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  • 51.
    Backlund, André Mattias
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Umeå School of Architecture.
    Collectivist Anarchism: Nerds in (Hacker + Maker)space2018Independent thesis Basic level (degree of Bachelor of Fine Arts), 10 credits / 15 HE creditsStudent thesis
  • 52.
    Balotis, Simon
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Umeå School of Architecture.
    Suranyu Lägenhetskomplex2016Independent thesis Basic level (degree of Bachelor of Fine Arts), 10 credits / 15 HE creditsStudent thesis
  • 53.
    Barbuta, Diana
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Umeå School of Architecture.
    Voluntary Prisoners of Digital Technologies2016Independent thesis Advanced level (degree of Master (Two Years)), 20 credits / 30 HE creditsStudent thesis
  • 54.
    Behzadnia, Anahid
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Umeå School of Architecture.
    Nynäspoolen2013Student paper other, 12 HE creditsStudent thesis
  • 55.
    Bengtsson, Simon
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Umeå School of Architecture.
    Där drömmar korsar2016Independent thesis Basic level (degree of Bachelor of Fine Arts), 10 credits / 15 HE creditsStudent thesis
  • 56.
    Berggren, Karin
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Umeå School of Architecture.
    Altés Arlandis, Alberto
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Umeå School of Architecture.
    From Berlin to the polar circle: a conversation with Francesco Apuzzo and Axel Timm from Raumlabor2013In: Intravention, durations, effects: notes of expansive sites and relational architectures / [ed] Alberto Altés and Oren Lieberman, Baunach, Germany: Spurbuchverlag , 2013, 1, p. 46-63Chapter in book (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Raumlabor, or ‘space laboratory’, is a collective of 8 trained architects based in Berlin (Germany), that work in the intersection of architecture, city planning, art and urban intervention. They have been exploring alternative and playful modes of architectural production since 1999 when they started working together, usually proposing temporary projects that transform the urban landscape through what they call ‘urban prototypes’. Their works include the temporary transformation of the metro station Eichbaum (Essen/Mülheim, Germany) into an opera house, the temporary Officina Roma entirely built out of trash for the RE-cycle exhibition at the MAXXI museum, and the mobile building laboratory ‘The Generator’ that welcomes the public to interact around the construction of modular furniture. 

    During the autumn semester of the 2011-2012 academic year, we invited Axel and Francesco from raumlabor to come to the Laboratory of Immediate Architectural Intervention for a week to develop a collaborative workshop aimed at designing and building “something” that could be placed in public space as an intervention.

  • 57.
    Bergh Lopes Da Costa, Isa
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Umeå School of Architecture.
    Wall E - Alternativ skola för konst och hantverk2016Independent thesis Basic level (degree of Bachelor of Fine Arts), 10 credits / 15 HE creditsStudent thesis
  • 58.
    Bertelsen, Tomas
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Umeå School of Architecture.
    Stadslidens Entertainment Center: Shopping and Shelter, United.2019Independent thesis Basic level (degree of Bachelor of Fine Arts), 10 credits / 15 HE creditsStudent thesis
  • 59.
    Bidö, Lukas
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Umeå School of Architecture.
    Learning in the 21th Century: The City as a Laboratory2017Independent thesis Advanced level (degree of Master (Two Years)), 20 credits / 30 HE creditsStudent thesis
    Abstract [en]

    We are living in a globalized world where everything and everyone is connected at all times and society is changing in a faster pace than ever before. Old knowledge becomes obsolete and needs to be continuously replaced by new one, creating the need for learning to be life-long. The American futurist Alvin Toffler claimed as early as in the 1990s, that in order to be literate in the 21st century one must be able to learn, unlearn and relearn - but still our learning institutions look very much the same as they did during most of the 20th century. We are educated at a fixed period of life and taught a predetermined skill-set by our teachers to prepare us for future work. The issues we are facing are serious, such as global warming, automation and digitalization, and we are in urgent need of both unlearning and relearning how to live.

    Creativity, innovation and entrepreneurship have become political buzzwords, wide spoken by governments around the globe when trying to tackle the issues of an uncertain future and the need to reinvent in order to adapt. They are the individual skills that both politicians and the market are craving. However, creativity has mostly been linked to creative and high-tech industries - as means of being competitive in the harsh 21st century global work environment. As a result, we have seen how an unjust and unequal system has developed, and the rise of a new class. The creative class, as described by Richard Florida, holds vast privileges over other classes; earning substantially more money, and playing a leading role in the gentrification processes of cities. This asks an important question of who can be creative and innovative. Are these skills reserved for the select few, or can everyone be creative and innovative? Perhaps a new, more social, civic and democratic definition is needed to truly fit the issues we are facing in the 21st century. How can creativity, innovation and entrepreneurship be learned, actively pursued and continuously practiced by each and everyone in ways that do not solely benefit personal interest, but society at large?

    The aim of this thesis is to explore the role of architecture in a society that demands creativity and innovation, and how it can act to empower the individual. It will discuss how society is changing, both in the broader context of western societies and in the local context of Umeå, and how learning institutions can adapt for continuous unlearning and relearning. How do we create frameworks that nurture creative possibilities, and grants equal opportunities for everyone?

  • 60.
    Bjärkstedt, Malin
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Umeå School of Architecture.
    Utbildningsmarknaden2016Independent thesis Basic level (degree of Bachelor of Fine Arts), 10 credits / 15 HE creditsStudent thesis
  • 61.
    Björn, Johan
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Umeå School of Architecture.
    KILEN: Enriching and strengthening an existing community by providing social landscapes and flexible public/semi public space2018Independent thesis Basic level (degree of Bachelor of Fine Arts), 10 credits / 15 HE creditsStudent thesis
  • 62.
    Blomstedt Lidén, Frida
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Umeå School of Architecture.
    Liera: Connecting modular housing to the existing fabric2019Independent thesis Basic level (degree of Bachelor of Fine Arts), 10 credits / 15 HE creditsStudent thesis
    Abstract [en]

    Three parties in Sweden had initiation of market rents in their political programs for the last election. The city we live in has 13 years of queue time for a three-room apartment. Last year 1600 public apartments in Umeå were sold to a private company in an undemocratic process. Our society is heading towards privatization and profit on the expense of those who always must pay. Based on an interest in housing politics, I decided to do a project of available rental apartments in a time of privatization. I researched modularity in housing, both to see how it can lower the production costs and how it can be possible to personalize the housing units depending on the inhabitants. I also researched how one can relate new projects to the existing fabric and ways to create well-functioning public spaces – a sense of living together without having to compromise people’s need for privacy. The result of this project is a building of flexible apartments that can vary in size to follow the life situation of its inhabitants.

  • 63.
    Blomstrand, Sara
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Umeå School of Architecture.
    Gemenskapens förskola2016Independent thesis Basic level (degree of Bachelor of Fine Arts), 10 credits / 15 HE creditsStudent thesis
  • 64.
    Borg, Kajsa
    Umeå University, Faculty of Teacher Education, Department of Creative Studies.
    Några köpmanshus i Västervik1982In: Tjustbygden 1982, Västervik: Tjustbygdens kulturhistoriska förening , 1982, p. 7-35Chapter in book (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
  • 65.
    Boström, Johanna
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Umeå School of Architecture.
    Rethinking Schools2016Independent thesis Advanced level (professional degree), 20 credits / 30 HE creditsStudent thesis
  • 66.
    Brandrup-Wognsen, Emma
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Umeå School of Architecture.
    Dhalgar Wad Transitional Homes2017Independent thesis Basic level (degree of Bachelor of Fine Arts), 10 credits / 15 HE creditsStudent thesis
  • 67.
    Brostedt, Love
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Umeå School of Architecture.
    A link to public space2013Independent thesis Basic level (degree of Bachelor), 10 credits / 15 HE creditsStudent thesis
    Abstract [en]

    Women in Dharavi have little social space except for their homes, in contrast to the menwho seem to be everywhere in the public space. If the status of women are to increase, theyalso need access to the public space.This project focuses on the interaction between women in common space in connectionto the homes and the public spaces in between. Common yards/gardens in between theunits are shared by four households creating a semi-private space. As the men are working,the women at home will take care of the garden and have a possibility to socialize withwomen from the other households.These common gardens have a clear visual connection to the public spaces, which areconnected to different play areas (playground does not seem to be the right word). As thewomen take their children to kindergarden or school they pass through the public space and can stay there to watch the children while they are playing. The children gives the women areason to be in public space. The women gives each other a reason to stay.

  • 68.
    Brostedt, Love
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Umeå School of Architecture.
    Restructuring Suburbia: Introducing Social Space in a Spatially Disperse Neighbourhood2017Independent thesis Advanced level (degree of Master (Two Years)), 20 credits / 30 HE creditsStudent thesis
    Abstract [en]

    Density is more about an experienced nearness to functions and activities than buildingsbeing physically close to each other. Density is interaction, and the intensity of itdepends on accessibility to the functions and activities of the built environment.

    The current planning, continuing the thoughts of the modernist, are a threat to publichealth and the environment, as sprawling settlements demand more resources forinfrastructure and time spent commuting between home and work, taking up the timeto spend with family and friends.

    The suburban planning principles of the Swedish housing estate unit have graduallytransformed the suburban neighbourhoods into dispersed, disconnected islands, wheresocial life is inhibited in the mere configuration of space.

    Legibility of the urban environment is important regarding orientation and navigation,but also to understand the underlying meanings of spaces and places. The urbanstructure should be easily read to be understandable in the choices of everyday life.

    How we understand the boundaries and transitions of our surrounding affects howspaces are used. Unclear territorial interfaces, like the open space landscape ofmodernist planning feels too exposed to be appropriated. If activities should take placein the outdoor environment, there must be a certain quality to the spaces that areinviting and promote interaction between people.

    The suburban housing estate neighbourhoods can be developed to promote thisinteraction, providing spaces where the different layers of social life can take place, fromthe private home – through mediating interfaces of front yards, indoor collective spaceand collective gardens – to the public realm of the streets, pathways and parks.

    The thesis studies the suburban neighbourhood Årsta in eastern Uppsala, whichshows the signs of a disperse suburban housing estate in its configuration of buildings,withdrawn from the streets, turning inward away from the public spaces.

    By adding built volume within the existing structure of the open yards, the boundariesbetween the public and the private spaces can be clearly defined and new activatedspaces can be created. Many fronts towards the streets and paths make people meet inevery-day life and new types of spaces can be used to set a framework for interactionbetween residents as well as outsiders. Such spaces can also work as a buffer betweenpublic life and the private dwelling, e.g. a collective garden mediates the space inbetween a pedestrian path and an inner yard.

  • 69.
    Brown, James Benedict
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Umeå School of Architecture.
    Conversations with Paulo Freire2015In: Radical Pedagogies: Architectural Education and the British Tradition / [ed] Harriss, Harriet & Froud, Daisy, London: RIBA Publishing , 2015, 1Chapter in book (Refereed)
  • 70.
    Brown, James Benedict
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Umeå School of Architecture.
    Mediated Space: The Architecture of News, Advertising and Entertainment2018Book (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    As the social media revolution embeds itself in our daily lives, and as those who once consumed media become producers, established broadcast media producers are witnessing the dissolution of trust in their established authority. Mediated Space critiques contemporary intersections of Architecture and broadcast media that exploit spaces and places that are real, imagined or hybrids of the two in order to re-establish and strengthen the power of traditional capitalist mechanisms of production and consumption. Examining eight spatial constructions in North America, Europe, the Middle East and Africa, Mediated Space embarks on a global exploration of how architecture, spatial design and technology conspire in the service of global capitalism. In three thematic parts that focus on the automotive space of the city, the journalistic space of the news room and the mediated skyline of the city, Mediated Space makes an architectural critique of spaces that are rarely designed by architects but that are experienced every day by millions of people.

  • 71.
    Brown, James Benedict
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Umeå School of Architecture.
    Production Sites and Production Sights of New Broadcasting House2019In: The Production Sites of Architecture / [ed] Psarra, Sophia, Abingdon: Routledge, 2019, 1Chapter in book (Refereed)
  • 72.
    Brown, James Benedict
    et al.
    Leicester School of Architecture, De Montfort University, UK.
    Harriss, Harriet
    Morrow, Ruth
    Soane, James
    A Gendered Profession: The question of representation in space making2016Book (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The issue of gender inequality in architecture has been part of the profession's discourse for many years, yet the continuing gender imbalance in architectural education and practice remains a difficult subject. This book seeks to change that. It provides the first ever attempt to move the debate about gender in architecture beyond the tradition of gender-segregated diagnostic or critical discourse on the debate towards something more propositional, actionable and transformative. To do this, A Gendered Profession brings together a comprehensive array of essays from a wide variety of experts in architectural education and practice, touching on issues such as LGBT, age, family status, and gender biased awards.

  • 73.
    Brunberg, Tove
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Umeå School of Architecture.
    The Urban Nomadic: An arrival space and a home for the local and the foreign citizens of Umeå to unite2019Independent thesis Basic level (degree of Bachelor of Fine Arts), 10 credits / 15 HE creditsStudent thesis
  • 74.
    Bygdén, Anna
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Umeå School of Architecture.
    Motion, layers and imagination2013Independent thesis Basic level (degree of Bachelor), 10 credits / 15 HE creditsStudent thesis
  • 75.
    Bäckström, Nina
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Umeå School of Architecture.
    Situated Commonism in the landscape of Umeå: Claiming and Sharing Places2015Independent thesis Advanced level (degree of Master (Two Years)), 30 credits / 45 HE creditsStudent thesis
    Abstract [en]

    This is about acting from a situation, a place, its conditions and its actors.

    It is an attempt to understand the ongoing transformations of the city

    of Umeå, to grasp how it functions and gain the knowledge to be able

    to act within and suggest new possible futures. By looking at Umeå and

    the current situation with the parking lot as an index, a tool, a laboratory,

    and a possible new common, new ways of building the city while

    living within it will be suggested. The non place of the parking lot with

    its singular purpose is part of the mechanisms that makes our city, at the

    same time it is the effect of this city making and it is also a great place

    to start a change of such system. The 2.5x5 meters that makes a parking

    lot is small in comparison with the city, and even more so in comparison

    with the country or the world, but the size also makes it possible to

    grasp, touch and inhabit. The smallness makes it seem rather innocent

    and without much importance but the power lies within its multiplicity.

    A change within a parking lot might not be much, but the possibility of

    spreading throughout the city and the world makes the parking lot a

    very powerful place.

    Since humans can sometimes be creatures of habit, I believe that it is

    extremely important to keep on questioning the way we inhabit the

    world together. Widely spread and accepted habits can start acting like

    dysfunctional natural laws steering us in a direction we might not have

    chosen if alternatives were presented to us. By investigating and testing

    the possibilities of such a bland and unquestioned place as the parking

    lot, I am looking to find glimpses of alternative ways of making the world

    while living it.

  • 76.
    Carbonell, Adrià
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Umeå School of Architecture.
    Dubai: the political project of a new metropolis2016In: Gulf cities as interfaces / [ed] George Katodrytis and Sharmeen Syed, Cambridge: Gulf Research Center Cambridge , 2016, p. 229-241Chapter in book (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    We commonly think of Dubai as a city built from scratch. This general assumption, though, is not completely accurate, as often happens when a city is described with a simple and generic statement at first glance. This idea tends to overlook all the non-material forces that are at the very origin of any urban settlement. By focusing on a particular formal structure, we tend to forget the cultural and political substrata embodied in a particular physical reality, as well as the visions and ambitions that drove its construction. When we look at urban patterns, we are usually fascinated by their formal qualities; we see them as fabrics, as systems, as shapes and images, as landscapes and skylines. But the visual analysis runs the risk of overlooking deeper roots. The new global city of Dubai is no exception; it is the result of a political vision driven by the ruling family, the Maktouns, that has turned into a massive economic and financial operation. The city has become the interface in which the global economy has landed in the city and, through a relation of mutual benefit, has created the city we know today. Thus, Dubai's political and economic system over the last few decades has run in parallel with the urban image envisioned by its rulers, in a process that has merged urban planning, investment opportunities and real estate speculation with the creation of a new city imagery. The New Dubai has been based mainly on three strategies: the planning and construction of a huge infrastructural network; the creation of Free Zones; and the accumulation of marks of distinction and symbolic power.

  • 77.
    Carbonell, Adrià
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Umeå School of Architecture.
    Repensar la urbanitat: ecologia, infraestructura, urbanització2015In: L'arquitectura que ve: una prospectiva sobre el disseny de l'hàbitat humà / [ed] Cabrera, Ivan; Roig, Antoni, Borriana: Agrupació Borrianenca de Cultura , 2015, Vol. 26, p. 93-98Chapter in book (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
    Abstract [ca]

    Si el segle XIX va ser el de l’aparició de les metròpolis i el segle XX el de l’explosió dels territoris a escala regional, el segle XXI és el de la urbanització planetària. El procés d’urbanització extensiva que estem vivint ha esborrat els límits entre la ciutat i el camp, resultant en un fenomen d’urbanització total a escala planetària, que s’està consolidant als inicis d’aquest nou segle. Seguint les idees que Henri Lefebvre va anticipar el 1970 a La revolution urbaine, aquest article qüestionarà els models tradicionals d’urbanitat i defensarà la necessitat de definir un nou territori per l’arquitectura que explori i articuli noves nocions d’ecologia i d’infraestructura, i que investigui nous processos d’urbanització.

  • 78.
    Carbonell, Adrià
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Umeå School of Architecture.
    Social Antagonism As Dubai’s Architectural Legacy2015Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In present-day multicultural and multireligious society, and in the absence of a common cultural background, the hypermodern New Dubai is fundamentally grounded in tourism, leisure and mass consumption. However, this hedonistic dream where ritual acts are devoted to lust and pleasure is built on extreme inequality. A closer look at its social reality shows an uneven, fragmented, highly hierarchical class structure. While the new world class of expatriates inhabits a shiny newly built environment, historic fabrics are occupied by immigrant labour. The new Dubai has been set up in parts, as a group of isolated enclaves, therefore creating a strong fragmentation of the urban form. Urbanism has served as a tool to deactivate social processes; the imposition of an urban vision as a reflection of a political ideology has overcome the social struggles and existing dissent in its society. 

  • 79.
    Carbonell, Adrià
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Umeå School of Architecture.
    Territorial ecologies: a new ground for spatial justice2015Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This paper will argue that in order to understand contemporary processes of neoliberal urbanization and to revert its lucrative destruction, the planetary dimension of the phenomena needs to be tackled (Brenner, 2014), and the isotropic sea of urbanization needs to be reconfigured into sustainable territorial ecologies. Drawing on Neil Smith’s “Uneven Development” and Saskia Sassen’s “Territory, Authority, Rights”, a new understanding of the territory will be put forward. The research will look into territorial ecologies as a new conceptual and design tool, thus redefining the relation between architecture, geography and landscape. Strategies of intervention will be defined in order to reformulate a new model of city making oriented towards a collective re-appropriation and democratic management of specific contexts, paying special attention to notions of ecology and infrastructure. 

  • 80.
    Carbonell, Adrià
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Umeå School of Architecture.
    Urbanisme Polìtic: Ciutats més enllà del conflicte2014In: Revista Diagonal, ISSN 2013-651X, Vol. 37, p. 16-20Article in journal (Other academic)
  • 81. Carbonell, Adrià
    Walls, Bars, Open Space2014In: Critical Prison Design / [ed] Roger Paez, New York: ACTAR, 2014, p. 44-51Chapter in book (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
  • 82.
    Celebioglu, Alexander
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Umeå School of Architecture.
    Connecting the Isolated2018Independent thesis Basic level (degree of Bachelor of Fine Arts), 10 credits / 15 HE creditsStudent thesis
    Abstract [en]

    Globalization is increasing the interaction between people on a worldwide scale due to advances in transportation and communication technology. Interactions between nation-states and individuals allowed for the growth of international trade, ideas, and culture. People are not bound to places anymore and are at home in all countries, but what happens to those excluded from globalization?

     

    The project is designed in Midyat, a south-eastern city in Turkey. Midyat is the center of a larger area, called Turabdin, with several villages. The people in and around Midyat grow up in a different socio-cultural context, then we do in the Western welfare condition. They grow up in a part of the world where Christian and Muslim minorities have fled to. The area has worked as a sanctuary for minorities, but also suffered from genocides. Almost everyone is multilingual, speaking Turkish, a little English because it is mandatory in school, Kurdish, Syriac and Assyrian. Most people are poor or lower middle class, not affording the latest phones or laptops. There is no public transportation. Either you own a car, take a taxi or walk. This makes it difficult, especially for children, to get from the village to the city.

    The children go to elementary school in their village, but there are no high schools in the villages, which means that the education offered for the children is limited to the age of 14. After school they have no other option than to get a job, which usually means following in their fathers’ footsteps. For young women, taking care of the house and waiting for a man to propose is usually what awaits. These children are isolated and not part of our globalized world.  

     

    My design proposal is a high school with housing possibilities, in Midyat. The main users will be children from different villages, with different backgrounds and cultures. In school they will be given the opportunity to continue towards an academic life. By going to school and live together, they will learn to accept each other’s differences, and to co-exist. They will be given a chance to take more control over their own life and future.

     

    I want to create a new educational ground that fits our changing world, with an open environment, avoiding long monotonous corridors. Basing from the idea that learning occurs in social and cultural settings, I want to transform traditional classrooms to allow for more social learning arrangements, connecting each of them to courtyards. Since the children will be living on the campus, I believe it is of importance to distance the living, educational and leisure areas while still being closely connected.  

  • 83.
    Cervin-Ellqvist, Helena
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Umeå School of Architecture.
    Flamingons textil2016Independent thesis Basic level (degree of Bachelor of Fine Arts), 10 credits / 15 HE creditsStudent thesis
  • 84.
    Chhaya, Kartikeya
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Umeå School of Architecture.
    Re-Imagining the Million Programme: Strategies to Increase Flexibility in Existing Multi-Family Housing2017Independent thesis Advanced level (degree of Master (Two Years)), 20 credits / 30 HE creditsStudent thesis
    Abstract [en]

    Housing has always been an urgent question in modern times: how to provide for increasing demand and quickly changing patterns of living. One of the main issues with it is that the very people who will buy, rent and use housing have mostly have little or no say in the design— or how they would like the house to change over time.

    One of the most audacious experiments in modern housing, the Swedish Million Programme, is over 50 years old; these estates are ageing and have become misaligned with modern ways of living, rendering them susceptible to segregated neighbourhoods and neglect, and out of date in terms of energy use. While a new housing shortage looms, the renovations to million program buildings could potentially provide some insights into the housing problem.

    The ageing infrastructure of the million programme is an opportunity to reconsider the way we think of housing today.

    The million programme was scientifically designed and constructed with state-of-the-art methods in the 60s and 70s, and was an example to the world. Today, the buildings are not up to environmental standards and need refurbishment to improve thermal performance. Also: the particular family sizes that the estates were designed for some decades ago, do not exist in the same proportions today. There is not as much diversity in sizes and types of apartments as are required for today’s different and unpredictable demographic changes.

    This project proposes a system of extensions to the facades of the buildings that challenge the existing plans and allows newer typologies to be remade from the old buildings. This would necessarily require the participation, conversation and negotiation of the residents, as well as facilitating agencies like the Kommun, Housing companies, Tenants’ Associations, Manufacturers, Construction companies and so on.

    Residents have been the most marginalised group of all the parties who come together to make housing; I contend that this is one of the fundamental issues of all housing that are designed with little adaptability and hence are dated with a fixed lifespan, after which changing lives begin to make them redundant. However, a user-driven process and designs that afford adaptation according to changing needs may allow housing to have an inherently longer life, and affect the social cohesion and sense of place of the city as well.

    The method is to test architectural strategies to a building of the million programme
in Umeå, to bring out potentials and possibilities of participation in such a context. The main strategy is a Support and Infill model of incremental addition: the design of fixed infrastructure and of potential changes that may be added onto it. Speculating possible configurations of addition may provide some insight about the benefits and pitfalls of such and similar systems of refurbishment, and of participation.

    Perhaps a built environment that is able to change more easily to accommodate people’s changing lives and needs over time produces more energetic, active and livable cities that are more resilient to change and unpredictability that is characteristic of our world today.

  • 85.
    Cladi, Nelly
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Umeå School of Architecture.
    SEEMINGLY UN/PRE/OCCUPIED2017Independent thesis Basic level (degree of Bachelor of Fine Arts), 10 credits / 15 HE creditsStudent thesis
  • 86.
    Conden, Helen-Rose
    et al.
    Dublin Institute of Technology.
    O'Dell, Micheal
    Dublin Institute of Technology.
    NAMALab: Maping Nama2011In: NAMALab / [ed] Helen Rose Condon, Michael O'Dell, Ireland: Dublin School of Architecture Press , 2011, 1, p. 130-132Chapter in book (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Mapping NAMA describes the visualisation of Irelands National Assets Managment Agencies property portfolio which was established between 2009 and 2011. The NAMA portfolio included Property, Sites and Land Banks aquired by developers and held as securties within a number of Irish Banks which were effeced by the financial crisis. Although operating as a public body NAMA has never released details of the portfolio due to its claim that the information would further damage the collapsed propoerty market and as a result would effect the value of the portflio resulting in reduced compensation for a state led Bank bailout. By colating court room appearences of property developers, newspaper reports and other soft data followed by extensive archive research of Dublin City Councils planning departemnt NAMALab produced a cartographic analysis of the NAMA portfolio. This map was then used by NAMAlab as the basis for a series of projective urban projects imagining the poetntial of Dublin City post financial crisis.

  • 87.
    Conway, Richard
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Umeå School of Architecture.
    Shirke, Sangram
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Umeå School of Architecture.
    Unterrainer, Walter
    Unterrainer, Linda
    Hagglund, Therese
    Ivansson, Hanna
    Zetterlund, Krut
    Sjölander, Viktor
    Hallen, Maja
    Samberg, Julia
    Thorstensson, Carin
    Elgenstierna, Carl
    Sandvik, Emma
    Realizing Dharavi2017In: Reinventing Dharavi: An Ideas Compendium / [ed] Urban Design Research Institute, Mumbai, India: Urban Design Research Institute , 2017, 1, p. 34-61Chapter in book (Refereed)
  • 88.
    Cozic, Gaelle
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Umeå School of Architecture.
    A Common Tomorrow: Kajulu Rescue Center2016Independent thesis Advanced level (degree of Master (Two Years)), 20 credits / 30 HE creditsStudent thesis
  • 89.
    Crocella, Gaia
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Umeå School of Architecture.
    Ecoskola2016Independent thesis Basic level (degree of Bachelor of Fine Arts), 10 credits / 15 HE creditsStudent thesis
  • 90.
    Dahlbäck, Anna
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Umeå School of Architecture.
    Talkin' bout our generations: Preschool and nursing home2019Independent thesis Basic level (degree of Bachelor of Fine Arts), 10 credits / 15 HE creditsStudent thesis
  • 91.
    Davallou, Aida
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Umeå School of Architecture.
    Habitat 2040: Basic income forming future living2019Independent thesis Basic level (degree of Bachelor), 10 credits / 15 HE creditsStudent thesis
    Abstract [en]

    Many future scenarios we hear about today are not progressive enough. We have stopedquestioning and striving for another, a better future than the one we are heading towards.The way we live today is not sustainable, we are dealing with a shrinking job market,growing wealth gaps, climate change and overconsumption. We are at a time right nowwhere our surrounding develops at a fast pace and it is up to us to form the future the waywe want to. I am proposing a speculation for what a possible utopia will look like in 2040,based on the book Utopia for realists and how we can get there by Rutger Bregman.I. Money for free - We need a new system that insures everyone a roof over their headsand food on their tables. Elon musk, President Nixon, Martin Luther King and manyother famous people believe in a system of an universal basic income. Today about onebillion of the world population live under the poverty line, this needs to change. Therehave been multiple studies done to prove the benefits of a Universal basic income andits been shown to be an effective way to end poverty. By having a basic income citizensdon’t have to live paycheck to paycheck and they will also have the possibility to workwith things they actually enjoy.II. 15 hour work week -The rise of automatization and artificial intelligence will change thejob market and together with a basic income humans can go from a 40+ hour workweek to a 15 hour work week. The time we gain can be spent on volunteering, leisureand on entrepreneurship. We will live in a time were everyone does the things they enjoyinstead spending their days chasing a wage to be able to survive.III. Rather pay for services than products - Our societies will go from a focus onmaterialistic items to a service driven society. With the upcoming of advanced 3dprinters and cheap machine labour materialistic products won’t have the same statusvalue as it has today. Ownership will therefor not be as important as it is today andshared ownership will become easier. People will rather put their money on services thatwill simplify their lives.IV. The new home - Due to the basic income and the gain of free time, the domesticsphere will change radically. Because of automatization and service consumptionHabitat 2040Basic income forming future living.Aida DavallouStudio 2humans will spend minimal amount of time on chores like cooking and cleaning, if wecook it’ll be because its fun. Our private homes will therefor only consist of the mostimportant necessities like bed and bath and instead we will have shared spaces werepeople socialize and spend most of their time. Our living situation will also be in aconstant change, making it important to create a living space that is easily adaptable toeach households needs.Sources:Bregman, Rutger. 2016. Utopia for realists: and how to get there.Great Britain, Bloomsbury publishing.

  • 92. David, Dernie
    New Stone Architecure by David Dernie2003 (ed. 1)Book (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
    Abstract [en]

    In recent years contemporary architects have become obsessed with a variety of new materials, and above all stone. The limits and predictability of the modernist palette have long been recognized, and contemporary architects are now looking to the ancient values of stone to give new expression to their ideas. Above all it is the permanence of stone that is increasingly used to express a sense of civic stability, or ground the otherwise fluid forms of contemporary architecture. New Stone Architecture explores the special role of this material in a timely reassessment of the ideas which underpin today's renaissance of stone architecture. The introduction uncovers the expressive possibilities of stone, describes the new technologies which make the new forms possible and offers an interpretation based on the author's technical and theoretical understanding of material themes. This is followed by thirty-three case studies from around the world. Architects featured include Michael Hopkins, Kengo Kuma, and Renzo Piano.

  • 93.
    David Reppen, Felicia
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Umeå School of Architecture.
    Securing Liminal Space: An Intimate Approach2017Independent thesis Advanced level (professional degree), 20 credits / 30 HE creditsStudent thesis
    Abstract [en]

    This thesis derives from the comprehension that liminality has the potential for new social relations to form towards new social conditions. With an intimate approach and a deeper understanding of oneself, we can reach a more sensible understanding of others, which can bridge preconceived borders consisting of seemingly different realities that make the city a whole. The aspiration is to shift focus from the obvious preconceived reality towards a self-reflective and intimate occupation of space and being amongst each other. What architectural strategies and spaces can cater for this liminal stage to take form?

    To explore the concepts of liminality and intimacy this thesis investigates existing independent social operations and physical sites that through their occupation lead to new social relations and physical connections in the city. The methods are based on an inquiry of literature pertaining to this topic, practical curating of intimate space, as well as interviews and engagements with previous mentioned operations and sites.

    In the proposal phase three sites, or rather sets of conditions, are test cases to examine how liminal spaces can be reassured through an intimate approach within the context of Umeå, Sweden. The three sites are temporal to different extents and operate on different scales and time spans. This temporality gives the sites an uncertain character, which through the research has been found to be a potential for occupying space and use it in unexpected ways. Similar to the temporal character of the sites, the architectural strategies for giving value to these places should avoid a dogmatic and preconceived thinking of how people should use the place. If the potential lies in the undefined, then the proposal should embrace this uncertainty and thereby become facilitators of imagination and reappropriation to take form.

  • 94. Dernie, David
    Architectural Drawing by David Dernie: (Portfolio Skills)2010In: Architectural Drawing by David Dernie: (portfolio skills), Laurence King , 2010, 1Chapter in book (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
    Abstract [en]

    Architectural Drawing focuses on the exciting possibilities for representing the built environment using allthe techniquesboth traditional and digitalthat are now available. Packed with practical information thebook illustrates all the key types and media of drawingfrom sketches to working detailsand includes some of the best examples by practicing architects. This book will be an indispensable practical resource in architectural schools.

  • 95.
    Deshpande, Parag
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Umeå Institute of Design. ?.
    The Temple of Chousath Yogini at Mitaoli2001In: Puratan, Vol. 12, no ?, p. ?-?Article in journal (Other academic)
  • 96.
    Diamant Jakobsson, Miriam
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Umeå School of Architecture.
    Flexible Space in Dharavi: Health, education and housing2013Independent thesis Basic level (degree of Bachelor of Fine Arts), 10 credits / 15 HE creditsStudent thesis
  • 97.
    Domeier, Johannes
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Umeå School of Architecture.
    In Scale 1:1 - A Tiny House2017Independent thesis Advanced level (degree of Master (Two Years)), 20 credits / 30 HE creditsStudent thesis
  • 98.
    Drakman, Lotten
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Umeå School of Architecture.
    Public Knowledge: A Park in Dharavi2013Independent thesis Basic level (degree of Bachelor), 10 credits / 15 HE creditsStudent thesis
    Abstract [en]

    Arcitectural project in the context of urban slum in India, with focus on knowledge and public space. Dharavi are located in the central parts of Mumbai and has a population of between 600000 and 1000000. Since knowledge are a central part of develop the area this project had as a goal of combining the knowledge transfer between generations and the recreation through creating a public park in the centre of the neighbourhood.

  • 99.
    Drechsler, Mirjam
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Umeå School of Architecture.
    Finding the Familiar in the Unfamiliar: Investigating the Role of Hospitality as a Performance of Togetherness and Support for New Arrivals in the Familiar Left Behind2017Independent thesis Advanced level (degree of Master (Two Years)), 20 credits / 30 HE creditsStudent thesis
    Abstract [en]

    Arriving at a new place, the stranger finds herself/himself facing the unfamiliar. In that situation, she/he is confronted with different tasks, duties and other difficulties in order to handle one own needs and desires such as settling down and creating oneself a home. This thesis aims to explore processes of arriving as well as its interrelation to concepts of hospitality.

    How does hospitality as a welcoming method facilitate and support the arriving stranger?

    The first part of the thesis focuses on general aspects of hospitality and its exploration. In order to approach, understand and narrow down the wide and extensive topic, a series of literature is considered and simultaneously connected to the context of my own experience and background as a newly-arrived international student. Therefore, subjective examples, in which I am hosted in and around Umeå, by different people or institutions and during the last 2 years, are investigated.

    Subsequently this thesis considers existing organizations and networks in Umeå, which operate with a welcoming approach within the realm of integration, cultural exchange, and social relations.

    It becomes apparent, that spaces and moments of familiarity are significant not just as a starting point for strangers to meet, bringing together differences and similarities especially through communalities such as food, music and dance, but also to provide structures for legal and further support. As a generous act, providing hospitality has the potential for facilitating needs of newly arrived people, enabling exchange and encounter to happen. It has the ability to become a tool for coexistence.

    Eventually, with concepts of hospitality, sharing and communality in mind, the proposal brings together existing organizations, forming a meeting point for new and already established inhabitants of Umeå in the town center.

  • 100. Dworzak, Hugo
    if Architecture...2013In: If Architecture ... When Architektur ... / [ed] Hugo Dworzak, Liechtenstein: University liechtenstein , 2013Chapter in book (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
    Abstract [en]

    in 2013 the Institute of Architecture and Planning at the University of Liechtenstein celebrated its 50th birthday. Having started as an evening school in 1963 they have undergone several changes and have reached University status in 2011. Through all these years attitudes like curiosity and endurance, the courage to experiment and constant renewal have nurtured teachers and students.

    Following the symposium the «If architecture ...» postcards will be auctioned to the highest bidders, with the proceeds going to the project «Community Art Space» in Tanzania for the benefit of the Maasai. 

    Hugo Dworzsak, Head of the Institute of Architecture and Planning, made a special publication out of the more than 300 contributions he received from architects, artits, writers and thinkers who had teached and/or lecturers at the institute.

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