umu.sePublications
Change search
Refine search result
1234567 51 - 100 of 4238
CiteExportLink to result list
Permanent link
Cite
Citation style
  • apa
  • ieee
  • modern-language-association-8th-edition
  • vancouver
  • Other style
More styles
Language
  • de-DE
  • en-GB
  • en-US
  • fi-FI
  • nn-NO
  • nn-NB
  • sv-SE
  • Other locale
More languages
Output format
  • html
  • text
  • asciidoc
  • rtf
Rows per page
  • 5
  • 10
  • 20
  • 50
  • 100
  • 250
Sort
  • Standard (Relevance)
  • Author A-Ö
  • Author Ö-A
  • Title A-Ö
  • Title Ö-A
  • Publication type A-Ö
  • Publication type Ö-A
  • Issued (Oldest first)
  • Issued (Newest first)
  • Created (Oldest first)
  • Created (Newest first)
  • Last updated (Oldest first)
  • Last updated (Newest first)
  • Disputation date (earliest first)
  • Disputation date (latest first)
  • Standard (Relevance)
  • Author A-Ö
  • Author Ö-A
  • Title A-Ö
  • Title Ö-A
  • Publication type A-Ö
  • Publication type Ö-A
  • Issued (Oldest first)
  • Issued (Newest first)
  • Created (Oldest first)
  • Created (Newest first)
  • Last updated (Oldest first)
  • Last updated (Newest first)
  • Disputation date (earliest first)
  • Disputation date (latest first)
Select
The maximal number of hits you can export is 250. When you want to export more records please use the Create feeds function.
  • 51. Ali, Qasim
    et al.
    Haider, Muhammad Zulqurnain
    Iftikhar, Wasif
    Jamil, Sidra
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Umeå Plant Science Centre (UPSC). Department of Botany, Faculty of Science and Technology, Government College University, Faisalabad, Pakistan.
    Javed, M. Tariq
    Noman, Ali
    Iqbal, Muhammad
    Perveen, Rashida
    Drought tolerance potential of Vigna mungo L. lines as deciphered by modulated growth, antioxidant defense, and nutrient acquisition patterns2016In: Revista Brasileira de Botânica, ISSN 0100-8404, E-ISSN 1806-9959, Vol. 39, no 3, p. 801-812Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Water shortage is one of the major environmental constraints that hamper the crop productivity worldwide. The present study was aimed to examine the drought tolerance potential of seven cultivars/lines of Vigna mungo L. depending upon their germination behavior, seedling growth, antioxidative defense mechanism, and nutrient acquisition. An experiment was conducted in the growth chamber using petri-plates and laid out in a completely randomized design (CRD). Hoagland's nutrient solution supplemented with 12 % PEG-8000 (drought treatment) or without PEG-800 (control) was used. Drought stress significantly altered the germination attributes as well as biomass production of all the studied cultivars/lines. Least adversative effects of drought stress were recorded in lines M-01001-1 and M-6036-21, respectively. The studied cultivars/lines exhibited differential response for various biochemical attributes under drought stress. The maximum increase in MDA and SOD activities and protein content was recorded in line M-603621, while the maximum AsA was recorded in line M-01001-1. Drought stress resulted in a significant reduction of plant N, P, K, Ca, and Mg contents, while the plant iron (Fe) contents remained unaffected. Results revealed that cultivars/lines M-01001-1 and M-6036-21 exhibited enhanced performance in terms of nutrient acquisition when stressed by drought. Based upon seed germination behavior, plant biomass production, biochemical attributes and mineral elements, the cultivars/lines M-01001-1 and M-6036-21 were identified as drought tolerant, while M-97 and Arroj-II were identified as drought sensitive.

  • 52. Aljetlawi, A A
    et al.
    Albertsson, Jan
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Umeå Marine Sciences Centre (UMF).
    Leonardsson, K
    Effect of food and sediment pre-treatment in experiments with a deposit-feeding amphipod, Monoporeia affinis2000In: Journal of Experimental Marine Biology and Ecology, ISSN 0022-0981, E-ISSN 1879-1697, Vol. 249, no 2, p. 263-280Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    We experimentally investigated the effects of different pre-treatments of the sediment, and the effect of daily addition of fresh phytoplankton, on the growth and survival of 1-year-old (1 +) individuals of the deposit feeder Monoporeia affinis (Amphipoda). We used three different types of sieved sediment: pre-frozen muddy clay, non-pre-frozen muddy clay, and fine sand. The muddy clay contained phytoplankton originating from the surface sediment sampled in the field during the late spring bloom. No phytoplankton was initially present in sand. The experiment lasted for 18 days. M. affinis responded to the daily phytoplankton addition by increasing growth. Phytoplankton addition had no significant effects on the survival of M. affinis. Upon phytoplankton addition, the sandy and non-frozen muddy clay gave similar growth and survival responses. In contrast, the pre-frozen sediment resulted in significantly lower growth and survival. The growth was negative in all treatments without phytoplankton. Thus, the high initial chlorophyll content in the muddy clay was not of sufficient quality or concentration to allow a positive growth response in M. affinis. The growth of M. affinis was significantly correlated with the reduction of the chlorophyll. Our results indicated that M. affinis is capable of assimilating settled phytoplankton with no, or only a few days' time delay. (C) 2000 Elsevier Science BN: All rights reserved.

  • 53.
    Alkhori, Liza
    et al.
    Linköpings universitet, Avdelningen för cellbiologi.
    Öst, Anita
    Linköpings universitet, Avdelningen för cellbiologi.
    Alenius, Mattias
    Linköpings universitet, Avdelningen för cellbiologi.
    The corepressor Atrophin specifies odorant receptor expression in Drosophila2014In: The FASEB Journal, ISSN 0892-6638, E-ISSN 1530-6860, Vol. 28, no 3, p. 1355-1364Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In both insects and vertebrates, each olfactory sensory neuron (OSN) expresses one odorant receptor (OR) from a large genomic repertoire. How a receptor is specified is a tantalizing question addressing fundamental aspects of cell differentiation. Here, we demonstrate that the corepressor Atrophin (Atro) segregates OR gene expression between OSN classes in Drosophila. We show that the knockdown of Atro result in either loss or gain of a broad set of ORs. Each OR phenotypic group correlated with one of two opposing Notch fates, Notch responding, Nba (N(on)), and nonresponding, Nab (N(off)) OSNs. Our data show that Atro segregates ORs expressed in the Nba OSN classes and helps establish the Nab fate during OSN development. Consistent with a role in recruiting histone deacetylates, immunohistochemistry revealed that Atro regulates global histone 3 acetylation (H3ac) in OSNs and requires Hdac3 to segregate OR gene expression. We further found that Nba OSN classes exhibit variable but higher H3ac levels than the Nab OSNs. Together, these data suggest that Atro determines the level of H3ac, which ensures correct OR gene expression within the Nba OSNs. We propose a mechanism by which a single corepressor can specify a large number of neuron classes.-Alkhori, L., Öst, A., Alenius, M. The corepressor Atrophin specifies odorant receptor expression in Drosophila.

  • 54. Allakhverdiev, Suleyman I.
    et al.
    Zharmukhamedov, Sergey K.
    Rodionova, Margarita V.
    Shuvalov, Vladimir A.
    Dismukes, Charles
    Shen, Jian-Ren
    Barber, James
    Samuelsson, Göran
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Department of Plant Physiology. Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Umeå Plant Science Centre (UPSC).
    Govindjee,
    Vyacheslav (Slava) Klimov (1945-2017): A scientist par excellence, a great human being, a friend, and a Renaissance man2018In: Photosynthesis Research, ISSN 0166-8595, E-ISSN 1573-5079, Vol. 136, no 1, p. 1-16Article in journal (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Vyacheslav Vasilevich (V.V.) Klimov (or Slava, as most of us called him) was born on January 12, 1945 and passed away on May 9, 2017. He began his scientific career at the Bach Institute of Biochemistry of the USSR Academy of Sciences (Akademy Nauk (AN) SSSR), Moscow, Russia, and then, he was associated with the Institute of Photosynthesis, Pushchino, Moscow Region, for about 50 years. He worked in the field of biochemistry and biophysics of photosynthesis. He is known for his studies on the molecular organization of photosystem II (PSII). He was an eminent scientist in the field of photobiology, a well-respected professor, and, above all, an outstanding researcher. Further, he was one of the founding members of the Institute of Photosynthesis in Pushchino, Russia. To most, Slava Klimov was a great human being. He was one of the pioneers of research on the understanding of the mechanism of light energy conversion and of water oxidation in photosynthesis. Slava had many collaborations all over the world, and he is (and will be) very much missed by the scientific community and friends in Russia as well as around the World. We present here a brief biography and some comments on his research in photosynthesis. We remember him as a friendly and enthusiastic person who had an unflagging curiosity and energy to conduct outstanding research in many aspects of photosynthesis, especially that related to PSII.

  • 55. Allan, Mohammed
    et al.
    Le Roux, Gael
    De Vleeschouwer, Francois
    Bindler, Richard
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Department of Ecology and Environmental Sciences.
    Blaauw, Maarten
    Piotrowska, Natalia
    Sikorski, Jaroslaw
    Fagel, Nathalie
    High-resolution reconstruction of atmospheric deposition of trace metals and metalloids since AD 1400 recorded by ombrotrophic peat cores in Hautes-Fagnes, Belgium2013In: Environmental Pollution, ISSN 0269-7491, E-ISSN 1873-6424, Vol. 178, p. 381-394Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The objective of our study was to determine the trace metal accumulation rates in the Misten bog, Hautes-Fagnes, Belgium, and assess these in relation to established histories of atmospheric emissions from anthropogenic sources. To address these aims we analyzed trace metals and metalloids (Pb, Cu, Ni, As, Sb, Cr, Co, V, Cd and Zn), as well as Pb isotopes, using XRF, Q-ICP-MS and MC-ICP-MS, respectively in two 40-cm peat sections, spanning the last 600 yr. The temporal increase of metal fluxes from the inception of the Industrial Revolution to the present varies by a factor of 5-50, with peak values found between AD 1930 and 1990. A cluster analysis combined with Pb isotopic composition allows the identification of the main sources of Pb and by inference of the other metals, which indicates that coal consumption and metallurgical activities were the predominant sources of pollution during the last 600 years.

    (c) 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  • 56. Allas, Ular
    et al.
    Toom, Lauri
    Selyutina, Anastasia
    Maeorg, Uno
    Medina, Ricardo
    Merits, Andres
    Rinken, Ago
    Hauryliuk, Vasili
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Molecular Biology (Faculty of Medicine). Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Molecular Infection Medicine Sweden (MIMS). University of Tartu, Institute of Technology, Nooruse 1, Tartu 50411, Estonia.
    Kaldalu, Niilo
    Tenson, Tanel
    Antibacterial activity of the nitrovinylfuran G1 (Furvina) and its conversion products2016In: Scientific Reports, ISSN 2045-2322, E-ISSN 2045-2322, Vol. 6, article id 36844Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    2-Bromo-5-(2-bromo-2-nitrovinyl) furan (G1 or Furvina) is an antimicrobial with a direct reactivity against thiol groups. It is active against Gram-positive and Gram-negative bacteria, yeasts and filamentous fungi. By reacting with thiol groups it causes direct damage to proteins but, as a result, is very short-living and interconverts into an array of reaction products. Our aim was to characterize thiol reactivity of G1 and its conversion products and establish how much of antimicrobial and cytotoxic effects are due to the primary activity of G1 and how much can be attributed to its reaction products. Stability of G1 in growth media as well as its conversion in the presence of thiols was characterized. The structures of G1 decomposition products were determined using NMR and mass-spectroscopy. Concentration-and time-dependent killing curves showed that G1 is bacteriostatic for Escherichia coli at the concentration of 16 mu g/ml and bactericidal at 32 mu g/ml. However, G1 is inefficient against non-growing E. coli. Addition of cysteine to medium reduces the antimicrobial potency of G1. Nevertheless, the reaction products of G1 and cysteine enabled prolonged antimicrobial action of the drug. Therefore, the activity of 2-bromo-5-(2-bromo-2-nitrovinyl) furan is a sum of its immediate reactivity and the antibacterial effects of the conversion products.

  • 57.
    Allegrini, Elisa
    et al.
    Technical University of Denmark, Department of Environmental Engineering.
    Boldrin, Alessio
    Tech Univ Technical University of Denmark, Department of Environmental Engineering.
    Jansson, Stina
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Department of Chemistry.
    Lundtorp, Kasper
    Babcock & Wilcox Vølund A/S, Göteborg, Sweden.
    Fruergaard Astrup, Thomas
    Technical University of Denmark, Department of Environmental Engineering.
    Quality and generation rate of solid residues in the boiler of a waste-to-energy plant2014In: Journal of Hazardous Materials, ISSN 0304-3894, E-ISSN 1873-3336, Vol. 270, p. 127-136Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The Danish waste management system relies significantly on waste-to-energy (WtE) plants. The ash produced at the energy recovery section (boiler ash) is classified as hazardous waste, and is commonly mixed with fly ash and air pollution control residues before disposal. In this study, a detailed characterization of boiler ash from a Danish grate-based mass burn type WtE was performed, to evaluate the potential for improving ash management. Samples were collected at 10 different points along the boiler's convective part, and analysed for grain size distribution, content of inorganic elements, polychlorinated dibenzo-. p-dioxins and dibenzofurans (PCDD and PCDF), and leaching of metals. For all samples, PCDD and PCDF levels were below regulatory limits, while high pH values and leaching of e.g. Cl were critical. No significant differences were found between boiler ash from individual sections of the boiler, in terms of total content and leaching, indicating that separate management of individual ash fractions may not provide significant benefits. 

  • 58. Alonso, Carlos
    et al.
    Roman, Alfonso
    Bejarano, Maria Dolores
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Department of Ecology and Environmental Sciences.
    Garcia de Jalon, Diego
    Carolli, Mauro
    A graphical approach to characterize sub-daily flow regimes and evaluate its alterations due to hydropeaking2017In: Science of the Total Environment, ISSN 0048-9697, E-ISSN 1879-1026, Vol. 574, p. 532-543Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Most flow regime characterizations focus on long time scale flow patterns, which are not precise enough to capture key components of short-term flow fluctuations. Recent proposed methods describing sub-daily flow fluctuations are focused on limited components of the flow regime being unable to fully represent it, or on the identification of peaking events based on subjectively defined thresholds, being unsuitable for evaluations of short-term flow regime alterations through comparisons between regulated and free-flowing rivers. This study aims to launch an innovative approach based on the visual display of quantitative information to address the challenge of the short-term hydrologic characterization and evaluation of alteration resulting from hydropeaking. We propose a graphical method to represent a discrete set of ecologically relevant indices that characterize and evaluate the alteration of sub-daily flow regimes. The frequency of occurrence of classified values of a descriptive hydrological variable is represented in a map-like graph where longitude, latitude and altitude represent the Julian day, the value of the variable and the frequency of occurrence, respectively. Subsequently, we tested the method on several rivers, both free-flowing and subjected to hydropower production. The advantages of our approach compared to other analytical methods are: (i) it displays a great amount of information without oversimplification; (ii) it takes into account changes in the intensity, timing and frequency of the sub-daily flows, without needing a priori defined thresholds to identify hydropeaking events; and (iii) it supports the Water Framework Directive goal. Specifically, results from applications of our graphical method agree with Sauterleute and Charmasson (2014) analytical method.

  • 59. Alriksson, Björn
    et al.
    Horváth, Ilona Sárvári
    Jönsson, Leif J
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Department of Chemistry. Department of Chemistry and Biomedical Sciences, Karlstad University.
    Overexpression of Saccharomyces cerevisiae transcription factor and multidrug resistance genes conveys enhanced resistance to lignocellulose-derived fermentation inhibitors2010In: Process Biochemistry, ISSN 1359-5113, E-ISSN 1873-3298, Vol. 45, no 2, p. 264-271Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The presence of fermentation inhibitors in lignocellulose hydrolysates is an obstacle for achieving efficient fermentation of lignocellulose hydrolysates to ethanol and other commodities. In this investigation, the possibility of generating more inhibitor-resistant Saccharomyces cerevisiae by genetic engineering was explored. Based on previous results from studies of deletion mutants, three S. cerevisiae genes (ATR1, FLR1, YAP1) involved in multidrug resistance and stress response of yeast were selected for overexpression in three S. cerevisiae strains. The resistance of the transformed strains to lignocellulose-derived fermentation inhibitors and a dilute-acid spruce hydrolysate was evaluated in fermentation experiments. Overexpression of FLR1 resulted in enhanced resistance to the phenolic inhibitor coniferyl aldehyde and the furan aldehyde HMF (5-hydroxymethyl-2-furaldehyde). Overexpression of ATR1 conferred increased resistance to coniferyl aldehyde. Strains overexpressing YAP1, which encodes a transcription factor, displayed increased resistance to coniferyl aldehyde, HMF, and the spruce hydrolysate. An ethanol productivity of 0.17 g ethanol × l−1 × h−1 was achieved for a YAP1-overexpressing transformant cultivated in spruce hydrolysate, whereas a control transformant, which did not overexpress YAP1, only reached a productivity of 0.05 g ethanol × l−1 × h−1

  • 60.
    Alvarez, Laura
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Molecular Infection Medicine Sweden (MIMS). Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Molecular Biology (Faculty of Medicine). Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Umeå Centre for Microbial Research (UCMR).
    Hernandez, Sara B
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Molecular Infection Medicine Sweden (MIMS). Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Molecular Biology (Faculty of Medicine). Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Umeå Centre for Microbial Research (UCMR).
    de Pedro, Miguel A
    Cava, Felipe
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Molecular Infection Medicine Sweden (MIMS). Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Molecular Biology (Faculty of Medicine). Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Umeå Centre for Microbial Research (UCMR).
    Ultra-sensitive, high-resolution liquid chromatography methods for the high-throughput quantitative analysis of bacterial cell wall chemistry and structure2016In: Bacterial cell wall homeostasis: methods and protocols /edited by Hee-Jeon Hong / [ed] Hee-Jeon Hong, New York: Humana Press, 2016, Vol. 1440, p. 11-27Chapter in book (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    High-performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) analysis has been critical for determining the structural and chemical complexity of the cell wall. However this method is very time consuming in terms of sample preparation and chromatographic separation. Here we describe (1) optimized methods for peptidoglycan isolation from both Gram-negative and Gram-positive bacteria that dramatically reduce the sample preparation time, and (2) the application of the fast and highly efficient ultra-performance liquid chromatography (UPLC) technology to muropeptide separation and quantification. The advances in both analytical instrumentation and stationary-phase chemistry have allowed for evolved protocols which cut run time from hours (2-3 h) to minutes (10-20 min), and sample demands by at least one order of magnitude. Furthermore, development of methods based on organic solvents permits in-line mass spectrometry (MS) of the UPLC-resolved muropeptides. Application of these technologies to high-throughput analysis will expedite the better understanding of the cell wall biology.

  • 61.
    Alvarez, Laura
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Molecular Biology (Faculty of Medicine). Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Molecular Infection Medicine Sweden (MIMS). Centro de Biología Molecular Severo Ochoa, Universidad Autónoma de Madrid- Consejo Superior de Investigaciones Científicas, Madrid, Spain.
    Sanchez-Hevia, Dione
    Sanchez, Mercedes
    Berenguer, Jose
    A new family of nitrate/nitrite transporters involved in denitrification2019In: International Microbiology, ISSN 1139-6709, E-ISSN 1618-1905, Vol. 22, no 1, p. 19-28Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Denitrifying bacteria carry out nitrate and nitrite respiration inside and outside the cell, respectively. In Thermus thermophilus, nitrate and nitrite transport processes are carried out by major facilitator superfamily (MFS) transporters. The sequence of the nar operon of nitrate-only respiring strains of T. thermophilus includes two tandemly organized MFS transporter genes (narK and narT) of the NarK1 and NarK2 families. Both can function as nitrate/nitrite antiporters, but NarK has been proposed as more specific for nitrate whereas NarT more specific for nitrite. In some nitrate- and nitrite-respiring strains of the same species, a single MFS transporter (NarO) belonging to a different MFS subfamily appears. To analyze the role of this single MFS in the same genetic context, we transferred the two types of nar operon to the aerobic strain HB27, and further included in both of them the ability to respire nitrite. The new denitrifying strains HB27dn, with two MFS, and HB27dp, with a single one, were used to isolate mutants devoid of transporters. Through in trans complementation experiments, we demonstrate that the NarO single MFS works efficiently in the transport of both nitrate and nitrite.

  • 62.
    Amer, Ayad
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Department of Molecular Biology (Faculty of Science and Technology). Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Umeå Centre for Microbial Research (UCMR).
    Costa, Tiago
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Department of Molecular Biology (Faculty of Science and Technology). Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Umeå Centre for Microbial Research (UCMR).
    Farag, Salah
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Department of Molecular Biology (Faculty of Science and Technology).
    Avican, Ummehan
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Molecular Biology (Faculty of Medicine). Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Umeå Centre for Microbial Research (UCMR). Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Molecular Infection Medicine Sweden (MIMS).
    Forsberg, Åke
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Molecular Biology (Faculty of Medicine). Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Umeå Centre for Microbial Research (UCMR). Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Molecular Infection Medicine Sweden (MIMS).
    Francis, Matthew
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Department of Molecular Biology (Faculty of Science and Technology). Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Umeå Centre for Microbial Research (UCMR).
    Genetically engineered frameshifted YopN-TyeA chimeras influence type III secretion system function in Yersinia pseudotuberculosis2013In: PLoS ONE, ISSN 1932-6203, E-ISSN 1932-6203, Vol. 8, no 10, article id e77767Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Type III secretion is a tightly controlled virulence mechanism utilized by many gram negative bacteria to colonize their eukaryotic hosts. To infect their host, human pathogenic Yersinia spp. translocate protein toxins into the host cell cytosol through a preassembled Ysc-Yop type III secretion device. Several of the Ysc-Yop components are known for their roles in controlling substrate secretion and translocation. Particularly important in this role is the YopN and TyeA heterodimer. In this study, we confirm that Y. pseudotuberculosis naturally produce a 42 kDa YopN-TyeA hybrid protein as a result of a +1 frame shift near the 3 prime of yopN mRNA, as has been previously reported for the closely related Y. pestis. To assess the biological role of this YopN-TyeA hybrid in T3SS by Y. pseudotuberculosis, we used in cis site-directed mutagenesis to engineer bacteria to either produce predominately the YopN-TyeA hybrid by introducing +1 frame shifts to yopN after codon 278 or 287, or to produce only singular YopN and TyeA polypeptides by introducing yopN sequence from Y. enterocolitica, which is known not to produce the hybrid. Significantly, the engineered 42 kDa YopN-TyeA fusions were abundantly produced, stable, and were efficiently secreted by bacteria in vitro. Moreover, these bacteria could all maintain functionally competent needle structures and controlled Yops secretion in vitro. In the presence of host cells however, bacteria producing the most genetically altered hybrids (+1 frameshift after 278 codon) had diminished control of polarized Yop translocation. This corresponded to significant attenuation in competitive survival assays in orally infected mice, although not at all to the same extent as Yersinia lacking both YopN and TyeA proteins. Based on these studies with engineered polypeptides, most likely a naturally occurring YopN-TyeA hybrid protein has the potential to influence T3S control and activity when produced during Yersinia-host cell contact.

  • 63.
    Amer, Ayad
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Department of Molecular Biology (Faculty of Science and Technology). Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Umeå Centre for Microbial Research (UCMR).
    Gurung, Jyoti
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Department of Molecular Biology (Faculty of Science and Technology). Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Umeå Centre for Microbial Research (UCMR).
    Costa, Tiago
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Department of Molecular Biology (Faculty of Science and Technology). Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Umeå Centre for Microbial Research (UCMR).
    Ruuth, Kristina
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Department of Molecular Biology (Faculty of Science and Technology). Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Umeå Centre for Microbial Research (UCMR).
    Zavialov, Anton
    Joint Biotechnology Laboratory, Department of Chemistry, University of Turku, Turku, Finland.
    Forsberg, Åke
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Molecular Biology (Faculty of Medicine). Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Umeå Centre for Microbial Research (UCMR). Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Molecular Infection Medicine Sweden (MIMS).
    Francis, Matthew S
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Department of Molecular Biology (Faculty of Science and Technology). Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Umeå Centre for Microbial Research (UCMR).
    YopN and TyeA Hydrophobic Contacts Required for Regulating Ysc-Yop Type III Secretion Activity by Yersinia pseudotuberculosis2016In: Frontiers in Cellular and Infection Microbiology, E-ISSN 2235-2988, Vol. 6, article id 66Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Yersinia bacteria target Yop effector toxins to the interior of host immune cells by the Ysc-Yop type III secretion system. A YopN-TyeA heterodimer is central to controlling Ysc-Yop targeting activity. A + 1 frameshift event in the 3-prime end of yopN can also produce a singular secreted YopN-TyeA polypeptide that retains some regulatory function even though the C-terminal coding sequence of this YopN differs greatly from wild type. Thus, this YopN C-terminal segment was analyzed for its role in type III secretion control. Bacteria producing YopN truncated after residue 278, or with altered sequence between residues 279 and 287, had lost type III secretion control and function. In contrast, YopN variants with manipulated sequence beyond residue 287 maintained full control and function. Scrutiny of the YopN-TyeA complex structure revealed that residue W279 functioned as a likely hydrophobic contact site with TyeA. Indeed, a YopNW279G mutant lost all ability to bind TyeA. The TyeA residue F8 was also critical for reciprocal YopN binding. Thus, we conclude that specific hydrophobic contacts between opposing YopN and TyeA termini establishes a complex needed for regulating Ysc-Yop activity.

  • 64.
    Amer, Ayad
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Department of Molecular Biology (Faculty of Science and Technology). Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Umeå Centre for Microbial Research (UCMR).
    Åhlund, Monika
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Department of Molecular Biology (Faculty of Science and Technology).
    Bröms, Jeanette
    Department of Medical Countermeasures, Swedish Defense Research Agency, Division of NBC12 Defense, Umeå, Sweden.
    Forsberg, Åke
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Umeå Centre for Microbial Research (UCMR). Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Molecular Infection Medicine Sweden (MIMS). Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Molecular Biology (Faculty of Medicine).
    Francis, Matthew
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Department of Molecular Biology (Faculty of Science and Technology). Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Umeå Centre for Microbial Research (UCMR).
    Impact of the N-terminal secretor domain on YopD translocator function in Yersinia pseudotuberculosis type III secretion2011In: Journal of Bacteriology, ISSN 0021-9193, E-ISSN 1098-5530, Vol. 193, no 23, p. 6683-6700Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Type III secretion systems (T3SSs) secrete needle components, pore-forming translocators, and the translocated effectors. In part, effector recognition by a T3SS involves their N-terminal amino acids and their 5′ mRNA. To investigate whether similar molecular constraints influence translocator secretion, we scrutinized this region within YopD from Yersinia pseudotuberculosis. Mutations in the 5′ end of yopD that resulted in specific disruption of the mRNA sequence did not affect YopD secretion. On the other hand, a few mutations affecting the protein sequence reduced secretion. Translational reporter fusions identified the first five codons as a minimal N-terminal secretion signal and also indicated that the YopD N terminus might be important for yopD translation control. Hybrid proteins in which the N terminus of YopD was exchanged with the equivalent region of the YopE effector or the YopB translocator were also constructed. While the in vitro secretion profile was unaltered, these modified bacteria were all compromised with respect to T3SS activity in the presence of immune cells. Thus, the YopD N terminus does harbor a secretion signal that may also incorporate mechanisms of yopD translation control. This signal tolerates a high degree of variation while still maintaining secretion competence suggestive of inherent structural peculiarities that make it distinct from secretion signals of other T3SS substrates.

  • 65. Amon, Jeremy D.
    et al.
    Yadav, Akhilesh K.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Molecular Biology (Faculty of Medicine). Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Molecular Infection Medicine Sweden (MIMS). Analytical Chemistry Division, CSIR-Indian Institute of Toxicology Research, Lucknow, India.
    Ramirez-Guadiana, Fernando H.
    Meeske, Alexander J.
    Cava, Felipe
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Molecular Infection Medicine Sweden (MIMS). Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Molecular Biology (Faculty of Medicine).
    Rudner, David Z.
    SwsB and SafA Are Required for CwlJ-Dependent Spore Germination in Bacillus subtilis2020In: Journal of Bacteriology, ISSN 0021-9193, E-ISSN 1098-5530, Vol. 202, no 6, article id e00668-19Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    When Bacillus subtilis spores detect nutrients, they exit dormancy through the processes of germination and outgrowth. A key step in germination is the activation of two functionally redundant cell wall hydrolases (SleB and CwlJ) that degrade the specialized cortex peptidoglycan that surrounds the spore. How these enzymes are regulated remains poorly understood. To identify additional factors that affect their activity, we used transposon sequencing to screen for synthetic germination defects in spores lacking SleB or CwlJ. Other than the previously characterized protein YpeB, no additional factors were found to be specifically required for SleB activity. In contrast, our screen identified SafA and YlxY (renamed SwsB) in addition to the known factors GerQ and CotE as proteins required for CwlJ function. SafA is a member of the spore's proteinaceous coat and we show that, like GerQ and CotE, it is required for accumulation and retention of CwlJ in the dormant spore. SwsB is broadly conserved among spore formers, and we show that it is required for CwlJ to efficiently degrade the cortex during germination. Intriguingly, SwsB resembles polysaccharide deacetylases, and its putative catalytic residues are required for its role in germination. However, we find no chemical signature of its activity on the spore cortex or in vitro. While the precise, mechanistic role of SwsB remains unknown, we explore and discuss potential activities. IMPORTANCE Spore formation in Bacillus subtilis has been studied for over half a century, and virtually every step in this developmental process has been characterized in molecular detail. In contrast, how spores exit dormancy remains less well understood. A key step in germination is the degradation of the specialized cell wall surrounding the spore called the cortex. Two enzymes (SleB and CwlJ) specifically target this protective layer, but how they are regulated and whether additional factors promote their activity are unknown. Here, we identified the coat protein SafA and a conserved but uncharacterized protein YlxY as additional factors required for CwlJ-dependent degradation of the cortex. Our analysis provides a more complete picture of this essential step in the exit from dormancy.

  • 66. Amorim, Gisele C
    et al.
    Cisneros, David A.
    Unité de Génétique Moléculaire, Département de MicrobiologieInstitut Pasteur, Paris Cedex 15 France; CNRS, ERL 3526, Paris, France.
    Delepierre, Muriel
    Francetic, Olivera
    Izadi-Pruneyre, Nadia
    ¹H, ¹⁵N and ¹³C resonance assignments of PpdD, a type IV pilin from enterohemorrhagic Escherichia coli2014In: Biomolecular NMR Assignments, ISSN 1874-2718, E-ISSN 1874-270X, Vol. 8, no 1, p. 43-46Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Bacterial type 4 pili (T4P) are long flexible fibers involved in adhesion, DNA uptake, phage transduction, aggregation and a flagella-independent movement called "twitching motility". T4P comprise thousands of copies of the major pilin subunit, which is initially inserted in the plasma membrane, processed and assembled into dynamic helical filaments. T4P are crucial for host colonization and virulence of many Gram-negative bacteria. In enterohemorrhagic Escherichia coli the T4P, called hemorrhagic coli pili (HCP) promote cell adhesion, motility, biofilm formation and signaling. To understand the mechanism of HCP assembly and function, we analyzed the structure of the major subunit prepilin peptidase-dependent protein D (PpdD) (also called HcpA), a 15 kDa pilin with two potential disulfide bonds. Here we present the (1)H, (15)N and (13)C backbone and side chain resonance assignments of the C-terminal globular domain of PpdD as a first step to its structural determination.

  • 67. Amstutz, Cynthia L.
    et al.
    Fristedt, Rikard
    Schultink, Alex
    Merchant, Sabeeha S.
    Niyogi, Krishna K.
    Malnoë, Alizée
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Department of Plant Physiology. Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Umeå Plant Science Centre (UPSC). Howard Hughes Medical Institute, University of California, Berkeley, CA, USA; Department of Plant and Microbial Biology, University of California, Berkeley, CA, USA; Molecular Biophysics and Integrated Bioimaging Division, Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, Berkeley, CA, USA.
    An atypical short-chain dehydrogenase–reductase functions in the relaxation of photoprotective qH in Arabidopsis2020In: Nature Plants, ISSN 2055-026X, Vol. 6, p. 154-166Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Photosynthetic organisms experience wide fluctuations in light intensity and regulate light harvesting accordingly to prevent damage from excess energy. The antenna quenching component qH is a sustained form of energy dissipation that protects the photosynthetic apparatus under stress conditions. This photoprotective mechanism requires the plastid lipocalin LCNP and is prevented by SUPPRESSOR OF QUENCHING1 (SOQ1) under non-stress conditions. However, the molecular mechanism of qH relaxation has yet to be resolved. Here, we isolated and characterized RELAXATION OF QH1 (ROQH1), an atypical short-chain dehydrogenase–reductase that functions as a qH-relaxation factor in Arabidopsis. The ROQH1 gene belongs to the GreenCut2 inventory specific to photosynthetic organisms, and the ROQH1 protein localizes to the chloroplast stroma lamellae membrane. After a cold and high-light treatment, qH does not relax in roqh1 mutants and qH does not occur in leaves overexpressing ROQH1. When the soq1 and roqh1 mutations are combined, qH can neither be prevented nor relaxed and soq1 roqh1 displays constitutive qH and light-limited growth. We propose that LCNP and ROQH1 perform dosage-dependent, antagonistic functions to protect the photosynthetic apparatus and maintain light-harvesting efficiency in plants.

  • 68.
    Amundsson, Katharina
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Department of Ecology and Environmental Sciences.
    Control of marine plankton respiration: High temperature sensitivity at low temperatures influenced by substrate availability2016Independent thesis Basic level (degree of Bachelor), 10 credits / 15 HE creditsStudent thesis
    Abstract [en]

    Temperature dependence of marine plankton respiration is an important factor in understanding the function and changes in the ecosystem of the ocean. The aim of this study is to test the temperature sensitivity (Q10) of plankton respiration. The oxygen optode method was used to measure plankton respiration. Natural water samples from the Baltic Sea was incubated at short (in situ +1, +2, +3°C) and long (in situ +5, +10, +20°C) temperature intervals with influence of dissolved organic matter (DOC). The Arrhenius equation and Q10-model was used to determine the temperature dependence (Q10) of respiration at different temperatures. There was a significant difference in Q10 between short temperature intervals at low temperatures (p=0,008) and long temperature intervals at higher temperatures. There was no significant difference between long and short temperature intervals when DOC was added (p=0,094). A significant effect could be seen with the DOC enrichment at low temperatures, where the Q10-values became significantly lower (p=0,002) after DOC addition. This effect could, however, not be seen at higher temperatures (p=0,117). Together with results from earlier studies it was concluded that the difference in temperature depends on the actual temperature and not the length of the interval. Lowered temperature dependence at raised DOC concentration, was the opposite of what was expected. The results suggest that the importance of temperature for CO2 emissions and development of hypoxia in the sea may have been underestimated.

  • 69.
    Anderl, Ines
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Molecular Biology (Faculty of Medicine).
    Activation of the Cellular Immune Response in Drosophila melanogaster Larvae2015Doctoral thesis, comprehensive summary (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    During the last 40 years, Drosophila melanogaster has become an invaluable tool in understanding innate immunity. The innate immune system of Drosophila consists of a humoral and a cellular component. While many details are known about the humoral immune system, our knowledge about the cellular immune system is comparatively small. Blood cells or hemocytes constitute the cellular immune system. Three blood types have been described for Drosophila larvae. Plasmatocytes are phagocytes with a plethora of functions. Crystal cells mediate melanization and contribute to wound healing. Plasmatocytes and crystal cells constitute the blood cell repertoire of a healthy larva, whereas lamellocytes are induced in a demand-adapted manner after infection with parasitoid wasp eggs. They are involved in the melanotic encapsulation response against parasites and form melanotic nodules that are also referred to as tumors.

    In my thesis, I focused on unraveling the mechanisms of how the immune system orchestrates the cellular immune response. In particular, I was interested in the hematopoiesis of lamellocytes.

    In Article I, we were able to show that ectopic expression of key components of a number of signaling pathways in blood cells induced the development of lamellocytes, led to a proliferative response of plasmatocytes, or to a combination of lamellocyte activation and plasmatocyte proliferation.

    In Article II, I combined newly developed fluorescent enhancer-reporter constructs specific for plasmatocytes and lamellocytes and developed a “dual reporter system” that was used in live microscopy of fly larvae. In addition, we established flow cytometry as a tool to count total blood cell numbers and to distinguish between different blood cell types. The “dual reporter system” enabled us to differentiate between six blood cell types and established proliferation as a central feature of the cellular immune response. The combination flow cytometry and live imaging increased our understanding of the tempo-spatial events leading to the cellular immune reaction.

    In Article III, I developed a genetic modifier screen to find genes involved in the hematopoiesis of lamellocytes. I took advantage of the gain-of-function phenotype of the Tl10b mutation characterized by an activated cellular immune system, which induced the formation blood cell tumors. We screened the right arm of chromosome 3 for enhancers and suppressors of this mutation and uncovered ird1.

    Finally in Article IV, we showed that the activity of the Toll signaling pathway in the fat body, the homolog of the liver, is necessary to activate the cellular immune system and induce lamellocyte hematopoiesis.

  • 70.
    Anderl, Ines
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Molecular Biology (Faculty of Medicine).
    Infection-induced proliferation is a central hallmark of the activation of the cellular immune response in Drosophila larvae.Manuscript (preprint) (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Blood cells have important roles in immune reactions in all metazoan species. In Drosophila melanogaster larvae, phagocytic plasmatocytes are the main blood cell (hemocyte) type. Lamellocytes participate in encapsulating foreign objects and are formed in response to parasitoid wasps laying their eggs into the hemocoel of the larvae. The immune reaction against wasps requires controlled recruitment and action of hemocytes from the lymph glands, sessile islets and circulation. However, the contribution of these different hematopoietic compartments to the immune-induced hemocyte pool remains unclear. We used eater-GFP and MSNF9MO-mCherry to fluorescently tag plasmatocytes and lamellocytes, respectively, and utilized flow cytometry and in vivo imaging to assess the hemocyte numbers and types in circulation and in sessile compartments after infection by three wasp species of the genus Leptopilina. We detected five different hemocyte types based on fluorescence, and a population of non-fluorescent cells. While non-infected larvae generally had only one, eaterGFP-high plasmatocyte population, early after wasp infection a new, eaterGFP-low cell population appeared in circulation. EaterGFP-high and –low cells both accumulated msnCherry during the immune response, and formed two cell lineages. Whereas the eaterGFP-low cells gradually lost GFP, the eaterGFP-high cells retained it at high levels. We suggest that eaterGFP-low cells represent an immune-induced hemocyte precursor cell pool, which, via a prelamellocyte stage, gives rise to lamellocytes. EaterGFP-high plasmatocytes also differentiated into large, msnCherry-positive hemocytes on wasp eggs, but these cells retain plasmatocyte identity. Importantly, all hemocyte types, except for lamellocytes, were able to divide after wasp infection, contributing to the increased hemocyte numbers after infection. We conclude that orchestrated differentiation and division of different hemocyte types in circulation and in sessile compartment is key to a successful immune response against parasitoid wasps.

  • 71. Andersen, G. Neumann
    et al.
    Andersen, M.
    Nagaeva, Olga
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Clinical Microbiology, Clinical Immunology.
    Wikberg, J. E. S.
    Mincheva-Nilsson, Lucia
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Clinical Microbiology, Clinical Immunology.
    Dermal Melanocortin Receptor Rebound in Diffuse Systemic Sclerosis after Anti-TGF ss 1 Antibody Therapy2012In: Scandinavian Journal of Immunology, ISSN 0300-9475, E-ISSN 1365-3083, Vol. 76, no 5, p. 478-482Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Disturbed transforming growth factor beta (TGF beta) signalling leads to enhanced synthesis of extracellular matrix (ECM), which is manifested as systemic sclerosis (SSc), but this may be attenuated by the melanocortin system. Here, we report of rebound reaction in the gene expression of melanocortin receptor (MCR) subtypes and of the precursor of these receptors ligands, the pro-opio-melanocortin protein (POMC), in the acute skin lesion of diffuse systemic sclerosis (dSSc) after treatment with a recombinant human anti-TGF beta 1 antibody. Biopsies, taken from the leading edge of the skin lesion, before and after treatment of a patient with recent onset dSSc, were examined. Before treatment, increased levels of TGF beta mRNA and suppressed levels of POMC mRNA and MCR subtypes MC1-3, 5R mRNAs were seen in the lesion, compared with healthy controls. After treatment, there was a rebound expression of POMC, MC2, 3, 5R mRNAs. As the melanocortin system regulates collagen and melanin production, our findings add a new understanding to the pathogenetic mechanisms involved in the acute skin lesion of dSSc, which is characterized by enhanced ECM formation and changes in skin pigmentation.

  • 72.
    Andersen, K. H.
    et al.
    Tech Univ Denmark, Denmark.
    Berge, T.
    Tech Univ Denmark, Denmark ; Univ Copenhagen, Denmark.
    Goncalves, R. J.
    Tech Univ Denmark, Denmark ;Consejo Nacl Invest Cient & Tecn, Argentina ; Estn Fotobiol Playa Union, Argentina.
    Hartvig, M.
    Tech Univ Denmark, Denmark ; Univ Copenhagen, Denmark ; Univ Göttingen, Germany.
    Heuschele, J.
    Tech Univ Denmark, Denmark.
    Hylander, Samuel
    Linnéuniversitetet, Institutionen för biologi och miljö (BOM).
    Jacobsen, N. S.
    Tech Univ Denmark, Denmark.
    Lindemann, C.
    Tech Univ Denmark, Denmark.
    Martens, E. A.
    Tech Univ Denmark, Denmark ; Univ Copenhagen, Denmark.
    Neuheimer, A. B.
    Tech Univ Denmark, Denmark ; Univ Hawaii Manoa, USA.
    Olsson, K.
    Tech Univ Denmark, Denmark.
    Palacz, A.
    Tech Univ Denmark, Denmark.
    Prowe, A. E. F.
    Tech Univ Denmark, Denmark ; GEOMAR Helmholtz Ctr Ocean Res Kiel, Germany.
    Sainmont, J.
    Tech Univ Denmark, Denmark.
    Traving, S. J.
    Tech Univ Denmark, Denmark ; Univ Copenhagen, Denmark.
    Visser, A. W.
    Tech Univ Denmark, Denmark.
    Wadhwa, N.
    Tech Univ Denmark, Denmark.
    Kiorboe, T.
    Tech Univ Denmark, Denmark.
    Characteristic Sizes of Life in the Oceans, from Bacteria to Whales2016In: Annual Review of Marine Science, ISSN 1941-1405, E-ISSN 1941-0611, Vol. 8, p. 217-241Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The size of an individual organism is a key trait to characterize its physiology and feeding ecology. Size-based scaling laws may have a limited size range of validity or undergo a transition from one scaling exponent to another at some characteristic size. We collate and review data on size-based scaling laws for resource acquisition, mobility, sensory range, and progeny size for all pelagic marine life, from bacteria to whales. Further, we review and develop simple theoretical arguments for observed scaling laws and the characteristic sizes of a change or breakdown of power laws. We divide life in the ocean into seven major realms based on trophic strategy, physiology, and life history strategy. Such a categorization represents a move away from a taxonomically oriented description toward a trait-based description of life in the oceans. Finally, we discuss life forms that transgress the simple size-based rules and identify unanswered questions.

  • 73. Anderson, James V.
    Ramos-Sánchez, José M.
    Conde, Daniel
    Ibáñez, Christian
    Takata, Naoki
    Allona, Isabel
    Eriksson, Maria E.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Department of Plant Physiology. Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Umeå Plant Science Centre (UPSC).
    Role of the Circadian Clock in Cold Acclimation and Winter Dormancy in Perennial Plants2015Collection (editor) (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Seasonal variation is a strong cue directing the growth and development of plants. It is particularly important for perennials growing in temperate and boreal regions where woody plants must become dormant to survive freezing winter temperatures. Shortening of the photoperiod induces growth cessation, bud set and a first degree of cold acclimation in most woody plants. The subsequent drop in temperature then produces a greater tolerance to cold and, in deciduous trees, leaf senescence and fall. Trees must time their periods of dormancy accurately with their environment. Circadian clocks underlie this ability, allowing organisms to predict regular, daily changes in their environment as well as longer term seasonal changes. This chapter provides an update on the plant clock in a model annual, thale cress (Arabidopsis thaliana), and further summarizes recent advances about the clock in perennial plants and its involvement in their annual growth cycles, which allows trees to withstand cold and freezing temperatures. Moreover, we outline our views on areas where future work on the circadian clock is necessary to gain insight into the life of a tree.

  • 74. Anderson, K. E.
    et al.
    Nisbet, R. M.
    Diehl, S.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Ecology and Environmental Science.
    Spatial scaling of consumer-resource interactions in advection-dominated systems2006In: American Naturalist, Vol. 168, no 3, p. 358-372Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Ecologists studying consumer-resource interactions in advection-dominated systems such as streams and rivers frequently seek to link the results of small-scale experiments with larger-scale patterns of distribution and abundance. Accomplishing this goal requires determining the characteristic scale, termed the response length, at which there is a shift from local dynamics dominated by advective dispersal to larger-scale dynamics dominated by births and deaths. Here, we model the dynamics of consumer-resource systems in a spatially variable, advective environment and show how consumer-resource interactions alter the response length relative to its single-species value. For one case involving a grazer that emigrates in response to high predator density, we quantify the changes using published data from small-scale experiments on aquatic invertebrates. Using Fourier analysis, we describe the responses of advection-dominated consumer-resource systems to spatially extended environmental variability in a way that involves explicit consideration of the response length. The patterns we derive for different consumer-resource systems exhibit important similarities in how component populations respond to spatial environmental variability affecting dispersal as opposed to demographic parameters.

  • 75. Anderson, K. E.
    et al.
    Nisbet, R. M.
    Diehl, S.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Ecology and Environmental Science.
    Cooper, S. D.
    Scaling population responses to spatial environmental variability in advection-dominated systems2005In: Ecology Letters, Vol. 8, no 9, p. 933-943Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    We model the spatial dynamics of an open population of organisms that disperse solely through advection in order to understand responses to multiscale environmental variability. We show that the distance over which a population responds to a localized perturbation, called the response length, can be characterized as an organisms average lifetime dispersal distance, unless there is strong density-dependence in demographic or dispersal rates. Continuous spatial fluctuations in demographic rates at scales smaller than the response length will be largely averaged in the population distribution, whereas those in per capita emigration rates will be strongly tracked. We illustrate these results using a parameterized example to show how responses to environmental variability may differ in streams with different average current velocities. Our model suggests an approach to linking local dynamics dominated by dispersal processes to larger-scale dynamics dominated by births and deaths.

  • 76.
    Andersson, Agneta
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Department of Ecology and Environmental Sciences. Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Umeå Marine Sciences Centre (UMF).
    Ahlinder, J.
    Mathisen, Peter
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Department of Ecology and Environmental Sciences.
    Hagglund, M.
    Backman, S.
    Nilsson, E.
    Sjodin, A.
    Thelaus, J.
    Predators and nutrient availability favor protozoa-resisting bacteria in aquatic systems2018In: Scientific Reports, ISSN 2045-2322, E-ISSN 2045-2322, Vol. 8, article id 8415Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The long co-existence of bacteria and protozoa has led to the development of bacterial protozoa resistance strategies, which are suggested to serve as drivers for the evolution of pathogenic bacteria. However, the ecological mechanisms underpinning selection for protozoa-resistance in aquatic bacteria are poorly known. To assess the role of nutrient availability and predation-pressure on selection for protozoa-resisting bacteria (PRB), an enrichment-dilution experiment was designed using laboratory microcosms containing natural lake water. PRB was monitored by screening 16S rRNA amplicon sequence data for reads assigned to bacteria that previously has been shown to resist degradation by amoebae. To estimate the effects of the microbial food web dynamics (microscopy of; heterotrophic bacteria, phytoplankton, protozoa and rotifers) and physicochemical variables on the PRB abundance in the study system, a joint species distribution modelling approach was used. The predation-pressure (ratio between predator and bacterial biomass) had a positive effect on the abundance of the PRB genus Mycobacterium, while perturbation (enrichment and dilution) favored the PRB genus Pseudomonas that dominated the bacterial community in the disturbed systems. Our results show that PRB with different ecological strategies can be expected in water of high and intermediate nutrient levels and after major disturbances of an aquatic system.

  • 77.
    Andersson, Agneta
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Department of Ecology and Environmental Sciences.
    Ahlinder, Jon
    Division of CBRN Defence and Security, Swedish Defence Research Agency, FOI, SE-901 82 Umeå, Sweden.
    Mathisen, Peter
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Department of Ecology and Environmental Sciences.
    Bäckman, Stina
    Division of CBRN Defence and Security, Swedish Defence Research Agency, FOI, SE-901 82 Umeå, Sweden.
    Nilsson, Elin
    Division of CBRN Defence and Security, Swedish Defence Research Agency, FOI, SE-901 82 Umeå, Sweden.
    Hammarström, Moa
    Division of CBRN Defence and Security, Swedish Defence Research Agency, FOI, SE-901 82 Umeå, Sweden.
    Sjödin, Andreas
    Division of CBRN Defence and Security, Swedish Defence Research Agency, FOI, SE-901 82 Umeå, Sweden.
    Thelaus, Johanna
    Division of CBRN Defence and Security, Swedish Defence Research Agency, FOI, SE-901 82 Umeå, Sweden.
    Aquatic ecosystems at risk for occurrence of pathogenic bacteriaManuscript (preprint) (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Pathogenic bacteria occur naturally in aquatic systems. Co-existence of bacteria and protozoa has led to development of predation resistance strategies, which is suggested to serve as a driver for evolution of pathogenic bacteria. However, the ecological mechanisms for selection for different types of predation resistant and pathogenic bacteria are poorly known. To disentangle effects from nutrient availability and protozoan predation pressure on the occurrence of varying predation resistant bacterial genera, an enrichment-dilution experiment was performed where an aquatic bacterial community was exposed to protozoa. Operational taxonomical units, specific for three predation resistant bacterial genera were identified; Pseudomonas, Rickettsia and Mycobacterium. These genera are also known to harbor species that are potentially pathogenic to mammals. Rickettsia and Mycobacterium were promoted where protozoa were abundant and the predation pressure high, while Pseudomonas dominated the bacterial community at the highest nutrient level where the predation pressure on bacteria were low. Our study thus indicates that waters of all nutrient states can harbor pathogenic bacteria, but that bacteria with different ecological strategies occur depending on nutrient level and perturbation. The generative model approach presented here provide a possibility to integrate environmental data in prediction models of pathogens in complex environments.

  • 78.
    Andersson, Agneta
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Department of Molecular Biology (Faculty of Science and Technology). Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Umeå Marine Sciences Centre (UMF).
    Hajdu, Susanna
    Inst. f. Systemekologi, Stockholms universitet.
    Haecky, Pia
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Department of Molecular Biology (Faculty of Science and Technology). Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Umeå Marine Sciences Centre (UMF).
    Kuparinen, Jorma
    Wikner, Johan
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Department of Molecular Biology (Faculty of Science and Technology). Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Umeå Marine Sciences Centre (UMF).
    Succession and growth limitation of phytoplankton in the Gulf of Bothnia (Baltic Sea)1996In: Marine Biology, ISSN 0025-3162, E-ISSN 1432-1793, Vol. 126, no 4, p. 791-801Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    A one year field study of four stations in the Gulf of Bothnia during 1991 showed that the biomass was ca. two times, and primary productivity ca, four times, lower in the north (Bothnian Bay) than in the south (Bothnian Sea) during the summer. Nutrient addition experiments indicated phosphorus limitation of phytoplankton in the Bothnian Bay and the coastal areas in the northern Bothnian Sea, but nitrogen limitation in the open Bothnian Sea. A positive correlation between the phosphate concentration and the production/biomass ratio of phytoplankton was demonstrated, which partly explained the differences in the specific growth rate of the phytoplankton during the summer. Differences in photosynthetic active radiation between the stations also showed a covariation with the primary productivity. The relative importance of nutrient or light limitation for photosynthetic carbon fixation could not, however, be conclusively determined from this study. Marked differences in phytoplankton species composition from north to south were also observed. The number of dominating species was higher in the Bothnian Sea than in the Bothnian Bay. The distribution of some species could be explained as due to nutrient availability (e.g. Nodularia spumigena, Aphanizomenon sp.), while salinity probably limits the distribution of some limnic as well as marine species. The potentially toxic phytoplankton N. spumigena, Dinophysis acuminata and Chrysochromulina spp. were common in the Bothnian Sea but not in the Bothnian Bay. The pico- and nanoplankton biomass during late summer was higher than previously reported due to a revised carbon/volume ratio.

  • 79.
    Andersson, Agneta
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Department of Ecology and Environmental Sciences. Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Umeå Marine Sciences Centre (UMF).
    Höglander, Helena
    Karlsson, Chatarina
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Umeå Marine Sciences Centre (UMF).
    Huseby, Siv
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Umeå Marine Sciences Centre (UMF).
    Key role of phosphorus and nitrogen in regulating cyanobacterial community composition in the northern Baltic Sea2015In: Estuarine, Coastal and Shelf Science, ISSN 0272-7714, E-ISSN 1096-0015, Vol. 164, p. 161-171Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Despite cyanobacteria being a key phytoplankton group in the Baltic Sea, the factors governing their community structure are still poorly understood. Here, we studied the occurrence of the orders Chroococcales, Oscillatoriales and Nostocales, and potentially explanatory variables at five locations in the northern Baltic Sea from June–September, 1998–2012. Cyanobacteria constituted 1–36% of the total phytoplankton biomass along the north–south gradient. In the Bothnian Bay, Chroococcales and Oscillatoriales dominated the cyanobacterial community, whereas in the Bothnian Sea and northern Baltic Proper, Nostocales was the dominant group. The dominance of Chroococcales was coupled to low salinity and low total phosphorus, whereas Oscillatoriales correlated with high total nitrogen and low salinity. Nostocales correlated to high total phosphorus, inorganic phosphorus and salinity. Chroococcales showed an increase over time in the offshore Bothnian Bay, whereas Nostocales increased in the coastal Bothnian Sea and coastal Baltic Proper. The increase of Nostocales in the coastal Bothnian Sea was explained by a rise in total phosphorus and decrease in dissolved inorganic nitrogen compared to an increase of total nitrogen and phosphorus in the coastal Baltic Proper. No significant trends were observed in the cyanobacterial community in the offshore Bothnian Sea and the offshore northern Baltic Proper. We concluded that Chroococcales may be a useful indicator for increased phosphorus levels in waters with low phosphorus concentrations, whereas Nostocales could be used as a quality indicator for increasing phosphorus concentrations in waters with low inorganic N/P ratios (<20), such as in the coastal Bothnian Sea and Baltic Proper.

  • 80.
    Andersson, Agneta
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Department of Ecology and Environmental Sciences.
    Joanna, Paczkowska
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Department of Ecology and Environmental Sciences.
    Brugel, Sonia
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Department of Ecology and Environmental Sciences.
    Rowe, Owen
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Department of Ecology and Environmental Sciences.
    Figueroa, Daniela
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Department of Ecology and Environmental Sciences.
    Kratzer, Susanne
    Stockholm University Institutionen för ekologi miljö och botanik 106 91 Stockholm.
    Marked impact of allochthonous dissolved organic matter on estuarine primary and bacterial productionManuscript (preprint) (Other academic)
  • 81.
    Andersson, Agneta
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Department of Ecology and Environmental Sciences. Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Umeå Marine Sciences Centre (UMF).
    Jurgensone, Iveta
    Rowe, Owen F.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Department of Ecology and Environmental Sciences.
    Simonelli, Paolo
    Bignert, Anders
    Lundberg, Erik
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Umeå Marine Sciences Centre (UMF).
    Karlsson, Jan
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Department of Ecology and Environmental Sciences.
    Can Humic Water Discharge Counteract Eutrophication in Coastal Waters?2013In: PLoS ONE, ISSN 1932-6203, E-ISSN 1932-6203, Vol. 8, no 4, p. e61293-Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    A common and established view is that increased inputs of nutrients to the sea, for example via river flooding, will cause eutrophication and phytoplankton blooms in coastal areas. We here show that this concept may be questioned in certain scenarios. Climate change has been predicted to cause increased inflow of freshwater to coastal areas in northern Europe. River waters in these areas are often brown from the presence of high concentrations of allochthonous dissolved organic carbon ( humic carbon), in addition to nitrogen and phosphorus. In this study we investigated whether increased inputs of humic carbon can change the structure and production of the pelagic food web in the recipient seawater. In a mesocosm experiment unfiltered seawater from the northern Baltic Sea was fertilized with inorganic nutrients and humic carbon (CNP), and only with inorganic nutrients (NP). The system responded differently to the humic carbon addition. In NP treatments bacterial, phytoplankton and zooplankton production increased and the systems turned net autotrophic, whereas the CNP-treatment only bacterial and zooplankton production increased driving the system to net heterotrophy. The size-structure of the food web showed large variations in the different treatments. In the enriched NP treatments the phytoplankton community was dominated by filamentous >20 mu m algae, while in the CNP treatments the phytoplankton was dominated by picocyanobacteria <5 mu m. Our results suggest that climate change scenarios, resulting in increased humic-rich river inflow, may counteract eutrophication in coastal waters, leading to a promotion of the microbial food web and other heterotrophic organisms, driving the recipient coastal waters to net-heterotrophy.

  • 82.
    Andersson, Agneta
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Department of Ecology and Environmental Sciences. Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Umeå Marine Sciences Centre (UMF).
    Karlsson, Chatarina
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Umeå Marine Sciences Centre (UMF).
    Hajdu, Susanna
    Stockholms universitet.
    Höglander, Helena
    Stockholms universitet.
    Skjevik, Ann-Turi
    SMHI.
    Pelagial biologi / växtplankton2010In: Havet: om miljötillståndet i svenska havsområden. 2010 / [ed] Kristina Viklund (huvudredaktör) Ulrika Brenner, Annika Tidlund, Marie Svärd, Stockholm: Naturvårdsverket, 2010, p. 32-33Chapter in book (Other academic)
  • 83.
    Andersson, Agneta
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Department of Ecology and Environmental Sciences. Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Umeå Marine Sciences Centre (UMF).
    Karlsson, Chatarina
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Umeå Marine Sciences Centre (UMF).
    Huseby, Siv
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Umeå Marine Sciences Centre (UMF).
    Höglander, Helena
    Mer fosfor ger mer cyanobakterier i norra Östersjön2013In: Havet, p. 51-54Article, review/survey (Other academic)
    Abstract [sv]

    I flera områden i norra Östersjön har cyanobakterierna ökat under de senaste tio till femton åren. I Bottenhavets och Egentliga Östersjöns kustområden ökar de kvävefixerande cyanobakterierna. I Bottenvikens utsjö är det den småcelliga och kolonibildande gruppen Chroococcales som blir fler. Förändringarna beror i flera fall på ökande halter av fosfor.

  • 84.
    Andersson, Agneta
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Department of Ecology and Environmental Sciences.
    Meier, Markus
    SMHI och Stockholms universitet.
    Hur påverkas Östersjön?2010In: Sverige i nytt klimat: våtvarm utmaning / [ed] Birgitta Johansson, Stockholm: Forskningsrådet Formas, 2010, p. 117-132Chapter in book (Other academic)
  • 85. Andersson, Agneta
    et al.
    Samuelsson, Kristina
    Haecky, Pia
    Albertsson, Jan
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Umeå Marine Sciences Centre (UMF).
    Changes in the pelagic microbial food web due to artificial eutrophication2006In: Aquatic Ecology, ISSN 1386-2588, E-ISSN 1573-5125, Vol. 40, no 3, p. 299-313Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The effect of nutrient enrichment on the structure and carbon flow in the pelagic microbial food web was studied in mesocosm experiments using seawater from the northern Baltic Sea. The experiments included food webs of at least four trophic levels; (1) phytoplankton-bacteria, (2) flagellates, (3) ciliates and (4) mesozooplankton. In the enriched treatments high autotrophic growth rates were observed, followed by increased heterotrophic production. The largest growth increase was due to heterotrophic bacteria, indicating that the heterotrophic microbial food web was promoted. This was further supported by increased growth of heterotrophic flagellates and ciliates in the high nutrient treatments. The phytoplankton peak in the middle of the experiments was mainly due to an autotrophic nanoflagellate, Pyramimonas sp. At the end of the experiment, the proportion of heterotrophic organisms was higher in the nutrient enriched than in the nutrient-poor treatment, indicating increased predation control of primary producers. The proportion of potentially mixotrophic plankton, prymnesiophyceans, chrysophyceans and dinophyceans, were significantly higher in the nutrient-poor treatment. Furthermore, the results indicated that the food web efficiency, defined as mesozooplankton production per basal production (primary production + bacterial production - sedimentation), decreased with increasing nutrient status, possibly due to increasing loss processes in the food web. This could be explained by promotion of the heterotrophic microbial food web, causing more trophic levels and respiration steps in the food web.

  • 86.
    Andersson, Agneta
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Department of Ecology and Environmental Sciences. Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Umeå Marine Sciences Centre (UMF).
    Wikner, Johan
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Department of Ecology and Environmental Sciences. Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Umeå Marine Sciences Centre (UMF).
    Klimatförändringar kan leda till mindre fisk i havet2016In: Havet: om miljötillståndet i svenska havsområden. 2015/2016, Göteborg: Havs- och vattenmyndigheten , 2016, p. 25-28Chapter in book (Other academic)
  • 87.
    Andersson, Agneta
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Department of Ecology and Environmental Sciences. Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Umeå Marine Sciences Centre (UMF).
    Wikner, Johan
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Umeå Marine Sciences Centre (UMF).
    Pelagisk biologi2004In: Bottniska viken: årsrapport från den marina miljöövervakningen. 2003, Skydd av havsområden gagnar fisken, Hörnefors: Umeå marina forskningscentrum (UMF) , 2004, p. 11-13Chapter in book (Refereed)
  • 88.
    Andersson, Anna
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Department of Ecology and Environmental Sciences.
    Övervakning och uppföljning av utter i Västerbottens län2005Independent thesis Advanced level (degree of Master (One Year)), 20 credits / 30 HE creditsStudent thesis
  • 89.
    Andersson, Bea Angelica
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Department of Ecology and Environmental Sciences.
    Analysis of Selection and Genetic Drift in a Dioecious Plant: Spatial Genetic Structure and Selection in Phenotypic Traits in a Young Island Population of Silene dioica2014Independent thesis Basic level (degree of Bachelor), 10 credits / 15 HE creditsStudent thesis
    Abstract [en]

    Selection and genetic drift are often competing forces in shaping genetic structure in populations. Genetic drift will often effectively cancel out the effect of selection when population sizes are small, such as in colonizing island populations. On a small island in the Skeppsvik Archipelago in northern Sweden, a newly founded population of Silene dioica has been monitored since it first established around 1993. Though inhabiting an area of merely 173 m2, the population has been shown to exhibit a genetically differentiated patch structure where closely related individuals are tightly grouped, distanced from other family groups. In this study, the effect of selection was evaluated as compared to that of genetic drift. Variation in phenotypic traits in flowers, leaves and stalks were compared to that of neutral markers, in the form of PST and FST measures, to assess a measure of what proportion of differentiation among patches in phenotypic traits could not be attributed to genetic drift. Males and females were analysed separately to obtain measures of sex specific selection. Signs of divergent and stabilizing selection were found in several traits in both males and females despite the small spatial scale and short time since colonization. Further analysis is needed to assess explanations for trait divergence among patches and direction of selection.

  • 90.
    Andersson, Charlotta
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Biosciences, Clinical chemistry.
    Li, Xingru
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Biosciences, Clinical chemistry.
    Lorenz, Fryderyk
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Radiation Sciences, Oncology.
    Golovleva, Irina
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Biosciences, Medical and Clinical Genetics.
    Wahlin, Anders
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Radiation Sciences, Oncology.
    Li, Aihong
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Biosciences, Clinical chemistry.
    Reduction in WT1 Gene Expression During Early Treatment Predicts the Outcome in Patients With Acute Myeloid Leukemia2012In: Diagnostic molecular pathology (Print), ISSN 1052-9551, E-ISSN 1533-4066, Vol. 21, no 4, p. 225-233Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Wilms tumor gene 1 (WT1) expression has been suggested as an applicable minimal residual disease marker in acute myeloid leukemia (AML). We evaluated the use of this marker in 43 adult AML patients. Quantitative assessment of WT1 gene transcripts was performed using real-time quantitative-polymerase chain reaction assay. Samples from both the peripheral blood and the bone marrow were analyzed at diagnosis and during follow-up. A strong correlation was observed between WT1 normalized with 2 different control genes (beta-actin and ABL1, P < 0.001). WT1 mRNA level at diagnosis was of no prognostic relevance (P > 0.05). A >= 1-log reduction in WT1 expression in bone marrow samples taken < 1 month after diagnosis significantly correlated with an improved overall survival (P = 0.004) and freedom from relapse (P = 0.010) when beta-actin was used as control gene. Furthermore, a reduction in WT1 expression by >= 2 logs in peripheral blood samples taken at a later time point significantly correlated with a better outcome for overall survival (P = 0.004) and freedom from relapse (P = 0.012). This result was achieved when normalizing against both b-actin and ABL1. These results therefore suggest that WT1 gene expression can provide useful information for minimal residual disease detection in adult AML patients and that combined use of control genes can give more informative results.

  • 91.
    Andersson, David C.
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Department of Chemistry.
    Martinez, N.
    Zeller, D.
    Rondahl, S. H.
    Koza, M. M.
    Frick, B.
    Ekstrom, F.
    Peters, J.
    Linusson, Anna
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Department of Chemistry.
    Changes in dynamics of alpha-chymotrypsin due to covalent inhibitors investigated by elastic incoherent neutron scattering2017In: Physical Chemistry, Chemical Physics - PCCP, ISSN 1463-9076, E-ISSN 1463-9084, Vol. 19, no 37, p. 25369-25379Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    An essential role of enzymes is to catalyze various chemical reactions in the human body and inhibition of the enzymatic activity by small molecules is the mechanism of action of many drugs or tool compounds used to study biological processes. Here, we investigate the effect on the dynamics of the serine protease alpha-chymotrypsin when in complex with two different covalently bound inhibitors using elastic incoherent neutron scattering. The results show that the inhibited enzyme displays enhanced dynamics compared to the free form. The difference was prominent at higher temperatures (240-310 K) and the type of motions that differ include both small amplitude motions, such as hydrogen atom rotations around a methyl group, and large amplitude motions, such as amino acid side chain movements. The measurements were analyzed with multivariate methods in addition to the standard univariate methods, allowing for a more in-depth analysis of the types of motions that differ between the two forms. The binding strength of an inhibitor is linked to the changes in dynamics occurring during the inhibitor-enzyme binding event and thus these results may aid in the deconvolution of this fundamental event and in the design of new inhibitors.

  • 92.
    Andersson, Emma
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Department of Ecology and Environmental Sciences.
    Adaptive trait utility in the feeding apparatus of European whitefish (Coregonus lavaretus): Relationships between feeding morphology and maximum and minimum prey size in the diet of whitefish2015Independent thesis Advanced level (degree of Master (Two Years)), 40 credits / 60 HE creditsStudent thesis
    Abstract [en]

    Whitefish (Coregonus lavaretus) populations diverge into morphs that differ in body size along a benthic-limnetic axis and throughout the depth of the water column. This process is assumedly initiated by the presence of northern pike (Esox lucius) and is followed by morphological adaptations to available food resources. In this study eight populations of whitefish was studied with the purpose of increasing the knowledge about adaptive trait utility in the feeding apparatus of whitefish. This was done by analyzing the mean and absolute maximum and minimum prey size ingested by fish along four morphological trait gradients. The morphological traits was body size, gill raker number and density, and gape size. The results show clear evidence of morphological adaptations in both the benthic and limnetic habitat, furthermore, when comparing the two prey size responses (mean and absolute values) it becomes clear that none of the studied whitefish is physically constrained in terms of the largest prey they can ingest. However, large fish seem to be limited in eating small prey sizes. Interestingly, I also found strong indicators for filter feeding adaptation for one of the studied populations.  

  • 93.
    Andersson, Jana
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Ecology and Environmental Science.
    En studie av gruvindustrins påverkan på ett akvatiskt system.: Brubäckens påverkan på Granforsmagasinet2005Independent thesis Advanced level (degree of Master (One Year)), 20 credits / 30 HE creditsStudent thesis
  • 94.
    Andersson, Jannika
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Department of Ecology and Environmental Sciences.
    How does nutrients and light affect algal growth in Swedish headwater streams?: A study using nutrient diffusing substrate and natural gradients of light2014Independent thesis Basic level (degree of Bachelor), 10 credits / 15 HE creditsStudent thesis
    Abstract [en]

    Gaining knowledge about what factors determine benthic algal biomass and productivity is vital for understanding food webs in aquatic systems, especially in woodland streams with naturally low rates of primary productivity. The aim of this study was to investigate what factors determine algal growth in Swedish headwater streams. Nutrients, in terms of nitrogen (N) and phosphorus (P), and light are factors known to affect algal growth. By using nutrient diffusing substrate (NDS) and different gradients of light, it was possible to test the importance of these factors. To determine the effect of the experiment, the study was carried out in a forested reference stream, which is largely shaded with extreme low nutrient levels, and in a stream running through a clear-cutting plantation with high nutrient levels and incident light. In the forested reference stream it became clear that algal growth increased by experimentally adding N (P<0.005), although light did not affect the productivity. In the stream running through the clear-cut, algal productivity increased significantly with higher levels of light (P<0.005), regardless of nutrient addition. The results from this study suggest that light only becomes the depending factor when sufficient amounts of nutrients are available. However, it is still unclear at what nutrient levels this shift occur, and therefore future research is recommended.

  • 95.
    Andersson, Jenny
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Department of Plant Physiology.
    Dissecting the photosystem II light-harvesting antenna2003Doctoral thesis, comprehensive summary (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    In photosynthesis, sunlight is converted into chemical energy that is stored mainly as carbohydrates and supplies basically all life on Earth with energy.

    In order to efficiently absorb the light energy, plants have developed the outer light harvesting antenna, which is composed of ten different protein subunits (LHC) that bind chlorophyll a and b as well as different carotenoids. In addition to the light harvesting function, the antenna has the capacity to dissipate excess energy as heat (feedback de-excitation or qE), which is crucial to avoid oxidative damage under conditions of high excitation pressure. Another regulatory function in the antenna is the state transitions in which the distribution of the trimeric LHC II between photosystem I (PS I) and II is controlled. The same ten antenna proteins are conserved in all higher plants and based on evolutionary arguments this has led to the suggestion that each protein has a specific function.

    I have investigated the functions of individual antenna proteins of PS II (Lhcb proteins) by antisense inhibition in the model plant Arabidopsis thaliana. Four antisense lines were obtained, in which the target proteins were reduced, in some cases beyond detection level, in other cases small amounts remained.

    The results show that CP29 has a unique function as organising the antenna. CP26 can form trimers that substitute for Lhcb1 and Lhcb2 in the antenna structure, but the trimers that accumulate as a response to the lack of Lhcb1 and Lhcb2 cannot take over the LHC II function in state transitions. It has been argued that LHC II is essential for grana stacking, but antisense plants without Lhcb1 and Lhcb2 do form grana. Furthermore, LHC II is necessary to maintain growth rates in very low light.

    Numerous biochemical evidences have suggested that CP29 and/or CP26 were crucial for feedback de-excitation. Analysis of two antisense lines each lacking one of these proteins clearly shows that there is no direct involvement of either CP29 or CP26 in this process. Investigation of the other antisense lines shows that no Lhcb protein is indispensable for qE. A model for feedback de-excitation is presented in which PsbS plays a major role.

    The positions of the minor antenna proteins in the PS II supercomplex were established by comparisons of transmission electron micrographs of supercomplexes from the wild type and antisense plants.

    A fitness experiment was conducted where the antisense plants were grown in the field and seed production was used to estimate the fitness of the different genotypes. Based on the results from this experiment it is concluded that each Lhcb protein is important, because all antisense lines show reduced fitness in the field.

  • 96.
    Andersson, Jens
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Department of Ecology and Environmental Sciences.
    Johansson, Frank
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Department of Ecology and Environmental Sciences.
    Söderlund, Tony
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Department of Ecology and Environmental Sciences.
    Interactions between predator- and diet-induced phenotypic changes in body shape of crucian carp2006In: Proceedings of the Royal Society of London. Biological Sciences, ISSN 0962-8452, E-ISSN 1471-2954, Vol. 273, no 1585, p. 431-437Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Predator cues and diet, when studied separately, have been shown to affect body shape of organisms. Previous studies show that the morphological responses to predator absence/presence and diet may be similar, and hence could confound the interpretation of the causes of morphological differences found between groups of individuals. In this study, we simultaneously examined the effect of these two factors on body shape and performance in crucian carp in a laboratory experiment. Crucian carp (Carassius carassius) developed a shallow body shape when feeding on zooplankton prey and a deep body shape when feeding on benthic chironomids. In addition, the presence of chemical cues from a pike predator affected body shape, where a shallow body shape was developed in the absence of pike and a deep body shape was developed in the presence of pike. Foraging activity was low in the presence of pike cues and when chironomids were given as prey. Our results thereby suggest that the change in body shape could be indirectly mediated through differences in foraging activity. Finally, the induced body shape changes affected the foraging efficiency, where crucians raised on a zooplankton diet or in the absence of pike cues had a higher foraging success on zooplankton compared to crucian raised on a chironomid diet or in the presence of pike. These results suggest that body changes in response to predators can be associated with a cost, in terms of competition for resources.

  • 97. Andersson, Jon
    et al.
    Dynesius, Mats
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Department of Ecology and Environmental Sciences.
    Hjalten, Joakim
    Short-term response to stump harvesting by the ground flora in boreal clearcuts2017In: Scandinavian Journal of Forest Research, ISSN 0282-7581, E-ISSN 1651-1891, Vol. 32, no 3, p. 239-245Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    We studied short-term ground vegetation responses to stump harvesting by recording the occurrence of all species of bryophytes, vascular plants and the cover of soil disturbance on 20 clearcuts in the Southern and Middle Boreal zone in northern Scandinavia. All 20 clearcuts were slash-harvested and scarified and 10 of the clearcuts were also stump-harvested. The added effect of stump harvesting was assessed by comparing stump-harvested clearcuts with non-stump-harvested clearcuts. We tested whether stump harvesting causes extra soil disturbance compared to conventional forestry and if stump harvesting is affecting the assemblage, species richness and occurrence of individual species of vascular plants and bryophytes in boreal clearcuts. Our results revealed that stump harvesting causes an increase in the area of disturbed soil surface compared to conventional harvesting. Four of the most commonly occurring plant species in this area were significantly affected by stump harvesting, and Vaccinium vitis-idaea had a median occurrence of only 20% of that in non-stump-harvested clearcuts. The large impact on some plant species from a relatively modest increase of soil disturbance caused by stump harvesting suggest that stumps, with their slightly elevated bases, contributes to the survival of certain species on clearcuts.

  • 98.
    Andersson, Jon
    et al.
    Department of Wildlife, Fish, and Environmental Studies, Swedish University of Agricultural Sciences, SE-901 83 Umeå, Sweden.
    Hjältén, Joakim
    Department of Wildlife, Fish, and Environmental Studies, Swedish University of Agricultural Sciences, SE-901 83 Umeå, Sweden.
    Dynesius, Mats
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Department of Ecology and Environmental Sciences.
    Long-term effects of stump harvesting and landscape composition on beetle assemblages in the hemiboreal forest of Sweden.2012In: Forest Ecology and Management, ISSN 0378-1127, E-ISSN 1872-7042, Vol. 271, p. 75-80Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Studies on the effects of stump harvesting on forest biodiversity are scarce and studies on long-term effects are until now non-existent. We evaluated such long-term effects by sampling beetles at 14 clear-cuts with and 14 clear-cuts without stump harvesting; harvesting had been done 21–28 years before this study. By using window traps, we collected 6429 individuals belonging to 432 species in 55 taxonomic families. To control for potentially confounding effects of among-site variations in landscape setting we also assessed forest age and volume of deciduous trees within the forest surrounding each site. The long-term effects from harvesting on beetle abundance, species richness and species composition was generally small in comparison to the influence of the characteristics of the surrounding forests. The species richness of the beetle family Latridiidae and the functional group fungivores appeared, however, to be negatively affected by the previous stump harvesting, while several other groups showed strong associations to the characteristics of the surrounding forest. We found little support for considerable long-term effects of stump harvesting on beetles flying in the stands. Long-term effects of stump harvesting at the landscape scale accumulated from harvest of many localities may still be severe, and should be the subject of future studies.

  • 99. Andersson, Jon
    et al.
    Hjältén, Joakim
    Dynesius, Mats
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Department of Ecology and Environmental Sciences.
    Wood-Inhabiting Beetles in Low Stumps, High Stumps and Logs on Boreal Clear-Cuts: Implications for Dead Wood Management2015In: PLoS ONE, ISSN 1932-6203, E-ISSN 1932-6203, Vol. 10, no 3, article id e0118896Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The increasing demand for biofuels from logging residues require serious attention on the importance of dead wood substrates on clear-cuts for the many forestry-intolerant saproxylic (wood-inhabiting) species. In particular, the emerging harvest of low stumps motivates further study of these substrates. On ten clear-cuts we compared the species richness, abundance and species composition of saproxylic beetles hatching from four to nine year old low stumps, high stumps and logs of Norway spruce. By using emergence traps we collected a total of 2,670 saproxylic beetles among 195 species during the summers of 2006, 2007 and 2009. We found that the species assemblages differed significantly between high stumps and logs all three years. The species assemblages of low stumps, on the other hand, were intermediate to those found in logs and high stumps. There were also significant difference in species richness between the three examined years, and we found significant effect of substrate type on richness of predators and fungivores. As shown in previous studies of low stumps on clear-cuts they can sustain large numbers of different saproxylic beetles, including red-listed species. Our study does, in addition to this fact, highlight a possible problem in creating just one type of substrate as a tool for conservation in forestry. Species assemblages in high stumps did not differ significantly from those found in low stumps. Instead logs, which constitute a scarcer substrate type on clear-cuts, provided habitat for a more distinct assemblage of saproxylic species than high stumps. It can therefore be questioned whether high stumps are an optimal tool for nature conservation in clear-cutting forestry. Our results also indicate that low stumps constitute an equally important substrate as high stumps and logs, and we therefore suggest that stump harvesting is done after carefully evaluating measures to provide habitat for saproxylic organisms.

  • 100.
    Andersson, Karin
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Molecular Biology (Faculty of Medicine).
    Prefibrillar oligomeric Transthyretin mutants - amyloid conformation, toxicity and association with Serum amyloid P component2005Doctoral thesis, comprehensive summary (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Amyloidoses represent a heterogeneous group of diseases characterized by abnormal protein metabolism leading to extracellular deposition of fibrillar, proteinaceous amyloid in various tissues and organs of the body. To date more than 20 different proteins have been linked to diseases with amyloid depositions, of which Alzheimer’s disease and the prion-associated diseases are the most well known. Despite the origin of protein in the amyloid, the fibrils share some common biochemical and biophysical properties such as a diameter of 8-13 nm, a β-pleated sheet secondary structure packed in an ordered crystal-like way, Congo red and thioflavin binding with characteristic spectroscopic patterns and decoration of the fibrils with Serum amyloid P component and glycoseaminoglycans.

    The plasma protein transthyretin (TTR) is associated with familial amyloidosis with polyneuropathy (FAP) and senile systemic amyloidosis (SSA). FAP is a lethal, autosomal inherited disorder caused by point mutations in the TTR-gene. More than 80 different mutations have been associated with amyloid formation and linked to FAP. The interpretation is that amino acid replacements at different sites of the polypeptide lead to reduced stability. Mutant TTR were constructed that have a strong tendency to self-aggregate under physiological conditions. The precipitates were shown to be amyloid by staining with thioflavin T and Congo red. As the mutants were sensitive to trypsin cleavage compared to plasma TTR, we suggest that the mutants represent amyloid precursors or that they may share structural properties with intermediates on a pathway leading to amyloid deposition. Monoclonal antibodies were generated that exclusively recognize the amyloidogenic folding of TTR providing direct biochemical evidence for a structural change in amyloidogenic intermediates. Two cryptic epitopes were mapped to a domain of TTR, where most mutations associated with amyloidosis occur and is proposed to be displaced at the initial phase of amyloid formation. Amyloidogenic intermediates of TTR were shown to induce a toxic, free radical dependent, response in cultured neuroblastoma cells. Morphological studies revealed a correlation between toxicity (apoptosis) and the presence of immature amyloid suggesting that mature full-length fibrils represent an inert end stage, which might serve as a rescue mechanism.

    Serum amyloid P component (SAP) is a highly conserved plasma glycoprotein universally found associated with amyloid depositions independently of protein origin. SAP’s role in amyloid formation is contradictory since both inhibition and promotion of aggregation have been shown in the case of fibril formation from the Aβ peptide of Alzheimer’s disease. Amyloidogenic prefibrils of TTR were shown to bind SAP and no interference with aggregation was detected. SAP co-localize in patches with mutant TTR on the surface of neuroblastoma cells and prevent apoptosis induced by mutant TTR and Aβ peptide, while several other molecules known to decorate amyloid fibrils were without effect.

1234567 51 - 100 of 4238
CiteExportLink to result list
Permanent link
Cite
Citation style
  • apa
  • ieee
  • modern-language-association-8th-edition
  • vancouver
  • Other style
More styles
Language
  • de-DE
  • en-GB
  • en-US
  • fi-FI
  • nn-NO
  • nn-NB
  • sv-SE
  • Other locale
More languages
Output format
  • html
  • text
  • asciidoc
  • rtf