umu.sePublications
Change search
Refine search result
234567 201 - 250 of 336
CiteExportLink to result list
Permanent link
Cite
Citation style
  • apa
  • ieee
  • modern-language-association-8th-edition
  • vancouver
  • Other style
More styles
Language
  • de-DE
  • en-GB
  • en-US
  • fi-FI
  • nn-NO
  • nn-NB
  • sv-SE
  • Other locale
More languages
Output format
  • html
  • text
  • asciidoc
  • rtf
Rows per page
  • 5
  • 10
  • 20
  • 50
  • 100
  • 250
Sort
  • Standard (Relevance)
  • Author A-Ö
  • Author Ö-A
  • Title A-Ö
  • Title Ö-A
  • Publication type A-Ö
  • Publication type Ö-A
  • Issued (Oldest first)
  • Issued (Newest first)
  • Created (Oldest first)
  • Created (Newest first)
  • Last updated (Oldest first)
  • Last updated (Newest first)
  • Disputation date (earliest first)
  • Disputation date (latest first)
  • Standard (Relevance)
  • Author A-Ö
  • Author Ö-A
  • Title A-Ö
  • Title Ö-A
  • Publication type A-Ö
  • Publication type Ö-A
  • Issued (Oldest first)
  • Issued (Newest first)
  • Created (Oldest first)
  • Created (Newest first)
  • Last updated (Oldest first)
  • Last updated (Newest first)
  • Disputation date (earliest first)
  • Disputation date (latest first)
Select
The maximal number of hits you can export is 250. When you want to export more records please use the Create feeds function.
  • 201.
    Longley Arthur, Paul
    Umeå University, Faculty of Arts, Humlab.
    Virtual voyages: travel writing and the antipodes, 1605-18372010Book (Other academic)
  • 202.
    Lopiparo, Jeanne
    Umeå University, Faculty of Arts, Humlab.
    Being in place: Intersections of identity and experience on the Honduran landscape2009In: The archaeologies of meaningful places, 2009Chapter in book (Other academic)
  • 203.
    Lopiparo, Jeanne
    Umeå University, Faculty of Arts, HUMlab. Archaeology and Sami Studies.
    House Societies and Heterarchy in the Terminal Classic Ulúa Valley, Honduras2007In: The Durable House: Architecture, Ancestors, and Origins, 2007Chapter in book (Other academic)
  • 204.
    Lundgren, Anna Sofia
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Arts, Department of culture and media studies.
    Johansson, Anna
    Umeå University, Faculty of Arts, Humlab.
    Digital rurality: producing the countryside in online struggles for rural survival2017In: Journal of Rural Studies, ISSN 0743-0167, E-ISSN 1873-1392, Vol. 51, p. 73-82Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Interest in the rural has increased in Sweden during the last decades and the rural has become increasingly present as an object of politics, not least in social media. While social media have been recognised for their significance for social movements generally, less is written about how to understand rural movements online. The aim of this article is to study how politics of the rural is performed in and through social media. Seven Sweden-based Facebook accounts were studied using discourse theory. Three different discourses were identified – a discourse of mobilising action, a discourse of re-representation and a discourse of frustration. Of these, we specifically highlight how the focus on urban norms and the practice of performative re-representation constituted the digital arenas as spaces where people who identified with rural areas were linked together, had their experiences and opinions acknowledged and their rural identities not only re-constituted, but recognised and valued. We also show how the different discourses in turn produced two opposing notions of rural areas: as dying or as alive. These two notions worked to structure the politics of the rural in different ways.

  • 205.
    Misharina, Anna
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Arts, Humlab. Studio CRIT.
    Chung, Keith
    Studio CRIT.
    Paradoxes of archetypes: the urban and the forest2014In: Scenario Journal, no 4Article in journal (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
    Abstract [en]

    There is a possibility of constructing a new paradigm of landscape urbanism today, one which does away with the paradoxical and unhelpful binaries of urban versus forest, of nature versus nurture, but instead promotes a synthetic project by exploring the productive possibilities of fusing together urban and forest. It’s a proposition to recognize the significance and instrumentality of forests as ecologically complex, spatially layered and dynamic systems that contribute to contemporary urban production. It suggests that the forest can, and does grow within human settlements; forming novel ecosystems that fuse wilderness and metropolis; a sophisticated natural system that could be managed and sustained within the city. Perhaps, as forests are considered through the lens of urban ecology, we might recognize the ways in which they benefit citizens and add value to cities – by mediating water, clean air, sunlight, shade, shelter to animals, and local climate. Ultimately, the urban forest is a place for citizens to escape the city and it’ll be an inexorable rebellion…

  • 206.
    Mortensen, Torill
    Umeå University, Faculty of Arts, HUMlab. Culture and Media.
    The real truth about what games researchers do all day: Methods, strategies and ethics of online multi-user games research2007In: The conference proceedings of PerthDAC 2007, 2007Conference paper (Other academic)
  • 207.
    Mähler, Roger
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Arts, Humlab.
    Palm, Fredrik
    Umeå University, Faculty of Arts, Humlab.
    Implementing and sustaining a DH infrastructur: The HUMlab experience2015Other (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
    Abstract [en]

    To curate processes within the digital humanities, an elaborate infrastructure of technology, supporting processes, physical spaces, competences, and human attitudes is needed, which can be challenging to create and sustain in the academia of humanities. In this poster we will share our experiences, good as well as bad, and how we have tackled the challenges of working within the digital humanities.

    The physical spaces of HUMlab are open and accessible, where technicians, students, and researchers from a wide variety of fields can meet and collaborate. The spaces in HUMlab have been designed with the aim of creating an appealing and attractive ‘meeting place’ with a technological infrastructure that breaks interdisciplinary barriers. The codesign of digital research methodologies and tools also functions across the disciplines and joins knowledge from different fields.

    The supporting processes, and the way they are executed, emphasise collaboration, knowledge sharing, and joint venture. The project model used in software development is based on an agile approach that has been adapted to the special needs and demands of academia and research within the humanities. Supporting workflows have been specified and implemented (e.g., stakeholder discussion, project initialization) with tollgates and templates. The real challenge is to create formalized workflows that promote new ideas, quality, creativity, innovation, and individual development.

    An open mindset is required to achieve and sustain interdisciplinarity and collaboration on equal terms. The working process must allow mistakes and encourage new ideas. Part of the challenge is to build trust and share knowledge in a dialogue that translates scholarly needs with technology to give added values.

    Technology plays an important part of HUMlab (e.g., a multitude of screen scapes), but even more important is the critical attitude towards the technology and how it is used. It is vital to understand the underlying epistemology of different technologies, and the methods and tools, and to have transparency on how they are applied in order to achieve certain (research) objectives.

    A real challenge is to sustain the numerous competences needed within the fields of digital humanities and humanities computing (especially when you don’t know the needs of the next collaboration). At HUMlab, this is done by so-called pet projects (freedom to work with personal projects), focus projects (small projects to expand knowledge in certain areas, and to step out of your ‘comfort zone’), assigned fields of interest (personal responsibility to sustain knowledge for a specific fields), and a competence matrix at an organizational level that is based on HUMlab’s needs and vision for the future, but also dynamic and flexible and adapting to an ever-changing world.

  • 208.
    Ng, Jenna
    Umeå University, Faculty of Arts, Culture and Media. Umeå University, Faculty of Arts, Humlab.
    A point of light: Epiphanic Cinephilia in Mamoru Oshii’s Avalon2009In: Cinephilia in the Age of Digital Reproduction: Film, Pleasure and Digital Culture, Vol. 1 / [ed] Jason Sperb and Scott Balcerzak, London: Wallflower Press , 2009, 1, p. 71-88Chapter in book (Other academic)
  • 209.
    Ng, Jenna
    Umeå University, Faculty of Arts, Humlab. Umeå University, Faculty of Arts, Department of culture and media studies.
    Cinephilia in Turin, Or, Passion in a Handful of Dust2007In: Bright Lights Film Journal, ISSN 0147-4049, Vol. 55Article, review/survey (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
  • 210.
    Ng, Jenna
    Umeå University, Faculty of Arts, Humlab. Umeå University, Faculty of Arts, Culture and Media.
    Film review of 2046 (Wong Kar-Wai, Hong Kong, 2004)2005In: The Film Journal, Vol. MarchArticle, review/survey (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
  • 211.
    Ng, Jenna
    Umeå University, Faculty of Arts, Humlab. Umeå University, Faculty of Arts, Culture and Media.
    Film review of Brokeback Mountain (Ang Lee, USA, 2005)2006In: The Film Journal,, Vol. JanuaryArticle, review/survey (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
  • 212.
    Ng, Jenna
    Umeå University, Faculty of Arts, Humlab. Umeå University, Faculty of Arts, Culture and Media.
    Film review of Michael Clayton (Tony Gilman, USA, 2007)2008In: Opticon 1826, Vol. 1, no 2Article, review/survey (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
  • 213.
    Ng, Jenna
    Umeå University. Umeå University, Faculty of Arts, Humlab. Umeå University, Faculty of Arts, Culture and Media.
    Film review of Touching the Void (Kevin MacDonald, Argentina, 2004) 2004In: Scope. An online Journal of Film Studies, ISSN 1465-9166, E-ISSN 1465-9166, Vol. November, p. ?-Article, review/survey (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
  • 214.
    Ng, Jenna
    Umeå University, Faculty of Arts, Humlab. Umeå University, Faculty of Arts, Culture and Media.
    Love in the Time of Transcultural Fusion: Cinephilia, Homage and Kill Bill2005In: Cinephilia: movies, love and memory / [ed] Marijke de Valck and Malte Hagener, Amsterdam: Amsterdam University Press , 2005, 1, p. 65-79Chapter in book (Other academic)
  • 215.
    Ng, Jenna
    Umeå University, Faculty of Arts, Humlab. Umeå University, Faculty of Arts, Culture and Media. University College London, UK.
    Reality, Revealing, Revelation: conference review of “New Directions in Turkish Film Studies Conference IX: Cinema and Reality, Kadir Has Üniversitesi, Istanbul, 2-4 May 20082008Report (Refereed)
  • 216.
    Ng, Jenna
    Umeå University, Faculty of Arts, Humlab. Umeå University, Faculty of Arts, Culture and Media. University College London, UK.
    Remembering history, rewriting memory: the articulation of Platoon through subjectivity, mediation and myth2006In: Cinemascope, ISSN 2240-4724, no 5Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 217.
    Ng, Jenna
    Umeå University, Faculty of Arts, Humlab. Umeå University. Umeå University, Faculty of Arts, Department of culture and media studies.
    “The myth of total cinephilia”2010In: Cinema Journal, ISSN 0009-7101, E-ISSN 1527-2087, Vol. 49, no 2, p. 146-151Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Recent scholarship on cinephilia has sought to expand on contemporary cinephilic practices—particularly in view of new technologies such as video, DVD, and the Internet—to showcase the multi-variegated ways in which cinephiles love cinema today, despite (and defying) Susan Sontag’s 1996 “end of cinephilia” declaration. This essay does not attempt to add to that discussion, but instead sketches in broad strokes an overarching theory, via an overview of its past and present forms, to suggest cinephilia’s own unifying goal. Might there not be a singular tapestry of disparate threads of cinephilia, woven across cinema’s different technologies, in which a guiding myth to this love may be discerned? Taking Andre Bazin's construction of the paradigmatic structure of myth guiding the invention of cinema towards a higher, more elemental drive, this essay discusses the question: How to originate a myth of total cinephilia?

  • 218.
    Ng, Jenna
    Umeå University, Faculty of Arts, Humlab. Umeå University, Faculty of Arts, Culture and Media. University College London, UK.
    Virtual Cinematography and the Digital Real: (Dis)placing the Moving Image Between Reality and Simulacra2007In: The State of the Real: Essays on Aesthetics / [ed] Damian Sutton, Ray McKenzie and Sue Brind, London: I.B. Tauris , 2007, 1, p. 172-180Chapter in book (Other academic)
  • 219.
    Ng, Jenna
    Umeå University, Faculty of Arts, Culture and Media. Umeå University, Faculty of Arts, Humlab.
    World of Grey: All About Lily Chou-Chou2009In: Rouge, Vol. 13, no MarchArticle, review/survey (Other academic)
  • 220.
    Ng, Jenna Pei Suin
    Umeå University, Faculty of Arts, Humlab.
    The myth of total cinephilia2010In: Cinema Journal, ISSN 0009-7101, E-ISSN 1527-2087, Vol. 49, no 2, p. 146-151Article in journal (Other academic)
  • 221.
    Ng, Jenna Pei Suin
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Arts, Humlab.
    Danielsson, Jonas
    Umeå University, Faculty of Arts, Department of culture and media studies.
    Svensk synd och japansk oskuld?: en jämförelse av syndiga filmer 1950-19802010In: Kulturella perspektiv - Svensk etnologisk tidskrift, ISSN 1102-7908, no 2, p. 12-24Article in journal (Other academic)
  • 222.
    Ng, Pei-Suin
    Umeå University, Faculty of Arts, Humlab. Umeå University, Faculty of Arts, Culture and Media. University College London, UK.
    Poetry of Squalor: exploring the borgata in Pier Paolo Pasolini’s Accattone2007In: Opticon1826, no 2Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Don Marquis once wrote a poem about a fly who argued that he was ‘a vessel of righteousness scattering seeds of justice’ by helping to rid the world of alcoholics and the iniquitous who succumbed to the germs he carried to them. In justification stretched to absurdity, Marquis makes the point that grime, poverty and squalor do not constitute attractive subjects— surely it is easier to be enticed by bright lights and beauty, more tempting to revel in glitz, glamour and grandeur. Yet Pasolini’s Rome as depicted in his early films centers precisely on such wretchedness: set predominantly in the urban periphery, Pasolini’s camera determinedly avoids the more pleasant sights of the Pantheon or the Trevi Fountain, preferring instead the grimness of the borgate or the wilderness in the city outskirts. This essay focuses on Pasolini’s cinematic representation of the Roman slums, or the borgate, in Accattone by analysing on various levels its significance as a specific topographical space. My primary argument is that Pasolini’s alternate take on the borgate, replete with myth, utopian idealism and ideological ambition, nonetheless remains a flawed striving of romanticism,  whose redemption remains out of reach, and whose doom is inescapable.

  • 223.
    Nilsson, Malin
    et al.
    Umeå University, Umeå University Library.
    Olsson, Magnus
    Umeå University, Umeå University Library.
    Berggren, Lenita
    Umeå University, Umeå University Library.
    Grasic, Samo
    Umeå University, Faculty of Arts, Humlab.
    Sjöberg, Susanne
    Umeå University, Umeå University Library.
    How the library better can support students to analyze and evaluate sources when using popular media platforms2017In: 83rd IFLA General Conference and Assembly, 19–25 August 2017, Wrocław, Poland, 2017Conference paper (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Printed material is no longer the only source for information. The media landscape of today consists more and more of films, vlog and video. Despite this, printed sources are often the only referred to in the students' academic work. Umeå University Library conducted interviews and workshops with student groups from different disciplines. From this we learned that the library can play a crucial role to facilitate guidance to evaluate the reliability and credibility of films and how to cite different online sources.

    Together with HUMlab we aim to develop a new way of guiding the students in source criticism, both in technical and pedagogical aspects.

     

  • 224.
    Norberg, Micael
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Arts, Umeå Academy of Fine Arts.
    Ewadotter, Emma
    Umeå University, Faculty of Arts, Humlab.
    A permanent mark on a physical body2014Book (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
    Abstract [en]

    Boiling down a conversation that has been ongoing for years to a few pages of text is a complicated thing to do. Boiling down experiences gathered over the span of half a lifetime is even more so. In the beginning of this project, mingling two different people’s notions of existence into one body of text seemed to provide nothing but confusion and frustration. But there turned out to be some points of connection, bright lights that started to indicate a path. It was loosely defined, sometimes lost from sight, but nonetheless a common ground. What started to emerge was a shared notion of being. A being among beings. Being aware of the creeping sensation of becoming aware through a bodily experience. Being there-ness, a sensation brought upon the flesh through needles and patterns. It could have been anything, of course. The prick of the needle is just the beginning, the thin sliver of sunlight indicating that a door has been opened. Walking through that door is a different thing altogether…

  • 225.
    Norén, Fredrik
    Umeå University, Faculty of Arts, Humlab. Umeå University, Humlab.
    Dagen H: när samhällsinformation inte skildes från propaganda2019In: Efterkrigstidens samhällskontakter / [ed] Fredrik Norén, Emil Stjernholm, Lund: Mediehistoria, Lunds universitet , 2019, p. 125-154Chapter in book (Refereed)
  • 226.
    Norén, Fredrik
    Umeå University, Faculty of Arts, Department of culture and media studies. Umeå University, Faculty of Arts, Humlab.
    Information som lösning, information som problem: En digital läsning av tusentals statliga utredningar2016In: Nordicom Information, ISSN 0349-5949, Vol. 38, no 3, p. 9-26Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This article investigates how the Swedish information politics emerged in the twentieth century by analysing thousands of Swedish Governmental Official Reports (8000 reports since 1922). By using methods such as topic modelling with LDA/MALLET, the result shows that a governmental information discourse arose in the 1960s, infiltrating a growing number of political interests, and that the content of the discourse has changed over time.

    One important conclusion highlights digital text methods as a more inductive way of doing content analysis than is commonly practised in media and communication studies. A machine can find patterns in texts that no single person could read in a lifetime. Furthermore, the quantitative approach can generate results that problematise previous – qualitative – research. Digital and quantitative analysis of a huge corpora does not neglect close reading; on the contrary this study shows the necessity of bridging both methods in order to better understand the results.

  • 227.
    Norén, Fredrik
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Arts, Department of culture and media studies.
    Snickars, Pelle
    Umeå University, Faculty of Arts, Department of culture and media studies. Umeå University, Faculty of Arts, Humlab.
    Distant reading the history of Swedish film politics in 4500 governmental SOU reports2017In: Journal of Scandinavian Cinema, ISSN 2042-7891, E-ISSN 2042-7905, Vol. 7, no 2, p. 155-175Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Using computational methods, digitized collections and archives can today be scrutinized in their entirety. By distant reading and topic modeling one particular collection – 4500 digitized Swedish Governmental Official Reports (SOU) from 1922 to 1991 – this article gives a new archival perspective of the history of Swedish film politics and policy-making. We examine different probabilistic topics related to film (and media) that the algorithm within the topic modeling software Mallet extracted from the immense text corpora of all these Official Reports. Topic modeling is a computational method to study themes in texts by accentuating words that tend to co-occur and together create different topics. Basically, it is a research tool for the discovery of hidden semantic structures, exploring a collection through the underlying topics that run through it. Hence, our article captures a number of film discourses and trends within the SOU material. In conclusion, we argue that topic modeling should be recognized as a method and research aid for gathering an overview of a major material; as a way to pose new and unforeseen research questions; and as a kind of computational support that makes it possible to apprehend major patterns more or less impossible to detect through a traditional archival investigation.

  • 228.
    Norén, Fredrik
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Arts, Humlab.
    Stjernholm, Emil
    Efterkrigstidens samhällskontakter2019Collection (editor) (Refereed)
    Abstract [sv]

    Propaganda, upplysning, pr och information. Detta är några exempel på efterkrigstidens mångfacetterade kommunikationsbegrepp. Under perioden från andra världskrigets slut till 1980-talet var Sverige en framväxande välfärdsstat, och mediernas möjligheter att fostra, påverka och utbilda diskuterades regelbundet. Men i vilka sammanhang användes dessa begrepp och hur omsattes de i praktiken? I Efterkrigstidens samhällkontakter presenteras 10 mediehistoriska texter om olika aktörer i efterkrigstidens Sverige – myndigheter, företag, föreningar – och hur dessa kämpade för att torgföra sina visioner, tankar och idéer. De olika kapitlen visar att metoderna för att föra ut budskapen till allmänheten var sofisti-kerade och att en uppsjö olika medier togs i bruk – från tändsticksplån till debattpocket-böcker. I denna bok framträder den svenska kommunikationsapparaten som präglad av både decentraliserade och kommersiella drag. Efterkrigstidens samhällskontakter formades på så sätt genom en sammanflätning av privata och offentliga sfärer – vem som var mottagare och vem som var avsändare var ibland långt ifrån självklart.

  • 229.
    Norén, Fredrik
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Arts, Humlab.
    Stjernholm, Emil
    Efterkrigstidens samhällskontakter: en inledning2019In: Efterkrigstidens samhällskontakter / [ed] Fredrik Norén, Emil Stjernholm, Lund: Mediehistoria, Lunds universitet , 2019, p. 9-38Chapter in book (Refereed)
  • 230.
    Nygren, Thomas
    Umeå University, Faculty of Arts, Humlab.
    Digitala material och verktyg: möjligheter och problem utifrån exemplet spatial history2013In: Historisk Tidskrift (S), ISSN 0345-469X, Vol. 133, no 3, p. 474-482Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 231.
    Nygren, Thomas
    Umeå University, Faculty of Arts, Humlab. Uppsala, Stanford.
    Students Writing History Using Traditional and Digital Archives2014In: Human IT, ISSN 1402-1501, E-ISSN 1402-151X, Vol. 12, no 3, p. 78-116Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This study shows that upper secondary students’ historical writing maybe influenced by their use of sources from traditional archives versus theiruse of digital sources in databases. A qualitative approach, theoreticalperspectives, and historical empathy seem to be stimulated primarily byusing traditional archives and print sources, while digital archives andsources, in contrast, stimulate the use of quantitative data and a moresocial scientific approach. The results indicate a historiographical shift instudents’ historical thinking, which researchers of history education needto consider in a digital era. The results of this study call for reflections inhistory teaching to make it possible for students to learn and experiencethe double nature of history as part of the humanities and social sciences

  • 232.
    Nygren, Thomas
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Arts, Humlab. Department of Education, Uppsala University and Department of History, Stanford University.
    Foka, Anna
    Umeå University, Faculty of Arts, Humlab.
    Buckland, Phillip I.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Arts, Department of historical, philosophical and religious studies.
    The status quo of digital humanities in Sweden: past, present and future of digital history2014In: H-Soz-Kult, ISSN 2196-5307Article in journal (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    A current Swedish review of digital history claims that research in digital history in Sweden is almost absent.[1] This statement must naturally be considered in the light of how the field is defined, and in this article we choose a broad definition consisting of the aggregate domain of studies in which digital material and tools are used to study the past. Digital history is without a doubt a more active field in English-speaking academic settings, but there are a number of well-established projects and initiatives in Sweden. The case studies presented in this article are cross-disciplinary and might therefore not define themselves as strictly (or solely) digital history. This may, however, be irrelevant in the post-disciplinary context.

    The digitization of historical source material has increasingly compelled Swedish historians to navigate in digital environments. This increased accessibility and the capacity for digitally processing historical material hold great potential for empowering research. While on the one hand, considerable growth can be expected in the coming years as technology becomes more accessible, user-friendly and domain science orientated [2], on the other hand, the expansion of digital archives and the development of digital tools are already posing new challenges for historians. Knowledge and understanding of digital media needs to be augmented considerably in order to fully take advantage of contemporary research opportunities and challenges. This essay will discuss how the creation of data and the use of new digital tools might support a variety of types of historical research, primarily by looking at developments in digital humanities (hereon DH) and digital archaeology. The variegated realm of DH practices, with their background in humanities computing and computing linguistics, will be used as a point of departure. Internationally, DH often uses the concept of labs to describe environments designed for the use of data and tools in interdisciplinary research.[3] Centres of DH have primarily been created in the USA and, more recently, in Europe.

    While on-going research in multiple fields, using digital data and tools, is contributing important new knowledge and developing infrastructures which are advancing the study of history; there is, of course, considerable room for improvement, both in terms of the efficiency of the tools and the scope of their application. This article will present two Swedish examples of interdisciplinary and collaborative lab spaces which are currently involved in research on the past. The more disciplinary practices of digital archaeology and digital history will also be examined in order to flag out current historically orientated research which may fall under the umbrella of DH. The essay will conclude by discussing some potential future directions.

  • 233.
    Nygren, Thomas
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Arts, Humlab. Stanford University; Uppsala universitet.
    Sandberg, Karin
    Mälardalens Högskola.
    Vikström, Lotta
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Centre for Population Studies (CPS).
    Digitala primärkällor i historieundervisningen: en utmaning för elevers historiska tänkande och historiska empati2014In: Nordidactica: Journal of Humanities and Social Science Education, ISSN 2000-9879, no 2, p. 208-245Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In this study, 110 Swedish upper secondary students use a historical database designed for research. We analyze how they perceive the use of this digital tool in teaching and if they are able to use historical thinking and historical empathy in their historical writing and presentations. Using case-study methodology including questionnaires, observations, interviews and text analysis we find this to be a complex task for students. Our results highlight technological problems and problems in contextualizing historical evidence. However, students show interest in using primary sources and ability to use historical thinking and historical empathy, especially older students in more advanced courses when they have time to reflect upon the historical material.

  • 234.
    Nygren, Thomas
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Arts, Humlab.
    Vikström, Lotta
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Demographic Data Base.
    Treading old paths in new ways: upper secondary students using a digital tool of the professional historian2013In: Education Sciences, ISSN 2227-7102, Vol. 3, p. 50-73Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This article presents problems and possibilities associated with incorporating into history teaching a digital demographic database made for professional historians. We detect and discuss the outcome of how students in Swedish upper secondary schools respond to a teaching approach involving digitized registers comprising 19th century individuals and populations. Even though our results demonstrate that students experience the use of this digital database as messy, stressful, complicated, even meaningless and frustrating, they also perceive working with it as most interesting. We discuss this twofold outcome, its reasons and lessons to learn from it. When technology is functioning and the task is specialized and sufficiently guided by the teacher, which is not always the case, our results propose that digital databases can stimulate young people’s interest and historical thinking. Knowledge construction based upon historical thinking is evident in the students’ examination papers in which they present and debate their findings. These papers indicate that students can use a digital database and write history based upon empirical evidence, source criticism and historical empathy, just as professional historians do.

  • 235.
    Nygren, Thomas
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Arts, Humlab.
    Åstrand, Björn
    Umeå University, Faculty of Arts, Department of historical, philosophical and religious studies.
    En splittrad historia: Sambandet mellan kursplaner i historia för gymnasieskola och högre utbildning2012In: Nordidactica: Journal of Humanities and Social Science Education, ISSN 2000-9879, no 2, p. 1-30Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This quantitative and qualitative analysis of syllabuses indicates difficulties in the relation between history teaching in upper secondary schools and in higher education. Using analytical tools stemming from research of education and history didactics we highlight problematic differences between universities. It is evident that history education in many ways lacks a progression from upper secondary school to higher education. Judging from the formulations in the syllabuses, the grading demands on the students in upper secondary schools are in some cases even higher than in the universities. The results from this study suggest a need for further analysis of the teaching of history, and other subjects, in higher education in relation to teaching in upper secondary schools.

  • 236.
    Olofsson, Jennie
    Umeå University, Faculty of Arts, Humlab.
    A computer is a screen, is a cell phone, is plastics, is a microwave, is a copper coil…: On the fluidity of electronic waste2016In: Wi: Journal of Mobile Media, ISSN 1918-2104, Vol. 10, no 1Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Informed by previous studies that employ Actor Network-Theory (ANT), this article discusses electronic waste (e-waste) as fluid objects. The concept of ‘fluidity’ or ‘fluid’ includes an object’s ability to flow and thereby change shape, and therefore obstructs any attempt to explain e-waste in terms of a single state of being. Traditionally, fluidity has been used as a means to capture the changing characters of objects while they are being used. Elaborating on the notion of fluidity or the fluid in relation to e-waste serves both to expand previous understandings of fluidity to also encompass the status of objects as they are discarded, and to challenge traditional understandings of e-waste as the end point in the object’s lifecycle.

  • 237.
    Olofsson, Jennie
    Umeå University, Faculty of Arts, Humlab.
    ‘Are you fed up with your pc? Get a Mac.’: Swedish popular media representations of digital technologies and the stockpiling behavior of consumers2015In: Studies in media and communication, ISSN 2325-8071, E-ISSN 2325-808X, Vol. 3, no 1, p. 11-21Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This article offers a speculative reading on the linkage between Swedish popular media representations of digital technologies and peoples’ stockpiling behavior. The hypothesis is that Swedish popular media representations of digital technologies contribute to fuelling an understanding of these technologies as resource-free, consumable goods, and that this in turn might affect peoples’ tendencies to stockpile obsolete digital technologies in their homes. Previous studies have shown that stockpiling of obsolete electrical and electronic equipment is a common phenomenon in many countries (see for comparison Grossman, 2006; Saphores et al., 2006, 2009; Lescak, 2008; Gabrys, 2011). At the same time, little light is shed on why people stockpile obsolete electrical and electronic equipment in their homes. This article focuses particularly on digital technologies such as computers, televisions, smart phones, cell phones, laptops and tablets. Digital technologies are interesting as they account for a large – and increasing – amount of electrical and electronic equipment. Looking at the ways in which Swedish popular media represent digital technologies, this article suggests that popular media representations of digital technologies matter, not only in the ways people imagine and use digital technologies, but also the ways in which we think (or choose not to think) about their afterlife. The hypothesis is that the ways in which Swedish popular media represent digital technologies obstruct environmentally sound disposal and reuse options, something that in turn serves to cement and/or reinforce contemporary consumption behaviors and the environmental impacts that follow. By this, this article provides additional insights into what appears to be a western tendency to store obsolete electrical and electronic equipment at home. 

  • 238.
    Olofsson, Jennie
    Umeå University, Faculty of Arts, Humlab.
    “Did you mean: why are women cranky?”: Google – a means of inscription, a means of de-scription?2013In: Humanities and the Digital, MIT Press, 2013Chapter in book (Other academic)
  • 239.
    Olofsson, Jennie
    Umeå University, Faculty of Arts, Humlab.
    “It is unmanly to drive using the first gear?”: Driving as an embodied performance in multiple forms.2009In: Current strands of thought and work in progress at the division for Gender and Technology, Luleå tekniska universitet, 2009Chapter in book (Other academic)
  • 240.
    Olofsson, Jennie
    Umeå University, Faculty of Arts, Humlab.
    Normativa strömmar och underliggande motstånd: om fluiditet, läckage och kvinnors kroppar2016In: Tidskrift för Genusvetenskap, ISSN 1654-5443, E-ISSN 2001-1377, Vol. 36, no 4, p. 28-48Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 241.
    Olofsson, Jennie
    Umeå University, Faculty of Arts, Humlab.
    Revisiting the TV object: on the site-specific location and objecthood of the Swedish television during its inception2014In: Television and New Media, ISSN 1527-4764, E-ISSN 1552-8316, Vol. 15, no 4, p. 371-386Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This article explores the site-specific location and objecthood of the Swedish television during its inception. It offers an understanding not only of how people in Sweden experienced the arrival of the television but also of the ways in which its material properties fashioned peoples’ use of space and how this worked in tandem with social stratifications, national discourses, and gendered ideals. Engaging in the historical and material actuality of the television offers additional insights into the ways in which the television is experienced today, and how these experiences continuously contribute to fashioning peoples’ experience of the TV object.

  • 242.
    Olofsson, Jennie
    Umeå University, Faculty of Arts, Humlab.
    'Stray dogs and women are prohibited in the sentry': on the spatial effects of firefighters' homosocial practices2016In: Masculinities, gender equality and crisis management. / [ed] Mathias Ericson and Ulf Mellström, London and New York: Routledge, 2016, p. 81-90Chapter in book (Refereed)
  • 243.
    Olofsson, Jennie
    Umeå University, Faculty of Arts, Humlab.
    The profession of fire fighting is about teamwork, it is about trusting each other”: Masculine enactments and generational discrepancies within the Swedish fire service2013In: Culture, Society & Masculinity, ISSN 1941-5583 (Print), 1941-5591 (Online), Vol. 5, no 1, p. 75-88Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Dissecting the iconic image of the male firefighter this article offers an understanding of how housing preferences and instrumental use are componential to the professional identity of retired firefighters. Drawing on an ethnographic account at a fire station in Luleå, a small town in the Northern parts of Sweden, the intention is to show how retired firefighters performed masculinity, not through embodied viability, but through housing preferences and instrumental use. Distancing themselves from the residential areas and the instrumental management of their professional heirs, the retired firefighters were thus able to retain their status, despite the fact that they were no longer active as firefighters. Exploring the masculine enactments of the retired firefighters, this article seeks to highlight the dynamic of change within the fire service. In doing so, the intention is to provide a deeper understanding of the temporary constructions of masculine values and ideals that pervade this organization.

  • 244.
    Olofsson, Jennie
    Umeå University, Faculty of Arts, Humlab.
    Var är alla män?: Att ta plats och äga rum inom den svenska filmbranschen2011Other (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
  • 245.
    Olofsson, Jennie
    Umeå University, Faculty of Arts, Humlab.
    What do you get if you recycle ten CRT screens?2015Other (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
  • 246.
    Olofsson, Jennie
    Umeå University, Faculty of Arts, Humlab.
    'Zombies ahead!' A study of how hacked digital road signs destabilize the physical space of roadways2014In: Visual Communication, ISSN 1470-3572, E-ISSN 1741-3214, Vol. 13, no 1, p. 75-93Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This article explores some of the ways in which hacked Changeable Message Signs (CMSs) destabilize the physical space of motor transport spaces and jeopardize the institutionalized function of travel. While CMSs draw attention to the correlation between motorists' current positions, possible inconveniences ahead and their final destination, hacked CMSs and the subsequent projection of unsanctioned messages destabilize this correlation. Hence, the seemingly straightforward relationship between motor transport spaces and the activities of motorists, pedestrians and passers-by is in fact fashioned by the particular kind of message that is displayed at any given moment. Focusing on the spatial effects of hacked CMSs and how the dissemination of unsanctioned information points to the social stratifications of motor transport spaces, hacking is understood as a means of combating the disciplinary regimes of roadways.

  • 247.
    Outakoski, Hanna
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Arts, Department of language studies.
    Cocq, Coppélie
    Umeå University, Faculty of Arts, Humlab.
    Steggo, Peter
    Strengthening Indigenous languages in the digital age: social media–supported learning in Sápmi2018In: Media International Australia: Incorporating Culture & Policy, ISSN 1329-878X, E-ISSN 2200-467X, Vol. 169, no 1, p. 21-31Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This article presents and discusses Sámi social media initiatives for strengthening languages. The Sámi are the Indigenous people of Europe. All Sámi languages are endangered, and the lack of resources for maintaining, promoting and teaching the languages has been underscored on several occasions by the European Council and the Sámi parliaments. Social media has become an arena where resources are created and shared, enabling communities of speakers to support each other and promote their languages. YouTube, blogs, Twitter and language learning applications are here discussed as public domains and community-grounded media. Based on a few examples and on our expertise as instructors within Sámi studies, we suggest strategies for developing long-lasting and innovative models for revitalizing threatened languages and cultures, and for counteracting language loss through social media. This contribution shares examples of innovative uses of social media in Sámi of relevance for other Indigenous contexts.

  • 248.
    Palm, Fredrik
    Umeå University, Faculty of Arts, Humlab.
    Abstracting Query Building for Multi-entity Faceted Browsing2009In: FQAS '09 Proceedings of the 8th International Conference on Flexible Query Answering System / [ed] Troels Andreasen, Berlin: Springer-Verlag Berlin , 2009, p. 53-63Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This paper presents an overview of work based on the QVIZ-project to support faceted browsing, focusing on the handling of larger, more complex relational database structures, discrete and continuous data, hierarchies, temporal and spatial data. Faceted browsing allows the creation of unpredictable arrangements of search criteria by the user. Such dynamics require a generic and abstracted mechanism in order to be able to adapt to multidimensional exploration and user requirements. Faceted browsers function through the progressive narrowing of choices in selected dimensions. This paper describes an approach using a graph representation of data models and shortest path operations to build queries. The system described is fully functional and has developed since 2007 at HUMlab, Umeå University, Sweden. It is now being used in several digital humanities and multidisciplinary projects with different database schemata.

  • 249.
    Palm, Fredrik
    Umeå University, Faculty of Arts, Humlab.
    Crossing the Archival Borders2008In: IST-Africa 2008 Conference Proceedings / [ed] Paul Cunningham and Miriam Cunningham, Ireland: IIMC International Information Management Corporation, 2008 , 2008Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Digital archival resources are becoming more and more common assets in institutional storage. The digital organisation of resources enables a possibility for different presentation than the logical storage of resources. A more natural approach has been developed in the QVIZ-project (FP6-IST-032518) where the existing archival storage principles are combined with a rich context and time-spatial representation for discovery of archival documents. This approach has shown the potential to enable cross-border access to different archives in Europe and also make us aware of the shared European history.

  • 250.
    Palm, Fredrik
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Arts, Humlab.
    Edlund, Lars-Erik
    Umeå University, Faculty of Arts, Department of language studies.
    Data mining, visualisation and publishing of Atlas of Nordic Dialects2013Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This paper presents an customized implementation of  the QVIZ-browser to support a multitude of research question towards a structured dataset of Nordic dialects, DIABAS. This is enabled by so called facetted browsing. of the relational database structure. Faceted browsing allows the creation of unpredictable arrangements of search criteria by the user. The system has been customized to support this rather new explorative mode of data mining combined with tools to make working map for future publication. The combination of data mining and creation of visual map enables the research to be using the system for analysis as well as providing content for planned publication Språkatlas (Founded by KGAA)

    The paper will mainly describe how the tool has been used to prepare the publication and how it has been used by the involved researchers with examples of research questions. The analysis of design and its usage will combine knowledge from the research area of Nordic Dialects as well as expertise of the query building mechanism involved under the hood of the system.

    In the paper the collaborative work will be described where special focus is on the translations process between the properties of the content, the research questions foreseen and the potentials and problems with the tools being used.

234567 201 - 250 of 336
CiteExportLink to result list
Permanent link
Cite
Citation style
  • apa
  • ieee
  • modern-language-association-8th-edition
  • vancouver
  • Other style
More styles
Language
  • de-DE
  • en-GB
  • en-US
  • fi-FI
  • nn-NO
  • nn-NB
  • sv-SE
  • Other locale
More languages
Output format
  • html
  • text
  • asciidoc
  • rtf