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  • 51.
    Dijk, van, Jelle
    et al.
    Eindhoven University of Technology.
    Moussette, Camille
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Umeå Institute of Design.
    Kuenen, Christoffel
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Umeå Institute of Design.
    Hummels, Caroline
    Eindhoven University of Technology.
    Radical Calshes: What Tangible Interaction is Made of2013In: Proceedings of the 7th International Conference on Tangible, Embedded and Embodied Interaction - TEI '13, Association for Computing Machinery (ACM), 2013, p. 323-326Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Driven by a critique of Ishii et al’s recent vision of Radical Atoms we call for a debate on the different conceptual paradigms underlying the TEI community and its activities. TEI was initiated to share and connect different perspectives, but we feel conceptual debate is lacking. To fuel this debate, we start with comparing two paradigms by examining the Radical Atoms proposal and balance it from our design-led perspective. Our aim with this paper is to revive the richness of TEI’s multidisciplinary approach.

  • 52.
    DiSalvo, Carl
    et al.
    Georgia Institute of Technology.
    Redström, Johan
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Umeå Institute of Design.
    Watson, Matt
    University of Sheffield.
    Commentaries on the special issue on practice-oriented approaches to sustainable HCI2013In: ACM Transactions on Computer-Human Interaction, ISSN 1073-0516, E-ISSN 1557-7325, Vol. 20, no 4, p. 26-Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 53.
    Eriksson, Ruben
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Umeå Institute of Design.
    FRM AIRCON: What can be done to improve the personal protective equipment for auto body painters?2016Independent thesis Basic level (degree of Bachelor), 10 credits / 15 HE creditsStudent thesis
    Abstract [en]

    The professional auto body painter works in an extreme environment, where the painter faces constant movement, ever-changing working situations and pressure to deliver a flawless paint job: the paint booth. The temperature in the paint booth is high, often around 30˚ Celsius. The floor is very hard, made of metal grid or concrete, and the painter usually has to move around a lot, at least 9 km per day. For this project I chose to focus on the painter’s work footwear as a major part of the personal protective equipment. My goal is to create a new standard in working shoes, specifically made for this environment and context. A comfortable shoe that could withstand heat, paint dust and wear. A shoe that is made for its users: the FRM AIRCON.

  • 54.
    Fang, Siyuan
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Umeå Institute of Design.
    Living zone2016Independent thesis Advanced level (degree of Master (Two Years)), 20 credits / 30 HE creditsStudent thesis
    Abstract [en]

    The great advancements in technology are transforming cars into the next digital frontier, redefining people’s lifestyle around mobility. The thesis intended to push further on this trend, exploring new interaction paradigms and creating delightful experiences in future self-driving vehicles. With a cross-discipline scope, the formula is to blend digital information into physical form and material, blurring the boundary between the car’s interior and interface. As the conclusion, I learned that a constant harmony between virtual and physical world is the key for designers to create natural and intuitive experiences with technology.

    The final result is an autonomous interior concept with multi-sensory user experiences. The core interface, as the physical manifestation of the car’s artificial intelligence, interact with users emotionally, offering its amazing capability in assistance. The in-car environment is evolved with sensors and displays, providing intuitive access to dedicated functions and immersive content.

  • 55.
    Feckenstedt, Henrike
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Umeå Institute of Design.
    Talking to the Future - about Radioactivity: Understanding Radioactivity Through Everyday Product Interactions2015Independent thesis Advanced level (degree of Master (Two Years)), 20 credits / 30 HE creditsStudent thesis
    Abstract [en]

    Nuclear waste remains radioactive for thousands of years. Burying it underground in an enormous repository, called Onkalo, surrounded and secured by solid rock is the long-term solution Finnish authorities implement right now. Once the repository is filled up, it will be locked up forever and never opened again. At the same time three new nuclear power plants are built.

    Out of Sight, out of Mind?

    Ultimately, this raises questions: Can this be the solution for final disposal of nuclear waste? How do we understand a problem clearly exceeding our capabilities as human beings? How do we deal with the dilemmas of uncertainty, invisibility, time, demand, possible contamination, and our individual responsibility as human beings?

    Understanding Through Interaction

    I designed three everyday products, a lamp, a toy for children, and a pregnancy test, that afford a familiar everyday action on one hand, while exposing a dilemma related to Onkalo on the other. In doing so, the artifacts make those dilemma tangible and facilitate understanding and critical thinking. Sharing a personal experience, the users can engage in a personal discourse around nuclear waste actively, opposing the distant and highly politicalised discourse spread by the media.

  • 56.
    Fennis, Jules
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Umeå Institute of Design.
    Myriad: an Open-ended Design Project2014Independent thesis Advanced level (degree of Master (Two Years)), 20 credits / 30 HE creditsStudent thesis
    Abstract [en]

    A fascination for electronics development platforms was the starting point for this project. Brought forward from open source initiatives, these exist of modular hardware toolkits and software. This modularity allows people to use them in different configurations to support a variety of contexts and purposes. In this way it enables them to bring just about any idea to life.

    There is an emerging trend on the web, where people modify or hack into products, trying to change or extends their products to fit their needs. As technology is becoming cheaper and embedded in everyday products, it allows products to become more flexible, and be more sensitive towards these trends.

    My project has been an investigation in developing a method for design, which promotes modular product systems, rather than closed, fixed products. Open-ended design is an approach which supports an exploration space for end-users. Focused on laymen users, allows them to investigate what functionality and behaviour is needed for their own interests and niche purposes. The open-ended design framework was used to design Myriad: a flexible, modular camera system to complement GoPro cameras. Myriad exists of a growing library of modules, sensors and a mobile app which combined create unique camera functionality and behaviours.

  • 57.
    Feuš, Miha
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Umeå Institute of Design.
    The Haptic Drive: Haptic feedback for car interfaces2013Independent thesis Advanced level (degree of Master (Two Years)), 20 credits / 30 HE creditsStudent thesis
    Abstract [en]

    With the use of touch-screen enabled interfaces, came a new era for in-car interactions. Sadly, no technology comes without drawbacks, in this case the demand of visual attention, which is desperately needed to operate the vehicle in a safe manner. The main motivation for this project is finding a way to bring the sense of touch back to interfaces while retaining the flexibility that touch-screens have introduced.

    The collaborating partner for this project was Icon Incar, who also supported it in many ways. The research phase of this project has been carried out at the company HQ in Berlin. This included feedback sessions at the company, reading research papers on haptics and automotive interfaces, talking to experts in the field of haptics and the facilitation of a workshop. The research helped to confirm the initial problem statement and helped to form ideas in the ideation stage, of which there were many.

    Those ideas were a mixture of technologies and sensing abilities that went far beyond the initial problem statement in order keep a brother scope. There were many feedback session, with different people, which were necessary to weed out the bad ideas and keep the viable ones for testing. While building and testing the first prototypes, there was simultaneously a quest going on to find a solution for fully actuated and shape shifting displays, something that has not been done before. While coming up with dozens of possible technical solutions, the fact was overlooked that none of them would provide a good experience (except some far fetched futuristic granular systems). As it turns out, actuating the display itself would not cause any problems, but manipulating the actuation would, because it would not give the best experience. Manipulating actuated button would work and feel just fine, but sliders and knobs - whenever the finger has to move over a surface - would feel unnatural. After more analysis, I found that there is not one technology yet, that could stimulate all the different properties a human being can feel with the sense of touch. Therefor, there have to be many technologies working together to provide the best possible experience.

    More than a dozen haptic prototypes have been built and tested to help the users perform various tasks blindly. Those ranged from controlling the climate, scrolling throughout lists, identifying functions and getting feedback for selected options. Many of the ideas did not work out as expected and were discontinued after the haptic testing, which was a vital part of the process. The working ideas were then combined into a larger concept.

    To simplify the interface even more, a general list of features was thoroughly studied so that functions could be simplified, combined or discarded. Drivers and car dealers have been interviewed to understand what the most commonly used functions are.

    The analysis of existing interfaces has shown that there is currently only one function and type of information provided at any time. This means that the driver can not see directions while changing the music, for example. The concept layout will, therefore, provide information about all the basic functions (climate control, navigation, music and phone) where one function shows all information and others only the basics. To avoid visual clutter and ensure quick recognition, graphic elements have been distilled to their essential forms while still retaining a sense of visual pleasure.

    To identify, differentiate between and set climate control, the knob for heating would change its temperature, the ventilation knob blow air at the set speed and the air flow direction knob would tilt in the set direction. While the volume knob would react to the beat of the music. With the help of microfluidics, active buttons would pop out of the screen and can be identified by their shapes. When activating those shape shifting buttons, the driver would feel feedback, similar to the one of real buttons, provided by an actuator at the back of the display.

    The combination of all listed solutions would provide simpler interactions and help the drivers to keep their focus on the road. This would in turn make driving a better and safer experience.

  • 58.
    Foka, Anna
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Arts, Humlab. Pufendorf Institute, Lund University, Sweden.
    Misharina, Anna
    Umeå University, Faculty of Arts, Humlab.
    Arvidsson, Viktor
    Gelfgren, Stefan
    Umeå University, Faculty of Arts, Humlab.
    Beyond humanities qua digital: Spatial and material development for digital research infrastructures2018In: Digital Scholarship in the Humanities, ISSN 2055-7671, E-ISSN 2055-768X, Vol. 33, no 2, p. 264-278Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Universities around the world have increasingly turned to digital infrastructures as a way to revamp the arts and humanities. This article contributes a fresh understanding by examining the material development of HumlabX, a research laboratory for digital humanities at Umeå University, Sweden. Specifically, we approach the empirical case as a timeline of research funding, projects, events, and deliverables to examine how the research laboratory as an organizational and material space developed and evolved in relation to new technology investments. Based on our analysis, we argue that while digital research infrastructures can, indeed, stimulate innovation in and around research, aimed to produce new knowledge, digital technologies carry social and material implications that affect organizational processes. We show that while knowledge production processes at HumlabX were highly influenced by the infrastructural legacy of the past, they indeed directed scholars toward innovation. By discussing these implications in detail, we move beyond the debate of humanities qua digital, and demonstrate the need for scholars of digital humanities to engage in the development of policies for digital research infrastructures. Using a Swedish case study, we argue that research laboratories for the digital humanities must be scrutinized and should be fully exposed as socio-material organizations that develop, and should develop, over time. In particular, we stress the need to ensure that digital humanities laboratories are sustainable and open for redevelopment.

  • 59. Forlano, Laura
    et al.
    Ståhl, Åsa
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Umeå Institute of Design.
    Lindström, Kristina
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Umeå Institute of Design.
    Jönsson, Li
    Mazé, Ramia
    Mending and Growing in Feminist Speculative Fabulations: Design’s Unfaithful Daughters2016Other (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
    Abstract [en]

    This conversation seeks to consider design research practices around critical and speculative design which have been criticised for their lack of public engagement and awareness of their political and normative positions. In particular, we are interested in the ways in which feminist speculative fabulation offer alternative approaches through attention to core feminist arguments around corporeality, materiality, embodiment, affectivity and experientiality. Our conversation will imagine new ways of practicing design by examining relationships between speculative futures and reimaginings of the past; the role of a feminist perspective in problem-making and questioning; speculative design and fabulation as participatory practice; the role of practices around mending, growing, maintaining and repairing; and, the posthuman design and the anthropocene. 

  • 60.
    Fällman, Daniel
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Informatics.
    Andersson, Niklas
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Umeå Institute of Design.
    Johansson, Lars
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Umeå Institute of Design.
    Come Together, Right Now, Over Me: Conceptual and Tangible Design of Pleasurable Dupliances for Children2001In: Proceedings of the International Conference on Affective Human Factors Design, CAHD 2001, London: Asean Academic Press , 2001Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 61.
    Fällman, Daniel
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Informatics.
    Andersson, Niklas
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Umeå Institute of Design.
    Johansson, Lars
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Umeå Institute of Design.
    Dupliances: Physical and Virtual Activity Encompassed2001In: Proceedings of CHI 2001: Human Factors in Computing Systems, Extended Abstracts, New york: ACM Press , 2001Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 62.
    Fällman, Daniel
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Informatics.
    Bogren, Linda
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Umeå Institute of Design.
    Henje, Catharina
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Umeå Institute of Design.
    Attract, inform, and interact: Working with product semantics in an inclusive design project2009Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 63.
    Fällman, Daniel
    et al.
    Interactive Institute.
    Moussette, Camille
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Umeå Institute of Design.
    Sketching with Stop Motion Animation2011Other (Refereed)
  • 64.
    Galitsky, Joshua
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Umeå Institute of Design.
    Paving the Mega Cities: Dynapac Red Carpet2012Independent thesis Advanced level (degree of Master (Two Years)), 20 credits / 30 HE creditsStudent thesis
    Abstract [en]

    While the design and the technology behind the vehicles we drive has gone a long way, the main principle in which we construct our roads today, the materials and the machinery we use to do it has hardly changed for the last 40 years.This project takes  a fresh look at an industry that has remained stagnant for several decades. Looking into a future in which large Mega-Cities will develop, the aim of this project will be to develop a new solution for constructing and maintaining the transport arteries in those cities. This project was performed in collaboration with Dynapac, a leading manufacturer of road construction equipment, with supporting feedback from NCC roads, the Scandinavian road construction group.

  • 65.
    Gaunt, Kevin
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Umeå Institute of Design. Umeå University.
    Connecting Cameras: Putting a New Twist on Connected Consumer Electronics2016Independent thesis Advanced level (degree of Master (Two Years)), 20 credits / 30 HE creditsStudent thesis
    Abstract [en]

    Camera makers are now increasingly adding WiFi chips to cameras to make transferring photos to smartphones or computers easier. At the same time this new technology brings on the opportunity to rethink what a connected camera could be and how it might shape our relationship with these devices. As the features in our consumer cameras start to move beyond physical constraints of the device itself, we will rely more on the device’s inherent character to make sense of it. Through multiple workshops, experiments, mockups and prototypes I explored a set of alternative characters and concepts for our digital consumer cameras and ultimately give an example of how a playful camera might inspire us to look at ourselves and the world around us with new eyes. 

    The resulting provocation is KOPPLA, a prototype of an Internet-connected camera that treats its owners as a creative collective. It offers inspiring creative challenges at the touch of a button. These challenges come from other camera owners in the collective, from local communities or from organizations interested in gathering personal perspectives. The final design aims to provoke new ideas for what the industry considers a connected camera to be. In that sense, as a connecting rather than connected camera, KOPPLA goes beyond offloading photographs to a smartphone or the Internet – instead connecting its owners to new places, people and ideas.

  • 66.
    Goraczkowski, Sebastian
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Umeå Institute of Design.
    Ford Evoke2016Independent thesis Advanced level (degree of Master (Two Years)), 20 credits / 30 HE creditsStudent thesis
    Abstract [en]

    „ What if Adaptive Personalization excelled Hardware Customization? “ Adaptive Vehicle Personalization

    Human mobility is about to create a generation of " Movers"  - a new breed of mobility users with global transportation  needs and a connection to multiple urban areas  already from a young age. Expectations towards mobility go towards adaptable and personalized solutions and technological advancements should enable a strategy in which one vehicle could adapt to multiple qualities.

    The final result is an adaptable urban mobility solution designed for global membership use in the year 2025. The intention of the project has been to holistically investigate how Vir tual Reality can influence the design process and result of interior and exterior. The goal has been to inspire and to show a believable way of how in the future adaptive personalization could excel hardware customization in order to suit the different and changing needs of various mobility service users.

  • 67. Granbom, Marianne
    et al.
    Szanton, Sarah
    Gitlin, Laura N.
    Paulsson, Ulrika
    Zingmark, Magnus
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Epidemiology and Global Health.
    Ageing in the right place: a prototype of a web-based housing counselling intervention for later life2019In: Scandinavian Journal of Occupational Therapy, ISSN 1103-8128, E-ISSN 1651-2014Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: Despite a strong desire among most older adults to age in place, there are few widely available services to support planning and preparing for one's future housing needs. Objective: To develop a prototype of a web-based housing counselling intervention for use in later life, by employing a user-centred design. Material and Methods: As the first step in intervention development, we employed a development process based on research circle methodology. Nine older adults participated in three sessions. Findings from literature reviews, a meeting with a technology and design panel (n = 6) and interviews with representatives of nonprofit organizations, companies, and municipalities (n = 7) served as discussion points. Result: An on-paper prototype was derived, composed of the THINK, LEARN and ACT module reflecting different stages of the decision-making process. Each module addressed preferences, health, home and social and financial resources. Key design features and theoretical underpinnings were included.

  • 68.
    Gray, Colin M.
    et al.
    Indiana University, Bloomington, USA.
    Stolterman, Erik
    Indiana University, Bloomington, USA.
    Siegel, Martin A.
    Indiana University, Bloomington, USA.
    Reprioritizing the Relationship Between HCI Research and Practice: Bubble-Up and Trickle-Down Effects2014In: Proceedings of the 2014 conference on Designing interactive systems, Association for Computing Machinery (ACM), 2014, p. 725-734Conference paper (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    There has been an ongoing conversation about the role and relationship of theory and practice in the HCI community. This paper explores this relationship privileging a practice perspective through a tentative model, which describes a “bubble-up” of ideas from practice to inform research and theory development, and an accompanying “trickle-down” of theory into practice. Interviews were conducted with interaction designers, which included a description of their use of design methods in practice, and their knowledge and use of two common design methods—affinity diagramming and the concept of affordance. Based on these interviews, potential relationships between theory and practice are explored through this model. Disseminating agents already common in HCI practice are addressed as possible  mechanisms for the research community to understand practice more completely.  pportunities for future research, based

    on the use of the tentative model in a generative way, are

    considered.

  • 69.
    Grönskog, Johan
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Umeå Institute of Design.
    Nonvisual Society2012Independent thesis Basic level (degree of Bachelor), 10 credits / 15 HE creditsStudent thesis
    Abstract [en]

    The exclusion of visually impaired from the information flow presented to us through signs was what led me into this project. With a growing amount of information being presented to us on signs and digital information surface the need of communicating this information in a way that could be read by visually impaired is evident. Looking into different ways of communication, my goal was to create something that filled the need of the visually impaired without branding them as disabled.

     Having a close relative with bad eyesight is became evident on how much it limited her in her everyday life, not being able to navigate herself without the support of her husband. Through interviews with her and others with varying diagnoses I reached an insight in their situation. To my surprise they still favored a visual form of communication before an auditory or tactile form, because it’s easy to survey and quick to interpret. Through an iterative process of prototyping and close discussions with the users I reached the conclusion that a head-mounted device would simplify the usage and, with the latest developments in component size, also manifest into something that didn´t run the risk of discriminating the users.

     This resulted in a pair of glasses with in-built electronics and displays. Through cameras mounted on the frames, the visual information is transferred to a CPU in the left temple arm that analyses and enhances the image with software designed for your specific diagnosis. When you feel the need to enhance your vision, you use the controls on top of the temple arms to control the software´s output which is displayed in transparent OLED-displays glued on to the lenses. If the enhanced image isn´t enough, you also have the possibility to let the software use text-to-speech and read the information through built in speakers directed towards the ears. The glasses could easily be dismounted with USB-connectors at the joints which aids the installment of the software, service and customization of the device and in particular the charging of the battery, which is located in the right temple arm. The battery is then charged in a designated compartment of the spectacle box.

  • 70.
    Göransdotter, Maria
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Umeå Institute of Design.
    A Home for Modern Life: Educating Taste in 1940s Sweden2012In: Conference Proceedings: Volume 2. Design Research Society 2012: Bangkok: Research: Uncertainty Contradiction Value / [ed] Praima Israesena, Juthamas Tangsantikul, David Durling, Bangkok: Department of Industrial Design, Faculty of Architecture, Chulalongkorn University , 2012, p. 526-541Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 71.
    Göransdotter, Maria
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Umeå Institute of Design.
    Från moral till modernitet: Hemmet i 1930-talets svenska funktionalism1999In: Nordisk arkitekturforskning, ISSN 1102-5824, Vol. 2, p. 45-54Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 72.
    Göransdotter, Maria
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Umeå Institute of Design.
    Ting, tecken, text: Om semiotik och smakfostran1997In: Kollektive identiteter, ting og betydninger / [ed] Brita Brenna & Karen M. Fjeldstad, Oslo: Senter for teknologi og menneskelige verdier , 1997, p. 49-62Chapter in book (Refereed)
  • 73.
    Göransdotter, Maria
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Umeå Institute of Design.
    Erhardsson, Margareta
    Umeå University.
    Lindh-Karlsson, Monica
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Umeå Institute of Design.
    Fötterna i marken och blicken mot skyn: Strategier för samverkan med näringsliv och samhälle i utbildningar2010Conference paper (Other academic)
  • 74.
    Göransdotter, Maria
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Umeå Institute of Design.
    Redström, Johan
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Umeå Institute of Design.
    Design Methods and Critical Historiography: An Example from Swedish User-Centered Design2018In: Design Issues, ISSN 0747-9360, E-ISSN 1531-4790, Vol. 34, no 2, p. 20-30Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Design history tends to focus on designers and design outcomes, primarily objects. In contrast, historical accounts and analyses of designing are rare. This paper argues for the need of design histories that also address the origins of our design methods with respect to contexts, values and ideas in order to understand what these actually bring to the contemporary design situation. To illustrate what such a historical approach to design methods might bring, we present a study on the origins of Scandinavian user-centered design. In particular, we discuss the Home Research Institute's (HFI) development of methods for investigating and reforming everyday life and domestic work in mid-1940s Sweden.

  • 75.
    Göransdotter, Maria
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Umeå Institute of Design.
    Redström, Johan
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Umeå Institute of Design.
    Kitchen choreographies: Homes, things and modern movements2016Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Thinking of things in relation to users and use, there is always some kind of action involved in the usage of things (or interaction, as contemporary design would have it): an action that happens in time and over time, and that more often than not involves movement.  This paper investigates how time – seen in relation to the physical dwelling, the objects in it and the people living there, using things – have been the basis for proposing new designs for things and homes, literally new practices of “modern movements”, in the homes of 1940s Sweden.

    The home and its’ everyday things and practices has over the years emerged as a research theme  within design history as well as in other disciplines. Relationships between dwelling, architecture and the ideals of modern living manifest in floor plans and city plans have been explored, as have the styles and aesthetics of things and buildings. Relationships between people and everyday things and environments have opened up for research into how things and people reciprocally build both meanings and practices, as well as how design scripts actions and behaviours. Many studies focus on the kitchen: its’ physical design, the objects related to it and – not least – the (mainly women’s’) work and values associated with it. The Frankfurt kitchen in the late 1920s, for example, has become almost a standard example of how ideas of rationality and modernity were brought into the equation of solving problems of low (or non-existent) standards of housing to address issues of economy in planning and building. Such examples also illustrate interests in scripting new behaviour specifically in the kitchen; behaviours that extended also to the home, and on a larger scale to life and society in general within the modern movement.

    In the process of forming the Swedish welfare state, ‘the home’ was central both as a metaphor and as an area of reform and rethinking. In parallel to the planning and building of rational housing to address the appalling housing situation in Sweden, there were similar concerns for planning, education and reform of how homes were actually used and inhabited. A focal point came to be the kitchen, where the movements and actions of women were investigated systematically and scientifically with the threefold aim of improving the building standards, finding the best design of kitchen utensils and equipment, and determining the best ways of working, acting and moving around in the kitchen. In this paper, studies of housework and household objects made by the Hemmens Forskningsinstitut (HFI, ‘The Home Research Institute’) in the late 1940s forms the basis of an analysis of the relationships between things in use and users in action, and how notions of rationality and repetition, optimisation of motions and methods, brought from industrial contexts came to define also what makes sense in a home.

  • 76.
    Hedkvist, Mirjam
    Umeå University, Faculty of Arts, Department of Creative Studies (Teacher Education).
    IKT-pedagogik i slöjden: En studie om informations- och kommunikationsteknik i textilslöjden utifrån ett lärarperspektiv2013Independent thesis Advanced level (professional degree), 20 credits / 30 HE creditsStudent thesis
    Abstract [sv]

    Studiens syfte har varit att, utifrån ett lärarperspektiv, bidra till ökad kunskap om hur IKT används i textilslöjden och hur förutsättningarna för detta ser ut. Avsikten var främst att ta reda på hur lärare använder sig av de resurser som finns på skolorna och i sina klassrum men även vad de skulle önskat att de hade tillgång till. Studien gjordes på några mellan- och högstadieskolor runt om i Sverige och datamaterialet insamlades genom kvalitativa intervjuer med fyra stycken verksamma textillärare. Fokus i intervjuerna var att finna positiva och/eller negativa aspekter med digitala verktyg i textilslöjden, hur lärares undervisning förändras, samt om slöjdens arbetsprocess förändras vid arbete med digitala verktyg. Resultatet visade att de intervjuade lärarna använde sig av IKT olika mycket men har många liknande tankar kring att det är tidssparande, inspirerande och utvecklande för eleverna att arbeta med i olika sammanhang. De är överens om att lärare måste anpassa sin undervisning om de ska arbeta med digitala verktyg och att det behövs tid att lära sig och för att planera. Den viktigaste slutsatsen blev att alla de positiva aspekterna med IKT var didaktiskt relaterade medan de negativa enbart hade med klassrumsmiljön att göra.

  • 77.
    Hedlund, Maja
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Umeå Institute of Design.
    Hur kan personer med hjärtsvikt testa värden i hemmet, för en snabbare behandling och korrigering av medicinering?2013Independent thesis Basic level (degree of Bachelor), 10 credits / 15 HE creditsStudent thesis
    Abstract [en]

    - To be trapped in a roller-coaster That ́s how some of the patients are describing the situa- tion of living with heart failure. To be stuck in their home not knowing if they will have to seek care today and not knowing if they will have the energy to attend that birth- day party later this week.Each year 2-3% of the Swedish population are diagnosed with heart failure, which results in 30,000 new individu- als with the disorder. Cardiovascular disease is rapidly in- creasing in the world and before 2030, people with heart failure will increased by 100%. Our improved living condi- tions and better health have allowed us to grow older and made us more dependent on other types of care, care at home.

    Today the patients are only looking for changes in weight and if they have excessive water in their body. What if we could see changes in values before they develop in to symptoms? We could then use a smaller dosage of medicine and minimize the risk of damaging other organs.During my work I have met with patients, husbands, wives and care givers to gain a better insight and understanding of the different stakeholders problems. The common factor is the insufficient methods for monitoring that are being used today, which aren’t optimal for patients, relatives or care givers.That led me to look at non-invasive testing methods (PPG), which would make it possible to see a trend of a patients health. Photoplethysmography (PPG) is a simple and low-cost optical technique that can be used to detect blood volume changes in the microvascular bed of tissue. PPG is most often employed non-invasively and operates at a red or a near infrared wavelength due to its properties to permeate tissue. By sending out different wavelengths and recorde how much is transmit- ted, scattered and absorb, the sensor can measure levels in the blood.

    When the station is done with the test it will send the result automatically to “Mina vårdkontakter” which will be accessible for both care givers and the patient. The profile will provide the patients with test results and a first contact holding advice for immediate and awaiting care. This will educate the patients and lead to them gaining a better understanding of their current health situation.

  • 78.
    Hedlund, Maja
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Umeå Institute of Design.
    What if we could tailor the knee-prevention for female soccer players on an individual level and guide them to a physique that can support them?2016Independent thesis Advanced level (degree of Master (Two Years)), 20 credits / 30 HE creditsStudent thesis
    Abstract [en]

    It´s important to consider all the risks that the players are exposed to and have a holistic view on the matter. The conclusions from my sponsor and looking through research in the area I came to the conclusion that surface and shoes have minimal consequences and are not an area of interest for me in this project.

  • 79.
    Helgason, Ingi
    et al.
    Edinburgh Napier University, Institute for Informatics & Digital Innovation.
    Rosenbak, Søren
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Umeå Institute of Design.
    Smyth, Michael
    Edinburgh Napier University, Institute for Informatics & Digital Innovation.
    Mitrović, Ivica
    University of Split, Arts Academy, department of Visual Communications Design.
    Discourse, Speculation and Disciplinarity: Designing Urban Futures2015In: Nordes 2015: Design Ecologies challenging anthropocentrism in the design of sustainable futures, Stockholm, 2015Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This paper presents a design case study of a summer school that brought together a multidisciplinary group of early-career professionals to explore ideas relating to new technologies in an urban context. The organisers of the summer school took an explicitly designinformed approach to the event, specifically a ‘critical design’ approach. The aspiration of the organisers was that the school activities would lead to the creation of an exhibition of artefacts and visual media expressing the ideas explored during the school. The expectation of generating exhibition quality outputs influenced the participants’ experience of the event, and this paper describes the process and reflects upon the success of this method. The authors address the question: in what way is it useful to adopt a critical design approach with a multidisciplinary group in a workshop or school setting? It is suggested that envisionment in the form of ‘design fictions’ is key to the success of this approach.

  • 80.
    Helgason, Ingi
    et al.
    Edinburgh Napier University, Centre for Interaction Design.
    Smyth, Michael
    Edinburgh Napier University, Centre for Interaction Design.
    Wouters, Niels
    University of Leuven, Department of Architecture, Research [x] Design.
    Surawska, Olga
    University of the Arts London, Central Saint Martins.
    Skrinjar, Lea
    University of Novi Sad, Faculty of Technical Sciences.
    Jensen, Louise
    IT University of Copenhagen.
    Rosenbak, Søren
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Umeå Institute of Design.
    Streinzer, Andreas
    Vienna University, Department of Anthropology.
    From Urban Space to Future Place: The UrbanIxD Summer School 20132013Report (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    How the UrbanIxD summer school applied critical design & design fiction to future urban technologies. Produced in collaboration with the Book Sprints for ICT Research FP7 project.

  • 81.
    Helms, Karey
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Umeå Institute of Design.
    The Family Circuit: A New Narrative of American Domesticity2014Independent thesis Advanced level (degree of Master (Two Years)), 20 credits / 30 HE creditsStudent thesis
    Abstract [en]

    As the world endures and approaches a string of energy crises, both financially and environmentally, this project aims to critique and challenge society's relationship with energy by provoking individuals to examine their current habits of energy consumption, consider the future implications of these actions, and question their willingness to make sacrifices for a cleaner environment. This is accomplished through the development of a fictional society in the near future in which individuals are required to produce all the electrical energy that they need or desire to consume. Within the daily narrative of a fictional family of five, the details and events of their everyday lives have been extrapolated to create a liminal world where mundane, yet peculiar diegetic prototypes create tense situations, uncomfortable behaviors, and unforeseen consequences. Plot devices manifested include distributed government information in the form of an energy harvesting catalog, product infomercial, energy bill, and a home monitoring brochure. The narrative emphasis and human driven context aspires to foster a new lens of speculation, imagination, and discovery regarding the production and consumption of energy.

    What if you were required to produce all the energy you desire to consume?

  • 82.
    Henriksson, Adam
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Umeå Institute of Design.
    Alternative Search: From efficiency to experience2014Independent thesis Advanced level (degree of Master (Two Years)), 20 credits / 30 HE creditsStudent thesis
    Abstract [en]

    Search engines of today are focusing on efficiently and accurately generating search results.Yet, there is much to be explored in the way people interact with the applications and relate to the content. Individuals are commonly unique, with complex preferences, motives and expectations. Not only is it important to be sensitive to these differences, but to accommodate the extremes. Enhancing a search engine does not only rely on technological development, but to explore potential user experiences in broader perspectives - which not only gratifies the needs for information, but supports a diversity of journeys.

    The aim of the project is to develop an alternate search engine with different functionality based on new values that reflects contemporary needs.

    The result, Exposeek, is an experiential prototype supporting exploratory browsing based on principles of distributed infrastructure, transparent computation and serendipitous information. Suggestive queries, legible algorithms and augmented results provide additional insights and present an alternative way to seek and peruse the Web. 

  • 83.
    Hermans, Guido
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Umeå Institute of Design.
    A Comparison of Mass Customization Toolkits for Consumer Products Produced by Rapid Manufacturing2011In: Bridging Mass Customization & Open Innovation: Proceedings of the MCPC 2011 Conference / [ed] Henry Chesbrough & Frank Piller, Raleigh, NC: Lulu Inc. , 2011, p. 9-Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Several mass customization toolkits for consumer products are compared amongst each other from a design perspective. The customized products are all produced with rapid manufacturing technologies and in all cases the shape of the product is the main variable attribute which can be customized. The aim is to determine criteria that define the generic process of this co-creation approach. Comparison is used as a method since it focuses on understanding the customization tools and the process. The first part of the paper is concerned with the theoretical approach and the comparison of five toolkits. The second part deals more in-depth with the design of solution spaces which focus primarily on customization beyond aesthetics and it also deals with the design of validation tools. The expected outcome is a generic process of co-creation which highlights valuable aspects and can be used for the future development of mass customization toolkits.

  • 84.
    Hermans, Guido
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Umeå Institute of Design.
    A Model for Evaluating Mass Customization Toolkits2012Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Mass customization involves the consumer in the design process by enabling them to customize a design through the use of a toolkit. In this paper, a model is introduced that can be used to evaluate mass customization toolkits. The model is based on target outcome and guidance and analyzes the toolkits by looking at product attributes, mechanisms, freedom in the solution space and guidance in terms of the starting point and provided instructions. The three main findings presented in this paper concern the emphasis of current toolkits on customizing hard product attributes, a focus on ‘lower-level’ product attributes, and the uniqueness of the outcomes that current toolkits produce. 

  • 85.
    Hermans, Guido
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Umeå Institute of Design.
    A Model for Evaluating the Solution Space of Mass Customization Toolkits2012In: International Journal of Industrial Engineering and Management, ISSN 2217-2661, Vol. 3, no 4, p. 205-214Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Mass customization involves consumers in the design process by enabling them to customize a product through the use of a toolkit. The aim of this paper is to develop a profound understanding of constructing a solution space of mass customization toolkits and to examine the autonomy of the user in relation to the solution space. In this study a model is proposed that can be used to evaluate the solution space of mass customization toolkits. The model is based on target outcome and guidance and analyses toolkits by examining product attributes, mechanisms and choice in the solution space and guidance throughout the process of customization. The three main findings presented concern the emphasis of existing toolkits on customizing ‘hard’ product attributes, a strong focus on ‘lower-level’ product attributes, and the lack of uniqueness in the outcomes from current toolkits.

  • 86.
    Hermans, Guido
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Umeå Institute of Design.
    Identifying User-as-Designer Behaviors When Designing By Using Toolkits2013Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Consumer products are becoming more and more open for consumers to design, make or adapt them to their own preferences and needs. An emerging area of product toolkits turns users into designers. In this paper we use the term user-as-designer, shortly user-designer, which refers to a consumer who uses a toolkit to design a product for himself. Designing by using toolkits challenges the role of the professional designer in ways that yet have to be fully explored and understood as well as the role of the passive consumer that gains new freedom and responsibility.

    The aim of this paper is to explore consumers designing an everyday product focusing on the behavior users have in relation to the tool they use. The participants expressed their preferences directly into the creation of an object through the use of a digital toolkit. A group of ten students participated, their designs were produced by 3D printing and they reflected upon their process and design. Three core findings are presented that concern the behavior of users when designing through a toolkit. First, we identified four user-designer characters that describe the exploration of the solution space. Secondly, we revealed the behavior of participants through visualizing the process of customization. The third finding concerns the predictability of outcomes for the designer of the toolkit. The discussion focuses on two levels; first we describe the aspects from this study that are relevant for future toolkit development. Issues like the exploration of the solution space, specific behavior in constrained toolkits, predictability, iteration and the amount of freedom for the user. The second level of the discussion focuses on the implications for consumer involvement in the design process. This study has shown that when consumers are engaged in the design process they need to understand what it means to create rather than being tricked in some part of a process in an isolated manner. 

  • 87.
    Hermans, Guido
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Umeå Institute of Design.
    Investigating Lay Design through Prototyping a Toolkit for Audio Equipment2015In: RTD2015 21st Century Makers and Materialities: Proceedings of the 2nd Biennial Research Through Design Conference, Cambridge, UK, 2015Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Post-industrial design challenges the current way of design and production of consumer products. Leveraging from 3D printing and the potential of layperson involvement in the design process, we investigated how the relation between the professional designer and layperson might change in a democratized design process, where the layperson is an active participant, mediated by toolkit software.

    In this research through design study we examined this relation by prototyping a toolkit for audio equipment based upon three personas and scenarios that we developed. Consequently three audio products have been made and fabricated using 3D printing.

    In the second part of this study we staged a series of discussions with design practitioners around the material that we developed. In these interviews they discussed the role of the layperson and the professional designer, accountability of both, the ways in which this toolkit creates accessibility and adaptability and the aesthetics of the product prototypes. The outcome of this study is, besides the objects and the web- based toolkit and a detailed description and discussion of the changing role of the designer and layperson, an insight that revealed the value of a research through design approach. Namely, in this study the material helped the design practitioners to become self-reflective.

  • 88.
    Hermans, Guido
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Umeå Institute of Design.
    Investigating the unexplored possibilities of digital-physical toolkits in lay design2014In: International Journal of Design, ISSN 1991-3761, E-ISSN 1994-036X, Vol. 8, no 2, p. 15-28Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Digital–physical toolkits enable the layperson to design everyday consumer products. The aim of this paper is to identify and gain understanding of the unexplored possibilities of digital–physical toolkits. Looking at several different types of toolkits that enable novices to create, adapt or customize a design, we analyzed these toolkits and identified several characteristics and mechanisms that they share. We also investigated how people use toolkits through two usage experiments. In the first experiment, we identified several issues that arise when consumers use toolkits. In the second experiment, we developed a vocabulary for the exploration of the design space and we identified specific behaviors that laypersons enact when designing. The results of this paper are introduced through our lay design model, which deals with different types of layperson autonomy as well as with the unexplored possibilities of learning paths and iteration within digital–physical toolkits. If lay design becomes commonplace there will be an increasing need for understanding this practice. The unexplored possibilities discussed in this paper present opportunities for designers, and taking advantage of them will have far-reaching consequences for the whole product development cycle, from the way products are designed and developed to how they are distributed and sold.

  • 89.
    Hermans, Guido
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Umeå Institute of Design.
    Opening Up Design: Engaging the Layperson in the Design of Everyday Products2015Doctoral thesis, monograph (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    This dissertation in industrial design focuses on the gap between the context of design and the context of use. It aims to open up design to the layperson and investigate an active role for the layperson in the design of everyday products. Over the last century, the industrial paradigm has institutionalised and professionalised many practices, including product design. A binary spectrum of production and consumption has been established with distinct roles for the professional designer, who engages in production, and the consumer, who engages in consumption. However, this clear distinction has been blurred recently and the consumer, or layperson, is no longer involved only in consumption, but also in production. In this research I have explored and examined the participation of the layperson, or the non-professional, in design, which I refer to as lay design. It constitutes a shift for the professional designer from knowing what a future user would like to have towards knowing what a layperson would like to design, which is for most designers an unfamiliar way of thinking. I specifically investigated how the layperson can be involved in design through the use of so-called digital-physical toolkits, software applications where one designs in a digital environment and which outputs a physical product.

    Lay design is enabled by two developments: On the one hand, the creation of variable designs is enabled by computational design, and on the other hand, the fabrication of variable products is enabled by 3D printing. The two main questions that I focused on are: How will the roles of the professional designer and the layperson change when the latter engages in the design of personal products and how can designers develop digital-physical toolkits for the layperson to collaboratively create value and meaning?

    The theory that I drew on consists of existing approaches which involve the layperson in design, such as mass customisation, meta-design, and co-design, and I used the theory of technological mediation to analyse and discuss the mediating role of toolkits in lay design. I investigated the research questions through a series of studies, both analytical and experimental. For the experiments I took a constructive design research approach, which means that I engaged in the making of toolkit and product prototypes in order to obtain insights and an understanding of the subject.

    The main contribution of this research is a framework of lay design that consists of a set of principles and guidelines that enables the professional designer to develop digital-physical toolkits that empower the layperson to engage in the design of everyday products. Through the participation of the layperson in the design process, lay design constitutes value created by both the professional and lay designer, thereby eliminating the separation of production and consumption. The framework’s principles outline the basic ideas of lay design while the guidelines support the professional designer in the development of toolkits and their products in practice. Lay design is concerned with the layperson designing personal products and is therefore primarily self-serving. It deals with creating meaningful products by enabling the layperson to personify designs, meaning that the designed product cannot exist without its originator. This research established an understanding of design spaces and toolkits and of the roles the professional designer, layperson, and toolkits play.

    The implications of lay design concern the role of the professional designer, the way value is created, a shared accountability, and also the way designers are educated regarding the tool-sets, skill-sets, mindset, and knowledge.

  • 90.
    Hermans, Guido
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Umeå Institute of Design.
    Wordpress of objects: addressing layman participation in a post- industrial society2013In: Proceedings of the 2013 ACM conference on Pervasive and ubiquitous computing adjunct publication, ACM Press, 2013, p. 945-950Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In this paper a perspective on layman participation in the design of everyday products is presented. The development of digital fabrication technologies such as 3D printing enables an increasing involvement of the layman in appropriating the performance of objects to their own needs and desires. The question is how professional designers as well as laymen deal with openness in product design. An analogy is made with the content management system Wordpress to discuss how could be dealt with openness in a toolkit that addresses multiple skill levels of its users.

  • 91.
    Hermans, Guido
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Umeå Institute of Design.
    Stolterman, Erik
    Indiana University.
    Exploring Parametric Design: Consumer Customization of an Everyday Object2012In: Proceedings of DRS2012 / [ed] Praima Israsena, Juthamas Tangsantikul, David Durling, Bangkok: Chulalongkorn University , 2012, p. 707-717Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Toolkits for mass customization can be seen as a link between a consumer and a solution space and enable the user to customize a design to their own needs and desires. The development and increasing availability of additive manufacturing which enables customization and the growing amount of businesses developing mass customization services will direct industrial designers to rethink their role and their tasks in the design process. Customization through digital fabrication technologies is an emerging field where industrial designers have to be aware of and able to design for. There is an ongoing shift from standardization and mass production towards individualization, markets of one and customization. The aim of this exploratory study is to get a better understanding of toolkits for mass customization in order to develop a method for designing customizable products. The experiment conducted in this study invited participants to customize, use and evaluate a kitchen product. We present five core findings from this experiment. This study has identified several issues that play a role when consumers take on the task of customizing a consumer product. The study has also shown potential future areas when it comes to parametric design.

  • 92.
    Hermans, Guido
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Umeå Institute of Design.
    Valtonen, Anna
    School of Arts, Design and Architecture, Aalto University.
    Investigating the changing relation between consumer and designer in post-industrial design2014In: Proceedings of DRS2014: Design's Big Debates / [ed] Lim, Y.-K., Niedderer, K., Redström, J., Stolterman, E., & Valtonen, A., Umeå: Umeå Institute of Design, Umeå University , 2014, p. 940-950Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This paper focuses on the post-industrial society and the changing object of design. Postindustrial design will be realized through the digitalization of the physical world and the advent of digital fabrication tools such as 3D printing that bridge the gap between digital design and physical goods. In post-industrial design professional designers will be concerned with designing toolkits and incomplete designs rather than fully determined products. The consumer will be adapting the incomplete design to his or her needs and desires in some way or another. This adaptation could be done with minimal involvement as well as by intensive participation. The aim of this paper is to investigate the changing relation between consumer and designer in a post-industrial society by examining the object of design. We exemplify the new object of design by examining several consumer products that possess some property of post-industrial design. Based on our research we propose four ways, or tactics, for designers to deal with heterogeneous consumer needs and preferences, two of which are unique to post-industrial design. We end this paper by briefly discussing the implications to design practice and design education.

  • 93.
    Holmsten, Jenny
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Umeå Institute of Design.
    Future Forests - Vision 2030: Bachelor Thesis Report - Jenny Holmsten2015Independent thesis Basic level (degree of Bachelor), 10 credits / 15 HE creditsStudent thesis
    Abstract [en]

    Forests cover about 30% of the earth surface and is a vital resource as a habitat for plants, animals and humans. Today climate change and global warming is a fact and something must be done. We burn massive amounts of fossil fuels and during this combustion carbon dioxide is created. To help eliminate this global change we need to start caring about the forests. The forests have a major role in climate change and global warming. It currently contributes to about one-sixth of the global carbon emissions.

    But today deforestation is a real environmental threat. The world trees are being cut down too quickly for the earth to regenerate new forests. And while the society is moving into a more bio-based economy the pressure of a efficient forest industry and forest regrowth is increasing drastically. A new way of reforestation must happen, a sustainable and natural method must be im plemented.

    In Sweden and the Scandinavian area the method has had a stagnant development. Is done manually with a standardized procedure not taking natural properties into account. Money often goes over quality.

    My project will focus on developing a concept that can live up to the upcoming future demands and the environmental aspects that needs to be taken in account to ensure a healthy and sustainable forest.

    The final result performs an efficient and precise reforestation and enables for a detailed planning and analysis of the area in advanced.

  • 94.
    Huang, Chung-Ching
    et al.
    Indiana University, Bloomington, USA.
    Stolterman, Erik
    Indiana University, Bloomington, USA.
    Temporal Anchors in User Experience Research2014In: Proceedings of the 2014 conference on Designing interactive systems, Association for Computing Machinery (ACM), 2014, p. 271-274Conference paper (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    As HCI becomes more aware of long-term use experience, users' retrospection might be one starting point to explore prior interactive use. However, due to the limitation of current methodologies and human memory, research participants might recall specific prior use episodes and less their experience over time. In this note, we examine how to encourage retrospection and reflection concerning the changes of use experience in the past and over time. We have reviewed relevant research and traced the usage of temporal references in those studies, such as diagrams of use measurement over time or the history of interactive products. We propose the notion of temporal anchors as way of capturing and grounding temporal aspects of long-term use experience. We have found that methods that include temporal anchors have facilitated opportunities for rich reflections and communications around use experience and temporality.

  • 95.
    Hummels, Caroline
    et al.
    Eindhoven University of Technology.
    Trotto, Ambra
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Umeå School of Architecture. Interactive Institute Swedish ICT.
    Designing in skills studio2014In: Proceedings of the 8th International Conference on Tangible, Embedded and Embodied Interaction (TEI ’14), 2014, p. 357-360Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The Designing in Skills Studio provides a framework and tools to address the theme of collaboration in a design process, applying the theories of embodiment and skilful coping. Each participant will collaborate with the others in order to explore one of his perceptual-motor skills, and find out how this skill shapes his sensitivity and can contribute to a richer shared design process and outcome. The studio aims at creating the stage for reflecting on the impact of embodiment on cooperation, and based on these insights, discussing and initiating the development of new ways of tangible and embodied interaction for multi-stakeholder cooperation in the future.

  • 96.
    Hägg, Adam
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Umeå Institute of Design.
    Lynk&Co Rebyell: The rebellious shared city sport car, shaped for the future urban youth.2017Independent thesis Advanced level (degree of Master (Two Years)), 20 credits / 30 HE creditsStudent thesis
    Abstract [en]

    This thesis concerns the implementation of car sharing technology into a semi autonomous future city sportscar. The vehicle is aimed towards the young rebellious generation who will be living an urban, compact lifestyle. The goal was to create a design language and practical supporting features that would appeal to the target group and express sharing technology.

    The car can change its visual expression depending on the mode or kind of use. The trunk window is a transparent screen displaying information about availability. In order to enter the car, the window scans the user’s iris and recognises if the person is a subscriber of the service. While using the car, the trunk window turns opaque and the front windows turn transparent.

    Methods used during the design process included research, sketching, package study, clay modelling, CAD modelling, final visualisation and a physical model.

  • 97.
    Hägg, Adam
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Umeå Institute of Design.
    Öka effektivitet och säkerhet vid planering av byggnationer2014Independent thesis Basic level (degree of Bachelor), 10 credits / 15 HE creditsStudent thesis
  • 98.
    Höglund, Eric
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Umeå Institute of Design.
    Gaffeltruck för ökad säkerhet, ergonomi och hälsa2014Independent thesis Basic level (degree of Bachelor), 10 credits / 15 HE creditsStudent thesis
    Abstract [en]

    Transportation of cargo is crucial for the functioning of our society. In order to reach end customers road transportation with truck is required.

    Heavy road transportation has increased. More than half of all truck drivers work with customer deliveries. These drivers can have up to 50 stops per day. The goods can weigh more than 1000 kg. The handling is done manually with a pallet truck. The varying context makes the work particularly heavy for the driver.

    Loading and unloading is the most dangerous work a truck driver performs. The arms, back and legs are most vulnerable in this stressful job, according to "Löntagaren" nr 4/2006.

    The goal of the project was to design a new product which can replace the pallet truck in order to improve the safety and ergonomics.

  • 99.
    Ingvaldson, Anton
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Umeå Institute of Design.
    Future Assembly: AURES - The intelligent assisting arm2016Independent thesis Basic level (degree of Bachelor), 10 credits / 15 HE creditsStudent thesis
    Abstract [en]

    The world is constantly changing and workers are forced to adapt to a pace that is more suitable for machines. In the Automotive Industry assembly line workers injuries keeps increasing despite major improvements in recent years. This is due to the cause that the marked demands more goods but to a lower cost. With this in mind, how can we create an aid for assembly line workers that could decrease repetitive strain injuries, facilitate flexibility and reduce the weight load on the workers joints? In this project I have explored the possibility to create new and intelligent aids for the assembly lines with great focus the human body and ergonomics.

  • 100.
    Jaasma, Philémonne
    et al.
    Department of Industrial Design, Eindhoven University of Technology.
    Trotto, Ambra
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Umeå School of Architecture. Interactive Institute Swedish ICT.
    Hummels, Caroline
    Eindhoven University of Technology.
    Irresistible brushes or open stickies?: bodystorming vs. brainstorming2014In: Proceedings of Design Research Society Conference, DRS 2014, 2014Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    What is the effect of skilful coping in multi-stakeholder co-design activities? During a 2 months research-through-design project, we explored the potential and the effect of bodystorm techniques in comparison with more commonly used brainstorm techniques. Would bodystorm techniques have the potential to increase people’s level of engagement or even the quality of the outcome of the co-design process?

    In two separate co-design workshops, we invited residents of the neighbourhood Vaartbroek in Eindhoven, employees from the housing cooperative Woonbedrijf and civil servants from the Municipality of Eindhoven to generate ideas and initiatives for creating a self-empowered community. 

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