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  • 301.
    Lindqvist, Anna
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of applied educational science.
    Om män, pojkar och dans i förskola och skola2018In: Estetiska ämnen och genus / [ed] Eva Skåreus, Malmö: Gleerups Utbildning AB, 2018, 1, p. 127-142Chapter in book (Other academic)
  • 302.
    Liong, Chan Ching Mario
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Umeå Centre for Gender Studies (UCGS).
    Factors influencing distress toward erectile dysfunction and attitude toward erectile dysfunction drugs among middle-aged and elderly chinese women and men in Hong Kong2013In: Journal of Sexual Medicine, ISSN 1743-6095, E-ISSN 1743-6109, Vol. 10, no 3, p. 782-790Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Aim.  This study aims to explain distress toward erectile dysfunction (ED), attitude toward ED drugs, and experiences with ED drug use in terms of sexual attitudes, relationship satisfaction, and sociodemographic factors among the middle-aged and elderly Chinese population. Studies show that a significant number of middle-aged and elderly men in Asia suffer from ED. However, people's attitudes toward ED drugs are not positive. Few studies have sought to reveal the influencing factors of this negative attitude.

    Methods.  Nine hundred forty-six Hong Kong women and men aged 36–80 with stable partners were administered a structured questionnaire through face-to-face street-intercept survey. Self-reporting on single-item questions using a five-point Likert scale was adopted for most of the variables, including attitude toward sex, relationship satisfaction, distress toward ED, and attitude toward ED drugs. Perceived importance of sex in an intimate relationship and attitude toward sex were assessed through three items. Respondents were asked to report whether they had taken ED drugs or bought ED drugs for their partners.

    Results.  While perceived importance of sex in an intimate relationship and distress toward ED both contributed to the estimation of attitudes toward ED drugs for both genders, relationship satisfaction was only associated with men's attitude, while women's attitude was related to two other factors: relationship status and income level. Both age and attitude toward ED drugs influenced experiences with ED drug use for women and men. Men's experience with ED drug use was further related to the perceived importance of sex and to men's self-esteem and relationship status.

    Conclusion.  Results of this study could help identify people who are disturbed by ED but reluctant to seek treatment. Clinicians and public health policy makers could make use of the findings to encourage proper understanding of ED.

  • 303.
    Liong, Chan Ching Mario
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Umeå Centre for Gender Studies (UCGS).
    Structural Thinking: A Two-edged Blade of Fatherhood in Hong Kong2012Conference paper (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    This paper is based on the field work consisted of participant observation in a Catholic-background men’s centre in Hong Kong and in-depth interview with individual fathers between 2004 and 2007. The men’s centre promotes that men should assume their familial role as husbands and fathers and that men need other men as peers to support one another. I participated in two of their self-help groups and one men’s rights group. In addition, I conducted face-to-face semi-structured in-depth interviews with a total of 30 fathers through snowballing. Some of these informants were members of the men's centre while some were not. Fathers with different class backgrounds and marital statuses were included. Some were working-class men (e.g. construction site workers), some were professionals (e.g. lawyer), and some were business owners. Some were married; some were divorced; some were single fathers taking care of their children. Yet these fathers were all mid-aged, i.e. late-30s to 60s.

     

    Patriarchy is rooted in the history of Hong Kong and continues to exist in contemporary society. In both the colonial and post-colonial periods, notions of masculinity and fatherhood in Hong Kong are seen to be extremely conservative and they highlight the role of the state in the adoption and reproduction of patriarchal ideology. While changes towards gender equality have occurred slowly after long-term struggle, a coherent gender policy has been lacking. This has contributed to a socio-cultural environment that encourages the naturalization and normalization of the patriarchal structure and practices in the family. 

     

    The “new good men/father” notion proposed by the men’s centre situates men in the family context, with traditional masculinity reiterated and resurrected. Economic requirement on men prevailed in the centre’s discourse. Authority of men was also emphasized through encouraging fathers to assume their educator’s and decision-maker’s role. New elements of fatherhood, like doing housework, taking care of and playing with children, as well as caring the wife, were added as ways to make the family harmonious and under control and became the new hegemonic standards for masculinity. However, wife sometimes exercise resistance to the structural power of men. Some even sabotage the male family structure by claiming their agency through divorce or extra-marital affairs. Patriarchal fatherhood is under threat.

    Divorced and single-fatherhood was seen as deviant and was problematized in the discourse.

     

    The thinking that marriage is the foundation of fatherhood rather than a romantic alliance is common among my informants. This belief subsequently motivates the father to give toil and sweat to maintain marriage and (“complete”) family which is deemed to be the facilitating environment in the interest of children. At the same time, fathers expect to get what they are promised by the patriarchal structure – filial children and an obedient wife. I call this expectation “structural thinking” within the patriarchal habitus of the father. Structural thinking is the internalization of the existing social structure with the expectation of gaining the benefits and outcomes which are defined and laid out by the structure. Within structural thinking, individual’s will and interest are often subsumed under the requirements of the power-laden structure. When the promised outcomes do not occur, structural thinking leads the social actor to blame other individual actors rather than seeing the biased nature of the structure, thus leaving the power-laden structure unchallenged. Men, as the beneficiary of the patriarchal structure, preserve it by demanding themselves and others to conform to it. It leads men to defend the patriarchal family and to tolerate a painful or loveless marriage just to guarantee a caring mother and a legitimate, intact family for the children. I would like to argue in this paper that the family structure legitimizes father’s power which is a two-edged blade – it does not only place him above other individual family members, but also lead to the distortion of his own subjectivities and individuality in cases like divorce.

  • 304.
    Liong, Chan Ching Mario
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Umeå Centre for Gender Studies (UCGS).
    Under the Shadow of Deviance: Positionality, Subjectivity, and Masculinity of the Male Feminist Ethnographer in a Patriarchal Field Setting2012Conference paper (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    This paper comes from my reflective account of my ethnographic field experience from 2004 to 2007 in studying construction of masculinities among Chinese fathers in Hong Kong. I came to a men’s centre promoting a “new good men / father” notion as the starting point of my fieldwork. Planning to examine how gender equality would be promoted within the family, I was disappointed by the prevailing discourse of “harmony of the family” in the centre, which left gender power relation, compulsory heterosexuality, and hegemony of monogamy and intact nuclear family unchallenged despite that involvement in childcare and housework was encouraged in fatherhood. At the same time, I discovered that my embodiment and self-presentation of “soft” masculinity did not fit in the male-dominated groups. With the “deviant” masculine embodiment, even though I was not publicly criticized, my subject position as a young, effeminate man somehow hindered my feminist voice being heard or accepted. Yet I could foresee critical analysis in my writing. In such a situation, I had constant worries of being accused of betraying my informants, who might think that I was part of them, sharing their thoughts and views. The fact that I was perceived as a son and a student facilitated my adoption of the performance of learning masculinities and men’s situations from my male informants. Unexpected openness and revelation resulted. In this paper, I am going to discuss the problems and potentials of doing ethnographic research with non-hegemonic masculine embodiment in such an inconsistent fieldsite by examining the positionality and subjectivity of the researcher and the way masculinities effect the situation.

  • 305.
    Liong, Chan Ching Mario
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Umeå Centre for Gender Studies (UCGS).
    Chan, Lih-Shing Alex
    Community College of City University.
    Walking a Tightrope: Performing Chinese Young Masculinities in Hong Kong2012Conference paper (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Young men growing up in Hong Kong are caught in the socio-cultural dynamics that problematise their sense of masculinity. The constitution of Chinese masculinity tends to harness the Confucian discourse of self-control, which values containment and even suppression of sexual desire. While such notion of masculinity is also located within heterosexual identification, Chinese men are expected to compartmentalise relational contexts in dealt with their sexual expression. Nonetheless, the objectification of sexuality driven by consumerist urban culture and the commercial media has rapidly pushed the boundary of sexual expression; more than before, Chinese young men are compelled to respond to sexual identification regardless of social settings. By using the data collected from male college students, this paper argues that young men adopt different strategies in performing masculinity while evading certain gendered labels. This paper also proposes that these strategies are to be understood in Bourdieu's theoretical framework.

  • 306.
    Liong, Mario
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Umeå Centre for Gender Studies (UCGS).
    Like father, like son: negotiation of masculinity in the ethnographic context in Hong Kong2015In: Gender, Place and Culture: A Journal of Feminist Geography, ISSN 0966-369X, E-ISSN 1360-0524, Vol. 22, no 7, p. 937-953Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Feminist geographers have indicated that ethnographic research is an inter-subjective process constructed in relation to the intersection between the gender and other social dimensions of both the researcher and the informants relevant to the field. In particular, the matching and adaptation of masculinities in the research context is a complex methodological issue that receives relatively little attention. Using my fieldwork experience, this article builds on the contribution of feminist geographers to discuss how my masculine self-presentation was negotiated with the research topic, the caring masculinity endorsed among my middle-aged male informants, the sociocultural milieu and my positionalities and bodily representations in producing collaborative ethnographic data. My young age and doctoral student status, combined with my soft and meek' self-presentation, produced wen masculinity within the Chinese cultural context, which facilitated the paradoxical reception of me as both a son and a consultant in the men's groups. This masculine embodiment not only facilitated our rapport but also signified my cultural competence to participate in decision-making and activist activities in the discussion groups, which brought me to some unexpected research lands. The effect of my masculine embodiment on the ethnographic research process indicates that fieldwork is not only situated in a place but is also itself a space constructed through cultural understanding of social interactions and embodied gender representations.

  • 307.
    Livholts, Mona
    et al.
    Institutionen för socialt arbete, Mittuniversitetet.
    Bränström Öhman, Annelie
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Umeå Centre for Gender Studies (UCGS). Umeå University, Faculty of Arts, Department of culture and media studies.
    Rönnblom, Malin
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Umeå Centre for Gender Studies (UCGS).
    Koobak, Redi
    Writing change in feminist and gender studies: staging the political and the embodied2010In: NORA: Nordic Journal of Feminist and Gender Research, ISSN 0803-8740, E-ISSN 1502-394X, Vol. 18, no 4, p. 223-225Article in journal (Other academic)
  • 308.
    Lundgren, Anna Sofia
    Umeå University, Faculty of Arts, Culture and Media. Etnologi.
    Fixeringar och förhandlingar: betydelser av kön i monument2007In: Minnesmärken: att tolka det förflutna och besvärja framtiden / [ed] Jonas Frykman & Billy Ehn, Stockholm: Carlsson Bokförlag, 2007, p. 301-321Chapter in book (Other academic)
  • 309.
    Lundgren, Anna Sofia
    Umeå University, Faculty of Arts, Culture and Media.
    Genus på offentlig plats: reflexer och transparenser2006Book (Other academic)
  • 310.
    Lundgren, Anna Sofia
    Umeå University, Faculty of Arts, Department of culture and media studies.
    Heteronormativitet i läraryrket2014In: Skola i normer / [ed] Lena Martinsson & Eva Reimers, Malmö: Gleerups Utbildning AB, 2014, 2, p. 53-80Chapter in book (Other academic)
  • 311.
    Lundgren, Anna Sofia
    Umeå University, Faculty of Arts, Department of culture and media studies.
    "Om man jämför så är jag rätt gammal": Ålder som förhandling och resurs2010In: Livslinjer: Genus, sexualitet och ålder / [ed] Fanny Ambjörnsson & Maria Jönsson, Göteborg: Makadam , 2010, p. 148-181Chapter in book (Refereed)
  • 312.
    Lundgren, Britta
    Umeå University, Faculty of Arts, Department of culture and media studies.
    Challenging gender 2007-20112012In: UCGS, Umeå Centre for Gender Studies Annual Report, p. 13-14Article in journal (Other academic)
  • 313.
    Lundgren, Britta
    Umeå University, Faculty of Arts, Department of culture and media studies.
    Umeås genusforskning - från seminarier till excellenscentrum2009In: Thule - Kungl. Skytteanska Samfundets årsbok, ISSN 0280-8692, p. 245-252Article in journal (Other academic)
  • 314.
    Lundström, Catrin
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Umeå Centre for Gender Studies (UCGS).
    Transnationell vithet: Svenska migrantkvinnor i USA och Singapore2010In: Tidskrift för Genusvetenskap, ISSN 1654-5443, no 1-2, p. 23-45Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This article examines different expressions of whiteness in a transnational context through first-generation Swedish migrant women’s narratives of their bodies, when moving and re-installing themselves in the altered social, racial and political landscapes of the United States and Singapore. Their specific migratory experiences are used as a departure to analyze the ways in which gender- and nation-specific forms of capital may be converted through migration. The central inquiries in the article are concerned with how Swedish women experience their bodies, as migrant bodies, and how embodied privilege move and are being re-invested in two racially different contexts. The study, conducted from 2006-2009, is based on in-depth interviews, focus group discussions with almost 50 women in United States and Singapore, all of them being members of a support group for Swedish-speaking women, and three of their spouses. In addition, I have conducted participant observations in several Swedish-related arenas in the two countries. By looking at how Swedishness is being re-installed in non-Swedish contexts, the article contextualizes migrating Swedishness and whiteness and contributes with a transnational perspective on whiteness, which carries a potential to destabilize an idea of whiteness as a homogeneous entity. In sum, it is argued that white privileges often remain normalized and invisible for the informants themselves, but while Swedish femininity is highly valued in the United States, it is represented as a non-normative whiteness in the Singaporean context.

  • 315.
    Lusey, Hendrew G.
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine, Epidemiology and Global Health. Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Nursing. World Council of Churches, The Ecumenical HIV and AIDS Initiative in Africa, Regional Coordination Office for Central Africa, Kinshasa, Democratic Republic of Congo.
    Christianson, Monica
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Nursing.
    San Sebastian, Miguel
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine, Epidemiology and Global Health.
    Edin, Kerstin E.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Nursing.
    Church representatives' perspectives on masculinities in the context of HIV: the case of the Ecumenical HIV and AIDS Initiative in Africa2016In: African Journal of AIDS Research, ISSN 1608-5906, E-ISSN 1727-9445, Vol. 15, no 3, p. 273-281Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Despite a growing body of literature related to church leaders challenging dominant norms of masculinities that may enable the spread of HIV, research on masculinity issues among African church representatives who are policy makers is scarce. The objectives of this study were to explore the perspectives on masculinities held by church representatives within the Ecumenical HIV and AIDS Initiative in Africa (EHAIA) and to identify strategies they used to transform masculinities in their respective churches. Qualitative interviews were carried out with 14 church representatives belonging to the EHAIA International Reference Group. These interviews were analysed using thematic analysis and four themes were identified: "barriers to challenge masculinities" may contribute to the spread of HIV; "counterproductive conservative church leadership" fails to challenge dominant forms of masculinities; "facilitators to challenge masculinities" perceived as slowly changing men and "an evolving hope for gender equality" would be perceived in certain marital relationships. The latter two were viewed as positive approaches resulting from masculinity workshops and male priests disclosing their HIV-positive status. This research highlights strategies that may help male church-goers challenge masculinities, support gender equality and, improve the lives of men and women in the context of HIV.

  • 316.
    Lusey, Hendrew
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine, Epidemiology and Global Health. Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Nursing. World Council of Churches, Central Africa Regional Coordinator of the Ecumenical HIV and AIDS Initiative in Africa (EHAIA), Kinshasa Gombe, Democratic Republic of Congo.
    Sebastian, Miguel San
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine, Epidemiology and Global Health.
    Christianson, Monica
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Nursing.
    Edin, Kerstin E.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Nursing.
    Factors associated with gender equality among church-going young men in Kinshasa, Democratic Republic of Congo: a cross-sectional study2017In: International Journal for Equity in Health, ISSN 1475-9276, E-ISSN 1475-9276, Vol. 16, article id 213Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: While women and girls are made vulnerable by inequitable and violent versions of masculinities, there is increasing evidence that gender equality will not be achieved without partnering with men. The aim of this study was to assess gender-equitable norms and their determinants among church-going young men in Kinshasa, the Democratic Republic of Congo.

    Method: A cross-sectional study was carried out among 289 church-going young men, aged 18-24 years, residing in three disadvantaged communes of Kinshasa. Variables included sociodemographic characteristics, attitudes towards gender equality and responses to issues related to the Gender-Equitable Men (GEM) scale. Logistic regression was applied to identify the associations between sociodemographic characteristics, attitudes and the GEM scale.

    Results: The findings provide evidence of attitudes and beliefs that act as barriers to gender equality. For instance, the majority of church-going young men (83.74%) agreed that a man is the only decision maker in the home and about half (50.87%) of the respondents supported the statement "There are times a woman deserves to be beaten". Similarly, around half of the participants agreed with the idea of men's uncontrollable sex drive (50.87%) and men's toughness (50.17%). Close to half of the participants (44.29%) agreed that it is women's responsibility to prevent pregnancy. These attitudes co-existed with a few gender-equitable norms as 82.70% agreed on the importance of joint decisions concerning family planning. An association between education, certain places of residence, being single or separated, and supportive attitudes towards gender equality was found with higher scores for the GEM.

    Conclusion: Our study findings indicate that a high proportion of church-going young men do not endorse gender-equitable norms. Therefore, churches urgently need comprehensive gender equality and masculinity policies and programmes to influence young men's attitudes and behaviours. The promotion of gender equality in schools and the wider community also need to be encouraged.

  • 317.
    Löfström, Åsa
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Umeå School of Business and Economics (USBE), Economics.
    Betygsgapet mellan flickor och pojkar - konsekvenser för framtidens arbetsmarknad2012Report (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
  • 318.
    Löfström, Åsa
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Umeå School of Business and Economics (USBE), Economics.
    Könslönegap och glastak: en studie av kvinnor och män i ekonomyrket2012Report (Other academic)
    Abstract [sv]

    En mycket vanlig förklaring till att det finns en löneskillnad mellan kvinnor och män är att de inte har samma yrke och samma utbildning. Kan denna förklaring därmed tolkas som att lönegapet är lika med noll i yrken där det både finns kvinnor och män? För att få svar på detta analyserade vi en grupp kvinnliga och manliga ekonomer med högskoleutbildning. Trots denna likhet var den könsrelaterade löneskillnaden inte försumbar. En närmare granskning av lönestrukturen i yrket visade dock att lönegapets storlek varierade. Det var större högre upp i fördelningen och mindre i den undre delen. Trots att könsfördelningen på de olika stegen i karriärtrappan är jämnare idag än tidigare och trots att ”glastaket” börjat krackelera på sina håll är löneskillnaden mellan kvinnor och män fortfarande stora. Sett i ett livscykelperspektiv betyder det också att männens livsinkomst blir högre vilket i sin tur kommer att de dom en tryggare ålderdom, via högre pension, än vad kvinnor kommer att få. Eftersom det länge sagts att ”bara” kvinnor utbildar sig, ”bara” kvinnor kommit ikapp männen och ”bara” de engagerar sig mer i sina jobb då kommer också deras löne- och karriärvillkor att bli som männens. Frågan man därför kan ställa sig idag är om denna förväntan snarare är att likna vid en illusion, en livslögn, än en faktisk möjlighet?

  • 319.
    Löfström, Åsa
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Umeå School of Business and Economics (USBE), Economics.
    Lön, livslön och livslögn: en studie av könslönegapet i ekonomyrket2012In: Ekonomisk Debatt, ISSN 0345-2646, no 7, p. 36-46Article in journal (Other academic)
    Abstract [sv]

    Den könssegregerade arbetsmarknaden har länge fått klä skott för det könsrelaterade lönegapet, men innebär det att gapet är noll i yrken som är könsintegrerade? I denna artikel studeras ekonomyrket. Resultatet visar en skillnad mellan män och kvinnor på sju procent. Gapet varierar dock med yrkets lönestruktur och är mer än tio procent i den övre delen av lönefördelningen mot knappt fyra i den undre. Att likhet i utbildning och yrke skulle borga för ett noll-gap verkar ha stannat vid en förhoppning, en förhoppning som kanske är på väg att utvecklas till en livslögn med konsekvenser för kvinnors livslön.

  • 320.
    Löfström, Åsa
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Umeå School of Business and Economics (USBE), Economics.
    Time for men to catch up on women?: A study of the Swedish gender wage gap 1973-20122014Report (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    The Swedish gender wage gap decreased substantially from the 1960s until the beginning of the 1980s. At the same time women had been narrowing men in employment experience and education. While women continued to catch up on men the average wage gap remained almost the same as in the 1980s. The catch-up hypothesis was obviously not the sole answer to the wage-gap. The purpose here was to discuss other factors of relevance for the evolution of the average pay gap. Data for the period 1972-2012 is used in the analysis: The results are mixed and firm conclusions are scarce. Some indications though, the older the women are at first birth the smaller the pay gap and the same for female union membership while unemployment, economic growth, fertility and time made the gap larger. It seems as “time”, often reliable on issues such as changes in attitudes and prejudices, cannot settle this. One finding, common in other studies as well, is the influence “children” may have on the wage gap. If postponement of motherhood and/or fewer children is necessary to reduce the gender wage gap the question whether this is desirable or not must be addressed more seriously. If the answer is “no” it may be high time for men to catch up on women - through sharing the full responsibility for children and household duties.

  • 321.
    Lönnerskog Nilsson, Hanna
    Umeå University.
    Kapitel 1: Om projektet och den här boken2011In: Projekt Storytelling: kvinnliga forskares och forskarstuderandes berättelser om hur det är att vara kvinna i akademin och vid Umeå universitet / [ed] Hanna Lönnerskog Nilsson, Umeå: Umeå universitet , 2011, p. 8-9Chapter in book (Other academic)
  • 322.
    Lönnerskog Nilsson, Hanna
    Umeå University.
    Kapitel 2: Om berättelserna, författarna och kopplingen till befintlig forskning2011In: Projekt Storytelling: kvinnliga forskares och forskarstuderandes berättelser om hur det är att vara kvinna i akademin och vid Umeå universitet / [ed] Hanna Lönnerskog Nilsson, Umeå: Umeå universitet , 2011, p. 10-13Chapter in book (Other academic)
  • 323.
    Lönnerskog Nilsson, Hanna
    Umeå University.
    Kapitel 24: Några återkommande teman och slutsatser2011In: Projekt Storytelling: kvinnliga forskares och forskarstuderandes berättelser om hur det är att vara kvinna i akademin och vid Umeå universitet / [ed] Hanna Lönnerskog Nilsson, Umeå: Umeå universitet , 2011, p. 131-133Chapter in book (Other academic)
  • 324.
    Lönnerskog Nilsson, Hanna
    Umeå University.
    Kapitel 25: Vad kan du göra för att bidra till reellt lika villkor för kvinnor och män?2011In: Projekt Storytelling: kvinnliga forskares och forskarstuderandes berättelser om hur det är att vara kvinna i akademin och vid Umeå universitet / [ed] Hanna Lönnerskog Nilsson, Umeå: Umeå universitet , 2011, p. 134-137Chapter in book (Other academic)
  • 325.
    Lönnerskog Nilsson, Hanna
    Umeå University.
    Kapitel 26: Projektets egen story och framtidsvision2011In: Projekt Storytelling: Kvinnliga forskares och forskarstuderandes berättelser om hur det är att vara kvinna i akademin och vid Umeå universitet / [ed] Hanna Lönnerskog Nilsson, Umeå: Umeå universitet , 2011, p. 138-144Chapter in book (Other academic)
  • 326.
    Lönnerskog Nilsson, Hanna
    Umeå University.
    Kapitel 27: En berättelse om snö och om varför du är så viktig för att skapa förändring2011In: Projekt Storytelling: Kvinnliga forskares och forskarstuderandes berättelser om hur det är att vara kvinna i akademin och vid Umeå universitet / [ed] Hanna Lönnerskog Nilsson, Umeå: Umeå universitet , 2011, p. 145-146Chapter in book (Other academic)
  • 327.
    Lönnerskog Nilsson, Hanna
    Umeå University.
    Storytelling - att skriva om berättelsen om akadmin: Slutrapport för projekt Storytelling2011Report (Other academic)
  • 328.
    Lövgren, Karin
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Demographic Data Base.
    Att göra kvinnlighet och ålder i bloggosfären2016In: Att konstruera en kvinna: berättelser om normer, flickor och tanter / [ed] Karin Lövgren, Lund: Nordic Academic Press, 2016, p. 115-144Chapter in book (Other academic)
  • 329.
    Lövgren, Karin
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Demographic Data Base.
    Att konstruera en kvinna: berättelser om normer, flickor och tanter2016Collection (editor) (Other academic)
  • 330.
    Lövgren, Karin
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Demographic Data Base.
    “Det är viktigt att klä sig vuxet”: Äldre kvinnor om stilval2015Conference paper (Other academic)
  • 331.
    Lövgren, Karin
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Demographic Data Base.
    'Fun' as a resource in old women's deliberations about style and dress2014In: Walking beside: challenging the role of emotions in normalization / [ed] Eva Söderberg & Sara Nyhlén, Sundsvall: Mittuniversitetet , 2014, 6, p. 155-173Chapter in book (Refereed)
  • 332.
    Lövgren, Karin
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Demographic Data Base.
    Gör om mig: åldrande och kvinnlighet i en populär mediegenre2015In: Budkavlen, ISSN 0302-2447, p. 71-88Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [sv]

    I medierna finns ett flertal versioner av gör-om-mig formatet. I dessa ges kvinnor råd om hur de ska kunna förändra sin stil. Experter ska hjälpa henne att uppdatera sig och att framstå som den bästa versionen av sig själv. Programmen och artiklarna har blivit kritiserade för att de disciplinerar kvinnor. Genus och att göra normativ kvinnlighet är centralt i programmen. Det är också ålder. I den här artikeln undersöker jag dels ett inslag i tv-programmet Go'kväll, dels böcker som ger råd till kvinnor om stil och kläder. Jag granskar vilka råd man ger till den äldre kvinnan just utifrån hennes ålder.

    Hur kan man förstå att formatet är så lockande och har både så många sökanden och så stor publik? Vilken mening ges åldrande i programmen respektive böckerna och vad säger de om kulturellt meningsskapande kring åldrande och kvinnlighet?

  • 333.
    Lövgren, Karin
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Demographic Data Base.
    Inledning: att konstruera en kvinna2016In: Att konstuera en kvinna: berättelser om normer, flickor och tanter / [ed] Karin Lövgren, Lund: Nordic Academic Press, 2016, p. 7-24Chapter in book (Other academic)
  • 334.
    Lövgren, Malin
    et al.
    The Department of Neurobiology, Care Sciences and Society, Division of Nursing Karolinska Institutet, 23300, 141 83 Huddinge, Sweden; The Department of Health and Social Sciences, Högskolan Dalarna, 791 88 Falun, Sweden.
    Leveälahti, Helena
    The Department of Neurobiology, Care Sciences and Society, Division of Nursing Karolinska Institutet, 23300, 141 83 Huddinge, Sweden; Stockholms Sjukhem Foundation, Research & Development Unit/Palliative Care, Mariebergsgatan 22, 112 35 Stockholm, Sweden.
    Tishelman, Carol
    Stockholms Sjukhem Foundation, Research & Development Unit/Palliative Care, Mariebergsgatan 22, 112 35 Stockholm, Sweden; School of Nursing, Midwifery and Social work, The University of Manchester, Oxford Road, Manchester M13 9PL, United Kingdom; The Department of Learning, Informatics, Management and Ethics, Medical Management Center, Karolinska Institutet, Berzelius väg 3, 171 77 Stockholm, Sweden.
    Runesdotter, Sara
    The Department of Neurobiology, Care Sciences and Society, Division of Nursing Karolinska Institutet, 23300, 141 83 Huddinge, Sweden; Stockholms Sjukhem Foundation, Research & Development Unit/Palliative Care, Mariebergsgatan 22, 112 35 Stockholm, Sweden.
    Hamberg, Katarina
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine, Family Medicine.
    Koyi, H
    The Department of Respiratory Medicine and Allergy, Karolinska University Hospital, Solna, 171 76, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Time spans from first symptom to treatment in patients with lung cancer: The influence of symptoms and demographic characteristics2008In: Acta Oncologica, ISSN 0284-186X, E-ISSN 1651-226X, Vol. 47, no 3, p. 397-405Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    BACKGROUND: Cancer stage at diagnosis is the most important prognostic factor for lung cancer (LC), but most patients are diagnosed with advanced disease with many and intense symptoms. This study explores relationships between LC patients' first symptoms, symptoms triggering health care system (HCS) contact, demographic/clinical characteristics, and time spans in the care trajectory from first symptom(s) to treatment start.

    MATERIALS AND METHODS: Medical records were examined from all 314 patients diagnosed with primary LC in 2003 at a Department of Respiratory Medicine, in Stockholm Sweden. Descriptive analysis was used to examine symptoms and time spans in the care trajectory. Cox regression analysis was conducted to explore the influence of symptoms and demographic/clinical characteristics on the time spans.

    RESULTS: Tumor-specific symptoms led to HCS visits to a greater extent than did systemic symptoms, despite reports of weight loss, fatigue and appetite loss as common first symptoms. Minor differences between women and men were found regarding specific symptoms. The study confirms that the time spans from first symptoms reported to treatment start are extensive, exceeding Swedish national recommendations. A lump/resistance, neurological symptoms, appetite loss, hemoptysis and non-thoracic related pain were associated with significantly shorter time spans in the care trajectory. People >74 years old risked longer time span from first HCS visit to treatment start.

    CONCLUSION: This study indicates a need for a more efficient LC care trajectory. Elderly patients could be particularly vulnerable for longer time spans.

  • 335.
    Lövgren, Malin
    et al.
    The Department of Neurobiology, Care Sciences and Society, Division of Nursing, Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm, Sweden; School of Health and Social Sciences, Högskolan Dalarna, Falun, Sweden.
    Tishelman, Carol
    Stockholms Sjukhem Foundation, Research & Development Unit/Palliative Care, Stockholm, Sweden; School of Nursing, Midwifery and Social work, The University of Manchester, Manchester, United Kingdom; The Department of Learning, Informatics, Management and Ethics, Medical Management Center, Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Sprangers, Mirjam
    Department of Medical Psychology, Academic Medical Center, University of Amsterdam, Amsterdam, The Netherlands.
    Koyi, Hirsh
    The Department of Respiratory Medicine and Allergy, Karolinska University Hospital, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Hamberg, Katarina
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine, Family Medicine.
    Symptoms and problems with functioning among women and men with inoperable lung cancer - A longitudinal study2008In: Lung Cancer, ISSN 0169-5002, E-ISSN 1872-8332, Vol. 60, no 1, p. 113-124Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The aim of this study is to compare the prevalence and intensity of symptoms and problems with functioning between women and men with inoperable lung cancer (LC) during 3 months post-diagnosis. One hundred and fifty-nine patients completed the EORTC QLQ C-30+LC13 at three time points: close to diagnosis and prior to treatment, and one, and 3 months later. Descriptive cross-sectional analyses and longitudinal analyses using repeated measure ANOVA were conducted. These patients reported many and intense symptoms and problems with functioning. The most salient finding from the cross-sectional analysis was that women reported both more, and more intense problems with emotional functioning close to diagnosis. Statistically significant improvements over time were found in both men and women with regard to emotional functioning, dyspnea, insomnia, cough, pain in arm/shoulder, while physical functioning, fatigue, constipation, dysphagia, peripheral neuropathy and alopecia deteriorated significantly over time. The longitudinal analyses suggest that, with the exception of emotional functioning, gender differences were not only related to biological sex alone, but were also found to be related to other components of the patients' life situation, such as education, age, civil status and type of LC. Sensitivity to different symptom experiences and responses to those experiences between and within women and men is also necessary in the management of symptoms in patients with inoperable LC.

  • 336.
    Madison, Guy
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Psychology.
    Explicating politicians’ arguments for sex quotas in Sweden: Increasing power and influence rather than increasing quality and productivity2019In: Frontiers in Communication, E-ISSN 2297-900X, Vol. 4, article id 1Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Quotas are employed or proposed in several European countries as a means to decrease differences in outcomes across groups. Quotas belong to a family of biased selection and treatment measures based on group membership, rather than individual ability. The effects of such measures depend on the underlying model of the relevant variables and their relationships, but this model is not explicit in the political discourse. Here, thematic analysis is applied to statements that argue for legislated sex quotas in Sweden, issued by leading politicians and government officials. The most common, recurrent themes are that: (a) Women are at least as able as men; (b) less able men are currently selected over more able women; (c) the proportion of women should be increased to at least 40%, which (d) will increase organizations' quality and productivity; (e) this should be achieved by means of quotas but (f) not through improved meritocratic assessment. It is shown that these claims are inconsistent, as (1) improved meritocratic assessment was not proposed, although that would more effectively select the more able than would quotas, and (2) quotas will lead to lower rather than higher quality and productivity, as it demands that the less able be appointed if they are female. This suggests that the purpose of quotas is to increase the influence of the favored group even if it is currently less able.

  • 337.
    Madison, Guy
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Psychology.
    Söderlund, Therese
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Psychology.
    Can gender studies be studied?: Reply to comments on Söderlund and Madison2016In: Scientometrics, ISSN 0138-9130, E-ISSN 1588-2861, Vol. 108, no 1, p. 329-335Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    We reply to the comment by Lundgren, Shildrick and Lawrence on our article on gender studies bibliometrics and argue that it does not challenge any of our main results. Their points of criticism concerned that we had not compiled exactly all scholarly gender production, that the gender studies field had changed during the period, that the definition of the research area is vague, and suggest that only gender studies scholars themselves are able to study the field. We maintain that constructive scientific critique should specify alternative methods and how they are expected to change the results and conclusions, and why that would be preferable. Without such stringency, it reduces to regressive lists of detail.

  • 338.
    Madison, Guy
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Psychology.
    Söderlund, Therese
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Psychology.
    Comparisons of content and scientific quality indicators across peer-reviewed journal articles with more or less gender perspective: gender studies can do better2018In: Scientometrics, ISSN 0138-9130, E-ISSN 1588-2861, Vol. 115, no 3, p. 1161-1183Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The field of gender studies has faced criticism for poor scholarship and methodology, both from within and outside academia. Here, we compare indicators of scientific quality across three samples of peer-reviewed journal articles with more, less and no gender perspective, on the assumption that gender studies tend to apply a gender perspective. The statements in the articles were content-analysed with respect to subject matter, their level of support in surrounding text, and other indicators of scientific quality. The higher the level of gender perspective, the lower was the scientific quality for seven out of nine indicators. Support was higher for the no gender perspective group, but did not differ across the two higher levels. We suggest that the impact of the field can be increased by implementing established research methods employed in other disciplines, especially in terms of bringing about desired social and societal change.

  • 339.
    Magnusson, Eva
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Psychology.
    Conflict, danger and difference: Nordic heterosexual couples converse about gender equality and fairness2008In: Critical studies of gender equalities: Nordic dislocations, dilemmas and contradictions, Göteborg: Makadam , 2008, p. 161-179Chapter in book (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
  • 340.
    Magnusson, Eva
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Psychology.
    Könstillhörighet: förklaringar, normer, betydelser2019 (ed. 1)Book (Other academic)
  • 341.
    Magnusson, Eva
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Psychology.
    Making up (new) women: conceptions of women in the history of the Swedish welfare state2013In: Tracing the women-friendly welfare state: gendered politics of everyday life in Sweden / [ed] Åsa Gunnarsson, Göteborg: Makadam Förlag, 2013, 1, p. 234-254Chapter in book (Other academic)
  • 342.
    Magnusson, Eva
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Psychology. Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Centre for Women's Studies.
    Psykologi och kön: från könsskillnader till genusperspektiv2003Book (Other academic)
  • 343.
    Magnusson, Eva
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Psychology.
    Vardagens könsinnebörder under förhandling: om arbete, familj och produktion av kvinnlighet1998Doctoral thesis, monograph (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    The subject of this study was Swedish women's experiences of their everyday lives as lived between the demands of work and family. Twenty female civil servants were interviewed six times each over a three and a half year period when their work places underwent organizational changes.

    One purpose of the study was to investigate how women while managing everyday demands reproduce or transform the meanings of gender in their own lives. A second purpose was to discuss the impact of these processes on women's self-understandings and ways of relating to power and issues of gender equality, as well as the meanings of "femininity" in their lives.

    The repeated semi-structured interviews were analysed using two qualitative approaches: the first focused on the ways individual women understood and negotiated their everyday lives. It yielded four main areas of negotiation: the personal biography as a dynamic context in which a woman understands her experiences; the balancing between work and family generally managed by women; women's often somewhat ambiguous personal fit at work; and the striving for subject positions at work. In the second approach discourse analysis was used to study how gender is locally reproduced or transformed from personal experiences set in specific discursive contexts. Modes of understanding were in focus; i.e. the different ways women may integrate experiences as parts of their sense of self, depending mainly on social positionings. Important discursive themes were the women's self-presentations, their experiences of gender equality and power differentials, and their ways of relating to femininity.

    The dissertation also discusses the types of psychological theory best suited to the historically changeable contents of "femininity", in contrast to its more stable relational qualitites of subordination vs. superordination, and argues for theory situated in a feminist social constructionist framework.

  • 344.
    Magnusson, Eva
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Psychology. Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Umeå Centre for Gender Studies (UCGS).
    Marecek, Jeanne
    Femisms, psychologies, and the study of social life2017In: The Palgrave handbook of critical social psychology / [ed] Brendan Gough, London: Palgrave Macmillan, 2017, 1, p. 17-35Chapter in book (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    A key goal of feminists in psychology has been to understand and challenge social relations of inequality, privilege, and oppression. Several orienting assumptions of mainstream psychology present obstacles to achieving this goal. For example, one assumption is internalism — focusing on inner motives, traits, and capacities as the determinants of human behaviour, while ignoring the sociocultural context. Another is universalism — the assumption that psychological theories and explanations can hold for all people everywhere and at all times. The chapter also reviews the history of feminism in psychology and provides an overview of methods and practices utilized by feminist psychologists.

  • 345.
    Magnusson, Eva
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Psychology.
    Marecek, Jeanne
    Swarthmore College, Pennsylvania, USA.
    Gender and Culture in Psychology: Theories and Practices2012Book (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Gender and Culture in Psychology introduces readers to new approaches to the psychological study of gender that bring together feminist psychology, socio-cultural psychology, discursive psychology and critical psychology. It presents research and theory that embed human action in social, cultural and interpersonal contexts. The book provides conceptual tools for thinking about gender, social categorization, human meaning and culture. It also describes a family of interpretative research methods, which focus on rich talk and everyday activities, and provides a close-in view of how interpretative research proceeds. The latter portion of the book showcases innovative projects in the psychology of gender that investigate topics of concern to scholars and feminist activists: young teens' encounters with heterosexual norms; male-female couples' negotiating the sharing of housework and childcare; sexual coercion and violence in male-female relationships; the cultural politics of women's weight and eating concerns; psychiatric labelling of psychological suffering; and feminism in psychotherapy"--.

  • 346.
    Magnusson, Eva
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Psychology.
    Marecek, Jeanne
    Department of Psychology, Swarthmore College, Swarthmore, Pennsylvania, USA.
    Setting the stage: gender, sex, and sexualities in psychology2018In: Gender, sex, and sexualities: Psychological perspectives / [ed] Nancy Kimberly Dess, Jeanne Marecek, Leslie C. Bell, New York: Oxford University Press, 2018, p. 3-28Chapter in book (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    This chapter lays the groundwork for navigating psychological scholarship on gender, sex, and sexualities. It presents some central concepts in these fields, as well as tools for thinking about and asking questions about these concepts and their use. The chapter begins with a discussion of social categories and categorization and then moves to a focus on sex categories. Next is an examination of three concepts that psychologists employ with great frequency, but with varying and sometimes ambiguous meanings: gender, difference, and "the social." The closing section offers a series of questions to guide students as they read books and articles on gender, sex, and sexualities.

  • 347.
    Magnusson, Eva
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Psychology. Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Umeå Centre for Gender Studies (UCGS).
    Rönnblom, MalinUmeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Umeå Centre for Gender Studies (UCGS).Silius, Harriet
    Critical Studies of Gender Equalities: Nordic Dislocations, Dilemmas and Contradictions2008Collection (editor) (Other academic)
  • 348. Marecek, Jeanne
    et al.
    Magnusson, Eva
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Psychology.
    Qualitative inquiry in feminist psychology2017In: APA handbook of the psychology of women.: Vol. 1. History, theory, and battlegrounds / [ed] Cheryl B. Travis & Jacquelyn W. White, Washington, DC, USA: American Psychological Association (APA), 2017, 1, p. 109-126Chapter in book (Other academic)
  • 349.
    Midnattssol, Ida
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Umeå Centre for Gender Studies (UCGS).
    Ett relationsanarkistiskt ställningstagande - en undersökning av subjektspositionering inom relationsanarki.2013Independent thesis Basic level (degree of Bachelor), 20 credits / 30 HE creditsStudent thesis
    Abstract [en]

    This essay aims to examine what subject positions are possible within the discourse of relationship anarchy. Through semi-structured interviews with four people who define themselves as relationship anarchists I've made a discourse analysis to determine how these relationship anarchists explain what, in the discourse they’re in, is described as an relationship anarchistic way of being, what isn’t and how they relate to this. Relationship anarchy is described as an ideology based on freedom. It is about the right to define their relationships as they like, as something constantly changing and that does not hold a specific value based on its label. But it is apparent that the freedom is relative when it occurs in a discourse where other standards are created. Based on these standards, both the hegemonic discourse, where being a couple is the relationship standard, and the counter-hegemonic relationship anarchist discourse, the respondents are positioning themselves as something different from that, and that their way of practicing relationships are based on responsibility and communication. Based on this I find that there are three possible subject positions within relationship anarchy: the idealogical, the player and the responsible.

  • 350.
    Monica, Christianson
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Nursing.
    Boman, Jens
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Clinical Microbiology.
    Essén, Birgitta
    Men don’t think that far” – Interviewing men in Sweden aboutchlamydia and HIV testing during pregnancy from a discursivemasculinities construction perspective.2017In: Sexual & Reproductive HealthCare, ISSN 1877-5756, E-ISSN 1877-5764, Vol. 12, p. 107-115Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Objectives: We used qualitative research design to discursively explore expectant fathers’ perceptions of chlamydia and HIV, and their masculinity constructions about testing, and explored how they talked about their potential resistance towards testing and their pre-test emotions.

    Study design: Twenty men were offered chlamydia and HIV testing at the beginning of their partner’s pregnancy. Those who agreed to be tested were interviewed in-depth; those who declined testing were also interviewed. The interviews were tape recorded and transcribed verbatim. The analysis was inspired by discourse analysis on masculinity.

    Main outcome: Three discursive themes: Men prefer to suppress their vulnerability to STIs, Body and biology differ between men and women and Men have mixed emotions around STI testing underscore the informants’ conversations and sometimes conflicting thoughts about STI testing.

    Conclusion: The majority of men talked about pregnancy as a feminine territory, raised uncertainties about men’s roles in the transmission of STIs, and talked about women’s and men’s essentially different bodies and biology, where few men realised that they could infect both their partner and the unborn child. This knowledge gap that men have must become apparent to healthcare providers, and policy makers must give men equal access to the reproductive arena.

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