umu.sePublications
Change search
Refine search result
4567 301 - 314 of 314
CiteExportLink to result list
Permanent link
Cite
Citation style
  • apa
  • ieee
  • modern-language-association-8th-edition
  • vancouver
  • Other style
More styles
Language
  • de-DE
  • en-GB
  • en-US
  • fi-FI
  • nn-NO
  • nn-NB
  • sv-SE
  • Other locale
More languages
Output format
  • html
  • text
  • asciidoc
  • rtf
Rows per page
  • 5
  • 10
  • 20
  • 50
  • 100
  • 250
Sort
  • Standard (Relevance)
  • Author A-Ö
  • Author Ö-A
  • Title A-Ö
  • Title Ö-A
  • Publication type A-Ö
  • Publication type Ö-A
  • Issued (Oldest first)
  • Issued (Newest first)
  • Created (Oldest first)
  • Created (Newest first)
  • Last updated (Oldest first)
  • Last updated (Newest first)
  • Disputation date (earliest first)
  • Disputation date (latest first)
  • Standard (Relevance)
  • Author A-Ö
  • Author Ö-A
  • Title A-Ö
  • Title Ö-A
  • Publication type A-Ö
  • Publication type Ö-A
  • Issued (Oldest first)
  • Issued (Newest first)
  • Created (Oldest first)
  • Created (Newest first)
  • Last updated (Oldest first)
  • Last updated (Newest first)
  • Disputation date (earliest first)
  • Disputation date (latest first)
Select
The maximal number of hits you can export is 250. When you want to export more records please use the Create feeds function.
  • 301.
    Yang, Xingyu
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Umeå Institute of Design.
    Jeep Black Label: Formulating future symbolism around hybrid lifestyle2017Independent thesis Advanced level (degree of Master (Two Years)), 20 credits / 30 HE creditsStudent thesis
    Abstract [en]

    The world is becoming more complicated; our lives develop into multiple facets. This master thesis focuses on defining a future typology in vehicle design representing a hybrid lifestyle.

    New technologies bring convenience to people but sometimes the amount of information exceeds our needs. Jeep Black Label is designed to escape all that in the year 2040. An unplugged lounge experience for the city and a great analogue getaway into nature.

    A holistic research method was used to understand the context for this vehicle. The design process followed an inside-out approach. First a dynamic interior space was generated based on users’ needs. The nal step was to ideate and choose a meaningful exterior appearance following the goal to communicate brand identity, automation and hybrid driving modes.

  • 302.
    Yong-fei, Han
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Umeå Institute of Design.
    BMW i-3/60°2013Independent thesis Advanced level (degree of Master (Two Years)), 20 credits / 30 HE creditsStudent thesis
    Abstract [en]

    Now and in the future we will consider more and more ecological aspects. The car industry already has a strong commitment to environmental care, but I have decided to investigate how we can go a step further. Imagine a car taking advantage of new and upcoming technologies to reduce its footprint. This vehicle will demonstrate a new method to mass produce cars by simplifying the workflow and reduce the amount of component. The main idea is to be energy efficient while you build it and drive it.

  • 303. Yuan, Lingxi
    Volvo Project Mirror: A mobility ecosystem facilitating future ownership experience2019Independent thesis Advanced level (degree of Master (Two Years)), 20 credits / 30 HE creditsStudent thesis
    Abstract [en]

    How would future vehicle ownership evolve as car sharing becomes dominant in urban scenario? How may we recreate the sense of emotional attachments to personal vehicles? How can we utilize the car even when it's idle and thus making ownership more sustainable? Imagine a future model of vehicle ownership which challenges the concept of personal vehicle and its role nowadays. This project envisions such a future to inspire the people and spark discussions about the subject. The inspirations of the project is partly the development of autonomous driving technology and the heated discussion of a car sharing future that comes with it. The other part of the it comes from the idea of open source development for creating an ecosystem that facilitates itself in the long run. The author believes the answer to a changing landscape of mobility might not come from within but could be lying in another field.

    The author took a speculative approach to set the future scenario based on research and interviews. After carefully analysis of the information gathered, a realistic future mobility model was generated, on the base of which the story and the interior design was developed further through the common vehicle design process. The process involves collecting image boards, loops of ideation, sketching, modelling, prototyping as well as feedbacks sessions along the way. The steps were not in chronological order as the validation of the ideas requires some steps to overlap. After the final design freeze, there was also a period of time for the making of the physical model.

    The result is Volvo Project Mirror - an ecosystem that goes beyond mobility solutions. The main focus is the modular interior concept that’s highly customisable for reflecting personal characteristics, making sustainable incremental updates according to different needs and different stages of life, and more importantly, sharing furnitures and gears in between home space and car to maximize usage, thus blurring the line between the two.

  • 304.
    Zarin, Rouien
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Umeå Institute of Design.
    Faster. Stronger. Better?: designing for enhanced engagement of extreme sports2017Doctoral thesis, monograph (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    The human body is capable of very rich and complex movements and gestures which we use in everyday life to manipulate, navigate and negotiate the world around us—it is our interface for human experience. However, as technology advances it simultaneously shrinks, moving closer to our bodies, intertwining with the many facets of our lives and positions itself between our experiences of the physical environments around us. When utilizing these technological systems in the context of intense sporting activities this competition for our focus leads to problematic scenarios—in the best case altering the aesthetic qualities of physical activity and in the worst case leaving us vulnerable to perilous situations. 

    This constructive design research thesis aims to understand how design may be used in relation to the body as part of an informative research approach to generate knowledge about how people actively engage with technology. This is deemed increasingly important as the advancements in technological connectivity and its corresponding trend in miniaturization create a pervasive effect that beckons closer examination and attention as these elements influence how we move. This is achieved by investigations conducted through studies in the area of extreme sports—specifically mountain biking and climbing activities— with the purpose of deepening understanding about human engagement with digital technologies situated within particular contexts. This research explores how the body’s movements can be considered a material to be worked with, designed and assessed in order to influence performance behaviour.

    Overall, the thesis undertakes a mixed methods approach to addressing interaction design issues within the context of movement. By advocating making as a generative activity, this research produces a series of artifacts drawing from notions of embodiment that is used to ‘tease out’ knowledge, which is then reflected upon and iterated. These corresponding artifacts embody and imbue designerly intention, subsequently raising pertinent questions of what it means to be connected in an ever evolving digital world, and how we can distinguish, address and begin to design for/with information realities relating to the natural and artificial.

    Ultimately the thesis offers three main contributions to designers and researchers: (1) the Stages of Performativity framework that serves to increase awareness of the temporal aspects when designing for activities (2) A proposed model of the makers prototyping process and its corresponding seduction loop phenomenon (3) a series of non-prescriptive artifacts intended to be aspirational such as the Blackbox, Heel hook, Morpheel, Griptile and Climbing Sleeve prototypes. These contributions could be of particular interest to those intent on utilizing a maker driven prototyping practice by primarily proposing a comprehensive account of the transactions occurred during my prototyping process that is conducive to heightening awareness and cognition towards athletes engaged in extreme sports. The hope is to inspire an active role in designing experiences that enhance or support physical activities rather than impeding them.

    In addition, this research approach advocates the unpacking or engagement with technological materials as a means for extending understanding and defining their functions in for the sake of employing them for thought provoking, prototyping endeavors to challenge complex and seemingly established systems while simultaneously providing a discourse in regards to the advancements of connected technologies towards a more humanizing experience.  

    Finally, it is suggested that the probing of alternate realities by means of constructive design exploration is an essential step towards sketching meaningful engagement when considering the role that we desire technology to play in our lives.

  • 305.
    Zarin, Rouien
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Umeå Institute of Design. Interactive Institute.
    The Voice Harvester: An Interactive Musical Instrument2014Other (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
    Abstract [en]

    The Voice Harvester is an exploratory interactive installation that embodies human voice in physical materials. Sound input is amplified and transmitted through audio drivers connected to a thin, flexible membrane that agitates the material on it. The title “Voice Harvester” was derived from the fact that the installation create was able to elicit nonlinguistic, expressive, and naturalistic human vocal sounds to explore the full range of capability of the human voice through use of a novel, playful, and embodied interaction.

    This design exploration took place by a team at Interactive Institute Umeå under the guidance of Artist and Composer Anders Lind. The concepts of human engagement, involvement, and embodiment as well as the creation of a physical tangible thing were central to this design exploration.

    The object elicits curiosity and subsequent interaction utilizing the unusual appearance and leveraging tacit knowledge within users of the purpose of microphones. When a user speaks (or makes any sound) into the microphone they will see the materials in the acrylic tubes animate with the physical embodiment of their voice. The intent was that once this happens users will continue to engage and interact with the Voice Harvester to see the different ways in which they are able to manipulate the materials into action.

    The Voice Harvester is built as part of a series of interactive installations to be shown in Umeå, Sweden as part of the Umeå 2014 Capital of Culture and has already been exhibited at the MADE festival 2013.

    Co-created with Anders Lind, Music Composer and Rouien Zarin

  • 306.
    Zarin, Rouien
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Umeå Institute of Design. Interactive Institute.
    Trollskogen: A Framework for Enhancing Communication for Cognitively Disabled Children2009Independent thesis Advanced level (degree of Master (Two Years)), 20 credits / 30 HE creditsStudent thesis
    Abstract [en]

    All people need to communicate - but not all people have the same preconditions. Some are limited in their ability to speak, read and write, for example, people with severe learning difficulties.To help support this communities it is apparent that new tools need to be created to help enhance communication by providing alternative means.

    Promoting independence

    Communicative technologies can potentially increase independence amongst a group of people who rely on caregivers and assistance on a daily basis and provide opportunities of enhancing community and safety through social connectedness.

    Multi-Touch Devices

    The technology for multitouch tables and devices has existed for a few years and is continually improving. This opens new doors for interaction and can be a potential asset for people with Cognitive Disabilities.

  • 307.
    Zarin, Rouien
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Umeå Institute of Design.
    Fällman, Daniel
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Informatics.
    The woodbot pilots: exploring no-handsinteraction for interactive public installations2011In: Diversity and unity: Proceedings of IASDR2011, the 4th World Conference on Design Research / [ed] N.F.M. Roozenburg, L.L. Chen & P.J. stappers, IASDR , 2011Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    We present and discuss the Woodbot Pilots, an interactive experience in the form of a gesture-based game that runs on a large-scale interactive installation designed to be placed in an airport terminal and used by the general public. The background of the project is described, as well as the installation itself and a scenario of its use. To end the paper, we discuss some of the issues it raises in relation to public installations as well as some of the lessons we have learnt in conceiving, designing, implementing, and studying its use.

  • 308.
    Zarin, Rouien
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Umeå Institute of Design.
    Lindbergh, Kent
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Informatics.
    Fällman, Daniel
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Informatics.
    Stop Motion Animation as a Tool for Sketching in Architecture2012In: Proceeding of the 2012 Design Research Society International Conference, 2012Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Widely acknowledged as an archetypal design activity, sketching is typically carried out using little more than pen and paper. Today’s designed artifacts however, are often given qualities that are hard to capture with traditional means of sketching. While pen and paper sketching catches the character of a building, it may not equally well capture how that building changes with the seasons, how people pass through it, how the light moves in between its rooms from sunrise to dawn, and how its façade subtly decays over centuries. Yet, it is often exactly these dynamic and interactive aspects that are emphasized in contemporary design work. So is there a way for designers to be able to sketch also these dynamic processes? Over several years and in different design disciplines, we have been exploring the potential of stop motion animation (SMA) to serve this purpose. SMA is a basic form of animation typically applied to make physical objects appear to be alive. The animator moves objects in small increments between individually photographed frames. When the photographs are combined and played back in continuous sequence, the illusion of movement is created. Although SMA has a long history in filmmaking, the animation technique has received scarce attention in most design fields including product design, architecture, and interaction design. This paper brings SMA into the area of sketching in architecture by reporting on the planning, conduct, result, and evaluation of a workshop course carried out with a group of 50 students at Umeå School of Architecture, Umeå University, Sweden.

  • 309.
    Zhang, Yangchen
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Umeå Institute of Design.
    I WAS HERE: A service to engage families exploring and preserving stories about their city2012Independent thesis Advanced level (degree of Master (Two Years)), 20 credits / 30 HE creditsStudent thesis
    Abstract [en]

    Nowadays, most aspects of our daily lives have been changed by digital technology. Digital content as a new medium has been used widely as memorial to bring back memories of a person, an event or old times. Since all the data probably will exist longer than our lifetime, how should we deal with them and treat them as a heritage? In this project, I am exploring the possibilities of an innovative service that would engage people to preserve memories in the digital age by sharing their stories with future generations. I aim at result that not only allows people to collect stories, but also brings new perspective on how people view their present lives in the community. Moreover, I hope this design will not be limited to Norsjö municipality, but could also bring an extra value to other small communities with similar needs.

  • 310. Zimmerman, John
    et al.
    Teixeira, Carlos
    Stolterman, Erik
    Forlizzi, Jodi
    A New North American Design Research Organization2016In: Dialectic, E-ISSN 2572-7001, Vol. 1, no 1, p. 14-17Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 311.
    Zobl, Christoph
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Umeå Institute of Design.
    Designing for Prehospital Care Training: Aiding the development of mental models within procedural memory, through a training toolkit that improves proficiency in prehospital care procedures such as REBOA.2017Independent thesis Advanced level (degree of Master (Two Years)), 20 credits / 30 HE creditsStudent thesis
    Abstract [en]

    This is an educational design project exploring how prehospital care training can be altered to improve mental proficiency for emergency medical professionals. 

    The London Air Ambulance performs a complex life-saving procedure known as REBOA (Resuscitative Endovascular Balloon Occlusion of the Aorta) on the roadside; the only emergency medical service to do so worldwide. Teams consisting of a doctor-paramedic pairing are required to perform at their peak in extreme environments, making training for such circumstances crucial. As a result, this project strategically maps current mental processes into a framework, identifying multiple design opportunities to approach chaotic accident scenes. The framework acts as the basis for defining a curriculum, which, using Instructional Design principles, develops into a learning programme that highlights how learners experience training activities to modify communication habits and on-scene behaviour.

    A three-part toolkit embodies this learning programme, functioning as a sensory guide to explicitly direct attention at pre-, mid- and post-procedure interaction events between team members.

  • 312.
    Önnerlöv, Lisa
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Umeå Institute of Design.
    Användarorienterad förarsituation för bergavläsning vid fjärrstyrt skrotningsarbete2013Independent thesis Basic level (degree of Bachelor), 10 credits / 15 HE creditsStudent thesis
    Abstract [en]

    Mechanical scaling is one of the most complex operations of all in the mining process. The operators are using both hearing, sight and feel to read the rock and to know where to scale and where to leave. They say they go on gut feeling in great extent, something that comes with experience. The scaling machine is placed into the edge of unsecured and newly blasted rock to hammer off the blocks that has become loose after the blast, but not enough to fall down. It goes without sayingthat it is a risky job. Boliden Mineral has a desire to remotely control this operation from above ground and thus became this challenge a degree project in industrial design. With a focus on ease of use and the sensory feedback, the project aims to develop a proposal on the driver situation that allows the operator to do an as equally good job above as below ground.

  • 313.
    Östlund, Carl
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Umeå Institute of Design.
    Ett gånghjälpmedel med fokus på användarens vardag2012Independent thesis Basic level (degree of Bachelor), 10 credits / 15 HE creditsStudent thesis
  • 314.
    Östman, Ludwig
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Umeå Institute of Design.
    Rolls-Royce and the Future of Luxury Mobility2018Independent thesis Advanced level (degree of Master (Two Years)), 20 credits / 30 HE creditsStudent thesis
    Abstract [en]

    The topic of the project has been about the future of luxury mobility and how the brand Rolls-Royce could evolve alongthe technological advancements until the year 2038. As luxury is changing from being about possession to the experience of luxury, the goal was to design a vehicle that could support both new internal and external experiences about the vehicle. The identified obstacle that could limit the scope of new experi- ences in an autonomous vehicle is motion sickness. As cities grow and technology develops the future cities are crowded so personal space, and privacy is being limited.During the process, the tools used varied from form explora- tion through sketching, concept principle testing and finalization in 3d software as well as visualization tools to communicate the proposed solutions. Working out of the Rolls-Royce designstudio provided brand insight but also expertise in the field of color & materials as well as advice on engineering solutions from the design team.The result Rolls-Royce Luxe Nomad is a vehicle for exploring the world outside the urban areas. Going far and beyond in search of new and unique experiences but also making the trip there as enjoyable as possible. The concept provides a solution inspired by high-speed trains that could limit those effects. Through understanding the future customers need of privacy a method of controlling the amount of insight was developed to enhance the user experience and giving them an increased sense of control of their space.

4567 301 - 314 of 314
CiteExportLink to result list
Permanent link
Cite
Citation style
  • apa
  • ieee
  • modern-language-association-8th-edition
  • vancouver
  • Other style
More styles
Language
  • de-DE
  • en-GB
  • en-US
  • fi-FI
  • nn-NO
  • nn-NB
  • sv-SE
  • Other locale
More languages
Output format
  • html
  • text
  • asciidoc
  • rtf