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  • 51. Cheong, Pauline Hope
    et al.
    Fischer-Nielsen, PeterGelfgren, StefanUmeå University, Faculty of Arts, Humlab.Ess, Charles
    Digital Religion, Social Media and Culture: Perspectives, Practices and Futures2012Collection (editor) (Refereed)
  • 52.
    Cochard, Aurélie
    Umeå University, Faculty of Arts, Department of historical, philosophical and religious studies.
    Kvinnliga medborgarskolan vid Fogelstads kursverksamhet: - mellan kvinnorörelsens två vågor2017Independent thesis Basic level (degree of Bachelor), 10 credits / 15 HE creditsStudent thesis
    Abstract [en]

    This paper analyses the Fogelstad Citizen School for Women in relation to first andsecond-wave feminism in Sweden. The school was established not long after women in Sweden were given the right to vote in 1921, with the purpose of educating women in civic education, in order for them to be able to make use of their newly gained rights.The school and its founders had thus a close connection to the ideas of Swedish first-wave feminism. On the other hand, the school shut down in 1954, about a decade before second-wave feminism is considered to have started in Sweden in the late 1960’/70’s. Hence, the school was active between two so-called “waves”. By analysing specific ideas on women expressed through course notes from the school’s later years, 1939–1945, this paper explores ideas about women that women’s specific qualities were emphasised in order to argue for women’s increased participation in society, while contextualising with other contemporary tendencies and events in Swedish society. A closer examination shows that specifically the school’s founders and its teacher in citizenship, Ebba Holgersson, were promoting gender essentialism, emphasising women’s nurturing characteristics and using it as an argument for women to participate more in societal and political matters. The results further imply that while this period cannot be attributed a specific feminist “wave” with regards to how a social movement’s wave it was defined, it was nonetheless a period where feminist ideas flourished and thus worked as bridge between first and second-wave feminism.

  • 53. Degroot, Dagomar
    Exploring the North in a Changing Climate: The Little Ice Age and the Journals of Henry Hudson, 1607–16112015In: Journal of Northern Studies, ISSN 1654-5915, Vol. 9, no 1, p. 69-91Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    During its nadir between approximately 1565 and 1720, the Little Ice Age cooled the Arctic by 0.5° C relative to early twentieth- century averages. Historians of past climates often craft declensionist and even determinist narratives of the Little Ice Age in the far north. Conversely, social or cultural historians usually depict the early modern Arctic environment as unchanging. The journals kept by Henry Hudson and his crew during their voyages of Arctic exploration provide detailed information on environmental conditions and human responses that bridge these different historical perspectives and concerns. The journals reflect the influence of the Little Ice Age in the Arctic, but also demonstrate that voyages of northern exploration were affected by complex and even counterintuitive relationships between global climate change and its local environmental manifestations. These relationships can only be examined with a rigorous methodology that confronts issues of scale and causation that are still rarely considered by climate historians. Ultimately, the journals reveal that a shifting climate was a dynamic, but hardly determinist, agent in the early modern exploration and exploitation of the Arctic.

  • 54.
    Edenheim, Sara
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Umeå Centre for Gender Studies (UCGS).
    Historiens psykopatologi2016In: Glänta, ISSN 1104-5205, no 2, p. 18-23Article in journal (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
  • 55.
    Egan Sjölander, Annika
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Arts, Department of culture and media studies.
    Ekerholm, Helena
    Umeå University, Faculty of Arts, Department of historical, philosophical and religious studies.
    Eklöf, Jenny
    Umeå University, Faculty of Arts, Department of historical, philosophical and religious studies.
    Lång, Henrik
    Mårald, Erland
    Umeå University, Faculty of Arts, Department of historical, philosophical and religious studies.
    Nordlund, Christer
    Umeå University, Faculty of Arts, Department of historical, philosophical and religious studies.
    Sundin, Bosse
    Umeå University, Faculty of Arts, Department of historical, philosophical and religious studies.
    Motorspriten kommer!: en historia om etanol och andra alternativa drivmedel2014Book (Other academic)
    Abstract [sv]

    Motorspriten kommer! löd budskapet i början av 1900-talet. Liknande utfästelser om alternativa drivmedel har gång på gång hörts genom historien. Men de oljebaserade bränslena har behållit sitt grepp om transportsystemet, trots att de alltid ansetts problematiska. Varför?

    Den här boken handlar om olika försök att utveckla och förverkliga alternativ till oljebaserade drivmedel i Sverige. Den spänner över ett drygt sekel, från slutet av 1800-talet och framåt, och behandlar bland annat sulfitsprit, syntetisk bensin, gengas, metanol och den första och andra generationens etanol. I fokus står motiven bakom dessa alternativ varför de har ansetts angelägna och önskvärda liksom de problem och strukturella hinder som de har mött och alltjämt fortsätter att möta. Boken ger historiska och medievetenskapliga perspektiv på de pågående försöken till en omställning på drivmedelsområdet och bidrar till kunskap av värde för såväl beslutsfattare som allmänhet.

    Boken bygger på forskning som utfördes inom det tvärvetenskapliga projektet Framtidens drivmedel? Biobränslen i historisk och kulturell belysning. Den är skriven av samtliga forskare i projektet Annika Egan Sjölander, Helena Ekerholm, Jenny Eklöf, Erland Mårald, Christer Nordlund och Bosse Sundin i samarbete med Henrik Lång.

  • 56.
    Ekerholm, Helena
    Umeå University, Faculty of Arts, Department of historical, philosophical and religious studies.
    Bränsle för den moderna nationen: Etanol och gengas i Sverige under mellankrigstiden och andra världskriget2012Doctoral thesis, comprehensive summary (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    This thesis investigate Swedish policy-making concerning promotion of wood gas and ethanol distilled from fermented sulphite lye as domestic fuel alternatives in the Interwar years and World War II. With a departure point in the theories of social constructions of technology (SCOT), the sociology of expectations and Thomas P. Hughe’s socio-technical systems I analyse the measures that were undertaken in these efforts, the arguments put forward for and against the ethanol and wood gas projects and how the efforts turned out. I also investigate how the interpretations of ethanol and wood gas as fuel alternatives changed from the Interwar period on through World War II and what consequences this had for ethanol and wood gas policy immediately after World War II. Source material includes Parliament and Government records, cabinet meeting files, governmental commissions, authority archives, technical evaluations and handbooks and scientific medical publications.

    Ethanol and wood gas were promoted from a nationalist vantage point. The Interwar debate was imbued with visions of national techno-scientific prowess in a perceived ongoing global contest for technological and scientific advancement, of which achieving autarky, self-sufficiency on important raw materials and industrial products, was an ideal for some. Ethanol and wood gas were also promoted as means for creating a lucrative new market for the forestry industry, which also held a prominent position in nationalist visions of technology. Expectations of a new war also motivated the promotion of ethanol and wood gas as national fuels. Measures for promotion included tax exemptions, sales guarantees and legislation for mandatory ethanol purchase for all petrol importing companies and gasifier loan funds. Political conflicts mainly centred around the principles of free trade as opposed to protectionism, proper use of tax funds and whether the potentials of the fuel alternatives were rhetorically exaggerated. During World War II ethanol and wood gas in particular served as important petrol surrogates. The increased wood gas use led to negative interpretations of wood gas a fuel alternative due to its hazardous, dirty and time-consuming maintenance and the changed driving behaviour it required from its users compared to petrol or ethanol fuelled automobiles. Compared to wood gas, ethanol was appreciated for its socio-technical similarities to petrol, but production was after the war deemed difficult to maintain during wartime. Whereas wood gas remained an important stand-by surrogate during the cold war, Swedish politicians lost interest in ethanol of the kind that was promoted in the Interwar years. 

  • 57.
    Ekerholm, Helena
    Centre for History of Science, The Royal Swedish Academy of Sciences.
    Keeping a House for Science: Sofia Kristensson as Matriarch and Gatekeeper at Kristineberg Zoological Station as a Scientific Household, 1877–18922015In: Science in Context, ISSN 0269-8897, E-ISSN 1474-0664, Vol. 28, no 4, p. 587-611Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Field research stations are households as a result of allegoric notions of the scientific family, and because they fulfil the purpose of a home in the field in a literal sense. They meet the practical and physical need for bed and board, as well as the emotional and intellectual need for social cohesion. I argue that this, in combination with local gender identity opened the door for a woman of lower social strata, the daughter of a fisherman, to take upon herself the role as station household matriarch, thus gaining an integral role within an inner circle of influential scientists. Secondly, I argue that locally employed members of the research station were valued primarily for their social skills. For the sake of ensuring necessary conditions for scientific work being abrasive was just as important as being agreeable.

  • 58. Ekerholm, Helena
    et al.
    Grandin, Karl
    Nordlund, Christer
    Umeå University, Faculty of Arts, Department of historical, philosophical and religious studies.
    Schell, Patience A.
    Introduction2017In: Understanding field science institutions / [ed] Helena Ekerholm, Karl Grandin, Christer Nordlund & Patience A. Schell, Sagamore Beach, MA: Science History Publications Ltd., 2017, p. 1-12Chapter in book (Refereed)
  • 59.
    Ekerholm, Helena
    et al.
    The Center for History of Science, The Royal Swedish Academy of Sciences.
    Grandin, KarlNordlund, ChristerUmeå University, Faculty of Arts, Department of historical, philosophical and religious studies.Schell, Patience A.
    Understanding field science institutions2017Collection (editor) (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    From the oceans to the mountains and the vast in-between scientists have created institutions for scientific work in the field. Long-lived or temporary, more or less humble in scale, these spaces in the landscape and seascape have provided an organizational domestication of migratory science and facilitated scientific work on nature beyond urban centers of learning. As such they have played a significant role in the history of knowledge production. The richly illustrated chapters in this book deepen our understanding of both similarities and differences within the complex history of field science institutions and their relation to other types of academic institutions, from the seventeenth century onwards.

  • 60.
    Eklöf, Jenny
    Umeå University, Faculty of Arts, Historical Studies.
    Den åtrådda platsen: tankar om vetenskap i det offentliga rummet2006In: Topos: essäer om tänkvärda platser och platsbundna tankar / [ed] Christer Nordlund och Erland Mårald, Stockholm: Carlsson Bokförlag, 2006, p. 94-112Chapter in book (Other academic)
  • 61.
    Eklöf, Jenny
    Umeå University, Faculty of Arts, Department of historical, philosophical and religious studies.
    Ett vetenskapligt rat race?2012Other (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
  • 62.
    Eklöf, Jenny
    Umeå University, Faculty of Arts, Historical Studies.
    Gene technology at stake: Swedish governmental commissions on the border of science and politics2007Doctoral thesis, monograph (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    This thesis examines the Swedish political response to the challenges posed by gene technology, seen through the prism of governmental commissions. It discerns and analyses continuities and changes in the Swedish political conception of gene technology, over the course of two decades, 1980–2000. This is done by thematically following ideas of “risks” and “ethics” as they are represented in the inner workings and reception of three governmental commissions. The Gene-Ethics Commission (1981–1984), the Gene Technology Commission (1990–1992) and the Biotechnology Commission (1997–2000) form the empirical focal points of this analysis. The first two provided preparatory policy proposals that preceded the implementation of the Swedish gene technology laws of 1991 and 1994. The last one aimed at presenting a comprehensive Swedish biotechnology policy for the new millennium.

    The study takes into account the role of governmental commissions as arenas where science and politics intersect in Swedish political life, and illuminates how this type of “boundary organisation”, placed on the border of science and politics, impinges on the understanding of the gene technology issue. The commissions have looked into the limits, dangers, possibilities and future applications of gene technology. They have been appointed to deal with the problematic task of distinguishing between what is routine and untested practices, realistic prediction and “science fiction”, what are unique problems and what are problems substantially similar to older ones, what constitutes a responsible approach as opposed to misconduct and what it means to let things “get out of hand” in contrast to being “in control”. Throughout a period of twenty years, media reports have continued to frame the challenges posed by gene technology as a task of balancing risks and benefits, walking the fine line between “frankenfoods” and “miracle drugs”.

    One salient problem for the commissions to solve was that science and industry seemed to promote a technology the public opposed and resisted, at least in parts. For both politics and science to gain, or regain, public trust it needed to demonstrate that risks – be it environmental, ethical or health related ones – were under control. Under the surface, it was much more complicated than “science helping politics” to make informed and rational decisions on how to formulate a regulatory policy. Could experts be trusted to participate in policy-making in a neutral way and was it not important, in accordance with democratic norms, to involve the public?

  • 63.
    Eklöf, Jenny
    Umeå University, Faculty of Arts, Department of historical, philosophical and religious studies.
    Jakten på en definition: Mindfulness som gränslandsfenomen2014In: Mindfulness: Tradition, tolkning och tillämpning / [ed] Katarina Plank, Lund: Nordic Academic Press , 2014, p. 33-54Chapter in book (Refereed)
  • 64.
    Eklöf, Jenny
    Umeå University, Faculty of Arts, Department of historical, philosophical and religious studies.
    Kan en humanist forska om genteknik och biobränslen? 2010In: Thule: Kungliga Skytteanska Samfundets Årsbok 2010, Umeå: Kungl. Skytteanska samfundet , 2010Chapter in book (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
  • 65.
    Eklöf, Jenny
    Umeå University, Faculty of Arts, Department of historical, philosophical and religious studies.
    Marknadsanpassningen av tredje uppgiften2013Other (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
  • 66.
    Eklöf, Jenny
    Umeå University, Faculty of Arts, Department of historical, philosophical and religious studies.
    Mellan friskt och sjukt: mindfulness som universalmedel2015In: Kulturella Perspektiv, Vol. 24, no 1, p. 42-49Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 67.
    Eklöf, Jenny
    Umeå University, Faculty of Arts, Department of historical, philosophical and religious studies.
    Mindfulness i självhjälpskulturen: En svårtolkad motsägelse2012In: Kulturella perspektiv - Svensk etnologisk tidskrift, ISSN 1102-7908, no 2, p. 2-10Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 68.
    Eklöf, Jenny
    Umeå University, Faculty of Arts, Department of historical, philosophical and religious studies.
    Mindfulness: sekulär teknik eller religiös praktik?2015In: Tidskriften Folkuniversitetet, no 3, p. 14-15Article in journal (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
  • 69.
    Eklöf, Jenny
    Umeå University, Faculty of Arts, Department of historical, philosophical and religious studies.
    Motkultur eller mainstream?: Vetenskapliggörandet av mindfulness2016In: Ikaros – om människan och vetenskapen, no 1–2, p. 23-24Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 70.
    Eklöf, Jenny
    Umeå University, Faculty of Arts, Department of historical, philosophical and religious studies.
    Neurodharma Self-Help: Personalized Science Communication as Brain Management2017In: Journal of Medical Humanities, ISSN 1041-3545, E-ISSN 1573-3645, Vol. 38, no 3, p. 303-317Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Over the past ten to fifteen years, medical interventions, therapeutic approaches and scientific studies involving mindfulness meditation have gained traction in areas such as clinical psychology, psychotherapy, and neuroscience. Simultaneously, mindfulness has had a very strong public appeal. This article examines some of the ways in which the medical and scientific meaning of mindfulness is communicated in public and to the public. In particular, it shows how experts in the field of mindfulness neuroscience seek to communicate to the public at large the imperative of brain fitness for the promotion of health, wellbeing and happiness. The study identifies claims being made in popular outlets that, by and large, bypass traditional mass media, such as self-help books, websites and online videos. By treating this material as a form of personalized science communication, this article contributes to the body of literature that understands science communication as a continuum and the boundary between science and popularized science as the outcome of human negotiations. The study finds that processes of personalization help to build bridges between scientific findings and their supposed application, that they infuse science with subjective meaning, and turn expert communication with the public into a moral vocation.

  • 71.
    Eklöf, Jenny
    Umeå University, Faculty of Arts, Department of historical, philosophical and religious studies.
    Recension av Svensk snillrikhet? Nationella föreställningar om entreprenörer och teknisk begåvning 1800-20002015In: Lychnos, ISSN 0076-1648, p. 258-259Article, book review (Other academic)
  • 72.
    Eklöf, Jenny
    Umeå University, Faculty of Arts, Department of historical, philosophical and religious studies.
    Review of Boel Berner's Blodflöden. Blodgivning och blodtransfusion i det svenska samhället.2014In: Lychnos, ISSN 0076-1648, p. 213-214Article, book review (Other academic)
  • 73.
    Eklöf, Jenny
    Umeå University, Faculty of Arts, Department of historical, philosophical and religious studies.
    Saving the world: personalized communication of mindfulness neuroscience2016In: Handbook of mindfulness: culture, context, and social engagement / [ed] Ronald E. Purser, David Forbes, Adam Burke, Springer, 2016, p. 323-335Chapter in book (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Over the past 10–15 years, medical interventions, therapeutic approaches, and scientific studies involving mindfulness meditation have gained traction in areas such as clinical psychology, psychotherapy, and neuroscience. Simultaneously, mindfulness has had a very strong public appeal. This chapter examines some of the ways in which the scientific meaning of mindfulness is communicated in public and to the public. In particular, it shows how experts in the field of mindfulness neuroscience seek to communicate to the public at large the imperative of brain fitness for the promotion of health, well-being, and happiness. The study identifies claims being made in popular outlets that, by and large, bypass traditional mass media, such as self-help books, Web sites, and online videos. By treating this material as a form of personalized science communication, this article contributes to the body of literature that understands science communication as a continuum, and the boundary between science and popularized science as the outcome of human negotiations. The study finds that processes of personalization help to build bridges between scientific findings and their supposed application, infuse science with subjective meaning, and turn expert communication with the public into a moral vocation.

  • 74.
    Eklöf, Jenny
    Umeå University, Faculty of Arts, Department of historical, philosophical and religious studies.
    Success Story or Cautionary Tale?: Swedish Ethanol in Co-existing Science-Policy Frameworks2011In: Science and Public Policy, ISSN 0302-3427, E-ISSN 1471-5430, Vol. 38, no 10, p. 795-806Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Sweden's consumption of transport ethanol has given the country a specific biofuel profile in Europe. In recent commentary, Sweden is either depicted as an environmental role model, or figures as a cautionary tale of things going wrong. In both cases, science plays a central role for how this success, or failure, has been achieved. Drawing on the insight that science and policy are highly interwoven, the article identifies different, co-existing and sometimes conflicting, science-policy frameworks. It sets out to shed some light over the complexities of science-policy interactions in the biofuel case and argues that one needs to ask which science is relevant for which policy choice, be aware that lack of scientific certainty carries different weight in different political situations and recognise that high decision-stakes entail value-plurality, also within scientific circles.

  • 75.
    Eklöf, Jenny
    Umeå University, Faculty of Arts, Department of historical, philosophical and religious studies.
    Vetenskap och buddhism i ett lyckligt äktenskap2014Other (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
  • 76.
    Eklöf, Jenny
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Arts, Department of historical, philosophical and religious studies.
    Byström, Tora
    Umeå University, Faculty of Arts, Department of historical, philosophical and religious studies.
    Palmadottir, Valgerdur
    Umeå University, Faculty of Arts, Department of historical, philosophical and religious studies.
    Priebe, Janina
    Umeå University, Faculty of Arts, Department of historical, philosophical and religious studies.
    Att skapa närvaro och gemenskap med hjälp av video, ljud och bild: kvalitetsutveckling av idéhistorisk avancerad nivå på nät2015Report (Other academic)
  • 77.
    Eklöf, Jenny
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Arts, Department of historical, philosophical and religious studies.
    Ekerholm, Helena
    Umeå University, Faculty of Arts, Department of historical, philosophical and religious studies.
    Mårald, Erland
    Umeå University, Faculty of Arts, Department of historical, philosophical and religious studies.
    Promoting ethanol in the shadow of oil dependence: 100 years of arguments and frictions in Swedish politics2012In: Scandinavian Journal of History, ISSN 0346-8755, E-ISSN 1502-7716, Vol. 37, no 5, p. 621-645Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    On a political level, Swedish transport ethanol has always been embedded in visions of an alternative, brighter future. Arguments in support of ethanol have been reiterated throughout the 20th and 21st century, exhibiting a striking stability over time. At the same time, the contexts in which arguments for ethanol have been raised have undergone dramatic shifts. This article investigates the historical contingencies of three empirical cases, covering the interwar years, the aftermath of the oil crises of the 1970s and the 21st century's concerns over global warming. It concludes with the observation that despite political convictions about ethanol's commercial, military and environmental potential, domestic production has not managed to take off on its own. It has relied on state support such as tax exemptions, it has been dependent on other industries for feedstock provision and its technical superiority is still waiting for market confirmation.

  • 78.
    Eklöf, Jenny
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Arts, Department of historical, philosophical and religious studies.
    Mager, Astrid
    Technoscientific promotion and biofuel policy: How the press and search engines stage the biofuel controversy2013In: Media Culture and Society, ISSN 0163-4437, E-ISSN 1460-3675, Vol. 35, no 4, p. 454-471Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    What are the conditions for the public understanding of biofuels and how do the media shape these conditions under the influence of a new production of knowledge? This article investigates how the biofuel controversy plays out in the Swedish press and Google search engine results and analyses winners and losers in the tight attention economy of contemporary media. It describes different visibility strategies biofuel stakeholders employ in both media arenas, and identifies a form of technoscientific promotion that hybrid actors use to succeed in the day-to-day struggle for media attention. To conclude, it raises broader societal questions of the contemporary blurring of knowledge boundaries and the emergence of new information hierarchies and their biases. By understanding how contemporary media shape controversies, we can address the democratic potential of both mass media and science.

  • 79.
    Eklöf, Jenny
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Arts, Department of historical, philosophical and religious studies.
    Nordlund, Christer
    Umeå University, Faculty of Arts, Department of historical, philosophical and religious studies.
    En humanistisk fågel Fenix: från kris till offensiv2013In: Kulturella perspektiv - Svensk etnologisk tidskrift, ISSN 1102-7908, no 1, p. 49-51Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 80.
    Ekman, Olivia
    Umeå University, Faculty of Arts, Department of historical, philosophical and religious studies.
    Att släcka ljungeldar: Medikaliseringen av eklampsi i Sverige 1840-19302016Licentiate thesis, monograph (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    This dissertation investigates the treatment of eclampsia in Sweden at the turn of the 20th century, paying particular attention to two treatments, the “Active treatment” and “Stroganoff’s treatment”. The aim is to investigate the evolving medicalization of eclampsia in Sweden by analyzing the interdisciplinary discussion on eclampsia in the Swedish medical journals. Eclampsia has been described by physicians as the “disease of a thousand theories”, an enigma or a riddle without an answer. The disease has been known since antiquity, as evidenced by its presence in the Hippocratic corpus, but has been without a cure to this day. In the latter half of the 19th century and the beginning of the 20th century, treatments of eclampsia emerged that – at the time – seemed to hold promise. Eclampsia has been described as an insidious disease that strikes the patient as lightning from a clear blue sky.In 1843 the Scottish doctor John Lever connected albuminuria with the onset of eclampsia which allowed for early diagnostic of eclampsia. This marked a new way of perceiving eclampsia; no longer was it just an acute disease, but a progressive disease that could be treated before it became life threatening. The discovery of albuminuria became an important clue in the formation of the theory that eclampsia was caused by an unknown poisoning. Since no cure could be found, preventing the onset of eclampsia became a higher priority.The only known way of ending the progression of the disease was to end the pregnancy – a method used since the 18th century. This was usually done by caesarian section, an operation that during the 19th and early 20th century could be just as fatal as the disease itself. A change came in the late the 19th century with the discovery of new operating techniques, better hygiene, and the introduction of general anesthetics, which reduced the amount of fatalities connected with operations. The caesarian section eventually became the choice of treatment for eclampsia known as the “Active treatment”. This4treatment was challenged by “Stroganoff’s treatment”, which was a reformed version of the older treatment of eclampsia. The version of “Stroganoff’s treatment” used by Swedish doctors, which incorporated caesarian section, gave them a broader range of treatments that could be modified to suit different scenarios in a way that was impossible using just the “Active treatment”. The two treatments were discussed in Swedish medical journals throughout the beginning of the 20th century, and their discussion shows the growing medicalization of eclampsia during this time.

  • 81.
    Ekman, Olivia
    Umeå University, Faculty of Arts, Department of historical, philosophical and religious studies.
    Eclampsia the disease of a thousand theories: Cause and treatment of eclampsia in the western world between 1840- 19302009Independent thesis Advanced level (degree of Master (One Year)), 10 credits / 15 HE creditsStudent thesis
  • 82.
    El Ghwil, Salem
    Umeå University, Faculty of Arts, Department of historical, philosophical and religious studies.
    Människans kunskap: En jämförande analys av Ibn Tufayls och John Lockes kunskapsteori2015Independent thesis Basic level (degree of Bachelor), 10 credits / 15 HE creditsStudent thesis
  • 83.
    Elenius, Lars
    Luleå University of Technolosy.
    Memory politics and the use of history: Finnish-speaking minorities at the North Calotte2010In: A European memory: contested histories and politics of remembrance / [ed] Małgorzata Pakier and Bo Stråth, New York: Berghahn , 2010, p. 294-307Chapter in book (Refereed)
  • 84.
    Elenius, Lars
    Luleå tekniska universitet.
    Selma Lagerlöf och Norrland: nationella idealbilder i Nils Holgerssons underbara resa2005In: Selma Lagerlöfs värld: fjorton uppsatser / [ed] Vinge, Louise & Maria Karlsson, Eslöv: Symposion Brutus Östlings bokförlag, 2005, p. 182-209Chapter in book (Other academic)
  • 85.
    Elenius, Lars
    Luleå tekniska universitet.
    Selma Lagerlöf och Norrland: nationella idealbilder i Nils Holgerssons underbara resa2002In: Sekelskiftets utmaningar: Essäer om utbildning, välfärd och nationell identitet vid förra sekelskiftet 1900 / [ed] Hatje, Ann-Katrin, Stockholm: Carlsson Bokförlag, 2002, p. 15-41Chapter in book (Other academic)
  • 86.
    Elenius, Lars
    Luleå tekniska universitet.
    Statistiken i nationalstatens tjänst2002In: När språk och kulturer möts: festskrift till Tuuli Forsgren 2 november 2002 / [ed] Heidi Hansson, Raija Kangassalo & Daniel Lindmark, Umeå: Umeå universitet , 2002, p. 285-302Chapter in book (Other academic)
  • 87.
    Eliasson, Pär
    Umeå University, Faculty of Arts.
    Platsens blick: Vetenskapsakademien och den naturalhistoriska resan 1790-18401999Doctoral thesis, monograph (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    The purpose of the present dissertation is to study the relationship between travel as a form of knowledge and the natural history pursued at the Royal Academy of Science during the period 1790-1840. Primarily, this dissertation deals with the perception of travel as a form of knowledge which existed at the Royal Swedish Academy of Science, though a number of selected journeys are used to illustrate the era's shifting perceptions on travel.

    Chapter One compares two variants of scientific travel, Linnean and Humboldtian. While the Linnean saw single objects, the Humboldtian saw "the whole" in the form of places. Places became the new study objects and the conditions reigning there were assumed to explain the special characteristics of the objects. This is what is implied by the "place's glance".

    Chapter Two provides an historical background to the subsequent debate about the theory and practice of scientific travel by scrutinizing works from the apodemic handbook genre. The purpose of apodemics was to make travel a method for the disciplined, systematic gathering of knowledge, which was achieved by organizing all aspects into categories..

    In Chapter Three, the natural history of the day is understood as a multiplicity of research traditions with a common object of study - the specimens found in the three kingdoms of nature. A number of models of scientific collection which were applied by the Academy around 1800 are analyzed. The correspondent model using local amateur collectors is contrasted with the model of the travelling professional scientist. The greatest problem of the travel model was the "route problematic", engendering a haphazardness in the collection of facts and specimens.

    In Chapter Four, the relationship between travel and the theories of natural history of the age is investigated through a case study of Göran Wahlenberg's travels in 1800-1810. As a result of the insights Wahlenberg achieved during his travels in the mountain regions of the land, the new botanical sub- discipline of plant geography was established. This demanded travel, since it was based on observations of the plants' spatial relationships to one another and measurements of other specific spatial phenomena, such as climate. Wahlenberg saw complex, multifacetted aggregates of plants and vegetation, where the Linnean only discerned separate species. Herein lies the meaning of the "place's glance".

    Chapter Five analyzes the botanical journeys undertaken by the Academy between 1820 (when a travel grant was instituted) and 1840. Patriotic and utilitarian arguments for domestic travel combined with their results lent scientific travel a new status at the Academy.

    Chapter Six deals with zoological travel during the same period. The main figures are the curators of the Swedish Museum of Natural History, J. W. Dalman and B. F. Fries, who formulated the zoological travel policy of the Academy. The needs of the museum dictated that the travellers focus on Sweden and Scandinavia, primarily the "Western seaboard", which included Bohuslän and the Norwegian Atlantic coast, and Norrland. The specific needs of marine biology forced Fries to develop new travel practices. Fries' establishment of a provisional research station for year-round zoological research was an important historical breakthrough. His idea of outfitting sea-going vessels as mobile research stations also prefigures the future development of polar travel later in the century.

  • 88. Elzinga, Aant
    Anita G.J. Buma, Annette J.M. Scheepstra & Richard Bintanja (eds.), Door de kou bevangen. Vijftig jaar Nederlands onderzoek in de poolgebieden, Lelystad: MaRiSuDa Uitgeverij 20162016In: Journal of Northern Studies, ISSN 1654-5915, Vol. 10, no 1, p. 109-115Article, book review (Other academic)
  • 89. Elzinga, Aant
    Cornelia Lüdecke & Kurt Brunner (Hrsg.), Von A(ltenburg) bis Z(eppelin). Deutsche Forschung auf Spitzbergen bis 1914. 100 Jahre Expedition des Herzogs Ernst II. von Sachsen-Altenburg, München, Neubiberg: Schriftenreihe des Instituts für Geodäsie der Universität der Bundeswehr München 20122013In: Journal of Northern Studies, ISSN 1654-5915, Vol. 7, no 1, p. 100-111Article, book review (Other academic)
  • 90. Elzinga, Aant
    Cornelia Lüdecke, Deutsche in der Antarktis. Expeditionen und Forschungen von Kaiserreich bis heute, Berlin: Chr. Links Verlag 20152016In: Journal of Northern Studies, ISSN 1654-5915, Vol. 10, no 1, p. 116-126Article, book review (Other academic)
  • 91. Elzinga, Aant
    Gerd Braune, Die Arktis. Porträt einer Weltregion, Berlin: Chr. Links Verlag 20162016In: Journal of Northern Studies, ISSN 1654-5915, Vol. 10, no 1, p. 106-108Article, book review (Other academic)
  • 92. Elzinga, Aant
    Johan Schimanski & Ulrike Spring, Passagiere des Eises. Polarhelden und arktische Diskurse 1874, Wien: Böhlau Verlag 20152016In: Journal of Northern Studies, ISSN 1654-5915, Vol. 10, no 1, p. 140-152Article, book review (Other academic)
  • 93.
    Elzinga, Aant
    University of Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Recovering the Heritage of Past Research and Natural Resource Exploitation in Polar and Alpine Regions: Lars Andersson (ed.), Sarek, Arktis och akademisk vardag. En bok om geografen Axel Hamberg (Skrifter rörande Uppsala Universitet, Serie C, Organisation och Historia 94), Uppsala: Acta Universitatis Upsaliensis 2012; Susan Barr, David Newman & Greg Nesteroff, Ernest Mansfield (18621924). "Gold—or I’m a Dutchman!", Trondheim: Akademika Publishing 2012.2013In: Journal of Northern Studies, ISSN 1654-5915, Vol. 7, no 1, p. 86-94Article, book review (Other academic)
  • 94. Elzinga, Aant
    Review essay: Changes in the Attribution of Values to Northern and Arctic Spaces. Silje Gaupseth, Marie-Theres Feerhofer & Per Pippin Aspaas (eds.), Travels in the North, Hannover: Wehrhahn Verlag 2013; John McCannon, A History of the Arctic. Nature, Exploration and Exploitation, London: Reaktion Books Ltd. 2012; Martin Breum, Når isen forsvinder. Danmark som stormagt i Arktis, Grønlands rigdomme og kampen om Nordpolen, Kobenhavn: Gyldendal 2013; Barry Scott Zellen (ed.), The Fast-Changing Arctic. Rethinking Arctic Security for a Warmer World, Calgary: University of Calgary Press 2013; Miyase Christensen, Annika E. Nilsson & Nina Wombs, Media and the Politics of Arctic Climate Change. When the Ice Breaks, Houndmills, Basingstoke, Hampshire UK: Palgrave Macmillan 20132015In: Journal of Northern Studies, ISSN 1654-5915, Vol. 9, no 1, p. 99-122Article, book review (Other academic)
  • 95.
    Elzinga, Aant
    University of Gothenburg.
    Review Essay: Coming to Grips with the Greenland Ice. Historical Flashbacks. Cornelia Ludecke (hsg.), Verborgene Eiswelten. Erich von Drygalskis Bericht über seine Grönlandexpeditionen 1891, 1892–1893, Munchen: August Dreesback Verlag 2015; Janet Martin-Nielsen, Eismitte in the Scientific Imagination. Knowledge and Politics at the Center of Greenland, New York: Palgrave Macmillan 20132015In: Journal of Northern Studies, ISSN 1654-5915, Vol. 9, no 2, p. 109-126Article, book review (Other academic)
  • 96.
    Eriksson, Ann-Catrine
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Arts, History and Theory of Art.
    Pettersson, Lennart
    Umeå University, Faculty of Arts, History and Theory of Art.
    En skål för Sveriges Qvinnor: Om Konstnärsgillet och kvinnorna1999In: Konst, bildning och föreningsliv i 1800-talets norden / [ed] Lennart Pettersson, Umeå: Umeå universitet , 1999, p. 93-107Conference paper (Other academic)
  • 97.
    Eskilsson, Lena
    Umeå University, Faculty of Arts, Historical Studies.
    En arena för möten mellan människor och idéer: kvinnliga medborgarskolan på Fogelstad2006In: Topos: essäer om tänkvärda platser och platsbundna tankar / [ed] Erland Mårald & Christer Nordlund, Stockholm: Carlsson Bokförlag, 2006, p. 167-182Chapter in book (Other academic)
  • 98.
    Eskilsson, Lena
    Umeå University, Faculty of Arts, Department of historical, philosophical and religious studies.
    Experiential poetics2013In: Historisk Tidskrift (S), ISSN 0345-469X, Vol. 133, no 2, p. 274-279Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 99.
    Eskilsson, Lena
    Umeå University, Faculty of Arts, Department of historical, philosophical and religious studies.
    Friluftsliv2008In: Signum svenska kulturhistoria: Det moderna genombrottet, Stockholm: Bokförlaget Signum , 2008, p. 363-391Chapter in book (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
  • 100.
    Espmark, Kristina
    Umeå University, Faculty of Arts, Department of historical, philosophical and religious studies.
    Från individ till historia: Etiska problem i biografisk forskning2007In: Forska rätt: Texter om etik och historisk forskning / [ed] Åsa Bergenheim, Umeå: Umeå universitet , 2007, p. 16-24Chapter in book (Refereed)
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