Archaeobotany, ISSN 0939-6314, E-ISSN 1617-6278, Vol. 20, no 6, p. 509-515Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The earliest recorded evidence of flax being cultivated in Sweden is from the end of the Bronze Age/beginning of the Iron Age. Later, from ca. a.d. 1100 and onwards, flax became an economically important plant in the country, and during the 12th to 16th centuries there was a substantial increase in the Swedish export of linen to other parts of Europe. Alongside its extensive cultivation, a set of cultural traditions and rituals was eventually built up around flax. The objective of this article is to draw an outline of the history of flax cultivation in Sweden and to present the relevant prehistoric and historic source material. A point of discussion will be the different roles that fibre flax and oil flax played over a long period of time and the problem of seed corn import for the development of domestic fibre flax in the country. The study is based on the prehistoric archaeobotanical record, mainly charred seeds from the Swedish Iron Age (ca. 500 b.c.-a.d. 1050), the archaeological record, documentary evidence and folklore.

  • 237.
    Viklund, Karin
    Umeå University, Faculty of Arts, Department of historical, philosophical and religious studies, Environmental Archaeology Lab.
    Jordbruket i Sverige2008In: Botanik: systematik, evolution, mångfald / [ed] Marie Widén & Björn Widén, Lund: Studentlitteratur, 2008, 1Chapter in book (Other academic)
  • 238.
    Viklund, Karin
    Umeå University, Faculty of Arts, Department of historical, philosophical and religious studies, Environmental Archaeology Lab.
    Karleby 63, Falköpings kommun, Västergötland. Arkeobotanisk analys av floterade jordprover från en trattbägarboplats2012Report (Other academic)
  • 239.
    Viklund, Karin
    Umeå University, Faculty of Arts, Department of historical, philosophical and religious studies, Environmental Archaeology Lab.
    Karleby Raä 63, Falköpings kn, Västergötland. Resultat av analys och bestämning av växtmaterial från floterade makroprover tagna i april och juli 20132013Report (Other academic)
  • 240.
    Viklund, Karin
    Umeå University, Faculty of Arts, Department of historical, philosophical and religious studies, Environmental Archaeology Lab.
    Klockarbacken, Malax -miljöarkeologisk undersökning av ett röse2010Report (Other academic)
  • 241.
    Viklund, Karin
    Umeå University, Faculty of Arts, Department of historical, philosophical and religious studies, Environmental Archaeology Lab.
    Linet i Sverige2012In: Svensk Botanisk Tidskrift, ISSN 0039-646X, Vol. 106, no Häfte 3-4, p. 156-164Article in journal (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    The earliest recorded evidence of flax cultivation in Sweden is from the end of the Bronze Age/beginning of the Iron Age. Later, from ca A.D.

    1100 and onwards, flax is an economically important crop in Sweden. Here, I present evidence of the cultivation of flax in Sweden with focus on the prehistoric archaeobotanical record, which consists primarily of charred seeds from the Swedish Iron Age (c. 500 BC – A.D.1050) and on documentary evidence. Finds of implements and other traces from the processing of flax are described. The question of which type of flax was grown in prehistoric times – fibre flax or oil flax – is discussed.

    Some of the numerous cultural traditions and rituals formed around flax over the centuries are described, as are some of the religious beliefs, magic and rituals associated with flax in ancient times.

  • 242.
    Viklund, Karin
    Umeå University, Faculty of Arts, Department of historical, philosophical and religious studies, Environmental Archaeology Lab.
    Nordic Archaeobotany - NAG 2000 in Umeå2002Conference proceedings (editor) (Other academic)
  • 243.
    Viklund, Karin
    Umeå University, Faculty of Arts, Department of historical, philosophical and religious studies, Environmental Archaeology Lab.
    Para, Raä 8, Sånga sn, Ångermanland. Miljöarkeologisk undersökning av en folkvandringstida gravhög2011Report (Other academic)
  • 244.
    Viklund, Karin
    Umeå University, Faculty of Arts, Department of historical, philosophical and religious studies, Environmental Archaeology Lab.
    The crowberry connection: environmental archaeology and cultural categorization, examples from Sami contexts2011In: Archaeology and Environment, ISSN 0281-5877, no 27Article in journal (Other academic)
  • 245.
    Viklund, Karin
    Umeå University. Umeå University, Faculty of Arts, Department of historical, philosophical and religious studies, Environmental Archaeology Lab.
    The long history of Swedish bread. Continuity and change in Swedish regional bread cereal traditions.1994In: Laborativ arkeologi ., no 7Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 246.
    Viklund, Karin
    Umeå University, Faculty of Arts, Department of historical, philosophical and religious studies, Environmental Archaeology Lab.
    Tossene 63 och 446:2-3: makrofossilanalys av jordprover från hällristningslokaler2012Report (Other academic)
  • 247.
    Viklund, Karin
    Umeå University, Faculty of Arts, Department of historical, philosophical and religious studies, Environmental Archaeology Lab.
    Två gravar i Överlännäs och Sånga sn, Ångermanland i miljöarkeologisk belysning2010Report (Other academic)
  • 248.
    Viklund, Karin
    Umeå University, Faculty of Arts, Department of historical, philosophical and religious studies, Environmental Archaeology Lab.
    Umeå, Raä 590, 586, 318. Västra länken, miljöarkeologisk undersökning av jordprover2012Report (Other academic)
  • 249.
    Viklund, Karin
    Umeå University, Faculty of Arts, Department of historical, philosophical and religious studies, Environmental Archaeology Lab.
    Växtmaterial i jordprover från en stenåldersboplats. Karleby 63, Falköpings kommun, Västergötland.2013Report (Other academic)
  • 250.
    Viklund, Karin
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Arts, Department of historical, philosophical and religious studies, Environmental Archaeology Lab.
    Ahlqvist, Jenny
    Analys av makrofossil samt markkemisk analys av jordprover från ett gravröse, Tossene 314, Bovallstrand, Bohuslän, Västra Götalands län2012Report (Other academic)
2345678 201 - 250 of 373
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