umu.sePublications
Change search
Refine search result
123 51 - 100 of 108
CiteExportLink to result list
Permanent link
Cite
Citation style
  • apa
  • ieee
  • modern-language-association-8th-edition
  • vancouver
  • Other style
More styles
Language
  • de-DE
  • en-GB
  • en-US
  • fi-FI
  • nn-NO
  • nn-NB
  • sv-SE
  • Other locale
More languages
Output format
  • html
  • text
  • asciidoc
  • rtf
Rows per page
  • 5
  • 10
  • 20
  • 50
  • 100
  • 250
Sort
  • Standard (Relevance)
  • Author A-Ö
  • Author Ö-A
  • Title A-Ö
  • Title Ö-A
  • Publication type A-Ö
  • Publication type Ö-A
  • Issued (Oldest first)
  • Issued (Newest first)
  • Created (Oldest first)
  • Created (Newest first)
  • Last updated (Oldest first)
  • Last updated (Newest first)
  • Disputation date (earliest first)
  • Disputation date (latest first)
  • Standard (Relevance)
  • Author A-Ö
  • Author Ö-A
  • Title A-Ö
  • Title Ö-A
  • Publication type A-Ö
  • Publication type Ö-A
  • Issued (Oldest first)
  • Issued (Newest first)
  • Created (Oldest first)
  • Created (Newest first)
  • Last updated (Oldest first)
  • Last updated (Newest first)
  • Disputation date (earliest first)
  • Disputation date (latest first)
Select
The maximal number of hits you can export is 250. When you want to export more records please use the Create feeds function.
  • 51.
    Nordström, Anna
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Surgical and Perioperative Sciences, Sports Medicine.
    Fjellman-Wiklund, Anncristine
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Community Medicine and Rehabilitation.
    Grysell, Tomas
    Drama as a pedagogical tool for practicing death notification-experiences from Swedish medical students2011In: BMC Medical Education, ISSN 1472-6920, E-ISSN 1472-6920, Vol. 11, no 74, p. 7-Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: One of the toughest tasks in any profession is the deliverance of death notification. Marathon Death is an exercise conducted during the fourth year of medical school in northern Sweden to prepare students for this responsibility. The exercise is designed to enable students to gain insight into the emotional and formal procedure of delivering death notifications. The exercise is inspired by Augusto Boal's work around Forum Theatre and is analyzed using video playback. The aim of the study was to explore reflections, attitudes and ideas toward training in delivering death notifications among medical students who participate in the Marathon Death exercise based on forum play.

    Methods: After participation in the Marathon Death exercise, students completed semi-structured interviews. The transcribed interviews were analyzed using the principles of qualitative content analysis including a deductive content analysis approach with a structured matrix based on Bloom's taxonomy domains.

    Results: The Marathon Death exercise was perceived as emotionally loaded, realistic and valuable for the future professional role as a physician. The deliverance of a death notification to the next of kin that a loved one has died was perceived as difficult. The exercise conjured emotions such as positive expectations and sheer anxiety. Students perceived participation in the exercise as an important learning experience, discovering that they had the capacity to manage such a difficult situation. The feedback from the video playback of the exercise and the feedback from fellow students and teachers enhanced the learning experience.

    Conclusions: The exercise, Marathon Death, based on forum play with video playback is a useful pedagogical tool that enables students to practice delivering death notification. The ability to practice under realistic conditions contributes to reinforce students in preparation for their future professional role.

  • 52.
    Nordström, Anna
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Community Medicine and Rehabilitation, Geriatric Medicine. Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Surgical and Perioperative Sciences, Sports Medicine.
    Fjellman-Wiklund, Anncristine
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Community Medicine and Rehabilitation, Physiotherapy.
    Grysell, Tomas
    The effect of a role-playing exercise on clerkshipstudents’ views of death notification: the Swedish experience2011In: International Journal of Medical Education, ISSN 2042-6372, Vol. 2, p. 24-29Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Objectives The purpose of this study was to examine clerkship students' perspective towards delivering death notifications. An additional purpose of the study was to identify the learning needs of students following a role play exercise in delivering death notifications.

    Methods Participants in this study were fourth-year medical students (N=86) ranging in age from 22-43 years with a mean age of 27.1 years. There were 28 women and 58 men. Questionnaires, consisting of open-ended questions and a visual analogue scale (VAS), were administered before and after the "Marathon Death" role play exercise.

    Results Six categories emerged from the analysis of the questionnaire: communication, emotions, self-development, exercise-related, learning opportunities and tools and strategies. Results from the visual analogue scale showed that the majority of students (60%) needed to practice how to deliver difficult messages in death notifications. After taking part in the role-playing activity with video playback, where the students had an opportunity to view, discuss and reenact scenarios, seventy-six out of 78 (97.4%) stated that they had received training in communication skills. The responding students rated the exercise as highly relevant, scoring it a mean of 91 on a VAS scale of 0 to 100 mm.

    Conclusions Students are not competent in the communication skills required for delivering death notifications. A majority of students expressed a need for training in communication skills. The "Marathon Death" role play exercise provides initial training and emotional support for delivering a death notification. However, further empirical studies are required about the effect of the exercise on delivering the notification of death.

  • 53.
    Nordström, Anna
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Surgical and Perioperative Sciences, Sports Medicine.
    Gerdhem, Paul
    Department of Orthopaedics, Malmö University Hospital, Sweden.
    Brändström, Helena
    Department of Medical Sciences, Uppsala University, Sweden .
    Stiger, Fredrik
    Department of Medical Sciences, Uppsala University, Sweden .
    Lerner, Ulf
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Odontology, Oral Cell Biology.
    Lorentzon, Mattias
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Surgical and Perioperative Sciences, Sports Medicine.
    Obrant, Karl
    Department of Orthopaedics, Malmö University Hospital, Sweden.
    Nordström, Peter
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Community Medicine and Rehabilitation, Geriatric Medicine. Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Surgical and Perioperative Sciences, Sports Medicine.
    Åkesson, Kristina
    Department of Orthopaedics, Malmö University Hospital, Sweden.
    Interleukin-6 promoter polymorphism is associated with bone quality assessed by calcaneus ultrasound and previous fractures in a cohort of 75-year-old women2004In: Osteoporosis International, ISSN 0937-941X, E-ISSN 1433-2965, ISSN 0937-941X, Vol. 15, no 10, p. 820-826Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Interleukin 6 (IL-6) is a multifunctional cytokine and a potent stimulator of bone resorption and has been implicated in the pathogenesis of osteoporosis in postmenopausal women. The aim of this study was to investigate if a functional IL-6 promoter polymorphism (-174) was related to bone mass and fractures in a cohort consisting of 964 postmenopausal Caucasian women aged 75 years. Bone mineral density (BMD; g/cm2) of the femoral neck, lumbar spine and total body was measured using dual energy X-ray absorptiometry (DXA). Quantitative ultrasound (QUS) was also measured in the calcaneus and quantified as speed of sound (SOS; m/s), broadband ultrasound attenuation (BUA; dB/MHz), and stiffness index (SI). IL-6 genotypes was determined by restriction fragment length polymorphism (RFLP) using the restriction enzyme NlaIII. The frequencies of the different IL-6 genotypes were 27.5% (GG), 47.9% (GC), 24.6% (CC). The IL-6 polymorphism (presence of G) was independently related to a lower stiffness (beta=-0.07; P=0.03) and BUA (beta=-0.08; P=0.02), but not to BMD at any site measured by DXA. In the cohort, 420 subjects (44%) reported at least one fracture during their lifetime, and 349 (36%) reported at least one fracture after the age of 50. Using binary logistic regression, the IL-6 polymorphism (presence of G) was significantly related to an increased risk of a previous fracture during life (odds ratio 1.46, 95% CI 1.08-1.97) and to an increased risk of a fracture occurring after 50 years of age (odds ratio 1.37, 95% CI 1.004-1.88). The risk was further increased for fractures grouped as osteoporotic fractures (odds ratio 1.67, 95% CI 1.14-2.45), including forearm fractures (odds ratio 1.59, 95% CI 1.05-2.40). In conclusion, presence of G allele in the IL-6 promoter polymorphism at position -174 is independently related to previous fractures in postmenopausal women. This association may be related primarily to an altered bone quality identified by QUS and not a lower bone mass. This is also the first demonstration of association of IL-6 gene polymorphism to calcaneal QUS.

  • 54.
    Nordström, Anna
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine, Occupational and Environmental Medicine.
    Hadrévi, Jenny
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Community Medicine and Rehabilitation, Sports medicine.
    Olsson, Tommy
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine, Medicine.
    Franks, Paul W.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine, Medicine. Department of Clinical Sciences, Genetic and Molecular Epidemiology Unit, Lund University Diabetes Centre, Malmö, Sweden; Department of Nutrition, Harvard School of Public Health, Boston, Massachusetts 02115.
    Nordström, Peter
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Community Medicine and Rehabilitation, Geriatric Medicine. Lunds Universitet.
    The Higher Prevalence of Type 2 Diabetes in Men Than in Women is Associated with Differences in Visceral Fat Mass2016In: Journal of Clinical Endocrinology and Metabolism, ISSN 0021-972X, E-ISSN 1945-7197, Vol. 101, no 10, p. 3740-3746Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Context: We have previously found that visceral fat is a stronger predictor for cardiovascular risk factors than body mass index (BMI). Objective: To investigate the prevalence of diabetes in elderly men and women in relation to objectively assessed visceral fat volume. Design and settings: The cohort consisted of a population-based sample of 705 men and 688 women, all aged 70 years at the time of examination. Main outcome measures: Associations between body fat estimates, plasma glucose level and diabetes prevalence were investigated using multivariable-adjusted statistical models.Results:Theprevalence of type2 diabetes was 14.6% in men and 9.1% inwomen (p0.001). Mean BMI was slightly higher in men than in women (27. 3 vs. 26.6 kg/m2, p 0.01), with a greater difference in mean visceral fat mass (1987 vs. 1087 g, p 0.001). After adjustment for physical activity and smoking, men had about twice the odds of having type 2 diabetes compared with women (OR, 1.95; 95% CI, 1.38–2.76). The inclusion of BMI in this model did not change the risk associated with male sex (OR, 1.93; 95% CI, 1.34–2.77). However, when visceral fat was included as a covariate, male sex was not associated with increased risk of type 2 diabetes (OR, 0.77; 95% CI, 0.51–1.18).Conclusions: The higher prevalence of type 2 diabetes in older men than in older women was associated with larger amount of visceral fat in men. In contrast, differences in BMI was not associated with this difference.

  • 55.
    Nordström, Anna
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Surgical and Perioperative Sciences, Sports Medicine. Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Community Medicine and Rehabilitation, Rehabilitation Medicine.
    Högström, Gabriel
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Surgical and Perioperative Sciences, Sports Medicine.
    Eriksson, Anders
    Department of Health Sciences, Luleå University of Technology, Luleå.
    Bonnerud, Patrik
    Department of Health Sciences, Luleå University of Technology, Luleå.
    Tegner, Yelverton
    Department of Health Sciences, Luleå University of Technology, Luleå.
    Malm, Christer
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Surgical and Perioperative Sciences, Sports Medicine. Winternet, Boden, Idrottsmedicin.
    Higher muscle mass but lower gynoid fat mass in athletes using anabolic androgenic steroids2012In: Journal of Strength and Conditioning Research, ISSN 1064-8011, E-ISSN 1533-4287, Vol. 26, no 1, p. 246-250Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Nordstrom, A, Hogstrom, G, Eriksson, A, Bonnerud, P, Tegner, Y, and Malm, C. Higher muscle mass but lower gynoid fat mass in athletes using anabolic androgenic steroids. J Strength Cond Res 26(1): 246-250, 2012-This study evaluated the relationship between anabolic androgenic steroid (AAS) use and body constitution. Dual-energy x-ray absorptiometry was used to measure bone mineral density (BMD, g.cm(-2)) of the total body, arms, and legs. Total gynoid and android fat mass (grams) and total lean mass (grams) were measured in 10 strength trained athletes (41.4 +/- 7.9 years) who had used AASs for 5-15 years (Doped) and 7 strength trained athletes (29.4 +/- 6.2 years) who had never used AASs (Clean). Seventeen sedentary men (30.3 +/- 2.1 years) served as Controls. Doped athletes had significantly more lean body mass (85.5 +/- 3.8 vs. 75.3 +/- 2.5 vs. 60.7 +/- 1.9, p < 0.001) and a greater index of fat-free/fat mass (5.8 vs. 2.6 vs. 2.5, p < 0.001) compared with Clean athletes and Controls. Doped athletes also had significantly less gynoid fat mass compared with that of Clean athletes (2.8 +/- 0.4 vs. 4.8 +/- 0.2 kg, p = 0.02). There were no differences in BMD between the athletes (p = 0.39-0.98), but both groups had significantly higher BMDs at all sites compared with that of Controls (p = 0.01 to <0.001). Thus, long-term AAS use seems to alter body constitution, favoring higher muscle mass and reduced gynoid fat mass without affecting BMD.

  • 56.
    Nordström, Anna
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Surgical and Perioperative Sciences, Sports Medicine. Idrottsmedicin.
    Högström, Magnus
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Surgical and Perioperative Sciences, Sports Medicine. Idrottsmedicin.
    Nordström, Peter
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Surgical and Perioperative Sciences, Sports Medicine. Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Community Medicine and Rehabilitation, Geriatric Medicine.
    Effects of different types of weight-bearing loading on bone mass and size in young males: A longitudinal study.2007In: Bone, ISSN 8756-3282, E-ISSN 1873-2763, Vol. 42, no 3, p. 565-571Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 57.
    Nordström, Anna
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Surgical and Perioperative Sciences, Sports Medicine. Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine, Medicine.
    Karlsson, Caroline
    Nyquist, Fredrik
    Olsson, Tommy
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine, Medicine.
    Nordström, Peter
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Surgical and Perioperative Sciences, Sports Medicine. Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine, Medicine.
    Karlsson, Magnus
    Bone loss and fracture risk after reduced physical activity.2005In: Journal of Bone and Mineral Research, ISSN 0884-0431, E-ISSN 1523-4681, Vol. 20, no 2, p. 202-207Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Former male young athletes partially lost benefits in BMD (g/cm2) with cessation of exercise, but, despite this, had a higher BMD 4 years after cessation of career than a control group. A higher BMD might contribute to the lower incidence of fragility fractures found in former older athletes > or =60 years of age compared with a control group. INTRODUCTION: Physical activity increases peak bone mass and may prevent osteoporosis if a residual high BMD is retained into old age. MATERIALS AND METHODS: BMD was measured by DXA in 97 male young athletes 21.0 +/- 4.5 years of age (SD) and 48 controls 22.4 +/- 6.3 years of age, with measurements repeated 5 years later, when 55 of the athletes had retired from sports. In a second, older cohort, fracture incidence was recorded in 400 former older athletes and 800 controls > or =60 years of age. RESULTS: At baseline, the young athletes had higher BMD than controls in total body (mean difference, 0.08 g/cm2), spine (mean difference, 0.10 g/cm2), femoral neck (mean difference, 0.13 g/cm2), and arms (mean difference, 0.05 g/cm2; all p < 0.001). During the follow-up period, the young athletes who retired lost more BMD than the still active athletes at the femoral neck (mean difference, 0.07 g/cm2; p = 0.001) and gained less BMD at the total body (mean difference, 0.03 g/cm2; p = 0.004). Nevertheless, BMD was still higher in the retired young athletes (mean difference, 0.06-0.08 g/cm2) than in the controls in the total body, femoral neck, and arms (all p < 0.05). In the older cohort, there were fewer former athletes > or =60 of age than controls with fragility fractures (2.0% versus 4.2%; p < 0.05) and distal radius fractures (0.75% versus 2.5%; p < 0.05). CONCLUSIONS: Although exercise-induced BMD benefits are reduced after retirement from sports, former male older athletes have fewer fractures than matched controls.

  • 58.
    Nordström, Anna
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Surgical and Perioperative Sciences, Sports Medicine. Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Community Medicine and Rehabilitation, Rehabilitation Medicine.
    Neovius, Martin G
    Rössner, Stephan
    Nordström, Peter
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Community Medicine and Rehabilitation, Geriatric Medicine. Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Surgical and Perioperative Sciences, Sports Medicine.
    Postpubertal development of total and abdominal percentage body fat: an 8-year longitudinal study.2008In: Obesity, ISSN 1930-7381, Vol. 16, no 10, p. 2342-2347Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The aim of the present study was to describe postpubertal changes in total and abdominal adiposity in young men and the relation to changes in physical activity (PA). The study included 107 white men with a mean age of 17.1 +/- 1.7 years at baseline. Total percentage body fat (%BF) and abdominal percentage body fat (abd%BF) were measured at baseline and after a mean time of 28, 68, and 92 months using dual-energy X-ray absorptiometry (DXA). PA (h/week) was assessed at each visit by questionnaire. Over the study period, significant increases of 7.8 +/- 5.5%BF and 9.0 +/- 5.6 abd%BF were observed. Subjects who were active athletes throughout the study (n = 24), or nonathletes not changing their level of PA during follow-up (n = 27) increased 5.7 +/- 3.2 and 8.1 +/- 6.7%BF, respectively. Athletes who quit organized training during follow-up period (n = 56) increased by 8.7 +/- 4.9%BF. In the total cohort, the average annual gains in BMI, %BF, and abd%BF were 0.4 kg/m(2), 0.9%BF, and 1.1abd%BF (all P < 0.0001), respectively. Adjustment for changes in PA altered the coefficient magnitudes only marginally. Changes in PA were, however, significantly and inversely associated with changes in %BF and abd%BF (P = 0.005 and P = 0.02, respectively), but were not significantly associated with BMI development (P = 0.15). In summary, our results indicate that the natural course of adiposity development in postpubertal men is characterized by adiposity gains. The influence of PA on especially abd%BF may influence the future risk of cardiovascular disease.

  • 59.
    Nordström, Anna
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Community Medicine and Rehabilitation. Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Surgical and Perioperative Sciences, Sports Medicine.
    Nordström, Peter
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Community Medicine and Rehabilitation, Geriatric Medicine.
    Cognitive Performance in Late Adolescence and the Subsequent Risk of Subdural Hematoma: An Observational Study of a Prospective Nationwide Cohort2011In: PLoS Medicine, ISSN 1549-1277, E-ISSN 1549-1676, Vol. 8, no 12, p. e1001151-Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: There are few identified risk factors for traumatic brain injuries such as subdural hematoma (SDH). The aim of the present study was to investigate whether low cognitive performance in young adulthood is associated with SDH later in life. A second aim was to investigate whether this risk factor was associated with education and physical fitness. Methods and Findings: Word recollection, logical, visuospatial, and technical performances were tested at a mean age of 18.5 years in a prospective nation-wide cohort of 440,742 men. An estimate of global intelligence was calculated from these four tests. Associations between cognitive performance, education, physical fitness, and SDH during follow-up were explored using Cox regression analyses. During a median follow-up of 35 years, 863 SDHs were diagnosed in the cohort. Low global intelligence was associated with an increased risk of SDH during follow-up (hazard ratio [HR]: 1.33, per standard deviation decrease, 95% CI = 1.25-1.43). Similar results were obtained for the other measures of cognitive performance (HR: 1.24-1.33, p<0.001 for all). In contrast, a high education (HR: 0.27, comparing more than 2 years of high school and 8 years of elementary school, 95% CI = 0.19-0.39), and a high level of physical fitness (HR: 0.76, per standard deviation increase, 95% CI = 0.70-0.83), was associated with a decreased risk of suffering from a SDH. Conclusions: The present findings suggest that reduced cognitive function in young adulthood is strongly associated with an increased risk of SDH later in life. In contrast, a higher level of education and a higher physical fitness were associated with a decreased risk of SDH.

  • 60.
    Nordström, Anna
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Surgical and Perioperative Sciences, Sports Medicine.
    Nordström, Peter
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Community Medicine and Rehabilitation, Geriatric Medicine.
    Ett bensäkert råd för framtiden2011In: Svensk Idrottsforskning: Organ för Centrum för Idrottsforskning, ISSN 1103-4629, no 2, p. 58-60Article in journal (Other academic)
  • 61.
    Nordström, Anna
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Surgical and Perioperative Sciences, Sports Medicine.
    Nordström, Peter
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Community Medicine and Rehabilitation, Geriatric Medicine.
    Prevention of bone loss with exercise2012In: Diet, nutrients and bone health, CRC Press, 2012, p. 493-508Chapter in book (Refereed)
  • 62.
    Nordström, Anna
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Surgical and Perioperative Sciences, Sports Medicine.
    Nordström, Peter
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Community Medicine and Rehabilitation, Geriatric Medicine.
    The effect of detraining on bone2011In: Open Bone Journal, ISSN 1876-5254, no 3, p. 22-30Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Physical activity has been recommended for the treatment and even prevention of osteoporosis. This is because physical activity can potentially increase bone mass and strength in the early years of life and reduce the risk of falling in older populations. However, a key question that remains to be answered is whether a high bone mineral density (BMD) resulting from physical activity is sustained despite decreased activity. The aim of this review is to describe the effects of decreased levels of physical activity on bone.A comprehensive search of Medline, EMBASE, and the Cochrane controlled trials register was conducted. Previous studies have reported that benefits from prior physical activity seem to be eroded after cessation of this activity, at least for bone sites that are rich in trabecular bone such as the clinically important proximal femur. In bone sites rich in cortical bone, there appeared to be long-term beneficial effects of physical activity.In conclusion, bone gain through physical activity is lost in bone sites rich in trabecular bone if the activity is not maintained. However, current knowledge is limited and further prospective research into the effect of detraining is recommended.

  • 63.
    Nordström, Anna
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine, Occupational and Environmental Medicine. School of Sports Science, UiT The Arctic University of Norway, Tromsø, Norway..
    Nordström, Peter
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Community Medicine and Rehabilitation, Geriatric Medicine.
    Traumatic brain injury and the risk of dementia diagnosis: A nationwide cohort study2018In: PLoS Medicine, ISSN 1549-1277, E-ISSN 1549-1676, Vol. 15, no 1, article id e1002496Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    BACKGROUND: Traumatic brain injury (TBI) has been associated with dementia. The questions of whether the risk of dementia decreases over time after TBI, whether it is similar for different TBI types, and whether it is influenced by familial aggregation are not well studied.

    METHODS AND FINDINGS: The cohort considered for inclusion comprised all individuals in Sweden aged ≥50 years on December 31, 2005 (n = 3,329,360). Diagnoses of dementia and TBI were tracked through nationwide databases from 1964 until December 31, 2012. In a first cohort, individuals diagnosed with TBI (n = 164,334) were matched with up to two controls. A second cohort consisted of subjects diagnosed with dementia during follow-up (n = 136,233) matched with up to two controls. A third cohort consisted of 46,970 full sibling pairs with discordant TBI status. During a mean follow-up period of 15.3 (range, 0-49) years, 21,963 individuals in the first cohort (6.3% with TBI, 3.6% without TBI) were diagnosed with dementia (adjusted odds ratio [OR], 1.81; 95% confidence interval [CI], 1.75-1.86). The association was strongest in the first year after TBI (OR, 3.52; 95% CI, 3.23-3.84), but the risk remained significant >30 years (OR, 1.25; 95% CI, 1.11-1.41). Single mild TBI showed a weaker association with dementia (OR, 1.63; 95% CI, 1.57-1.70) than did more severe TBI (OR, 2.06; 95% CI, 1.95-2.19) and multiple TBIs (OR, 2.81; 95% CI, 2.51-3.15). These results were in general confirmed in the nested case-control cohort. TBI was also associated with an increased risk of dementia diagnosis in sibling pairs with discordant TBI status (OR, 1.89; 95% CI, 1.62-2.21). A main limitation of the present study is the observational design. Thus, no causal inferences can be made based on the associations found.

    CONCLUSIONS: The risk of dementia diagnosis decreased over time after TBI, but it was still evident >30 years after the trauma. The association was stronger for more severe TBI and multiple TBIs, and it persisted after adjustment for familial factors.

  • 64.
    Nordström, Anna
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Surgical and Perioperative Sciences, Sports Medicine. Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine, Occupational and Environmental Medicine.
    Nordström, Peter
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Community Medicine and Rehabilitation, Geriatric Medicine.
    Ekstrand, Jan
    Football Research Group, Division of Community Medicine, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Linköping University, Linköping, Sweden.
    Sports-related concussion increases the risk of subsequent injury by about 50% in elite male football players2014In: British Journal of Sports Medicine, ISSN 0306-3674, E-ISSN 1473-0480, Vol. 48, no 19, p. 1447-1450Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background Little is known about the short-term and long-term sequelae of concussion, and about when athletes who have sustained such injuries can safely return to play. Purpose To examine whether sports-related concussion increases the risk of subsequent injury in elite male football players. Study design Prospective cohort study. Methods Injuries were registered for 46 male elite football teams in 10 European countries in the 2001/ 2002-2011/ 2102 seasons. Two survival models were used to analyse whether concussion increased the subsequent risk of an injury in the first year. Results During the follow-up period, 66 players sustained concussions and 1599 players sustained other injuries. Compared with the risk following other injuries, concussion was associated with a progressively increased risk of a subsequent injury in the first year (0 to <3 months, HR=1.56, 95% CI 1.09 to 2.23; 3 to <6 months, HR=2.78, 95% CI 1.58 to 4.89; 6-12 months, HR=4.07, 95% CI 2.14 to 7.76). In the second model, after adjustment for the number of injuries in the year preceding the concussion, this injury remained significantly associated with the risk of subsequent injury in the first year (HR=1.47, 95% CI 1.05 to 2.05). Conclusions Concussion was a risk factor for sustaining subsequent injury within the following year. In-depth medical evaluation, which includes neurological and cognitive assessment, is warranted within the concussion management and return-to-play process.

  • 65.
    Nordström, Anna
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine, Medicine. Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Surgical and Perioperative Sciences, Sports Medicine.
    Olsson, Tommy
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine, Medicine.
    Nordström, Peter
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Surgical and Perioperative Sciences, Sports Medicine. Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Community Medicine and Rehabilitation, Geriatric Medicine.
    Bone gained from physical activity and lost through detraining: a longitudinal study in young males.2005In: Osteoporosis International, ISSN 0937-941X, E-ISSN 1433-2965, Vol. 16, no 7, p. 835-841Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The aim of this study was to investigate the effect of training and detraining on bone mineral density of both weight-bearing and non-weight-bearing bone in a cohort of young males who participated in ice hockey training. Forty-three healthy adolescent ice hockey players (16.7+/-0.6 years) training for a mean of 9.7+/-2.4 h/week and 25 control subjects (16.8+/-0.3 years) training for 2.1+/-2.7 h/week, were included in this longitudinal study. Bone mineral density (BMD, g/cm2) of the arms, the dominant and non-dominant humerus, dominant and non-dominant femur, and the right femoral neck, total hip, and bone area of the femur, humerus and hip were measured at baseline and again after 30 and 70 months using dual-energy X-ray absorptiometry. From baseline to the first follow-up, athletes gained significantly more BMD in the femoral neck (0.07 versus 0.03 g/cm2) and arms (0.09 versus 0.06 g/cm2) compared with the controls (P = 0.04 for both). Between the first and the second follow-up, 21 ice hockey players stopped their active sports career. These men lost significantly more BMD at the femoral neck (-0.02 versus -0.10 g/cm2, P < 0.001), total hip (-0.05 versus -0.09, P = 0.04), dominant (0.02 versus -0.03 g/cm2, P = 0.009) and non-dominant humerus (0.03 versus -0.01 g/cm2, P = 0.03) than the still active ice hockey players (n = 22). At the second follow-up examination, at 22 years of age, the former ice hockey players still had significantly higher BMD at the non-dominant humerus than the controls (P < 0.01). During the total study period, the still active athletes (n = 22) gained significantly more BMD compared with the controls at the femoral neck (0.09 g/cm2; P = 0.008), total hip (0.05 g/cm2, P = 0.04) and arms (0.07 g/cm2; P = 0.01). No differences were seen in bone areas when comparing the different groups. In conclusion, training associated with ice hockey is related to continuous accumulation of BMD after puberty in males. Reduced activity is followed by BMD loss within 3 years of cessation of sports career at predominantly weight-bearing sites. The effects are confined to bone density and not bone size.

  • 66.
    Nordström, Anna
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine.
    Olsson, Tommy
    Nordström, Peter
    Rapid loss of bone mineral density of the femoral neck after cessation of ice hockey training: a 6-year longitudinal study in males.2003In: Journal of Bone and Mineral Research, ISSN 0884-0431, E-ISSN 1523-4681, Vol. 18, no 11, p. 1964-1969Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the effect of training and reduced training on BMD in young ice hockey players during 6 years of follow-up. We found BMD gains in the femoral neck in the ice hockey group compared with controls. However, these gains were lost with reduced activity after cessation of career. INTRODUCTION: It has been suggested that increasing bone mass by intense physical activity during childhood and adolescence may decrease the risk of osteoporosis later in life. MATERIALS AND METHODS: In this longitudinal study, 43 ice hockey players (16.7 +/- 0.6 years) and 25 control subjects (16.8 +/- 0.3 years) were studied at baseline and after a mean period of 30 and 70 months. The groups did not differ in weight or height. Bone mineral density (BMD; g/cm2) was measured for total body, femoral neck, and spine using DXA. Volumetric BMD (vBMD; mg/cm3) of the femoral neck was estimated. RESULTS: The ice hockey players were found to have gained significantly more femoral neck BMD than controls (0.07 versus 0.03 g/cm2, p = 0.04) and to have gained femoral neck vBMD, whereas the controls did not (16 versus 0 mg/cm3, p = 0.049) between baseline and the first follow-up. At the first follow-up, the ice hockey players were found to have significantly higher BMD at the femoral neck and total body versus controls (p < 0.05). Between the first and second follow-ups, 21 ice hockey players stopped their active sports career. During this time period, these subjects lost significantly more femoral neck BMD (0.10 versus 0.02 g/cm2, p < 0.001) and femoral neck vBMD (38 versus 4 mg/cm3, p < 0.001) compared with the 22 ice hockey players who continued training. The former ice hockey players also lost significantly more neck vBMD (38 versus 14 mg/cm3, p = 0.009) compared with the controls during the same period. At the second follow-up, only the 22 ice hockey players who had continued their training were found to have significantly higher BMD at the femoral neck (p = 0.01), total body (p = 0.04), and spine (p = 0.02) compared with the controls. The former athletes were found to have intermediate BMD at all sites. CONCLUSION: In summary, we have demonstrated fast BMD loss at the femoral neck after decreased physical activity in young men. We conclude that ice hockey training during childhood and adolescence may not prevent the development of osteoporosis of the femoral neck later in life if the activity is not maintained.

  • 67.
    Nordström, Anna
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Surgical and Perioperative Sciences, Sports Medicine.
    Olsson, Tommy
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine, Medicine.
    Nordström, Peter
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Surgical and Perioperative Sciences, Sports Medicine. Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Community Medicine and Rehabilitation, Geriatric Medicine.
    Sustained benefits from previous physical activity on bone mineral density in males.2006In: Journal of Clinical Endocrinology and Metabolism, ISSN 0021-972X, E-ISSN 1945-7197, Vol. 91, no 7, p. 2600-2604Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Context: The effect of physical activity on bone mineral density (BMD) is not well investigated longitudinally after puberty in men.

    Objective: Our objective was to evaluate the effect of exercise and reduced exercise on BMD after puberty in men.

    Design: We conducted a longitudinal study.

    Participants: Sixty-three healthy young athletes and 27 male controls, both with a mean age of 17 yr at baseline, participated. Also, 136 of the participants’ parents were investigated to evaluate heritable influences.

    Main Outcome Measures: Total body, total hip, femoral neck, and humerus BMD (grams per square centimeter) were measured at baseline and after mean periods of 27, 68, and 94 months in the young cohort.

    Results: BMDs of control parents and athlete parents were equal, suggesting absence of selection bias. The 23 athletes that remained active throughout the study increased BMD at all sites when compared with controls (mean difference, 0.04–0.12 g/cm2; P < 0.05) during the study period. After an average of 3 yr, 27 athletes ended their active careers. Although this group initially lost BMD at the hip compared with active athletes, the former athletes still had higher BMD than controls at the femoral neck (0.12 g/cm2; P = 0.007), total hip (0.11 g/cm2; P = 0.02), and humerus (0.10 g/cm2; P = 0.02) at the final follow-up.

    Conclusions: High sensitivity to physical loading persists after puberty in men. Reduced physical activity is associated with BMD loss in the first 3 yr in weight-bearing bone. Sustained benefits in BMD are preserved 5 yr after intensive training ends.

  • 68.
    Nordström, Anna
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Surgical and Perioperative Sciences, Sports Medicine.
    Tervo, Taru
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Surgical and Perioperative Sciences, Sports Medicine.
    Högström, Magnus
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Surgical and Perioperative Sciences, Sports Medicine.
    The effect of physical activity on bone accrual, osteoporosis and fracture prevention2011In: Open Bone Journal, ISSN 1876-5254, no 3, p. 11-21Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: Physical activity has been recommended for the prevention and even treatment of osteoporosis because it potentially can increase bone mass and strength during childhood and adolescence and reduce the risk of falling in older populations. However, few reports have systematically investigated the effect of physical activity on bone in men and women of different ages.

    Purpose: The goal of this study was to review the literature relating to the effect of physical activity on bone mineral density in men and women of various ages.

    Method: This review systematically evaluates the evidence for the effect of physical activity on bone mineral density. Cochrane and Medline databases were searched for relevant articles, and the selected articles were evaluated.

    Results: The review found evidence to support the effectiveness of weight bearing physical activity on bone accrual during childhood and adolescence. The effect of weight bearing physical activity was site-specific. In contrast, the role of physical activity in adulthood is primarily geared toward maintaining bone mineral density. The evidence for a protective effect of physical activity on bone is not as solid as that for younger individuals.

    Conclusions: The effect of weight bearing physical activity is seen in sites that are exposed to loading. There also seems to be a continuous adaptive response in bone to loading. Additional randomized, controlled studies are needed to evaluate the effect of physical activity in the elderly.

  • 69.
    Nordström, Anna
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine, Medicine. Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Surgical and Perioperative Sciences, Sports Medicine.
    Thorsen, Kim
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Surgical and Perioperative Sciences, Sports Medicine.
    Nordström, Peter
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Surgical and Perioperative Sciences, Sports Medicine. Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Community Medicine and Rehabilitation, Geriatric Medicine.
    A 3-year longitudinal study of the effect of physical activity on the accrual of bone mineral density in healthy adolescent males.2003In: Calcified Tissue International, ISSN 0171-967X, E-ISSN 1432-0827, Vol. 73, no 2, p. 108-114Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    It has previously been suggested that physical activity predominantly influences the accumulation of bone density before puberty. The purpose of the present study was to examine the effect of physical activity on the accumulation of bone mass in male athletes between 16 and 19 years of age. The cohort studied consisted of 12 badminton players (aged 16.1 +/- 0.5), 20 ice hockey players (aged 16.1 +/- 0.5), and 24 age-matched controls (aged 16.1 +/- 0.6). The bone mineral density (BMD, g/cm2) of the total body, spine, dominant and nondominant humerus, head and femoral neck was measured twice with a 3-year interval by dual energy X-ray absorptiometry (DXA). In addition, at the femoral neck, volumetric bone mineral density (vBMD, mg/cm3) was estimated. At baseline, the athletes as a whole group had significantly higher BMD at the total body (P = 0.03), dominant (P = 0.006) and nondominant humerus (P = 0.009) and femoral neck (P = 0.007) compared to the controls. At the 3-year followup, the athletes had significantly higher BMD at all sites (total body; P = 0.003, spine; P = 0.02, dominant humerus; P = 0.001, nondominant humerus; P = < 0.001, femoral neck; P = 0.001) except for the head (P = 0.91) compared with controls. The athletes also had higher vBMD at the femoral neck compared with the controls (P = 0.01). Furthermore, to be an athlete was found to be independently associated with a higher increase in nondominant humerus BMD (beta = 0.24; P < 0.05) and femoral neck BMD (beta = 0.30; P < 0.05) compared with the controls, during the study period. In summary, these results suggests that it is possible to achieve continuous gains in bone mass in sites exposed to osteogenic stimulation after puberty in males by engaging in weight-bearing physical activity.

  • 70.
    Nordström, Peter
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Community Medicine and Rehabilitation, Geriatric Medicine.
    Eklund, Fredrik
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Community Medicine and Rehabilitation, Geriatric Medicine.
    Björnstig, Ulf
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Surgical and Perioperative Sciences, Surgery.
    Nordström, Anna
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Surgical and Perioperative Sciences, Sports Medicine.
    Lorentzon, Ronny
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Surgical and Perioperative Sciences, Sports Medicine.
    Sievänen, Harri
    Gustafson, Yngve
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Community Medicine and Rehabilitation, Geriatric Medicine.
    Do both areal BMD and injurious falls explain the higher incidence of fractures in women than in men?2011In: Calcified Tissue International, ISSN 0171-967X, E-ISSN 1432-0827, Vol. 89, no 3, p. 203-210Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The higher incidence of fractures in women than in men is generally attributed to the lower areal bone mineral density (areal BMD, g/cm(2)) of the former. The purpose of the present study was to investigate both areal BMD and injurious falls as risk factors for fractures. In a first cohort, areal BMD was measured in 5,131 men and women (age range 40-95 years). In a second cohort, consisting of 26,565 men and women (age range 40-69 years), a health survey was conducted including questions about lifestyle and medication. Main outcome measures included validated prospective injurious falls and fractures in both cohorts. The higher areal BMD and femoral neck BMD in men compared to women (P < 0.001) were explained by a higher diameter of the femoral neck. Importantly, the diameter of the femoral neck was not associated with fractures in either sex (hazard ratio [HR] 0.94-1.04, P > 0.05 for all), suggesting that a higher areal BMD and lower incidence of osteoporosis in men do not explain their lower incidence of fractures. In contrast, women were more prone to sustain injurious falls than men in both cohorts investigated (HR for women = 1.61 and 1.84, P < 0.001 for both), resulting in a higher incidence of fractures (HR for women = 2.24 and 2.36, P < 0.001 for both). The number of injurious falls and fractures occurring each month during the study period showed a very strong correlation in both women (r = 0.95, P < 0.00001) and men (r = 0.97, P < 0.00001). In summary, low areal BMD, and thus osteoporosis, may not explain the higher fracture incidence in women than in men. Instead, a higher incidence of injurious falls in women was strongly associated with the higher fracture risk.

  • 71.
    Nordström, Peter
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Community Medicine and Rehabilitation, Geriatric Medicine. Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Surgical and Perioperative Sciences, Sports Medicine.
    Franks, Paul
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine, Medicine.
    Gustafson, Yngve
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Community Medicine and Rehabilitation, Geriatric Medicine.
    Nordström, Anna
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Surgical and Perioperative Sciences, Sports Medicine.
    Cognitive function in young men and the later risk of fractures2012In: Journal of Bone and Mineral Research, ISSN 0884-0431, E-ISSN 1523-4681, Vol. 27, no 11, p. 2291-2297Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Dementia has been associated with an increased risk of fractures. These associations may be explained by an impaired cognitive function, as well as comorbid illness and toxic reaction from drugs. To investigate whether cognitive function in young, healthy individuals already affects the risk of fractures, overall cognitive function scores were calculated from four cognitive tests accomplished during a national conscriptions test in 960,956 men with a mean age of 18 years. Incident fractures were searched in national registers. During a median follow-up of 30 years (range 0 to 41 years), 65,313 men had one fracture and 2589 men had a hip fracture. Compared with men with no fracture, overall cognitive function at baseline was 3.5% lower for men sustaining one fracture and 5.5% lower for men sustaining a hip fracture (p < 0.001 for both). When comparing the lowest and the highest decile, low overall cognitive function scores increased the risk one fracture (hazard ratio [HR] = 1.55, 95% confidence interval [CI] 1.50-1.61) and a hip fracture (HR = 2.12, 95% CI 1.77-2.55), after adjustment for confounders. A higher education (university level versus elementary school) was associated with a decreased risk of a fracture (HR = 0.67, 95% CI 0.65-0.69) and a hip fracture (HR = 0.51, 95% CI 0.45-0.57). The effects of education and cognitive function were reduced when also adjusting for total income and disability pension. In summary, low cognitive function and education in young men were associated with the later risk of especially hip fractures. These associations may partly be mediated by socioeconomic factors. © 2012 American Society for Bone and Mineral Research.

  • 72.
    Nordström, Peter
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Community Medicine and Rehabilitation, Geriatric Medicine.
    Gustafson, Yngve
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Community Medicine and Rehabilitation, Geriatric Medicine.
    Michaëlsson, Karl
    Nordström, Anna
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine, Occupational and Environmental Medicine.
    Length of hospital stay after hip fracture and short term risk of death after discharge: a total cohort study in Sweden2015In: BMJ. British Medical Journal, ISSN 1756-1833, Vol. 350, article id h696Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Objective To investigate relation between inpatient length of stay after hip fracture and risk of death after hospital discharge. Setting Population >= 50 years old living in Sweden as of 31 December 2005 with a first hip fracture the years 2006-12. Participants 116 111 patients with an incident hip fracture from a closed nationwide cohort. Main outcome measure Death within 30 days of hospital discharge in relation to hospital length of stay after adjustment for multiple covariates. Results Mean inpatient length of stay after a hip fracture decreased from 14.2 days in 2006 to 11.6 days in 2012 (P<0.001). The association between length of stay and risk of death after discharge was non-linear (P<0.001), with a threshold for this non-linear effect of about 10 days. Thus, for patients with length of stay of <= 10 days (n=59 154), each 1-day reduction in length of stay increased the odds of death within 30 days of discharge by 8% in 2006 (odds ratio 1.08 (95% confidence interval 1.04 to 1.12)), which increased to16% in 2012 (odds ratio 1.16 (1.12 to 1.20)). In contrast, for patients with a length of stay of >= 11 days (n=56 957), a 1-day reduction in length of stay was not associated with an increased risk of death after discharge during any of the years of follow up. Limitations No accurate evaluation of the underlying cause of death could be performed. Conclusion Shorter length of stay in hospital after hip fracture is associated with increased risk of death after hospital discharge, but only among patients with length of stay of 10 days or less. This association remained robust over consecutive years.

  • 73.
    Nordström, Peter
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Community Medicine and Rehabilitation, Geriatric Medicine.
    Michaelsson, Karl
    Gustafson, Yngve
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Community Medicine and Rehabilitation, Geriatric Medicine.
    Nordström, Anna
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Surgical and Perioperative Sciences, Sports Medicine. Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine, Occupational and Environmental Medicine.
    Traumatic brain injury and young onset dementia: a nationwide cohort study2014In: Annals of Neurology, ISSN 0364-5134, E-ISSN 1531-8249, Vol. 75, no 3, p. 374-381Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Objective To investigate the association between traumatic brain injuries (TBIs) and the risk of young onset dementia (YOD), that is, dementia before 65 years of age. Methods The study cohort comprised 811,622 Swedish men (mean age = 18 years) conscripted for military service between 1969 and 1986. TBIs, dementia, and covariates were extracted from national registers. Time-dependent exposures using Cox proportional hazard regression models were evaluated. Results During a median follow-up period of 33 years, there were 45,249 men with at least 1 TBI in the cohort. After adjustment for covariates, 1 mild TBI (hazard ratio [HR] = 1.0, 95% confidence interval [CI] = 0.5-2.0), at least 2 mild TBIs (HR = 2.5, 95% CI = 0.8-8.1), or 1 severe TBI (HR = 0.7, 95% CI = 0.1-5.2) were not associated with Alzheimer dementia (AD). Other types of dementia were strongly associated with the risk of 1 mild TBI (HR = 3.8, 95% CI = 2.8-5.2), at least 2 mild TBIs (HR = 10.4, 95% CI = 6.3-17.2), and 1 severe TBI (HR = 11.4, 95% CI = 7.4-17.5) in age-adjusted analysis. However, these associations were largely attenuated after adjustment for covariates (1 mild TBI: HR = 1.7; at least 2 mild TBIs: HR = 1.7; 1 severe TBI: HR = 2.6; p < 0.05 for all). Interpretation In the present study, we found strong associations between YOD of non-AD forms and TBIs of different severity. These associations were, however, markedly attenuated after multivariate adjustment.

  • 74.
    Nordström, Peter
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Community Medicine and Rehabilitation, Geriatric Medicine.
    Michaëlsson, Karl
    Hommel, Ami
    Norrman, Per Ola
    Thorngren, Karl-Göran
    Nordström, Anna
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine, Occupational and Environmental Medicine.
    Geriatric Rehabilitation and Discharge Location After Hip Fracture in Relation to the Risks of Death and Readmission2016In: Journal of the American Medical Directors Association, ISSN 1525-8610, E-ISSN 1538-9375, Vol. 17, no 1, article id UNSP 91.e1Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    OBJECTIVES: To investigate the effects of geriatric rehabilitation on short-term risk of death and readmission after a hip fracture were investigated in a nationwide cohort. In addition, the association of discharge location (nursing home or patient's home) with the short-term risk of death was assessed.

    DESIGN, SETTING, AND PARTICIPANTS: The cohort consisted of 89,301 individuals at least 50 years of age, with a first hip fracture registered in the Swedish quality register RIKSHÖFT, the years 2004-2012.

    MEASURES: Short-term risk of death and readmission to hospital after discharge was compared at 8 hospitals, where most patients received inpatient care in geriatric wards, and those treated at 71 regular hospitals.

    RESULTS: The risks of death within 30 days of admission were 7.1% in patients admitted to geriatric ward hospitals and 7.4% in those treated at regular hospitals (multivariable-adjusted hazard ratio [HR] 0.91, 95% CI 0.85-0.97), whereas the odds of readmission within 30 days of discharge were 8.7% and 9.8%, respectively (multivariable-adjusted odds ratio 0.86, 95% CI 0.81-0.91). The risk of death was influenced by discharge location and inpatient length of stay (LOS). Thus, for patients discharged to short-term nursing homes with a LOS of at most 10 days, each additional day of LOS reduction increased the risk of death within 30 days of discharge by 13% (HR 1.13, 95% CI 1.08-1.18). This association was reduced in patients discharged to permanent nursing homes (HR 1.04, 95% CI 1.02-1.07), and not significant in those discharged to their own home (OR 1.00, 95% CI 0.91-1.10).

    CONCLUSION: The risks of death and readmission were lower in patients with hip fracture who received care in hospitals with geriatric wards. The risk of death after discharge increased with shorter LOS, especially in patients discharged to short-term nursing homes.

  • 75.
    Nordström, Peter
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Surgical and Perioperative Sciences, Sports Medicine.
    Neovius, Martin
    Nordström, Anna
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Surgical and Perioperative Sciences, Sports Medicine.
    Early and rapid bone mineral density loss of the proximal femur in men.2007In: J Clin Endocrinol Metab, ISSN 0021-972X, Vol. 92, no 5, p. 1902-8Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 76.
    Nordström, Peter
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Community Medicine and Rehabilitation, Geriatric Medicine.
    Nordström, Anna
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine, Occupational and Environmental Medicine.
    Decreased mortality during inpatient care in The Netherlands: what are the keys to further improve health care for elderly patients?2016In: Age and Ageing, ISSN 0002-0729, E-ISSN 1468-2834, Vol. 45, no 1, p. 4-5Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 77.
    Nordström, Peter
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Community Medicine and Rehabilitation, Geriatric Medicine.
    Nordström, Anna
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Surgical and Perioperative Sciences, Sports Medicine.
    Hälsosamt fet av träning2011In: Svensk Idrottsforskning: Organ för Centrum för Idrottsforskning, ISSN 1103-4629, no 1, p. 66-68Article in journal (Other academic)
  • 78.
    Nordström, Peter
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Community Medicine and Rehabilitation, Geriatric Medicine.
    Nordström, Anna
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine, Section of Sustainable Health. School of Sports Science, UiT The Arctic University of Norway, Tromsö, Norway..
    Use of short-acting and long-acting hypnotics and the risk of fracture: a critical analysis of associations in a nationwide cohort2019In: Osteoporosis International, ISSN 0937-941X, E-ISSN 1433-2965Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Summary: Numerous observational studies suggest that hypnotics increase the risk of fractures, and long-acting hypnotics are suggested to be especially harmful. This study showed that the highest risk of fracture was found before start of treatment and remained after end of therapy, suggesting that the increased risk during treatment is influenced by other factors, such as underlying disease.

    Introduction: The purpose of this study was to evaluate associations between the use of short-acting and long-acting hypnotics and the risk of fracture.

    Methods: Four cohorts were formed from all individuals living in Sweden aged ≥ 50 years in 2005 (n = 3,341,706). In the first cohort, individuals prescribed long-acting propiomazine (n = 233,609) were matched 1:1 with controls. In the second cohort, individuals prescribed short-acting z-drugs (zopiclone, zolpidem, and zaleplon, n = 591,136) were matched 1:1 with controls. The third and fourth cohorts consisted of full sibling pairs with discordant propiomazine (n = 83,594) and z-drug (n = 153,314) use, respectively.

    Results: The risk of fracture was greatest among users of hypnotics in the 90 days before the initiation of treatment, both for propiomazine (odds ratio [OR], 2.52; 95% confidence interval [CI], 2.28–2.79) and z-drugs (OR, 4.10; 95% CI, 3.86–4.35) compared with that in matched controls. Furthermore, this risk was significantly reduced after the initiation of treatment with propiomazine (OR, 1.42; 95% CI, 1.27–1.60) and z-drugs (OR, 1.67; 95% CI, 1.56–1.80) and remained the first year following the last prescribed dose both for propiomazine (OR, 1.28, 95% CI, 1.21–1.36) and z-drugs (OR, 1.19, 95% CI, 1.16–1.23). The pattern was similar in the sibling cohorts, with the greatest risk of fracture seen in the 90 days before treatment with hypnotics was initiated.

    Conclusion: The use of short-acting and long-acting hypnotics is associated with an increased risk of fracture. This risk was highest before initiation of treatment and remained after end of therapy. The results suggest that the increased risk during treatment is influenced by other factors such as underlying disease.

  • 79.
    Nordström, Peter
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Community Medicine and Rehabilitation, Geriatric Medicine.
    Nordström, Anna
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Surgical and Perioperative Sciences, Sports Medicine.
    Eriksson, Marie
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Umeå School of Business and Economics (USBE), Statistics.
    Wahlund, Lars-Olof
    Gustafson, Yngve
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Community Medicine and Rehabilitation, Geriatric Medicine.
    Risk factors in late adolescence for young-onset dementia in men: a nationwide cohort study2013In: JAMA internal medicine, ISSN 2168-6114, Vol. 173, no 17, p. 1612-1618Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    IMPORTANCE: Young-onset dementia (YOD), that is, dementia diagnosed before 65 years of age, has been related to genetic mutations in affected families. The identification of other risk factors could improve the understanding of this heterogeneous group of syndromes.

    OBJECTIVE: To evaluate risk factors in late adolescence for the development of YOD later in life.

    DESIGN: We identified the study cohort from the Swedish Military Service Conscription Register from January 1, 1969, through December 31, 1979. Potential risk factors, such as cognitive function and different physical characteristics, were assessed at conscription. We collected other risk factors, including dementia in parents, through national register linkage.

    PARTICIPANTS: All Swedish men conscripted for mandatory military service (n = 488 484) with a mean age of 18 years.

    SETTING: Predominantly Swedish men born from January 1, 1950, through December 31, 1960.

    EXPOSURE: Potential risk factors for dementia based on those found in previous studies, data available, and quality of register data.

    MAIN OUTCOMES AND MEASURE: All forms of YOD.

    RESULTS: During a median follow-up of 37 years, 487 men were diagnosed as having YOD at a median age of 54 years. In multivariate Cox regression analysis, significant risk factors (all P &lt; .05) for YOD included alcohol intoxication (hazard ratio, 4.82 [95% CI, 3.83-6.05]); population-attributable risk, 0.28), stroke (2.96 [2.02-4.35]; 0.04), use of antipsychotics (2.75 [2.09-3.60]; 0.12), depression (1.89 [1.53-2.34]; 0.28), father's dementia (1.65 [1.22-2.24]; 0.04), drug intoxication other than alcohol (1.54 [1.06-2.24]; 0.03), low cognitive function at conscription (1.26 per 1-SD decrease [1.14-1.40]; 0.29), low height at conscription (1.16 per 1-SD decrease [1.04-1.29]; 0.16), and high systolic blood pressure at conscription (0.90 per 1-SD decrease [0.82-0.99]; 0.06). The population-attributable risk associated with all 9 risk factors was 68%. Men with at least 2 of these risk factors and in the lowest third of overall cognitive function were found to have a 20-fold increased risk of YOD during follow-up (hazard ratio, 20.38 [95% CI, 13.64-30.44]).

    CONCLUSIONS AND RELEVANCE: In this nationwide cohort, 9 independent risk factors were identified that accounted for most cases of YOD in men. These risk factors were multiplicative, most were potentially modifiable, and most could be traced to adolescence, suggesting excellent opportunities for early prevention.

  • 80.
    Nordström, Peter
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Community Medicine and Rehabilitation, Geriatric Medicine.
    Pedersen, Nancy L
    Gustafson, Yngve
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Community Medicine and Rehabilitation, Geriatric Medicine.
    Michaëlsson, Karl
    Nordström, Anna
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine, Occupational and Environmental Medicine.
    Risks of Myocardial Infarction, Death, and Diabetes in Identical Twin Pairs With Different Body Mass Indexes2016In: JAMA Internal Medicine, ISSN 2168-6106, E-ISSN 2168-6114, Vol. 176, no 10, p. 1522-1529Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    IMPORTANCE Observational studies have shown that obesity is a major risk factor for cardiovascular disease and death. The extent of genetic confounding in these associations is unclear. OBJECTIVE To compare the risk of myocardial infarction (MI), type 2 diabetes, and death in monozygotic (MZ) twin pairs discordant for body mass index (BMI). DESIGN, SETTING, AND PARTICIPANTS A cohort of 4046 MZ twin pairs with discordant BMIs (difference >0.01) was identified using the nationwide Swedish twin registry. The study was conducted from March 17, 1998, to January 16, 2003, with follow-up regarding incident outcomes until December 31, 2013. MAIN OUTCOMES AND MEASURES The combined primary end point of death or MI and the secondary end point of incident diabetes were evaluated in heavier compared with leaner twins in a co-twin control analysis using multivariable conditional logistic regression. RESULTS Mean (SD) baseline age for both cohorts was 57.6 (9.5) years (range, 41.9-91.8 years). During a mean follow-up period of 12.4 (2.5) years, 203 MIs (5.0%) and 550 deaths (13.6%) occurred among heavier twins (mean [SD] BMI, 25.9 [3.6] [calculated as weight in kilograms divided by height in meters squared]) compared with 209 MIs (5.2%) and 633 deaths (15.6%) among leaner twins (mean [SD] BMI, 23.9 [3.1]; combined multivariable adjusted odds ratio [OR], 0.75; 95% CI, 0.63-0.91). Even in twin pairs with BMI discordance of 7.0 or more (mean [SE], 9.3 [0.7]), where the heavier twin had a BMI of 30.0 or more (n = 65 pairs), the risk of MI or death was not greater in heavier twins (OR, 0.42; 95% CI, 0.15-1.18). In contrast, in the total cohort of twins, the risk of incident diabetes was greater in heavier twins (OR, 2.14; 95% CI, 1.61-2.84). Finally, increases in BMI since 30 years before baseline were not associated with the later risk of MI or death (OR, 0.97; 95% CI, 0.89-1.05) but were associated with the risk of incident diabetes (OR, 1.13; 95% CI, 1.01-1.26). CONCLUSIONS AND RELEVANCE In MZ twin pairs, higher BMI was not associated with an increased risk of MI or death but was associated with the onset of diabetes. These results may suggest that lifestyle interventions to reduce obesity are more effective in decreasing the risk of diabetes than the risk of cardiovascular disease or death.

  • 81.
    Nordström, Peter
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Community Medicine and Rehabilitation, Geriatric Medicine.
    Sievänen, Harri
    Gustafson, Yngve
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Community Medicine and Rehabilitation, Geriatric Medicine.
    Pedersen, Nancy L
    Nordström, Anna
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Surgical and Perioperative Sciences, Sports Medicine.
    High physical fitness in young adulthood reduces the risk of fractures later in life in men: a nationwide cohort study2013In: Journal of Bone and Mineral Research, ISSN 0884-0431, E-ISSN 1523-4681, Vol. 28, no 5, p. 1061-1067Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    A few studies indicate that self reported physical activity is associated with the risk of fractures in middle-aged and elderly men. We investigated whether objectively measured physical fitness in young adulthood was associated with the risk of low-energy fractures later in life in men. Aerobic capacity and isometric muscle strength were measured in 435445 Swedish men that conscripted for military service from 1969-1978. Incident fractures were searched in national registers. During a median follow-up period of 35 years (range, 11-41 years), 8 030 subjects sustained at least one fracture, increasing the risk of death 1.8 times (95% CI = 1.6-2.0) during follow up. When comparing men in the lowest and highest decile of physical fitness, the risk of a fracture was 1.8 times higher (95% CI = 1.6-2.1) and that of hip fracture was 2.7 times higher (95% CI = 1.6-4.7). The risk of fracture was also 1.4-1.5 times higher when comparing the extreme deciles of muscle strength (p < 0.001 for all). In a subcohort of 1009 twin pairs, up to 22% of the variation in physical fitness and 27-39% of the variation in muscle strength was attributable to environmental factors unique to one twin, e.g. physical activity. In conclusion, low aerobic capacity and muscle strength in young adulthood are associated with an increased risk of low-energy fractures later in life, while a low-energy fracture is associated with an increased risk of death already in middle-aged men.

  • 82.
    Nordström, Peter
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Community Medicine and Rehabilitation, Geriatric Medicine.
    Toots, Annika
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Community Medicine and Rehabilitation, Geriatric Medicine. Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Community Medicine and Rehabilitation, Physiotherapy.
    Gustafson, Yngve
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Community Medicine and Rehabilitation, Geriatric Medicine.
    Thorngren, Karl-Göran
    Hommel, Ami
    Nordström, Anna
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine, Occupational and Environmental Medicine.
    Bisphosphonate Use After Hip Fracture in Older Adults: A Nationwide Retrospective Cohort Study2017In: Journal of the American Medical Directors Association, ISSN 1525-8610, E-ISSN 1538-9375, Vol. 18, no 6, p. 515-521Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    OBJECTIVES: The aim of this study was to investigate the association between bisphosphonate use and the risk of new fracture in a nationwide cohort of individuals with previous hip fractures, with emphasis on individuals above 80 years of age.

    DESIGN, SETTING, AND PARTICIPANTS: From a nationwide cohort with hip fracture (2006-2012) (n = 93, 601), each individual prescribed bisphosphonates after hip fracture (n = 5845) was matched with up to three individuals not prescribed bisphosphonates, resulting in a cohort of 21,363 individuals.

    MAIN OUTCOME MEASURE: A new hip fracture.

    RESULTS: During a mean follow-up period of 2.98 (range, 0.02-8) years, 4581 fractures occurred in the cohort. Before the initiation of bisphosphonate therapy, individuals later prescribed bisphosphonates had an increased risk of hip fracture (multivariable adjusted odds ratio [OR], 2.63; 95% confidence interval [CI], 2.23-3.24) compared with controls. In the period after bisphosphonate therapy initiation, individuals prescribed bisphosphonates had a lower risk of hip fracture (multivariable adjusted hazard ratio [HR], 0.76; 95% CI, 0.65-0.90) compared with controls. Similar effects were seen after the initiation of bisphosphonates in individuals aged more than 80 years (HR, 0.79; 95% CI, 0.62-0.99). In contrast, the initiation of bisphosphonate therapy did not influence the risk of injurious falls not resulting in fracture (HR, 0.95; 95% CI, 0.86-1.05).

    CONCLUSION: Bisphosphonate use was associated with a decreased risk of hip fracture in this nationwide cohort of older men and women, with similar risk reductions in individuals older than 80 years.

  • 83.
    Nyström, Helena
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Community Medicine and Rehabilitation, Geriatric Medicine. Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine, Occupational and Environmental Medicine.
    Nordström, Anna
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine, Occupational and Environmental Medicine.
    Nordström, Peter
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Community Medicine and Rehabilitation, Geriatric Medicine.
    Risk of Injurious Fall and Hip Fracture up to 26 y before the Diagnosis of Parkinson Disease: Nested Case-Control Studies in a Nationwide Cohort2016In: PLoS Medicine, ISSN 1549-1277, E-ISSN 1549-1676, Vol. 13, no 2, article id e1001954Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    BACKGROUND: Low muscle strength has been found in late adolescence in individuals diagnosed with Parkinson disease (PD) 30 y later. This study investigated whether this lower muscle strength also may translate into increased risks of falling and fracture before the diagnosis of PD.

    METHODS AND FINDINGS: Among all Swedish citizens aged ≥50 y in 2005, two nested case-control cohorts were compiled. In cohort I, individuals diagnosed with PD during 1988-2012 (n = 24,412) were matched with up to ten controls (n = 243,363), and the risk of fall-related injuries before diagnosis of PD was evaluated. In cohort II, individuals with an injurious fall in need of emergency care during 1988-2012 (n = 622,333) were matched with one control (n = 622,333), and the risk of PD after the injurious fall was evaluated. In cohort I, 18.0% of cases and 11.5% of controls had at least one injurious fall (p < 0.001) prior to PD diagnosis in the case. Assessed by conditional logistic regression analysis adjusted for comorbid diagnoses and education level, PD was associated with increased risks of injurious fall up to 10 y before diagnosis (odds ratio [OR] 1.19, 95% CI 1.08-1.31; 7 to <10 y before diagnosis) and hip fracture ≥15 y before diagnosis (OR 1.36, 95% CI 1.10-1.69; 15-26 y before diagnosis). In cohort II, 0.7% of individuals with an injurious fall and 0.5% of controls were diagnosed with PD during follow-up (p < 0.001). The risk of PD was increased for up to 10 y after an injurious fall (OR 1.18, 95% CI 1.02-1.37; 7 to <10 y after diagnosis). An important limitation is that the diagnoses were obtained from registers and could not be clinically confirmed for the study.

    CONCLUSIONS: The increased risks of falling and hip fracture prior to the diagnosis of PD may suggest the presence of clinically relevant neurodegenerative impairment many years before the diagnosis of this disease.

  • 84. Ovchinnikova, Olga
    et al.
    Gylfe, Åsa
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Clinical Microbiology, Clinical Bacteriology.
    Bailey, Leslie
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Molecular Biology (Faculty of Medicine).
    Nordström, Anna
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Community Medicine and Rehabilitation, Rehabilitation Medicine. Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Surgical and Perioperative Sciences, Sports Medicine.
    Rudling, Mats
    Jung, Christian
    Bergström, Sven
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Molecular Biology (Faculty of Medicine).
    Waldenström, Anders
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine, Medicine.
    Hansson, Göran K
    Nordström, Peter
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Community Medicine and Rehabilitation, Geriatric Medicine.
    Osteoprotegerin promotes fibrous cap formation in atherosclerotic lesions of ApoE-deficient mice--brief report.2009In: Arteriosclerosis, Thrombosis and Vascular Biology, ISSN 1079-5642, E-ISSN 1524-4636, Vol. 29, no 10, p. 1478-1480Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    OBJECTIVE: Osteoprotegerin (OPG) is a tumor necrosis factor receptor-related cytokine, initially found to inhibit osteoclastogenesis. In the present study we investigated the effect of OPG treatment on atherosclerosis. METHODS AND RESULTS: Hypercholesterolemic apoe(-/-) mice were treated with recombinant 15 mg/kg OPG or vehicle injections twice a week for 10 consecutive weeks. Mice treated with OPG showed increased amounts of smooth muscle cells and collagen within the atherosclerotic lesions. OPG treatment did not affect atherosclerotic lesion size (8.2% versus 7.6%) or total vessel area but led to a 250% increase in lesion collagen, formation of mature collagen fibers in subendothelial fibrous caps, and upregulated mRNA for lysyl oxidase that promotes collagen crosslinking. In cell culture studies, OPG promoted cell proliferation in rat aortic smooth muscle cells. In contrast, OPG treatment did not affect markers of vascular or systemic inflammation. CONCLUSIONS: OPG treatment promotes smooth muscle accumulation, collagen fiber formation, and development of fibrous caps but does not affect inflammatory properties of atherosclerotic lesions. Its effects may contribute to plaque stabilization.

  • 85.
    Pietilä Holmner, Elisabeth
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Community Medicine and Rehabilitation, Rehabilitation Medicine.
    Fahlström, Martin
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Community Medicine and Rehabilitation, Rehabilitation Medicine.
    Nordström, Anna
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Surgical and Perioperative Sciences, Sports Medicine. Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Community Medicine and Rehabilitation, Rehabilitation Medicine.
    The effects of interdisciplinary team assessment and a rehabilitation program for patients with chronic pain2013In: American Journal of Physical Medicine & Rehabilitation, ISSN 0894-9115, E-ISSN 1537-7385, Vol. 92, no 1, p. 77-83Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Objective: The aim of this study was to evaluate the effects of interdisciplinary team assessment and a 4-wk rehabilitation program in chronic pain patients.

    Design: This was a longitudinal cohort study evaluating interdisciplinary pain rehabilitation measures in a specialist care setting. A total of 93 women (42.2 +/- 9.5 yrs) with chronic musculoskeletal pain (median pain duration, 8 yrs) were evaluated at assessment and at the start and end of the rehabilitation program. Pain intensity measured with a visual analog scale, pain dimensions measured with the Multidimensional Pain Inventory, and anxiety and depression measured with the Hospital Anxiety and Depression Scale were registered.

    Results: The participants exhibited significantly improved results of pain and pain-related measures. The results were seen both after the short-term intervention in the form of the interdisciplinary assessment and after the 4-wk rehabilitation program. The improvements seen after the assessment were not related to specific interventions, such as change of medication, and therefore seem to be a result of the interdisciplinary assessment concept as such.

    Conclusions: Both interdisciplinary assessment and rehabilitation program seem to be effective in chronic pain rehabilitation, at least for women. Further studies are needed to investigate potential sex differences, as well as content and duration for optimal pain rehabilitation programs.

  • 86.
    Renström, Frida
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine, Medicine.
    Payne, Felicity
    Metabolic Disease Group, The Wellcome Trust Sanger Institute, Cambridge CB10 1SA, UK.
    Nordström, Anna
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Surgical and Perioperative Sciences, Sports Medicine.
    Brito, Ema C
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine, Medicine.
    Rolandsson, Olov
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine, Family Medicine.
    Hallmans, Göran
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine, Nutritional Research.
    Barroso, Ines
    Metabolic Disease Group, The Wellcome Trust Sanger Institute, Cambridge CB10 1SA, UK.
    Nordström, Peter
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Community Medicine and Rehabilitation, Geriatric Medicine.
    Franks, Paul W
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine, Medicine.
    Replication and extension of genome-wide association study results for obesity in 4,923 adults from Northern Sweden.2009In: Human Molecular Genetics, ISSN 0964-6906, E-ISSN 1460-2083, Vol. 18, no 8, p. 1489-1496Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Recent genome-wide association studies (GWAS) have identified multiple risk loci for common obesity (FTO, MC4R, TMEM18, GNPDA2, SH2B1, KCTD15, MTCH2, NEGR1, and PCSK1). Here we extend those studies by examining associations with adiposity and type 2 diabetes in Swedish adults. The nine single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) were genotyped in 3,885 non-diabetic and 1,038 diabetic individuals with available measures of height, weight and BMI. Adipose mass and distribution was objectively assessed using dual energy X-ray absorptiometry (DEXA) in a sub-group of non-diabetics (n=2,206). In models with adipose mass traits, BMI or obesity as outcomes, the most strongly associated SNP was FTO rs1121980 (P<0.001). Five other SNPs (SH2B1 rs7498665, MTCH2 rs4752856, MC4R rs17782313, NEGR1 rs2815752, and GNPDA2 rs10938397) were significantly associated with obesity. To summarize the overall genetic burden, a weighted risk score comprising a subset of SNPs was constructed; those in the top quintile of the score were heavier (+2.6kg) and had more total (+2.4kg), gynoid (+191g), and abdominal (+136g) adipose tissue than those in the lowest quintile (all P<0.001). The genetic burden score significantly increased diabetes risk, with those in the highest quintile (n=193/594 cases/controls) being at 1.55-fold (95% CI: 1.21-1.99; P<0.0001) greater risk of type 2 diabetes than those in the lowest quintile (n=130/655 cases/controls). In summary, we have statistically replicated six of the previously associated obese-risk loci and our results suggest that the weight-inducing effects of these variants are explained largely by increased adipose accumulation.

  • 87. Sagelv, Edvard H.
    et al.
    Ekelund, Ulf
    Johansson, Jonas
    Welde, Boye
    Grimsgaard, Sameline
    Emaus, Nina
    Nordström, Anna
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine, Section of Sustainable Health.
    Brage, Soren
    Horsch, Alexander
    Hopstock, Laila A.
    Morseth, Bente
    Measures Of Adiposity And Its Association To Physical Activity In Adults: The Tromso Study2019In: Medicine & Science in Sports & Exercise, ISSN 0195-9131, E-ISSN 1530-0315, Vol. 51, no 6, p. 447-447Article in journal (Other academic)
  • 88. Scott, David
    et al.
    Johansson, Jonas
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine, Occupational and Environmental Medicine.
    McMillan, Lachlan B
    Ebeling, Peter R
    Nordström, Anna
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine, Occupational and Environmental Medicine. School of Sport Sciences, UiT The Arctic University of Norway, Tromsø, Norway..
    Nordström, Peter
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Community Medicine and Rehabilitation, Geriatric Medicine.
    Mid-calf skeletal muscle density and its associations with physical activity, bone health and incident 12-month falls in older adults: The Healthy Ageing Initiative2019In: Bone, ISSN 8756-3282, E-ISSN 1873-2763, Vol. 120, p. 446-451Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    BACKGROUND: Lower skeletal muscle density, indicating greater infiltration of adipose tissue into muscles, is associated with higher fracture risk in older adults. We aimed to determine whether mid-calf muscle density is associated with falls risk and bone health in community-dwelling older adults.

    METHODS: 2214 community-dwelling men and women who participated in the Healthy Ageing Initiative (Sweden) study at age 70 were included in this analysis. Mid-calf muscle density (mg/cm3) at the proximal tibia, and volumetric bone mineral density (vBMD) and architecture at the distal and proximal tibia and radius, were assessed by peripheral quantitative computed tomography. Whole-body lean and fat mass, lumbar spine and total hip areal bone mineral density (aBMD) were assessed by dual-energy X-ray absorptiometry. Participants completed seven-day accelerometer measurements of physical activity intensity, and self-reported falls data were collected 6 and 12 months later.

    RESULTS: 302 (13.5%) participants reported a fall at the 6- or 12-month interview, and 29 (1.3%) reported a fall at both interviews. After adjustment for confounders, each standard deviation decrease in mid-calf muscle density was associated with a trend towards greater likelihood of experiencing a fall (OR 1.13; 95% CI 1.00, 1.29 per SD lower) and significantly greater likelihood of multiple falls (1.61; 1.16, 2.23). Higher muscle density was not associated with total hip aBMD, and was associated with lower lumbar spine aBMD (B = -0.003; 95% CI -0.005, -0.001 per mg/cm3) and higher proximal cortical vBMD (0.74; 0.20, 1.28) at the radius. At the tibia, muscle density was positively associated with distal total and trabecular vBMD, and proximal total and cortical vBMD, cortical thickness, cortical area and stress-strain index (all P < 0.05). Only moderate/vigorous (%) intensity physical activity, not sedentary time or light activity, was associated with higher mid-calf muscle density (0.086; 0.034, 0.138).

    CONCLUSIONS: Lower mid-calf muscle density is independently associated with higher likelihood for multiple incident falls and appears to have localised negative effects on bone structure in older adults.

  • 89. Scott, David
    et al.
    Johansson, Jonas
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine, Occupational and Environmental Medicine. Department of Community Medicine, UiT The Arctic University of Norway, Tromsø, Norway.
    McMillan, Lachlan B
    Ebeling, Peter R
    Nordström, Peter
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Community Medicine and Rehabilitation, Geriatric Medicine.
    Nordström, Anna
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine, Occupational and Environmental Medicine. School of Sport Sciences, UiT The Arctic University of Norway, Tromsø, Norway.
    Associations of Sarcopenia and Its Components with Bone Structure and Incident Falls in Swedish Older Adults2019In: Calcified Tissue International, ISSN 0171-967X, E-ISSN 1432-0827, Vol. 105, no 1, p. 26-36Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The aim of this study was to compare bone structure parameters and likelihood of falls across European Working Group on Sarcopenia in Older People (EWGSOP2) sarcopenia categories. 3334 Swedish 70-year olds had appendicular lean mass (normalized to height; ALMHt), lumbar spine and total hip areal BMD (aBMD) estimated by dual-energy X-ray absorptiometry. Volumetric BMD (vBMD) and structure at the distal and proximal tibia and radius were estimated by peripheral quantitative computed tomography. Hand grip strength and timed up-and-go were assessed, and sarcopenia was defined according to EWGSOP2 criteria. Incident falls were self-reported 6 and 12 months after baseline. Only 0.8% and 1.0% of participants had probable and confirmed sarcopenia, respectively. Almost one-third of participants with confirmed sarcopenia reported incident falls, compared with 20% for probable sarcopenia and 14% without sarcopenia (P = 0.025). Participants with confirmed sarcopenia had poorer bone parameters (all P < 0.05) except endosteal circumference at the proximal radius and tibia, while those with probable sarcopenia had lower cortical area at the proximal radius (B = - 5.9; 95% CI - 11.7, - 0.1 mm2) and periosteal and endosteal circumferences at the proximal tibia (- 3.3; - 6.4, - 0.3 and - 3.8; - 7.5, - 0.1 mm2, respectively), compared with those without sarcopenia. Compared with probable sarcopenia, confirmed sarcopenic participants had significantly lower lumbar spine and total hip aBMD, distal radius and tibia total vBMD, and proximal radius and tibia cortical vBMD, area and thickness (all P < 0.05). Swedish 70-year olds with confirmed sarcopenia demonstrate poorer BMD and bone architecture than those with probable and no sarcopenia, and have increased likelihood of incident falls.

  • 90.
    Tervo, Taru
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Umeå Sport Sciences Center. Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Surgical and Perioperative Sciences.
    Nordström, Anna
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Surgical and Perioperative Sciences. Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine, Occupational and Environmental Medicine.
    Science of flooball: a systematic review2014In: Open Access Journal of Sports Medicine, ISSN 1179-1543, E-ISSN 1179-1543, Vol. 2014, no 5, p. 249-255Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: 

    The purpose of this study was to comprehensively review the scientific research on floorball at the competitive and recreational levels according to field of study.

    Methods: 

    Full articles containing original data on floorball that had been published in English in peer-reviewed journals were considered for inclusion.

    Results: 

    Of 75 articles screened, 19 were included in this systematic review. One article each was identified in the fields of sports management and sports psychology, and the remaining 17 articles were in the field of sports medicine. Injury epidemiology in floorball players was the most thoroughly examined topic of research. To date, no research has been performed on the incidence of floorball-related injury, or any aspect of the sport, in children and adolescents.

    Conclusion: 

    Collaborative research among sports science disciplines is needed to identify strategies to reduce the incidence of injury and enhance the performance of licensed floorball players. Despite the increasing popularity of floorball in recent years, surprisingly little research has examined this sport.

  • 91.
    Tervo, Taru
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Umeå Sport Sciences Center.
    Nordström, Anna
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine.
    Vad vet forskningen om innebandy?2013In: