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  • 51.
    Brändström, Helge
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Surgical and Perioperative Sciences, Anaesthesiology.
    Sedig, Karin
    Lundälv, Jörgen
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Surgical and Perioperative Sciences, Surgery.
    KAMEDO report no. 77: sinking of the MS Sleipner, 26 November 19992006In: Prehospital and Disaster Medicine, ISSN 1049-023X, Vol. 21, no 2 Suppl 2, p. 115-116Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 52.
    Brändström, Helge
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Surgical and Perioperative Sciences, Anaesthesiology.
    Sundelin, Anna
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Surgical and Perioperative Sciences, Anaesthesiology.
    Hoseason, Daniela
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Surgical and Perioperative Sciences, Anaesthesiology.
    Sundström, Nina
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Radiation Sciences.
    Birgander, Richard
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Radiation Sciences, Diagnostic Radiology.
    Johansson, Göran
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Surgical and Perioperative Sciences, Anaesthesiology.
    Winsö, Ola
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Surgical and Perioperative Sciences, Anaesthesiology.
    Koskinen, Lars-Owe
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Pharmacology and Clinical Neuroscience, Clinical Neuroscience.
    Haney, Michael
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Surgical and Perioperative Sciences, Anaesthesiology.
    Risk for intracranial pressure increase related to enclosed air in post-craniotomy patients during air ambulance transport: a retrospective cohort study with simulation2017In: Scandinavian Journal of Trauma, Resuscitation and Emergency Medicine, ISSN 1757-7241, E-ISSN 1757-7241, Vol. 25, article id 50Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    BACKGROUND: Post-craniotomy intracranial air can be present in patients scheduled for air ambulance transport to their home hospital. We aimed to assess risk for in-flight intracranial pressure (ICP) increases related to observed intracranial air volumes, hypothetical sea level pre-transport ICP, and different potential flight levels and cabin pressures. METHODS: A cohort of consecutive subdural hematoma evacuation patients from one University Medical Centre was assessed with post-operative intracranial air volume measurements by computed tomography. Intracranial pressure changes related to estimated intracranial air volume effects of changing atmospheric pressure (simulating flight and cabin pressure changes up to 8000 ft) were simulated using an established model for intracranial pressure and volume relations. RESULTS: Approximately one third of the cohort had post-operative intracranial air. Of these, approximately one third had intracranial air volumes less than 11 ml. The simulation estimated that the expected changes in intracranial pressure during 'flight' would not result in intracranial hypertension. For intracranial air volumes above 11 ml, the simulation suggested that it was possible that intracranial hypertension could develop 'inflight' related to cabin pressure drop. Depending on the pre-flight intracranial pressure and air volume, this could occur quite early during the assent phase in the flight profile. DISCUSSION: These findings support the idea that there should be radiographic verification of the presence or absence of intracranial air after craniotomy for patients planned for long distance air transport. CONCLUSIONS: Very small amounts of air are clinically inconsequential. Otherwise, air transport with maintained ground-level cabin pressure should be a priority for these patients.

  • 53.
    Brändström, Helge
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Surgical and Perioperative Sciences, Anaesthesiology.
    Wiklund, Urban
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Radiation Sciences, Radiation Physics.
    Karlsson, Marcus
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Radiation Sciences, Radiation Physics.
    Ängquist, Karl-Axel
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Surgical and Perioperative Sciences, Surgery.
    Grip, Helena
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Radiation Sciences, Radiation Physics.
    Haney, Michael
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Surgical and Perioperative Sciences, Anaesthesiology.
    Autonomic nerve system responses for normal and slow rewarmers after hand cold provocation: effects of long-term cold climate training2013In: International Archives of Occupational and Environmental Health, ISSN 0340-0131, E-ISSN 1432-1246, Vol. 86, no 3, p. 357-365Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    PURPOSE: Differences among individuals concerning susceptibility to local cold injury following acute cold exposure may be related to function of the autonomic nervous system. We hypothesized that there are differences in heart rate variability (HRV) between individuals with normal or more pronounced vasoconstriction following cold exposure and that there is an adaptation related to prolonged cold exposure in autonomic nervous system response to cold stimuli.

    METHODS: Seventy-seven young men performed a cold provocation test, where HRV was recorded during cold hand immersion and recovery. Forty-three subjects were re-examined 15 months later, with many months of cold weather training between the tests. Subjects were analyzed as 'slow' and 'normal' rewarmers according to their thermographic rewarming pattern.

    RESULTS: For the 'pre-training' test, before cold climate exposure, normal rewarmers had higher power for low-frequency (P(LF)) and high-frequency (P(HF)) HRV components during the cold provocation test (ANOVA for groups: p = 0.04 and p = 0.005, respectively). There was an approximately 25 % higher P(HF) at the start in normal rewarmers, in the logarithmic scale. Low frequency-to-high frequency ratio (P(LF)/P(HF)) showed lower levels for normal rewarmers (ANOVA for groups: p = 0.04). During the 'post-training' cold provocation test, both groups lacked the marked increase in heart rate that occurred during cold exposure at the 'pre-training' setting. After cold acclimatization (post-training), normal rewarmers showed lower resting power values for the low-frequency and high-frequency HRV components. After winter training, the slow rewarmers showed reduced low-frequency power for some of the cold provocation measurements but not all (average total P(LF), ANOVA p = 0.05), which was not present before winter training.

    CONCLUSIONS: These HRV results support the conclusion that cold adaptation occurred in both groups. We conclude that further prospective study is needed to determine whether cold adaptation provides protection to subjects at higher risk for cold injury, that is, slow rewarmers.

  • 54.
    Brändström, Helge
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Surgical and Perioperative Sciences, Anaesthesiology.
    Winsö, Ola
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Surgical and Perioperative Sciences, Anaesthesiology.
    Lindholm, Lars
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine, Epidemiology and Global Health.
    Haney, Michael
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Surgical and Perioperative Sciences, Anaesthesiology.
    Regional intensive care transports: a prospective analysis of distance, time and cost for road, helicopter and fixed-wing ambulances2014In: Scandinavian Journal of Trauma, Resuscitation and Emergency Medicine, ISSN 1757-7241, E-ISSN 1757-7241, Vol. 22, p. 36-Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: There are three different types of ambulance systems, all of which can manage the same secondary intensive care patient transport mission: road ambulance, rotor-wing ambulance, and fixed-wing ambulance. We hypothesized that costs for specific transport distances would differ between systems. We aimed to analyze distances and observed times for ambulance intensive care secondary transport missions together with system costs to assess this. Methods: We prospectively collected data for consecutive urgent intensive care transports into the regional tertiary care hospital in the northern region of Sweden. Distances and transport times were gathered, and a cost model was generated based on these together with fixed and operating costs from the three different ambulance systems. Distance-cost and time-cost estimations were then generated for each transport system. Results: Road ambulance cost relatively less for shorter distances (within 250 kilometers/155 miles) but were relatively time ineffective. The rotor-wing systems were most expensive regardless of distance; but were most time-effective up to 400-500 km (248-310 miles). Fixed-wing systems were more cost-effective for longer distance (300 km/186 miles), and time effective for transports over 500 km (310 miles). Conclusions: In summary, based on an economic model developed from observed regional ICU patient transports, and cost estimations, different ambulance system cost-distances could be compared. Distance-cost and time results show that helicopters can be effective up to moderate ICU transport distances (400-500), though are expensive to operate. For longer ICU patient transports, fixed-wing transport systems are both cost and time effective compared to helicopter-based systems.

  • 55.
    Byström, Emma
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Surgical and Perioperative Sciences, Anaesthesiology.
    Postoperative nausea andvomiting in ambulatory surgeryHas it improved?2015Independent thesis Advanced level (professional degree), 20 credits / 30 HE creditsStudent thesis
  • 56.
    Bålfors, E.
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Surgical and Perioperative Sciences, Anaesthesiology.
    Häggmark, S.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Surgical and Perioperative Sciences, Anaesthesiology.
    Nyhman, H.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Surgical and Perioperative Sciences, Anaesthesiology.
    Rydvall, A.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Surgical and Perioperative Sciences, Anaesthesiology.
    Reiz, S.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Surgical and Perioperative Sciences, Anaesthesiology.
    Droperidol inhibits the effects of intravenous ketamine on central hemodynamics and myocardial oxygen consumption in patients with generalized atherosclerotic disease1983In: Anesth Analg, Vol. 62, no 2, p. 193-7Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    A 2-mg/kg dose of ketamine was administered intravenously to 16 patients with generalized atherosclerotic disease. Eight patients were given 200 mu/kg of droperidol intravenously 10 min before ketamine administration; eight patients not given droperidol served as controls. Central hemodynamics, coronary flow (thermodilution technique) and myocardial oxygen, lactate, hypoxanthine, and catecholamine balances were studied. In control patients, ketamine increased mean blood pressure by 42%, pulmonary capillary wedge pressure by 144%, mean right atrial pressure by 60%, heart rate by 15%, and systemic vascular resistance by 40% without changes in cardiac index, stroke volume index, or left ventricular stroke work index. These data indicate that cardiac performance did not increase in parallel with the rise in afterload. However, the 50% increase in myocardial oxygen demand was associated with a 48% increase in coronary blood flow without changes in coronary vascular resistance or myocardial oxygen extraction. Augmented sympathetic activity was manifested by 397% and 164% increases in plasma levels of epinephrine and norepinephrine, respectively. The hemodynamic and cardiometabolic effects of ketamine were abolished when patients were pretreated with droperidol. The increase in plasma epinephrine levels was likewise inhibited by droperidol; significantly lower plasma norepinephrine levels also were observed. These findings suggest that droperidol inhibits the cardiovascular effects of ketamine by a centrally mediated reduction in sympathetic activity and by peripheral alpha receptor blockade.

  • 57.
    Carpenter, Maud
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Surgical and Perioperative Sciences, Anaesthesiology.
    Lundakonceptet som behandling av skallskadade patienter på Intensivvårdsavdelningen Norrlands Universitetssjukhus Följsamhet till aktuellt behandlings-promemoria2015Independent thesis Basic level (professional degree), 20 credits / 30 HE creditsStudent thesis
  • 58.
    Cholley, B.
    et al.
    Univ Sorbonne Paris Cite, Dept Anesthesiol & Intens Care, Hop Europeen Georges Pompidou, Paris, France.
    Haney, Michael
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Surgical and Perioperative Sciences, Anaesthesiology.
    Ultrasound diagnostics during acute circulatory disturbance in the perioperative or intensive care setting2012In: Acta Anaesthesiologica Scandinavica, ISSN 0001-5172, E-ISSN 1399-6576, Vol. 56, no 7, p. 805-806Article in journal (Other academic)
  • 59. Cholley, BP
    et al.
    Mayo, PH
    Poelaert, J
    Vieillard-Baron, A
    Vignon, P
    Alhamid, S
    Balik, M
    Beaulieu, Y
    Breitkreutz, R
    Canivet, J-L
    Doelken, P
    Flaatten, H
    Frankel, H
    Haney M, Michael
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Surgical and Perioperative Sciences, Anaesthesiology.
    Hilton, A
    Maury, E
    McDermid, RC
    McLean, AS
    Mendes, C
    Pinsky, MR
    Price, S
    Schmidlin, D
    Slama, M
    Talmor, D
    Teles, JM
    Via, G
    Voga, G
    Wouters, P
    Yamamoto, T
    International expert statement on training standards for critical care ultrasonography2011In: Intensive Care Medicine, ISSN 0342-4642, E-ISSN 1432-1238, Vol. 37, no 7, p. 1077-1083Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Training in ultrasound techniques for intensive care medicine physicians should aim at achieving competencies in three main areas: (1) general critical care ultrasound (GCCUS), (2) "basic" critical care echocardiography (CCE), and (3) advanced CCE. A group of 29 experts representing the European Society of Intensive Care Medicine (ESICM) and 11 other critical care societies worldwide worked on a potential framework for organizing training adapted to each area of competence. This framework is mainly aimed at defining minimal requirements but is by no means rigid or restrictive: each training organization can be adapted according to resources available. There was 100% agreement among the participants that general critical care ultrasound and "basic" critical care echocardiography should be mandatory in the curriculum of intensive care unit (ICU) physicians. It is the role of each critical care society to support the implementation of training in GCCUS and basic CCE in its own country.

  • 60.
    Claesson, J.
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Surgical and Perioperative Sciences, Anaesthesiology.
    Freundlich, M.
    Gunnarsson, I.
    Laake, J. H.
    Moller, M. H.
    Vandvik, P. O.
    Varpula, T.
    Aasmundstad, T. A.
    Scandinavian clinical practice guideline on fluid and drug therapy in adults with acute respiratory distress syndrome2016In: Acta Anaesthesiologica Scandinavica, ISSN 0001-5172, E-ISSN 1399-6576, Vol. 60, no 6, p. 697-709Article, review/survey (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: The objective of the Scandinavian Society of Anaesthesiology and Intensive Care Medicine (SSAI) task force on fluid and drug therapy in adults with acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS) was to provide clinically relevant, evidence-based treatment recommendations according to standards for trustworthy guidelines. Methods: The guideline was developed according to standards for trustworthy guidelines, including a systematic review of the literature and use of the GRADE methodology for assessment of the quality of evidence and for moving from evidence to recommendations. Results: A total of seven ARDS interventions were assessed. We suggest fluid restriction in patients with ARDS (weak recommendation, moderate quality evidence). Also, we suggest early use of neuromuscular blocking agents (NMBAs) in patients with severe ARDS (weak recommendation, moderate quality evidence). We recommend against the routine use of other drugs, including corticosteroids, beta2 agonists, statins, and inhaled nitric oxide (iNO) or prostanoids in adults with ARDS (strong recommendations: low-to high-quality evidence). These recommendations do not preclude the use of any drug or combination of drugs targeting underlying or co-existing disorders. Conclusion: This guideline emphasizes the paucity of evidence of benefit - and potential for harm - of common interventions in adults with ARDS and highlights the need for prudence when considering use of non-licensed interventions in this patient population.

  • 61.
    Claesson, Jonas
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Surgical and Perioperative Sciences, Anaesthesiology. Anestesiologi och intensivvård.
    Lehtipalo, Stefan
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Surgical and Perioperative Sciences, Anaesthesiology. Anestesiologi och intensivvård.
    Bergstrand, Ulf
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Surgical and Perioperative Sciences, Anaesthesiology. Anestesiologi och intensivvård.
    Arnerlöv, Conny
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Surgical and Perioperative Sciences, Surgery. Kirurgi.
    Rocksen, David
    Hultin, Magnus
    Winsö, Ola
    Intestinal circulation, oxygenation and metabolism is not affected by oleic acid lung injury.2005In: Clinical Physiology and Functional Imaging, ISSN 1475-0961, E-ISSN 1475-097X, Vol. 25, no 6, p. 357-363Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This study was performed to establish a platform for further studies on effects of ventilatory treatment modalities on the intestines during mechanical ventilation of acute lung injury (ALI). We tested the hypotheses that oleic acid (OA) infusion causes changes in intestinal circulation, oxygenation and metabolism, and that OA is distributed to tissues outside the lung. This was performed as an experimental, prospective and controlled study in an university animal research laboratory. Thirteen juvenile anaesthetized pigs were used in the main study, where seven were given an intravenous infusion of 0.1 ml kg(-1) OA and six served as control (surgery only). In a separate study, four animals were given an intravenous infusion of 0.1 ml kg(-1) (3)H-labelled OA. We measured systemic and mesenteric (portal venous blood flow, jejunal mucosal perfusion) haemodynamic parameters, mesenteric oxygenation (jejunal tissue oxygen tension) and systemic cytokines (tumour necrosis factor-alpha and interleukin-6). We calculated mesenteric lactate flux and mesenteric oxygen delivery, uptake and extraction ratio. In the animals given 3H-OA, we measured 3H-OA in different tissues (lungs, heart, liver, kidney, stomach, jejunum, colon and arterial blood). We found that OA given intravenously is distributed in small amounts to the intestines. This intestinal exposure to OA does not cause intestinal injury when evaluating mesenteric blood flow, metabolism or oxygenation. OA infusion induced a moderate increase in mean pulmonary arterial pressure and a decrease in PaO2/Fraction inspired O2 (P/F) ratio, giving evidence of severe lung injury. Consequently, the OA lung injury model is suitable for studies on intestinal effects of ventilatory treatment modalities during mechanical ventilation of ALI.

  • 62.
    Claesson, Jonas
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Surgical and Perioperative Sciences, Anaesthesiology. Anestesiologi och intensivvård.
    Lehtipalo, Stefan
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Surgical and Perioperative Sciences, Anaesthesiology. Anestesiologi och intensivvård.
    Bergstrand, Ulf
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Surgical and Perioperative Sciences, Anaesthesiology. Anestesiologi och intensivvård.
    Arnerlöv, Conny
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Surgical and Perioperative Sciences, Surgery. Kirurgi.
    Winsö, Ola
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Surgical and Perioperative Sciences, Anaesthesiology. Anestesiologi och intensivvård.
    Negative mesenteric effects of lung recruitment maneuvers in oleic acid lung injury are transient and short lasting.2007In: Critical Care Medicine, ISSN 0090-3493, E-ISSN 1530-0293, Vol. 35, no 1, p. 230-238Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    OBJECTIVE: To test the hypothesis that repeated recruitment maneuvers (RMs) have sustained negative effects on mesenteric circulation, metabolism, and oxygenation 60 mins after RMs in pigs with oleic acid lung injury. Further, we aimed to test the hypothesis that an infusion of prostacyclin (PC) at 33 ng.kg.min would attenuate such possible negative mesenteric effects. DESIGN: Randomized, experimental, controlled study. SETTING: University hospital animal laboratory. SUBJECTS: A total of 31 anesthetized, fluid-resuscitated pigs with oleic acid lung injury. INTERVENTIONS: Animals were randomized to one of the following four groups: a control group (n = 7) that received no intervention, recruitment group (n = 8) that underwent the RM sequence, a prostacyclin group (n = 8) that received an infusion of PC, and a recruitment-prostacyclin group (n = 8) that received an infusion of PC and concomitant RM sequence. MEASUREMENTS AND MAIN RESULTS: We measured systemic and mesenteric hemodynamic variables, jejunal mucosal perfusion, mesenteric lactate flux, jejunal tissue oxygen tension, and mesenteric oxygen delivery, uptake, and extraction ratio. Five minutes after RMs, mesenteric oxygen extraction ratio and mesenteric lactate flux were more prominently increased in the recruitment group, giving evidence of worsened mesenteric conditions after RMs. These signs of worsened conditions were further supported by more decreased jejunal tissue oxygen tension and portal vein oxygen saturation in the recruitment group. PC preserved mesenteric oxygenation, as indicated by less of a decrease in portal vein oxygen saturation at the time corresponding to 5 mins after RM and less of a decrease in mesenteric oxygen delivery at the time corresponding to 15 mins after RM. PC preserved mesenteric oxygenation as indicated by less of a decrease in portal vein oxygen saturation at 5 mins after RM and an attenuated increase in mesenteric oxygen extraction ratio at 5 mins after RM. There was a trend toward worsened jejunal mucosal perfusion, although not significant. CONCLUSIONS: In an oleic acid lung injury model, three repeated RMs did not improve systemic oxygenation or lung mechanics. Negative effects on mesenteric oxygenation and metabolism were transient and short lasting. The intestinal effects of PC during RMs were minor and opposing, showing preserved oxygenation but a trend toward worsened mucosal perfusion.

  • 63.
    Claesson, Jonas
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Surgical and Perioperative Sciences, Anaesthesiology. Anestesiologi och intensivvård.
    Lehtipalo, Stefan
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Surgical and Perioperative Sciences, Anaesthesiology. Anestesiologi och intensivvård.
    Johansson, Göran
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Surgical and Perioperative Sciences, Anaesthesiology. Anestesiologi och intensivvård.
    Abrahamsson, Pernilla
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Surgical and Perioperative Sciences, Anaesthesiology. Anestesiologi och intensivvård.
    Palmqvist, Richard
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Biosciences, Pathology.
    Biber, Björn
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Surgical and Perioperative Sciences, Anaesthesiology.
    Winsö, Ola
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Surgical and Perioperative Sciences, Anaesthesiology. Anestesiologi och intensivvård.
    Evaluation of intestinal preconditioning in a porcine model using classic ischemic preconditioning or lung recruitment maneuvers.2008In: Shock, ISSN 1073-2322, E-ISSN 1540-0514, Vol. 21, no 1, p. 98-103Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    To test the hypotheses that repeated brief intestinal ischemic insults would elicit an intestinal preconditioning response to a subsequent intestinal I/R injury and that a similar response would be elicited by repeated lung recruitment maneuvers (RMs). Randomized experimental controlled animal study. University hospital animal laboratory. Eighteen anesthetized pigs. Animals were randomized to one of three groups, with six animals in each group. Control group 75-min superior mesenteric artery (SMA) occlusion followed by 60-min reperfusion. Ischemic preconditioning group, three 5-min-long SMA occlusions preceding 75-min SMA occlusion and 60-min reperfusion. Recruitment maneuver (RM) group, three 2-min-long RMs preceding 75-min SMA occlusion and 60-min reperfusion. We measured systemic and mesenteric hemodynamic parameters, jejunal mucosal perfusion, net mesenteric lactate flux, jejunal tissue oxygen tension, and mesenteric oxygenation. Every 15 min, jejunal microdialysate samples were collected and analyzed for glucose, lactate, and glycerol. Jejunal tissue samples were collected postmortem. After occlusion of SMA, regional parameters in all groups indicated abolished perfusion and gradually increasing intraluminal microdialysate lactate and glycerol levels. At reperfusion, regional parameters indicated mesenteric hyperperfusion, whereas microdialysis markers of mucosal anaerobic metabolism and cell injury decreased, although not reaching baseline. Histological examination revealed severe mucosal injury in all groups. There were no significant differences between groups in the observed parameters. No protective preconditioning response could be observed when performing repeated brief intestinal ischemic insults or repeated lung RMs before an intestinal I/R injury.

  • 64. Dalla, Keti
    et al.
    Hallman, Caroline
    Bech-Hanssen, Odd
    Haney, Michael
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Surgical and Perioperative Sciences, Anaesthesiology.
    Ricksten, Sven-Erik
    Strain echocardiography identifies impaired longitudinal systolic function in patients with septic shock and preserved ejection fraction2015In: Cardiovascular Ultrasound, ISSN 1476-7120, E-ISSN 1476-7120, Vol. 13, article id 30Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: Myocardial dysfunction is recognized in sepsis. We hypothesized that mechanical left (LV) and right (RV) ventricular function analysed using 2-dimensional speckle-tracking echocardiography in a cohort of early severe sepsis or septic shock patients, would be different to that of a group of critically ill, non-septic patients.

    Methods: Critically ill adult patients with early, severe sepsis/septic shock (n = 48) and major trauma patients with no sepsis (n = 24) were included retrospectively, as well as healthy controls (n = 16). Standard echocardiographic examinations, including right (RV) left (LV) volumes and mitral, aortic and pulmonary vein Doppler flow profiles, were retrospectively identified and the studies were then reanalysed for assessment of myocardial strain using speckle-tracking echocardiography. Endocardial tracing of the LV was performed in apical four-chamber (4-Ch), two-chamber (2-Ch), apical long-axis (3-Ch) and apical views of RV determining the longitudinal LV and RV free wall strain in each subject.

    Results: In septic patients, heart rate was significantly higher (p = 0.009) and systolic (p < 0.001) and mean arterial pressures (p < 0.001), as well as systemic vascular resistance (p < 0.001) were significantly lower when compared to the non-septic trauma group. Ninety-three per cent of the septic patients and 50 % of the trauma patients were treated with norepinephrine (p < 0.001). LV ejection fraction (LVEF) was lower in the septic patients (p = 0.019). In septic patients with preserved LVEF (>50 %, n = 34), seventeen patients (50 %) had a depressed LV global longitudinal function, defined as a LV global strain > -15 %, compared to two patients (8.7 %) in the non-septic group (p = 0.0014). In septic patients with preserved LVEF, LV global and RV free wall strain were 14 % (p = 0.014) and 17 % lower (p = 0.008), respectively, compared to the non-septic group with preserved LVEF. There were no significant differences between groups with respect to LV end-diastolic or end-systolic volumes, stroke volume, or cardiac output. There were no signs of diastolic dysfunction from the mitral or pulmonary vein Doppler profiles in the septic patients.

    Conclusions: LV and RV systolic function is impaired in critically ill patients with early septic shock and preserved LVEF, as detected by Speckle-tracking 2D echocardiography. Strain imaging may be useful in the early detection of myocardial dysfunction in sepsis.

  • 65.
    Diallo, Amira
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Surgical and Perioperative Sciences, Anaesthesiology.
    A serological study of the immune response in tonsillitis patients2012Independent thesis Advanced level (professional degree), 20 credits / 30 HE creditsStudent thesis
  • 66.
    Edström, Viktor
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Surgical and Perioperative Sciences, Anaesthesiology.
    Oxygen and hyperoxia exposure trends in intensive care patients: A retrospective assessment at the University hospital in Umeå2018Independent thesis Basic level (professional degree), 20 credits / 30 HE creditsStudent thesis
  • 67.
    Ek, Arvid
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Surgical and Perioperative Sciences, Anaesthesiology.
    Vital signs as independent predictors ofICU-admission or mortality?A Medical Emergency Team (MET) in retrospect2018Independent thesis Basic level (professional degree), 20 credits / 30 HE creditsStudent thesis
  • 68.
    Ekman, Agneta
    et al.
    Göteborgs universitet.
    Brynhildsen, Jan
    Linköpings unuversitet.
    Larsson, Christer
    Lunds universitet.
    Möller, Riitta
    Karolinska institutet, Stockholm.
    Hultin, Magnus
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Surgical and Perioperative Sciences, Anaesthesiology.
    Lindahl, Bertil
    Uppsala universitet.
    Grenegård, Magnus
    Örebro universitet.
    Fusk hotar tilliten till blivande läkares professionalitet2018In: Läkartidningen, ISSN 0023-7205, E-ISSN 1652-7518, no 115Article in journal (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
    Abstract [sv]

    Det är med stor sorg vi noterat att några studenter valt att fuska sig till en plats på läkarutbildningarna. Vi förväntar oss nu att Universitets- och högskolerådet skärper säkerheten vid högskoleprovet för att förhindra att fusket fortsätter och att utredningen om vilka som fuskat sig in på utbildningarna drivs vidare.

  • 69.
    Elg, Sanna
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Surgical and Perioperative Sciences, Anaesthesiology.
    How are patients affected by postoperative nausea and vomiting(PONV)?2018Independent thesis Basic level (professional degree), 20 credits / 30 HE creditsStudent thesis
  • 70.
    Engström, Julia
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Surgical and Perioperative Sciences, Anaesthesiology.
    A comparison between ICD-10 codes used by intensive care physicians and by neurosurgeons in neurosurgical intensive care unit patients2017Independent thesis Basic level (professional degree), 20 credits / 30 HE creditsStudent thesis
  • 71.
    Eriksson, Oskar
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Surgical and Perioperative Sciences, Anaesthesiology.
    Routines regarding sedation in Swedish ICU’s - A national survey and a local observation study2017Independent thesis Basic level (professional degree), 20 credits / 30 HE creditsStudent thesis
  • 72.
    Erkki, Maria
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Surgical and Perioperative Sciences, Anaesthesiology.
    Spontant intracerebralt hematom: En retrospektiv studie av patienter med spontant intracerebralt hematom som vårdats på intensivvårdsavdelningen vid Norrlands Universitetssjukhus2015Independent thesis Basic level (professional degree), 20 credits / 30 HE creditsStudent thesis
  • 73. Fagley, R. Eliot
    et al.
    Haney, Michael F.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Surgical and Perioperative Sciences, Anaesthesiology.
    Beraud, Anne-Sophie
    Comfere, Thomas
    Kohl, Benjamin Adam
    Merkel, Matthias Johannes
    Pustavoitau, Aliaksei
    von Homeyer, Peter
    Wagner, Chad Edward
    Wall, Michael H.
    Critical Care Basic Ultrasound Learning Goals for American Anesthesiology Critical Care Trainees: Recommendations from an Expert Group2015In: Anesthesia and Analgesia, ISSN 0003-2999, E-ISSN 1526-7598, Vol. 120, no 5, p. 1041-1053Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    OBJECTIVE: In this review, we define learning goals and recommend competencies concerning focused basic critical care ultrasound (CCUS) for critical care specialists in training. DESIGN: The narrative review is, and the recommendations contained herein are, sponsored by the Society of Critical Care Anesthesiologists. Our recommendations are based on a structured -literature review by an expert panel of anesthesiology intensivists and cardiologists with formal training in ultrasound. Published descriptions of learning and training routines from anesthesia-critical care and other specialties were identified and considered. Sections were written by groups with special expertise, with dissent included in the text. RESULTS: Learning goals and objectives were identified for achieving competence in the use of CCUS at a specialist level (critical care fellowship training) for diagnosis and monitoring of vital organ dysfunction in the critical care environment. The ultrasound examination was divided into vascular, abdominal, thoracic, and cardiac components. For each component, learning goals and specific skills were presented. Suggestions for teaching and training methods were described. DISCUSSION: Immediate bedside availability of ultrasound resources can dramatically improve the ability of critical care physicians to care for critically ill patients. Anesthesia-critical care medicine training should have definitive expectations and performance standards for basic CCUS interpretation by anesthesiology-critical care specialists. The learning goals in this review reflect current trends in the multispecialty critical care environment where ultrasound-based diagnostic strategies are already frequently applied. These competencies should be formally taught as part of an established anesthesiology-critical care medicine graduate medical education programs.

  • 74. Flaatten, H
    et al.
    Haney, Michael
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Surgical and Perioperative Sciences, Anaesthesiology.
    Wernerman, J
    The Scandinavian critical care trials group: producing important new findings in challenging times2013In: Acta Anaesthesiologica Scandinavica, ISSN 0001-5172, E-ISSN 1399-6576, Vol. 57, no 2, p. 138-140Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 75. Flaatten, H.
    et al.
    Rasmussen, L. S.
    Haney, Michael
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Surgical and Perioperative Sciences, Anaesthesiology.
    Publication footprints and pitfalls of bibliometry2016In: Acta Anaesthesiologica Scandinavica, ISSN 0001-5172, E-ISSN 1399-6576, Vol. 60, no 1, p. 3-5Article in journal (Other academic)
  • 76.
    Franklin, Karl
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine, Pulmonary Medicine.
    Sandström, Erik
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Surgical and Perioperative Sciences, Anaesthesiology.
    Johansson, Göran
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Surgical and Perioperative Sciences, Anaesthesiology.
    Bålfors, Eva
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Surgical and Perioperative Sciences, Anaesthesiology.
    Hemodynamics, cerebral circulation, and oxygen saturation in Cheyne-Stokes respiration1997In: J Appl Physiol, Vol. 83, no 4, p. 1184-91Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Because cardiovascular disorders and stroke may induce Cheyne-Stokes respiration, our purpose was to study the interaction among cerebral activity, cerebral circulation, blood pressure, and blood gases during Cheyne-Stokes respiration. Ten patients with heart failure or a previous stroke were investigated during Cheyne-Stokes respiration with recordings of daytime polysomnography, cerebral blood flow velocity, intra-arterial blood pressure, and intra-arterial oxygen saturation with and without oxygen administration. There were simultaneous changes in wakefulness, cerebral blood flow velocity, and respiration with accompanying changes in blood pressure and heart rate approximately 10 s later. Cerebral blood flow velocity, blood pressure, and heart rate had a minimum occurrence in apnea and a maximum occurrence during hyperpnea. The apnea-induced oxygen desaturations were diminished during oxygen administration, but the hemodynamic alterations persisted. Oxygen desaturations were more severe and occurred earlier according to intra-arterial measurements than with finger oximetry. It is not possible to explain Cheyne-Stokes respiration by alterations in blood gases and circulatory time alone. Cheyne-Stokes respiration may be characterized as a state of phase-linked cyclic changes in cerebral, respiratory, and cardiovascular functions probably generated by variations in central nervous activity.

  • 77.
    Fröjse, Rolf
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Surgical and Perioperative Sciences, Surgery.
    Lehtipalo, Stefan
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Surgical and Perioperative Sciences, Anesthesiology and Intensive Care.
    Bergstrand, Ulf
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Surgical and Perioperative Sciences, Anesthesiology and Intensive Care.
    Biber, Björn
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Surgical and Perioperative Sciences, Anesthesiology and Intensive Care.
    Winsö, Ola
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Surgical and Perioperative Sciences, Anesthesiology and Intensive Care.
    Johansson, Göran
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Surgical and Perioperative Sciences, Anesthesiology and Intensive Care.
    Arnerlöv, Conny
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Surgical and Perioperative Sciences, Surgery.
    Local metabolic effects of dopexamine on the intestine during mesenteric hypoperfusion.2004In: Shock, ISSN 1073-2322, E-ISSN 1540-0514, Vol. 21, no 3, p. 241-247Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This self-controlled experimental study was designed to test the hypothesis that dopexamine, a synthetic catecholamine that activates dopaminergic (DA-1) and beta2-adrenergic receptors, improves oxygenation in the jejunal mucosa during intestinal hypotension. In six normoventilated barbiturate-anesthetized pigs, controlled reductions in superior mesenteric arterial pressure (PSMA) was obtained by an adjustable clamp around the artery. Dopexamine infusions (0.5 and 1.0 microg.kg(-1).min(-1)) were administered at a freely variable PSMA (i.e., with the perivascular clamp fully open) and at a PSMA of 50 mmHg and 30 mmHg. We continuously measured superior mesenteric venous blood flow (QMES; transit-time ultrasonic flowmetry), jejunal mucosal perfusion (laser Doppler flowmetry), and tissue oxygen tension (PO2TISSUE; microoximetry). Jejunal luminal microdialysate of lactate, pyruvate, and glucose were measured every 5 min. Measurements of mucosal PCO2 (air tonometry), together with blood sampling and end-tidal PCO2 measurements, enabled calculations of pHi and PCO2 gap. Dopexamine reduced mesenteric vascular resistance and increased QMES at a PSMA of 50 mmHg and 30 mmHg. At a PSMA of 30 mmHg, dopexamine increased mesenteric oxygen delivery but did not influence mesenteric oxygen uptake or extraction. In this situation, dopexamine had no beneficial effect on jejunal mucosal blood flow. On the contrary, dopexamine increased mesenteric net lactate production and PCO2 gap, whereas PO2TISSUE and pHi decreased. Jejunal luminal microdialysate data demonstrated an increased lactate concentration and a pattern of decreased glucose concentration and increased luminal lactate-pyruvate ratio. These negative metabolic effects of dopexamine should be taken into account in situations of low perfusion pressures.

  • 78.
    Fröjse, Rolf
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Surgical and Perioperative Sciences, Surgery.
    Lehtipalo, Stefan
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Surgical and Perioperative Sciences, Anesthesiology and Intensive Care.
    Winsö, Ola
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Surgical and Perioperative Sciences, Anesthesiology and Intensive Care.
    Johansson, Göran
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Surgical and Perioperative Sciences, Anesthesiology and Intensive Care.
    Biber, Björn
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Surgical and Perioperative Sciences, Anesthesiology and Intensive Care.
    Arnerlöv, Conny
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Surgical and Perioperative Sciences, Surgery.
    Assessment of graded intestinal hypoperfusion and reperfusion using continuous saline tonometry in a porcine model.2004In: European Journal of Vascular and Endovascular Surgery, ISSN 1078-5884, E-ISSN 1532-2165, Vol. 28, no 1, p. 79-88Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    OBJECTIVE: To evaluate effects of graded intestinal hypoperfusion and reperfusion on intestinal metabolic parameters as assessed by a modified continuous saline tonometry technique. MATERIALS: Twelve barbiturate-anaesthetized female pigs. METHODS: Measurements were performed prior to and during three predefined levels of superior mesenteric mean arterial blood pressure (P(SMA) 70, 50 and 30 mmHg, respectively, each 80 min long), obtained by an adjustable clamp around the origin of the superior mesenteric artery, and during reperfusion. We continuously measured jejunal mucosal perfusion (laser Doppler flowmetry), jejunal tissue oxygen tension (PO(2TISSUE); microoximetry) and intramucosal PCO(2) (continuous saline tonometry) and calculated net intestinal lactate production, mesenteric oxygenation, PCO(2) gap (jejunal mucosal PCO(2)-arterial PCO(2)) and pHi. RESULTS: At P(SMA) 70 and 50 mmHg mesenteric oxygen uptake and net lactate production remained unaltered, in spite of decreased oxygen delivery. At these P(SMA) levels PCO(2) gap increased, while pHi and PO(2TISSUE) decreased. At P(SMA) 30 mmHg pronounced increases in PCO(2) gap and mesenteric net lactate production as well as marked decreases in PO(2TISSUE) and pHi were demonstrated. Data indicate absence of anaerobic conditions at an intestinal perfusion pressure (IPP)> or =41 mmHg, a pHi> or =7.22 or PCO(2) gap< or =15.8 mmHg. CONCLUSIONS: Continuous saline tonometry detected intestinal ischemia as induced by graded reductions in IPP. A threshold could be defined above which intestinal ischemia does not occur.

  • 79. Grauman, Sven
    et al.
    Boethius, Jakob
    Johansson, Joakim
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Surgical and Perioperative Sciences, Anaesthesiology. Department of Anaesthesia and Intensive Care, Östersund Hospital, Östersund, Sweden.
    Regional Anaesthesia Is Associated with Shorter Postanaesthetic Care and Less Pain Than General Anaesthesia after Upper Extremity Surgery2016In: Anesthesiology Research and Practice, ISSN 1687-6962, E-ISSN 1687-6970, article id 6308371Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Introduction: For surgery on the upper extremity, the anaesthetist often has a choice between regional anaesthesia (RA) and general anaesthesia (GA). We sought to investigate the possible differences between RA and GA after upper extremity surgery with regard to postoperative patient comfort. Methods: This is a retrospective observational study that was performed at an acute care secondary referral centre. One hundred and eighty-seven procedures involving orthopaedic surgery on the upper extremity were included. The different groups (RA and GA) were compared regarding the primary outcome variable, length of stay in Postanaesthesia Unit, and secondary outcome variables, opioid consumption and nausea treatment. Results: RA was associated with significantly shorter median length of stay (99 versus 171 minutes). In the GA group, 32% of the patients received opioid analgesics and 21% received antiemetics. In the RA group, none received opioid analgesics and 3% received antiemetics. Conclusion: In this observational study, RA was superior to GA for surgery of the upper extremity regarding Postanaesthesia Care Unit length of stay, number of doses of analgesic, and number of doses of antiemetic administered.

  • 80. Grenander, A.
    et al.
    Bredbacka, S.
    Rydvall, A.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Surgical and Perioperative Sciences, Anaesthesiology.
    Aroch, R.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Surgical and Perioperative Sciences, Anaesthesiology.
    Edner, G.
    Koskinen, Lars-Owe D.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Pharmacology and Clinical Neuroscience, Clinical Neuroscience.
    Olivecrona, M.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Pharmacology and Clinical Neuroscience, Clinical Neuroscience.
    Antithrombin treatment in patients with traumatic brain injury: a pilot study2001In: J Neurosurg Anesthesiol, Vol. 13, no 1, p. 49-56Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This study will determine if early administration of antithrombin concentrate to patients with traumatic brain injury (TBI) can inhibit or significantly shorten the time of coagulopathy. The progress of brain injury monitored by computed tomographic scan (CT) was also assessed, as was the time needed for intensive care and outcome related to Glasgow outcome scale (GOS). Twenty-eight patients with isolated brain trauma verified with CT were included in either of two parallel groups. The Glasgow coma score (GCS) was mean 7.5, and median 7.0; signifying a moderate to severe traumatic brain injury but with a mortality of only 3.5%. The patients randomized to antithrombin treatment received a total of 100 U/kg BW during 24 hours. To measure hypercoagulability, soluble fibrin (SF), D-dimer (D-d), and thrombin-antithrombin complex (TAT) were assessed together with antithrombin (AT) and routine coagulation tests. Before treatment, SF, D-d, and TAT were markedly increased in both groups. Soluble fibrin and D-dimer (measured after treatment began) appeared to decrease faster in the AT group, and there was a statistically significant difference between the groups at 36 hours for SF and at 36 hours, 48 hours, and at Day 3 for D-d. Thrombin-antithrombin complex levels were very high in both groups but, surprisingly, showed no significant difference between the groups. The authors conclude that antithrombin concentrate administered to patients with severe TBI resulted in a marginal reduction of hypercoagulation. We could not detect any obvious influence by antithrombin on brain injury progress, on CT, or on outcome or time needed for intensive care.

  • 81. Grände, P. O.
    et al.
    Naredi, Silvana
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Surgical and Perioperative Sciences, Anaesthesiology.
    Clinical studies in severe traumatic brain injury: a controversial issue2002Other (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
  • 82. Grände, P-O
    et al.
    Koskinen, L-O
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Pharmacology and Clinical Neuroscience, Neurosurgery.
    Naredi, S
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Surgical and Perioperative Sciences, Anaesthesiology.
    Reinstrup, P
    Romner, B
    Conventional treatments for severe head injury: are they effective, ineffective, or even harmful?2007In: Acta Anaesthesiologica Scandinavica, ISSN 0001-5172, E-ISSN 1399-6576, Vol. 51, no 10, p. 1294-1296Article in journal (Other academic)
  • 83. Guldbrand, P
    et al.
    Berggren, L
    Brattebö, G
    Mälstam, J
    Rönholm, E
    Winsö, Ola
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Surgical and Perioperative Sciences, Anesthesiology and Intensive Care.
    Survey of routines for sedation of patients on controlled ventilation in Nordic intensive care units.2004In: Acta Anaesthesiologica Scandinavica, ISSN 0001-5172, Vol. 48, no 8, p. 944-50Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 84.
    Gustafsson, Hanna
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Surgical and Perioperative Sciences, Anaesthesiology.
    Bariatric surgery and the following need of acute care surgery.2013Independent thesis Advanced level (professional degree), 20 credits / 30 HE creditsStudent thesis
  • 85.
    Gustafsson, Maria
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Surgical and Perioperative Sciences, Anaesthesiology.
    Hypotermibehandlas rätt patienter? Effekten av olika inklusionskriterier2012Independent thesis Advanced level (professional degree), 20 credits / 30 HE creditsStudent thesis
  • 86.
    Gustafsson, Ulf
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine, Medicine.
    Larsson, M
    School of Technology and Health, Royal Institute of Technology, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Bjällmark, A
    School of Technology and Health, Royal Institute of Technology, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Lindqvist, Per
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine, Medicine.
    Aroch, Roman
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Surgical and Perioperative Sciences, Anaesthesiology.
    Haney, Michael
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Surgical and Perioperative Sciences, Anaesthesiology.
    Waldenström, Anders
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine, Medicine.
    The effect of acute myocardial ischemia on the rotation axis of the left ventricleManuscript (preprint) (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Introduction: We have developed a method to assess the axis around which the left ventricle (LV) rotates. The aim was to assess the effect of acute regional ischemia on the otation axis.

    Method: Mid‐LAD occlusion was induced in six anesthetised pigs and echocardiographic images were recorded at baseline and after LAD occlusion. The rotation axis was calculated at three different levels of the LV throughout the cardiac cycle. Results: The direction of the rotation axis was significantly changed (p<0.01) after LAD occlusion, being directed towards the ischemic area. AV‐plane displacement was significantly reduced (p<0.05) during ischemia. No significant difference in twist or otation amplitudes was found.

    Conclusion: This new method of assessing rotational function seems as sensitive as AV‐plane displacement and superior to traditional rotation and twist parameters in detecting dysfunction in acute ischemic myocardium. The rotation axis method has the advantage of potentially identifying areas with dysfunction.

  • 87.
    Göransson, Helena
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Surgical and Perioperative Sciences, Anaesthesiology.
    Comparison of Thiopental and Propofol/Ketanest in anesthesia for electroconvulsive therapy: a retrospective cohort study2017Independent thesis Basic level (professional degree), 20 credits / 30 HE creditsStudent thesis
  • 88.
    Halliday, T. A.
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Surgical and Perioperative Sciences, Anaesthesiology. Anesthesiology and Intensive Care, Sundsvall, Sweden.
    Sundqvist, Jonas
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Surgical and Perioperative Sciences, Anaesthesiology. Anesthesiology and Intensive Care, Sundsvall, Sweden.
    Hultin, Magnus
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Surgical and Perioperative Sciences, Anaesthesiology. Anesthesiology and Intensive Care, Sundsvall, Sweden.
    Wallden, Jakob
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Surgical and Perioperative Sciences, Anaesthesiology. Anesthesiology and Intensive Care, Sundsvall, Sweden.
    Post-operative nausea and vomiting in bariatric surgery patients: an observational study2017In: Acta Anaesthesiologica Scandinavica, ISSN 0001-5172, E-ISSN 1399-6576, Vol. 61, no 5, p. 471-479Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: The risk of post-operative nausea and vomiting (PONV) in patients undergoing bariatric surgery is unclear. The aim of the study was to investigate the risk of PONV and the use and effectiveness of PONV prophylaxis.

    Methods: This prospective observational study included 74 patients undergoing bariatric surgery with total intravenous anaesthesia. Patients were given PONV prophylaxis based on published guidelines and a simplified PONV risk score. Perioperative data were collected and a questionnaire was used at 2, 4, 6, 24, 48 and 72 h after the operation to evaluate PONV. Data are presented as risk (%) with the 95% confidence interval.

    Results: Sixty five per cent (54-75) of the patients experienced PONV in the first 24 post-operative hours and the risk increased with the number of risk factors for PONV. PONV occurred in 78% (66-87) of women and 26% (12-49) of men during the first 24 h. In relation to the guidelines, one patient received suboptimal PONV prophylaxis, 23% received optimal prophylaxis and 76% supra-optimal prophylaxis. The risk of PONV was 82% (59-94) with optimal prophylaxis and 59% (46-71) with supra-optimal prophylaxis. Of all patients, 34% (24-45) experienced severe PONV in the first 24 h that limited their activity.

    Conclusions: The incidence of PONV in bariatric surgery patients was high despite a PONV prophylaxis regime following current guidelines. These results cast doubt as to the effectiveness of the usual PONV prophylaxis in this patient group and point to the need for further investigation of PONV prophylaxis and treatment in bariatric surgery patients.

  • 89.
    Haney, Michael
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Surgical and Perioperative Sciences, Anaesthesiology.
    Coronary physiology2012In: Core Topics in Cardiac Anesthesi: 2nd Edition / [ed] Jonathan H. Mackay and Joseph E. Arrowsmith, CAMBRIDGE: Cambridge University Press, 2012, 2, p. 22-27Chapter in book (Refereed)
  • 90.
    Haney, Michael
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Surgical and Perioperative Sciences, Anaesthesiology.
    A'Roch, Roman
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Surgical and Perioperative Sciences, Anaesthesiology.
    Johansson, Göran
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Surgical and Perioperative Sciences, Anaesthesiology.
    Poelaert, Jan
    Biber, Björn
    Beat-to-beat change in myocardial performance index related to load2007In: Acta Anaesthesiologica Scandinavica, ISSN 0001-5172, E-ISSN 1399-6576, Vol. 51, no 5, p. 545-552Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    BACKGROUND: This study was designed to assess the relationship of the "myocardial performance index" (MPI) to the beat-by-beat change in pre-load with static or unchanged contractile status.

    METHODS: Eight anesthetized juvenile pigs were studied using direct measurement of the left ventricular pressure and volume. Transient inflation of a vena cava balloon catheter produced controlled pre-load alterations. Consecutive beats were analyzed, grouped for first, second, third, etc. during the pre-load alteration, and evaluated for the change in MPI during the same contractile status with a controlled pre-load alteration. Two pharmacologic inotropic interventions were also included to generate several myocardial conditions in each animal.

    RESULTS: MPI demonstrated a strong linear relationship to the pre-load and after-load. MPI increased progressively during decreasing end-diastolic volume, mostly related to changes in ejection time. MPI was observed at the same level for three different myocardial function conditions (all eight animals), with a different relationship between MPI and pre-load noted for each observation.

    CONCLUSIONS: MPI is strongly load dependent, and can vary widely in value for the same contractile status if the load is varied. The use of this index in critically ill patients should be limited in this respect. Further work is needed to establish the relationship of MPI to load and contractile status.

  • 91.
    Haney, Michael F
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Surgical and Perioperative Sciences, Anaesthesiology.
    Häggmark, Sören
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Surgical and Perioperative Sciences, Anaesthesiology.
    Johansson, Göran
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Surgical and Perioperative Sciences, Anaesthesiology.
    Näslund, Ulf
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine, Medicine. Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine, Medicine.
    ST changes and temporal relation to the J point during heart rate increase and myocardial ischemia.2009In: Journal of electrocardiology, ISSN 1532-8430, Vol. 42, no 1, p. 6-11Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    There is no concensus concerning where in the ST segment to measure. We studied the relation between different J point intervals to ST results during tachycardia and ischemia. Symptomatic (anesthetized) patients with coronary artery disease were paced at ascending incremental levels until they became ischemic. ST vector magnitude and ST vector change from baseline (STC-VM) as well as the sum of ST changes from all 12 electrocardiogram (ECG) leads (ECG ST sum) were measured at J point 0 millisecond, J + 20, J + 60, and J + 80 milliseconds for 34 patients. ST segments increased in similar fashion during pacing and ischemia. There was no difference in ST results when measurement was performed at different time intervals for both STC-VM and ECG ST sum. We conclude that ST assessment by ST change from baseline is not affected by different J point intervals during increased heart rate and ischemia in this clinical model of pacing-induced ischemia and vectorcardiographic ST analysis.

  • 92.
    Haney, Michael F
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Surgical and Perioperative Sciences, Anaesthesiology.
    Johansson, Göran
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Surgical and Perioperative Sciences, Anaesthesiology.
    Häggmark, Sören
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Surgical and Perioperative Sciences, Anaesthesiology.
    Biber, Björn
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Surgical and Perioperative Sciences, Anaesthesiology.
    Myocardial systolic function increases during positive pressure lung inflation.2005In: Anesthesia and Analgesia, ISSN 0003-2999, Vol. 101, no 5, p. 1269-74Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Lung inflation with positive airway pressure may have rapid and dynamic effects on myocardial contractile function. We designed this study to assess the magnitude and time to onset of myocardial function changes during the initiation of single positive pressure lung inflation at clinically relevant inflation pressures. In 8 anesthetized 40-kg pigs, left ventricular pressures and volumes were measured directly (conductance volumetry). A 15 cm H2O airway pressure plateau with lung inflation (PPLI-15) was performed, and 2 single beats from that sequence, one from resting apnea at zero airway pressure and the second from the point when the lungs were first maximally inflated, were selected for analysis. Systolic function variables for zero airway pressure and PPLI-15 were analyzed. Systolic elastance, derived from bilinear time-varying elastance curves, increased approximately 15% during PPLI-15 from zero airway pressure. This agreed with other systolic function variables that identified an increase in left ventricular contractile function for the lung inflation beat. Serial measurements of myocardial function should be conducted with constant airway pressure and lung inflation conditions.

  • 93.
    Haney, Michael F
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Surgical and Perioperative Sciences, Anaesthesiology.
    Steendijk, Paul
    Johansson, Göran
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Surgical and Perioperative Sciences, Anaesthesiology.
    Biber, Björn
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Surgical and Perioperative Sciences, Anaesthesiology.
    The effect of lung inflation on absolute ventricular volume measurement by conductance.2006In: Clin Physiol Funct Imaging, ISSN 1475-0961, Vol. 26, no 4, p. 220-3Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    BACKGROUND: Conductance catheter in vivo ventricular volume measurements during lung ventilation may provide important information on left ventricular (LV) function. Breathing potentially may alter parallel conductance (V(c)), complicating interpretation of the conductance-derived volume signals. The effects of controlled positive pressure lung inflation (PPLI) on measured parallel conductance with dual-field conductance volumetry were investigated. METHODS: Eight anaesthetized pigs were instrumented with an LV dual-field conductance volumetry catheter. V(c) was measured repeatedly, using the hypertonic saline injection method, at three different levels of lung insufflation: continuous positive airway pressure (PPLI) 0, 5, and 10 cm H(2)O. RESULTS: V(c)s measured at PPLI 0, 5 and 10 cm H(2)O were 70.9 +/- 4.8, 70.7 +/- 5.5 and 70.5 +/- 5.9 ml, respectively. The corresponding uncalibrated end-diastolic volumes (EDV(u)) were 115.5 +/- 7.1, 117.0 +/- 7.5 and 117.5 +/- 7.7 ml, respectively. Mean coefficients of variance for V(c) and EDV(u) at all three PPLI levels were 3.8% and 1.25%, respectively. DISCUSSION: Several levels of PPLI demonstrated no systematic change in parallel conductance for LV dual-field conductance volume signal. We concluded that lung inflation at these levels does not generate changes in V(c).

  • 94.
    Haney, Michael F.
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Surgical and Perioperative Sciences, Anaesthesiology.
    Wiklund, Urban
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Radiation Sciences.
    Can heart rate variability become a screening tool for anesthesia-related hypotension?2007In: Acta Anaesthesiologica Scandinavica, ISSN 0001-5172, E-ISSN 1399-6576, Vol. 51, no 10, p. 1289-1291Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 95.
    Haney, Michael
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Surgical and Perioperative Sciences, Anesthesiology and Intensive Care.
    Johansson, Göran
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Surgical and Perioperative Sciences, Anesthesiology and Intensive Care.
    Häggmark, Sören
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Surgical and Perioperative Sciences, Anesthesiology and Intensive Care.
    Biber, Björn
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Surgical and Perioperative Sciences, Anesthesiology and Intensive Care.
    Analysis of left ventricular systolic function during elevated external cardiac pressures: an examination of measured transmural left ventricular pressure during pressure-volume analysis2001In: Acta Anaesthesiol Scand, Vol. 45, no 7, p. 868-74Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    BACKGROUND: Variations or disturbances in intrathoracic and extracardiac pressures (ECP) occur in critically ill and anaesthetised patients. There are uncertainties concerning the analysis of left ventricular pressure-volume relationship (LVPVR) and the calculation of systolic function parameters when conducted without reference to transmural left ventricular pressure (LVPtm) in the setting of elevated ECP. METHODS: In 7 anaesthetised adult pigs, we measured LVPVR using conductance volumetry and tip manometry along with measurement of pericardial and other intrathoracic pressures. Experimental pericardial infusion and pleural insufflation were performed. Transient controlled preload reductions were accomplished using balloon occlusion of the inferior vena cava. Preload recruitable stroke work (PRSW) was calculated using both intracavitary left ventricular pressure (LVPic) and LVPtm, and differences were tested for using a paired t-test. RESULTS: The pericardial and pleural interventions produced significant elevations in ECP. No difference in PRSW calculated using LVPic and LVPtm was detected. CONCLUSION: These results suggest that LVPtm need not be measured and included in LVPVR analysis of systolic function when there is significant external cardiac pressure. To be able to employ LVPVR analysis of systolic function without reference to LVPtm is important for simplified application in the clinical setting, particularly when elevated extracardiac pressures are suspected, or have been therapeutically induced, as with continuous positive pressure ventilation.

  • 96.
    Haney, Michael
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Surgical and Perioperative Sciences, Anaesthesiology.
    Johansson, Göran
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Surgical and Perioperative Sciences, Anaesthesiology.
    Häggmark, Sören
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Surgical and Perioperative Sciences, Anaesthesiology.
    Biber, Björn
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Surgical and Perioperative Sciences, Anaesthesiology.
    Heart-lung interactions during positive pressure ventilation: left ventricular pressure-volume momentary response to airway pressure elevation2001In: Acta Anaesthesiologica Scandinavica, ISSN 0001-5172, E-ISSN 1399-6576, Vol. 45, no 6, p. 702-709Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    BACKGROUND: Left ventricular (LV) pressure and volume changes are known to occur in response to positive airway pressure (PAP). We aimed to further describe the immediate LV response to increased PAP as demonstrated in successive heart cycles with LV pressure and volume alterations. We postulated that these acute systematic LV events during institution of PAP can follow a distinct pattern that would allow calculation of parameters of systolic function, including end-systolic elastance (Ees) and preload recruitable stroke work (PRSW). We also aimed to examine the relationship of PAP-derived Ees and PRSW to the same parameters derived from vascular occlusion. METHODS: Eight anesthetized adult pigs were studied with invasive circulatory measurements including LV pressure and volume (conductance). The PAP intervention was an airway pressure plateau of 15 cm H2O for 6 s (APP). Venous occlusion was performed by transient balloon inflation in the inferior vena cava (IVCO). Ees and PRSW were derived for each APP and IVCO intervention. RESULTS: Central circulatory variables during APP and IVCO are reported. LV systolic function parameters could be derived from each of the heart-lung interactions during APP sequences. Ees and PRSW derived from APP showed a significant positive bias in relation to those derived from the IVCO sequence. CONCLUSIONS: We conclude that the heart-lung interactions during APP of the magnitude and duration shown here can allow derivation of Ees and PRSW. These parameters are not interchangeable with Ees and PRSW derived from IVCO.

  • 97.
    Haney, Michael
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Surgical and Perioperative Sciences, Anesthesiology and Intensive Care.
    Johansson, Göran
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Surgical and Perioperative Sciences, Anesthesiology and Intensive Care.
    Häggmark, Sören
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Surgical and Perioperative Sciences, Anesthesiology and Intensive Care.
    Biber, Björn
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Surgical and Perioperative Sciences, Anesthesiology and Intensive Care.
    Method of preload reduction during LVPVR analysis of systolic function: airway pressure elevation and vena cava occlusion2002In: Anesthesiology, Vol. 97, no 2, p. 436-46Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    BACKGROUND: A graded preload reduction during analysis of the left ventricular pressure-volume relationship (LVPVR) is required for derivation of end-systolic elastance (Ees) and preload recruitable stroke work (PRSW). The authors aimed to measure serial changes in these systolic function parameters before and during planned circulatory interventions using two different methods of preload alteration: a positive airway pressure plateau (APP) and inferior vena cava occlusion (IVCO). METHODS: In eight animals, measurements were made at 38 degrees, 30 degrees, 32 degrees, 34 degrees, and posthypothermia 38 degrees C. In an additional eight animals, isoflurane, adrenaline, and aorta occlusion (balloon catheter occluder) were administered in series, each with a preintervention control measurement. Left ventricular volume was measured by conductance. Paired measurements of the systolic function parameters Ees and PRSW, each derived with two preload methods, were analyzed for bias. RESULTS: Circulatory alterations were achieved with the temperature, isoflurane, adrenaline, and aorta occlusion interventions. Measured changes in Ees and PRSW from control to intervention showed a strong correlation and no significant bias for APP in relation to IVCO. The APP-derived absolute values for Ees and PRSW demonstrated a consistent positive bias compared with IVCO. CONCLUSION: The APP method for preload reduction during LVPVR analysis detected changes in Ees and PRSW during the circulatory interventions in this model that were not different than those detected using another preload reduction method, IVCO. APP and IVCO are not interchangeable methods for preload reductions during LVPVR absolute quantitation of systolic function, and each needs to be used serially.

  • 98.
    Haney, Michael
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Surgical and Perioperative Sciences, Anaesthesiology.
    Löfvenberg, Richard
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Surgical and Perioperative Sciences.
    Svensson, Olle
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Surgical and Perioperative Sciences, Orthopaedics.
    Optimize perioperative health and begin with insistence on pre-operative smoking cessation2014In: Acta Anaesthesiologica Scandinavica, ISSN 0001-5172, E-ISSN 1399-6576, Vol. 58, no 2, p. 133-134Article in journal (Other academic)
  • 99.
    Hannuksela, Matias
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Surgical and Perioperative Sciences, Anaesthesiology.
    Familial thoracic aortic aneurysms and dissections: studies on genotype and phenotype2017Doctoral thesis, comprehensive summary (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: Thoracic aortic aneurysms and dissections (TAAD) have a genetic component with an estimated 20-25% of the patients having a positive family history. An aneurysm often precedes a dissection. Acute aortic dissections are associated with high mortality and morbidity, even when operated on. Complications due to prophylactic surgery are considerably fewer. Therefore, patients at risk for dissection should be identified, followed-up and evaluated for prophylactic intervention.

    Aims: 1. To establish reference values for ascending (AoA) and descending aortic (AoD) diameters measured by computed tomography. 2. To study the effectiveness of phenotypic cascade screening in families with an inherited form of thoracic aortic aneurysms and dissections (FTAAD) and to address questions that arise when screening for a genetic disorder is applied. 3. To study the agreement of aortic diameters obtained by TTE and MRI and to study aortic stiffness in individuals from families with FTAAD. 4. To perform exome sequencing in order to identify pathogenic sequence variants causing FTAAD, to characterize the phenotype, and to compare thoracic aortic diameter and stiffness in mutation carriers and non-carriers.

    Results: Paper I: The diameter of the thoracic aorta increased by 0.17 mm (0.12 – 0.20 mm) per year. The mean sex-related difference in diameter was 1.99 mm (1.28 – 2.60 mm) with men having larger aortas than women. The mean difference in aortic diameter per unit BMI was 0.27 mm (0.14 – 0.44 mm). Upper normal limits for the AoA can be calculated by the formula D (mm)=31+0.16*age and for the AoD by D (mm)=21+0.16*age.

    Paper II: Of 106 individuals from families with FTAAD but without known thoracic aortic disease, 19 individuals (18%) were identified to have a dilated AoA. The expected number of individuals in this group with an autosomal dominant disease would have been 40 (p<0.0001). In first-degree relatives younger than 40, we found only one individual with a dilated aorta although the expected number of individuals with disease causing mutation would have been 10.

    Paper III: Of 116 individuals investigated, 21 were identified with thoracic aortic dilatation and 95 individuals with normal thoracic aortic diameter. Aortic stiffness increased with age and diameter. The individuals with aortic dilatation were older than those without (49 vs. 37 years, p=0.001) and showed lower aortic elastic properties. The diameters measured by TTE and MRI correlated strongly (r2=0.93). The mean difference in diameters between the two methods was 0.72 mm (95% CI 0.41-1.02) with TTE giving larger diameters than MRI.

    Paper IV: From exome sequencing and segregation analysis, a 2-bp deletion in the MYLK gene (c.3272_3273del) was identified to cause FTAAD. The age and the aortic diameter at dissection or rupture varied in the family members. We did not find any differences in aortic diameter, aortic stiffness, or pulse wave velocity between carriers and non-carriers.

    Conclusions: Thoracic aortic diameter increases with age, and sex and body size are also associated with the diameter. In FTAAD, screening identifies family members with a previously unknown aortic dilatation. However, a normal aortic diameter does not exclude an individual from being a carrier of FTAAD. TTE can be used in follow-up for the ascending aorta. Individuals identified to have a dilated thoracic aorta have increased aortic stiffness compared to individuals with normal thoracic aortic diameter. The MYLK mutation (c.3272_3273del) causes thoracic aortic dissections with variable clinical expression. No differences in aortic stiffness were identified between MYLK mutation carriers and non-carriers.

  • 100.
    Hannuksela, Matias
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Surgical and Perioperative Sciences, Anaesthesiology.
    Lundqvist, Stefan
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Radiation Sciences, Diagnostic Radiology.
    Carlberg, Bo
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine.
    Thoracic aorta: dilated or not?2006In: Scandinavian Cardiovascular Journal, ISSN 1401-7431, E-ISSN 1651-2006, Vol. 40, no 3, p. 175-178Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Objectives: Knowledge of normal aortic diameters is important in the assessment of aortic disease. The aim of this study was to determine normal thoracic aortic diameters.

    Design: 77 patients undergoing computed tomography of the thorax were studied. The diameter of the thoracic aorta was measured at three levels in the ascending aorta and at three levels in the descending aorta. The diameter was studied in relation to age, sex, weight and height.

    Results: We found that aortic diameter is increasing with increasing age. Even sex and BMI influence the aortic diameter but to a lesser extent than age. The upper normal limit for ascending aorta can be calculated with the formula D(mm) = 31 + 0.16*age and for descending aorta with the formula D(mm) = 21 + 0.16*age. Thus a 20-year-old person has an upper normal limit for ascending aorta of 34 mm and an 80-year-old person has a limit of 44 m.

    Conclusions: The thoracic aortic diameter varies with age, sex and body weight and height. The strongest correlation can be seen with age. Age should therefore be taken into consideration when determining whether the thoracic aorta is dilated or not.

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