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  • 351.
    Müller, Dieter K.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Social and Economic Geography.
    Fritidshus och regional befolkningsfördelning2005In: GränsbrytningArticle in journal (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
  • 352.
    Müller, Dieter K.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Social and Economic Geography.
    German second home owners in the Swedish countryside: on the internationalization of the leisure space1999Doctoral thesis, monograph (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Between 1991 and 1996 the number of German second home owners in Sweden increased from about 1,500 to more than 5,500. The purpose of this thesis is to give a comprehensive description and analysis of the German cottage purchases in Sweden, 1991-96. In detail, the motives of the cottage buyers, the circumstances, the geographical patterns of cottage ownership, its diffusion, the integration of the cottage owners, and their expenses in the receiving areas are investigated. The analysis is based on two main sources; (a) an unique database UMCOBASE covering all second homes in Sweden; (b) a survey among 91 German second home owners.

    Second home ownership is considered as touriste product and as semi-permanent migration to the countryside. These perspectives have in common the importance of the role of the positive image of the countryside. Differences in property prices and climate may also attract second home owners to a specific area. It is argued that changes in the German society form a considerable driving force. Stress and life in the large metropolitan areas as well as the political situation after German reunification contribute not only to this interest for second home living, for the countryside, but also for Sweden, often seen as a shining example. Many German images of Sweden are based on popular writings and movies of the Swedish children's author Astrid Lindgren. Sweden provides the German cottagers with the requested environments and the availability of housing, cheap property prices, and rather short distances make the interior parts of southern Sweden an ideal destination for the mixture of households with different individual motivations and preferences mainly from Hamburg and Berlin.

    The internationalization of the economy and the globalization of culture make it easier to purchase a second home abroad. In this case, the growth of German second home ownership in Sweden can be considered as a colonization of the Swedish countryside. The diffusion of cottage ownership is enhanced and directed by the innovators who due to their social networks attract new cottagers to the same area. A very important precondition for the increased German interest in Swedish cottages was the decline of the Swedish currency in 1992 allowing purchases at a cheaper price. The fact that the real estate agencies focused on the German market may be another reason for the increase, and also for the distribution of German cottage ownership within Sweden. The German second home patterns are also analyzed employing multiple regression analysis. It is shown that the distance between ferry harbors and second homes is a major restriction for the distribution of German cottage ownership in Sweden. Even future growth will take place in areas where German cottage owners are present today.

    The multi-functionality of the countryside caused competition regarding land-use and decision-making power between rural residents, tourists, and agents of other interests. Even if second home tourists and the permanent residents share a lot of interests, integration into the local community can be difficult. It is argued that the German cottagers are leisure gentrifiers consuming the countryside as a leisure resource only. Second home owners are faithful tourists who visit the second home area frequently and stay for a long time. This entails that they also spend a considerable amount of money in the host community. Hence, some jobs in the research area are more or less dependent on the expenditures of the German cottage owners. Despite being motivated, most German cottagers have problems integrating into the host community. The German cottagers seem to adapt to this situation by meeting with each other and by applying a conservative eco-strategy, thus converting their surroundings into their imaginary Swedish countryside.

    The post-war societies in the western world are characterized by rapid changes. The recent interest in second homes can be read as a rejection of modern life, because the cottage might be the continuous place in life. It is argued, however, that the second home is attractive because it blurs the strict separation of everyday life and tourism.

  • 353.
    Müller, Dieter K.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Social and Economic Geography.
    Kulturarvet omfattar också fritiden.2005In: Västerbottens Kuriren 15 januari, p. 2-Article in journal (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
  • 354.
    Müller, Dieter K.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Social and Economic Geography.
    Las viviendas secundarias en Suecia:: Entre el partimonio nacional y el product exclusive2009In: Turismo, urbanización y estilos de vida: : Las nuevas formas de movilidad residencial, Barcelona: Icaria , 2009, p. 19-35Chapter in book (Refereed)
  • 355.
    Müller, Dieter K.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Social and Economic Geography.
    Mobility, tourism and second homes2004In: A Companion to Tourism, Blackwell, Oxford , 2004, p. 387-398Chapter in book (Other academic)
  • 356.
    Müller, Dieter K.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Social and Economic Geography.
    Second home tourism in the Swedish mountain range2005In: Nature-based Tourism in Peripheral Areas: Development or Disaster?, Channel View, Clevedon , 2005, p. 133-148Chapter in book (Refereed)
  • 357.
    Müller, Dieter K
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Social and Economic Geography.
    Second homes and sports-related mobility to the Tärnaby/Hemavan ski resort in Northern Sweden2009In: Sport and Tourism: Globalization, Mobility and Identity, Amsterdam: Butterworth-Heinemann , 2009, p. 182-183Chapter in book (Other academic)
  • 358.
    Müller, Dieter K.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Social and Economic Geography.
    Second homes in rural areas: Reflections on a troubled history2011In: Norsk Geografisk Tidsskrift, ISSN 0029-1951, E-ISSN 1502-5292, Vol. 65, no 3, p. 137-143Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Second homes have been on the research agenda for a considerable amount of time. Since the early 1990s, a renewed interestin second homes and second home research can be noted that also mirrors the global extension of the second home phenomenon.Still, second homes have received inadequate treatment in social sciences research. For example, despite the fact that most secondhomes are located in rural areas, they have seldom been addressed within rural studies. The article offers a review of second homeresearch with respect to issues raised, disciplinary affiliations, and related problems and shortcomings. The absence of second homesin rural studies is highlighted in particular. It is concluded that second homes should be brought back into rural studies, but alsothat the rural has to be integrated more clearly into second home research.

  • 359.
    Müller, Dieter K.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Social and Economic Geography.
    Second homes in Sweden: Between common heritage and exclusive commodity2010In: Placing Human Geography: Sweden through Time and Space / [ed] B. Hermelin & U. Janssson, Stockholm: Svenska sällskapet för antropologi och geografi , 2010, p. 185-207Chapter in book (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
  • 360.
    Müller, Dieter K.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Social and Economic Geography.
    Second homes in Sweden: patterns and issues2004In: Tourism, Mobility and Second Homes: Between Elite Landscape and Common Ground, Channel View, Clevedon , 2004, p. 244-258Chapter in book (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
  • 361.
    Müller, Dieter K.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Social and Economic Geography.
    Svensk idyll på tyska2006In: Mångnatur: Friluftsliv och natursyn i det mångkulturella samhället., Mångkulturellt centrum, Naturvårdsverket, Botkyrka, Stockholm , 2006Chapter in book (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
  • 362.
    Müller, Dieter K.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Social and Economic Geography.
    Svensk idyll på tyska2004In: Invandrare och minoriteter, no 3, p. 20-21Article in journal (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
  • 363.
    Müller, Dieter K.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Social and Economic Geography.
    The attractiveness of second home areas in Sweden: A quantitative analysis2006In: Current Issues in Tourism, ISSN 1368-3500, Vol. 9, no 4&5, p. 335-350Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The attractiveness of second home areas is usually measured in absolute figures. Such an approach ignores that second home areas have different potentials to attract second home buyers, because of their relative location in relation to major population centres. Hence, absolute figures represent the total distribution of the population rather than the amenity of a location. The purpose of this paper is to analyse the relative attractiveness, here expressed as relative acceptance (RA), of second home areas in Sweden, which accounts for the spatial context of the areas. The analysis is based on a comprehensive dataset containing geo-references for all second homes and second home owners in Sweden in 2001.

  • 364.
    Müller, Dieter K.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Social and Economic Geography.
    The Internationalization of rural municipalities: Norwegian second home owners in Northern Bohuslän, Sweden2011In: Tourism Planning & Development, ISSN 2156-8316, Vol. 8, no 4, p. 433-445Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The internationalization of second home tourism has been mentioned as a major reasonfor the renewed interest in the issue of second homes after a period of scientific disregard. Still, fewstudies have addressed the international flows of second home owners. However, cultural differencesas well as a recently limited relationship with the destination can imply that foreign second homeowners have a more consumptive approach to the destination. This paper addresses particularlyNorwegian second home owners in northern Bohusla¨n, a region in western Sweden, and aims atanalyzing whether foreign second home owners present a challenge for sustaining ruralcommunities. The analysis is based on the results of a mail survey and indicates that foreignsecond home owners are attracted by low price levels as well. This implies that macroeconomicchanges can quickly erode this attraction, making international second home tourism a lessreliable strategy for sustaining rural communities.

  • 365.
    Müller, Dieter K.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Social and Economic Geography.
    Tourism development in Europe's "Last Wilderness": An assessment of nature-based tourism in Swedish Lapland2011In: Polar tourism: A tool for regional development / [ed] Alan A. Grenier & Dieter K. Müller, Québec: Presses de l'Université du Québec , 2011, p. 129-153Chapter in book (Refereed)
  • 366.
    Müller, Dieter K.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Social and Economic Geography.
    Turismgeografi eller turism?: Reflektioner om utvecklingen i ett ämne2010In: Geografiska Notiser, ISSN 0016-724X, Vol. 68, no 2, p. 61-67Article in journal (Other academic)
  • 367.
    Müller, Dieter K.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Social and Economic Geography.
    Unplanned development of literary tourism in two municipalities in rural Sweden2006In: Scandinavian Journal of Hospitality and Tourism, ISSN 1502-2250, E-ISSN 1502-2269, Vol. 6, no 3, p. 214-228Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Recently, artistic places and places known from movies have induced an increase in tourism. However, rapid development also challenges the rural planning authorities who are not prepared to manage the high number of tourists. In this paper focus is put on two rural municipalities in southern Sweden. The purpose of this paper is to scrutinize and compare tourism development and tourism planning in these municipalities. This was accomplished by mapping tourism facilities and by in‐depth interviews with the local tourism managers. It is argued that tourism planning should be an integrated part of the rural planning process for achieving sustainable development. However, the case studies show that tourism planning does not reach this requirement. Although tourism is important to the local labor market, the municipal authorities are barely engaged in tourism at all. Instead tourism planning was outsourced to public‐private companies representing mainly the interests of the involved tourism entrepreneurs.

  • 368.
    Müller, Dieter K.
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Social and Economic Geography.
    Gallent, Nick
    Mace, Alan
    Tewdwr-Jones, Marc
    Second homes: European Perspectives and UK Policies: (Book review)2006In: European Journal of Housing Policy, no 6, p. 120-122Article, book review (Refereed)
  • 369.
    Müller, Dieter K.
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Social and Economic Geography.
    Hall, C. Michael
    Second homes and regional population distribution: on administrative practices and failures in Sweden2003In: Espace, populations, sociétés, no 2Article in journal (Other academic)
  • 370.
    Müller, Dieter K.
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Social and Economic Geography.
    Hall, C. Michael
    The Future of Second Homes2004In: Tourism, Mobility and Second Homes: Between Elite Landscape and Common Ground, Channel View, Clevedon , 2004, p. 273-278Chapter in book (Other academic)
  • 371.
    Müller, Dieter K.
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Social and Economic Geography.
    Hall, C. Michael
    Keen, Donna
    Second Home Tourism Impact, Planning and Management2004In: Tourism, Mobility and Second Homes: Between Elite Landscape and Common Ground, Channel View, Clevedon , 2004, p. 15-32Chapter in book (Other academic)
  • 372.
    Müller, Dieter K.
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Social and Economic Geography.
    Jansson, Bruno
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Social and Economic Geography.
    The difficult business of making pleasure peripheries prosperous: perspectives on space, place and environment2007In: Tourism in Peripheries: Perspectives from the Far North and South, CAB International, Wallingford , 2007, p. 3-18Chapter in book (Other academic)
  • 373.
    Müller, Dieter K.
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Social and Economic Geography.
    Jansson, BrunoUmeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Social and Economic Geography.
    Tourism in Peripheries: Perspectives from the Far North and South2007Collection (editor) (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
  • 374.
    Müller, Dieter K.
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Social and Economic Geography.
    Kuoljok Huuva, Stina
    Limits to Sami tourism development: The case of Jokkmokk2009In: Journal of Ecotourism, ISSN 1472-4049, E-ISSN 1747-7638, Vol. 8, no 2, p. 115-127Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Indigenous populations are frequently used in tourism promotion and marketing. This is also true for the Sami people in northern Europe. In the area, sometimes called Europe's last wilderness, the Sami and their culture are epitomised as a main asset for a growing tourism industry. Previously this has caused problems and irritation among the Sami. Nevertheless, tourism development is indeed also seen as a potential solution to problems affecting the Sami society, offering new sources of income and future employment in situ. Against this background, it is an interesting notion that only few Swedish Sami choose to make a living within tourism. Instead, tourism appears to be a complementary activity to reindeer herding only. Hence, the purpose of this article is to analyse constraints preventing Sami from getting more involved in tourism development. The article mainly draws on a study conducted in Jokkmokk, Sweden. Here, interviews were carried out with Sami tourism entrepreneurs who were also members of local cooperatives for reindeer husbandry. The results of the study indicate that cultural norms and legal obstacles form the main limitation for Sami tourism development.

  • 375.
    Müller, Dieter K.
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Social and Economic Geography.
    Marjavaara, Roger
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Social and Economic Geography.
    From second home to primary residence: migration towards recreational properties in Sweden 1991–20052012In: Tijdschrift voor economische en sociale geografie, ISSN 0040-747X, E-ISSN 1467-9663, Vol. 103, no 1, p. 53-68Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Second homes are at the nexus of tourism and migration. Previous research has demonstrated thatsecond homes are important domiciles after retirement. Nevertheless, few studies have addressedthis issue specifically. Many households claim that they would use their second homes more often,and some even state that they would convert these homes into their new permanent homes. Whilethis is a known phenomenon, its geographical outcome is rather unknown. Hence, the purpose ofthis paper is to investigate the conversion of second homes into primary residences. This is donewith respect to timing and geographical patterns. A geo-referenced longitudinal populationdatabase allows for identifying converted properties and linking them to information of theirowners’ households. This facilitates a discussion regarding the impact of conversions on planningand service provision in host communities, too. The analysis refers to the time period from 1991to 2005.

  • 376.
    Müller, Dieter K
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Social and Economic Geography.
    Marjavaara, Roger
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Social and Economic Geography.
    Urban Sprawl in Swedish2005In: PLAN - The Swedish Journal of Planning: English edition 2005-2006, p. 15-19Article in journal (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
  • 377.
    Müller, Dieter K.
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Social and Economic Geography.
    Marjavaara, Roger
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Social and Economic Geography.
    Urban sprawl på svenska2004In: Plan : tidskrift för planering av landsbygd och tätorter, ISSN 0032-0560, no 2-3, p. 19-23Article in journal (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
  • 378.
    Müller, Dieter K.
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Social and Economic Geography.
    Marjavaara, Roger
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Social and Economic Geography.
    Nordin, Urban
    Kulturgeografiska institutionen, Stockholms universitet.
    Fritidsboende - landsbygdens "osynliga" befolkning2011In: Plan, ISSN 0032-0560, Vol. 65, no 3, p. 14-19Article in journal (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
  • 379.
    Müller, Dieter K.
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Social and Economic Geography.
    Pettersson, Richard
    Umeå University, Faculty of Arts, Culture and Media.
    Förord2007In: Industrihistoriska kulturarv i regional utveckling: sociala och ekonomiska aspekter : konferens för kunskapsutveckling och nätverksbyggnad / [ed] Torkel Molin & Martin Paju, Stockholm: Riksantikvarieämbetet, 2007, p. 6-6Chapter in book (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
  • 380.
    Müller, Dieter K
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Social and Economic Geography.
    Pettersson, Robert
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Social and Economic Geography.
    Access to Sami tourism in Northern Sweden2001In: Scandinavian Journal of Hospitality and Tourism, ISSN 1502-2250, E-ISSN 1502-2269, Vol. 1, no 1, p. 5-18Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In recent years, there has been increased development of indigenous tourism as part of the tourism industry. Even the Sami of Northern Sweden are now engaging in tourism, not least because the restructuring of reindeer herding has forced them into taking up other occupations. The purpose of this article is to analyse the potential of the emerging Sami tourism in Sweden, with special emphasis on access to Sami tourism products. The analysis uses the four H approach outlined by V. L. Smith - habitat, heritage, history and handicraft. The article starts with a short description of the Sami and their culture, followed by a discussion of the relationship between the Sami and tourism in northern Sweden. Smith's concept is then introduced, modified and applied in relation to the new Sami tourism development in the area. The analysis is based on a survey of all 68 Sami tourist attractions and projects in Swedish Lapland in 1999.

  • 381.
    Müller, Dieter K.
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Social and Economic Geography.
    Pettersson, Robert
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Social and Economic Geography.
    Sami heritage at the winter festival in Jokkmokk, Sweden2006In: Scandinavian Journal of Hospitality and Tourism, ISSN 1502-2250, E-ISSN 1502-2269, Vol. 6, no 1, p. 54-69Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Indigenous tourism is an expansive sector in the growing tourism industry. However, the tourist experience of the indigenous heritage is often delimited to staged culture in museums, exhibitions and festivals. In this paper, focus is put on the annual Sámi winter festival in Jokkmokk, Sweden. It is discussed to what extent this festival truly is an indigenous event. This is accomplished by scrutinizing the Sámi representation at the festival regarding its content and its spatial location. It is argued that the available indigenous heritage is highly staged, although backstage experiences are available for the Sámi and for the curious tourists.

  • 382.
    Müller, Dieter K.
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Social and Economic Geography.
    Pettersson, Robert
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Social and Economic Geography.
    What and where is the indigenous at an indigenous festival?: Observations from the winter festival in Jokkmokk, Sweden.2005In: Indigenous Tourism: The Commodification and Management of Culture., Elsevier, Amsterdam , 2005, p. 201-216Chapter in book (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
  • 383.
    Müller, Dieter K
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Social and Economic Geography.
    Pettersson, Robert
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Social and Economic Geography.
    What and where is the indigenous at an indigenous festival: Observations from the winter festival in Jokkmokk, SwedenIn: Scandinavian Journal of Hospitality and TourismArticle in journal (Refereed)
  • 384.
    Müller, Dieter K.
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Social and Economic Geography.
    Ulrich, Philip
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Social and Economic Geography.
    Tourism development and the rural labor market in Sweden, 1960-19992007In: Tourism in peripheries: perspectives from the far north and south / [ed] Dieter K. Müller, Bruno Jansson, Wallingford: CAB International , 2007, p. 85-104Chapter in book (Other academic)
  • 385.
    Müller, Dieter
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Social and Economic Geography.
    Nordin, Urban
    Kulturgeografiska institutionen, Stockholms universitet.
    Marjavaara, Roger
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Social and Economic Geography.
    Fritidsboendes relationer till den svenska landsbygden: Resultat av en enkät bland svenska fritidshusägare 20092010Report (Other academic)
  • 386.
    Müller, Dieter
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Social and Economic Geography.
    Westin, Lars
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Centre for Regional Science (CERUM).
    Befolkningen i fjällen underskattas: Förlegad statistik fungerar inte - Umeåregionen och Storuman har delvis gemensam befolkning2002In: Västerbottens-Kuriren, ISSN 1104-0246Article in journal (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
  • 387.
    Müller, Dieter
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Social and Economic Geography.
    Westin, Lars
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Centre for Regional Science (CERUM).
    Bostadspendlingens nya regioner2003In: PLAN, ISSN 0032-0560, no 2-3, p. 48-50Article in journal (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
  • 388.
    Nilsson, Christer
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Department of Ecology and Environmental Sciences.
    Jansson, Roland
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Department of Ecology and Environmental Sciences.
    Keskitalo, E. Carina H.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Social and Economic Geography.
    Vlassova, Tatiana
    Institute of Geography, Russian Academy of Sciences, Moscow, Russia.
    Sutinen, Marja-Liisa
    The Finnish Forest Research Institute, Rovaniemi, Finland.
    Moen, Jon
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Department of Ecology and Environmental Sciences.
    Chapin III, F. Stuart
    Institute of Arctic Biology, University of Alaska, Fairbanks, Alaska, USA.
    Challenges to adaptation in northernmost Europe as a result of global climate change2010In: Ambio, ISSN 0044-7447, E-ISSN 1654-7209, Vol. 39, no 1, p. 81-84Article in journal (Other academic)
  • 389.
    Norberg, Margareta
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine, Epidemiology and Global Health. Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Centre for Population Studies (CPS).
    Malmberg, Gunnar
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Centre for Population Studies (CPS). Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Statistics.
    Ng, Nawi
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine, Epidemiology and Global Health. Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Centre for Population Studies (CPS).
    Broström, Göran
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Centre for Population Studies (CPS). Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Social and Economic Geography.
    Who is using snus? - Time trends, socioeconomic and geographic characteristics of snus users in the ageing Swedish population2011In: BMC Public Health, ISSN 1471-2458, E-ISSN 1471-2458, Vol. 11, p. 929-Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    BACKGROUND: The prevalence of smoking in Sweden has decreased in recent decades, and is now among the lowest in the world. During the same period, the use of Swedish moist oral snuff, a smokeless tobacco called snus, has increased. Few studies have evaluated time trends of the socioeconomic and geographic characteristics of snus users in Sweden. This paper contributes to filling that gap.

    METHODS: This study utilized the Linnaeus Database, which links national registers with comprehensive individual data on socioeconomic status (SES) to health data from a large ongoing health survey, the Västerbotten Intervention Programme (VIP). The VIP targets the entire middle-aged population of Västerbotten county at ages 40, 50 and 60 years with yearly cross-sectional surveys including self-reported data on tobacco habits. Time trends of snus use among 92,563 VIP-participants across different areas of residence and smoking groups were investigated graphically. Logistic regression was performed to estimate the associations between SES and geographical variables and current use versus non-use of snus.

    RESULTS: Overall, in parallel to decreasing smoking, the increasing trend of snus use in this middle-aged population continues, particularly in 40-year-olds. In both genders, the highest prevalence of snus use was observed among previous smokers. The prevalence of snus use also increased over time among smokers, and was consistently higher compared to those who had never smoked. Among males - both those who had never smoked and previous smokers - low education (OR 1.21, 95%CI 1.06-1.40 and OR 1.28, 95%CI 1.14-1.43), living alone (OR 1.16, 95%CI 1.07-1.27 and OR 1.13, 95%ci 1.04-1.23), low income and living in rural areas was associated with using snus, while this was not seen among male current smokers. Among women, living alone was associated with using snus irrespective of smoking habits. Among female smokers, the OR for snus use increased with higher education.

    CONCLUSIONS: A disadvantaged social profile and also higher prevalence in rural areas is observed among male snus users who had never smoked or were previous smokers. Among male smokers there was no association between SES and use of snus. The prevalence of snus use among women is increasing, but is still considerably lower than that of men. The association between snus and SES characteristics is less pronounced among women, although snus is clearly linked to living alone. These patterns should be taken into consideration in tobacco control policies.

  • 390.
    Nordlund, Annika
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Psychology.
    Westin, Kerstin
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Social and Economic Geography.
    Forest values and forest management attitudes among private forest owners in Sweden.2011In: Forests, ISSN 1999-4907, Vol. 2, no 1, p. 30-50Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The present study focused on how forests will be managed in the future in light of the increased emphasis being put by the public on the ecological and recreational values of forests, the trend towards an increased share of non-resident forest owners, and the increased female forest ownership. The value and belief basis of forest management attitudes was explored using a questionnaire sent to a sample of private forest owners ‘residing on’ (n = 995, return rate = 51.3%) and ‘not residing on’ the forest property (n = 997, return rate = 50%). The results showed that a share of private forest owners strongly value both the view that the forest should predominately be used for timber production and the view that preservation is most important. The proposed hierarchical structure of influence, in which the forest management attitude was influenced by values and beliefs, was supported in the study. The ecological, recreational, and production forest values primarily influenced the most closely related forest management attitude, even if some cross-sectional effects and some effects of socio-demographics were found, showing that the view a private forest owner has on different forms of management styles is shaped by the perceived multiple values of the forest.

  • 391.
    Nordlund, Annika
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Psychology.
    Westin, Kerstin
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Social and Economic Geography.
    How should forests be managed? The influence of forest owner's values and beliefs2011Conference paper (Other academic)
  • 392.
    Nordlund, Annika
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Psychology.
    Westin, Kerstin
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Social and Economic Geography.
    Predicting future intention to choose the train: Attitudinal influence and socio-demographic differences.2011Conference paper (Other academic)
  • 393.
    Nordlund, Annika
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Psychology.
    Westin, Kerstin
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Social and Economic Geography.
    Preserve forests for leisure, say Swedes2010Conference paper (Other academic)
  • 394.
    Nordlund, Annika
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Psychology.
    Westin, Kerstin
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Social and Economic Geography.
    Östman, Vanja
    Örnsköldsvik Kommun.
    Botniabanan ur ett nationellt och regionalt perspektiv2010Report (Other academic)
  • 395.
    Nordlund, Christer
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Arts, Department of historical, philosophical and religious studies.
    Eriksson, Madelene
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Social and Economic Geography.
    "Tankens kartografi"2008In: Upsala Nya tidningArticle, book review (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
  • 396. O´Hara, S.
    et al.
    Gentile, Michael
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Social and Economic Geography.
    Household Incomes in Post-Soviet Central Asia: The Case of Kazakhstan2009In: Eurasian geography and economics, ISSN 1538-7216, E-ISSN 1938-2863, Vol. 50, no 3, p. 327-347Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 397. O´Hara, S
    et al.
    Ivlevs, A
    Gentile, Michael
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Social and Economic Geography.
    The impact of global economic crisis on remittances in the commonwealth of independent states2009In: Eurasian geography and economics, ISSN 1538-7216, E-ISSN 1938-2863, Vol. 50, no 4, p. 447-463Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 398.
    Olofsson, Jenny
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Social and Economic Geography. Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Centre for Regional Science (CERUM).
    Fritidsboendets betydelse för den lokala utvecklingen i Ljungdalen-området i Bergs kommun2005Report (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Today tourism represents an important source of income and employment for many sparsely populated municipalities in Sweden. Tourism has become a way to survive when the traditional production system has changed and an another way of earn one's living is needed. When discussing tourism and the way it can develop a region, the impacts of second homes are important to take into consideration.

    This study concentrates on second home tourism in the area around Ljungdalen (Ljungdalen, Skärkdalen and Storsjö kapell) in the Swedish mountain range. The aim is to analyse the importance of second home tourism and the influence that second homes have on the local economy and environment in Ljungdalen. This study is mainly based on questionnaire that has been sent to 275 randomly selected second home owners in the area around Ljungdalen.

    The outcome of the questionnaire shows that the majority of the second home owners are retired and have owned their houses for a long time. The standard of the houses is varying, but most of the housing conditions are adequate. The respondents visit their second homes mainly during the summer, spring and autumn period and the most popular activities are hiking, skiing and recreation. The second home owners contribute to the local economy by making most of their purchases of local goods and services in the area during the visit in Ljungdalen. Impact on the environment is mostly caused by the second home owners activities (e.g. littering) and by the houses standards (e.g. sewerage). The opinions about how the environment has changed during the 1990s are both positive and negative. The same goes for thoughts about an possible expand of the second homes in the area. Nearly all of the respondents consider that a further tourism development is necessary for the areas survival, but that a development also can lead to an environmental deterioration.

  • 399.
    Olofsson, Jenny
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Social and Economic Geography.
    Malmberg, Gunnar
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Social and Economic Geography.
    When will the Russians come?: On Post-Soviet immigration and integration in Sweden2011In: International migration (Geneva. Print), ISSN 0020-7985, E-ISSN 1468-2435, Vol. 49, no 4, p. 93-117Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The focus of this paper is one of the paradoxes of international migration: the unexpectedly low level of migration between neighbouring countries with large macro-economic differentials; in this case migration from the former Soviet republics to Sweden. In line with Faist (2000), one assumption in the study is that the dynamics of international migration are strongly influenced by the emergence of a transnational social space. Based on a database (ASTRID) containing individual information about all residents in Sweden for the period 1986–2003, the study includes an analysis of migration in relation to the transnational social space -- its bridging and adaptive functions -- including labour market integration, family situation, intermarriage, population circulation and the spatial clustering of immigrants.

    The study reveals an over-representation of female immigrants and a high frequency of intermarriage among women migrants. Moreover, a changing migrant composition over the past decades was found, including a growing number of students, whereas the empirical analyses indicate a rather weak labour market position among immigrants from former Soviet republics. However, the position of recently arrived migrants has been enhanced over time, and migrants who stay for longer periods attain a stronger position on the labour market. The analyses also show an increasing number of highly educated persons among immigrants from the former Soviet republics. Furthermore, migrants from the former Soviet republics who move to Sweden tend to remain rather than return. In addition, the empirical analysis shows only minor tendencies of spatial clustering among the migrants. In sum, the study indicates that the lack of a more developed transnational social space may explain the rather low level of migration but also that the changing mobility patterns could represent an initial phase of a denser transnational social space that may trigger higher migration rates between the former Soviet republics and Sweden in the near future.

  • 400.
    Olofsson, Jenny
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Social and Economic Geography.
    Müller, Dieter K.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Social and Economic Geography.
    Användning av naturskyddade områden i Kvarken2006Report (Other academic)
567891011 351 - 400 of 536
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