umu.sePublications
Change search
Refine search result
12 51 - 70 of 70
CiteExportLink to result list
Permanent link
Cite
Citation style
  • apa
  • ieee
  • modern-language-association-8th-edition
  • vancouver
  • Other style
More styles
Language
  • de-DE
  • en-GB
  • en-US
  • fi-FI
  • nn-NO
  • nn-NB
  • sv-SE
  • Other locale
More languages
Output format
  • html
  • text
  • asciidoc
  • rtf
Rows per page
  • 5
  • 10
  • 20
  • 50
  • 100
  • 250
Sort
  • Standard (Relevance)
  • Author A-Ö
  • Author Ö-A
  • Title A-Ö
  • Title Ö-A
  • Publication type A-Ö
  • Publication type Ö-A
  • Issued (Oldest first)
  • Issued (Newest first)
  • Created (Oldest first)
  • Created (Newest first)
  • Last updated (Oldest first)
  • Last updated (Newest first)
  • Disputation date (earliest first)
  • Disputation date (latest first)
  • Standard (Relevance)
  • Author A-Ö
  • Author Ö-A
  • Title A-Ö
  • Title Ö-A
  • Publication type A-Ö
  • Publication type Ö-A
  • Issued (Oldest first)
  • Issued (Newest first)
  • Created (Oldest first)
  • Created (Newest first)
  • Last updated (Oldest first)
  • Last updated (Newest first)
  • Disputation date (earliest first)
  • Disputation date (latest first)
Select
The maximal number of hits you can export is 250. When you want to export more records please use the Create feeds function.
  • 51.
    Reichstein, Birte
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Department of Ecology and Environmental Sciences.
    Persson, Lennart
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Department of Ecology and Environmental Sciences.
    De Roos, Andre M.
    Univ Amsterdam, Inst Biodivers & Ecosyst Dynam, NL-1090 GE Amsterdam, Netherlands.
    Ontogenetic asymmetry modulates population biomass production and response to harvest2015In: Nature Communications, ISSN 2041-1723, E-ISSN 2041-1723, Vol. 6, article id 6441Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Patterns in biomass production are determined by resource input (productivity) and trophic transfer efficiency. At fixed resource input, variation in consumer biomass production has been related to food quality, metabolic type and diversity among species. In contrast, intraspecific variation in individual body size because of ontogenetic development, which characterizes the overwhelming majority of taxa, has been largely neglected. Here we show experimentally in a long-term multigenerational study that reallocating constant resource input in a two-stage consumer system from an equal resource delivery to juveniles and adults to an adult-biased resource delivery is sufficient to cause more than a doubling of total consumer biomass. We discuss how such changes in consumer stage-specific resource allocation affect the likelihood for alternative stable states in harvested populations as a consequence of stage-specific overcompensation in consumer biomass and thereby the risk of catastrophic collapses in exploited populations.

  • 52. Richmond, Erinn K.
    et al.
    Rosi, Emma J.
    Walters, David M.
    Fick, Jerker
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Department of Chemistry.
    Hamilton, Stephen K.
    Brodin, Tomas
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Department of Ecology and Environmental Sciences. Department of Wildlife Fish, and Environmental Studies, SLU, Umeå 90187, Sweden.
    Sundelin, Anna
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Department of Ecology and Environmental Sciences.
    Grace, Michael R.
    A diverse suite of pharmaceuticals contaminates stream and riparian food webs2018In: Nature Communications, ISSN 2041-1723, E-ISSN 2041-1723, Vol. 9, article id 4491Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    A multitude of biologically active pharmaceuticals contaminate surface waters globally, yet their presence in aquatic food webs remain largely unknown. Here, we show that over 60 pharmaceutical compounds can be detected in aquatic invertebrates and riparian spiders in six streams near Melbourne, Australia. Similar concentrations in aquatic invertebrate larvae and riparian predators suggest direct trophic transfer via emerging adult insects to riparian predators that consume them. As representative vertebrate predators feeding on aquatic invertebrates, platypus and brown trout could consume some drug classes such as antidepressants at as much as one-half of a recommended therapeutic dose for humans based on their estimated prey consumption rates, yet the consequences for fish and wildlife of this chronic exposure are unknown. Overall, this work highlights the potential exposure of aquatic and riparian biota to a diverse array of pharmaceuticals, resulting in exposures to some drugs that are comparable to human dosages.

  • 53.
    Rosvall, Martin
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Department of Physics.
    Esquivel, Alcides V.
    Lancichinetti, Andrea
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Department of Physics.
    West, Jevin D.
    Lambiotte, Renaud
    Memory in network flows and its effects on spreading dynamics and community detection2014In: Nature Communications, ISSN 2041-1723, E-ISSN 2041-1723, Vol. 5, p. 4630-Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Random walks on networks is the standard tool for modelling spreading processes in social and biological systems. This first-order Markov approach is used in conventional community detection, ranking and spreading analysis, although it ignores a potentially important feature of the dynamics: where flow moves to may depend on where it comes from. Here we analyse pathways from different systems, and although we only observe marginal consequences for disease spreading, we show that ignoring the effects of second-order Markov dynamics has important consequences for community detection, ranking and information spreading. For example, capturing dynamics with a second-order Markov model allows us to reveal actual travel patterns in air traffic and to uncover multidisciplinary journals in scientific communication. These findings were achieved only by using more available data and making no additional assumptions, and therefore suggest that accounting for higher-order memory in network flows can help us better understand how real systems are organized and function.

  • 54.
    Sandström, Andreas
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Department of Physics.
    Dam, Henrik F.
    Krebs, Frederik C.
    Edman, Ludvig
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Department of Physics.
    Ambient fabrication of flexible and large-area organic light-emitting devices using slot-die coating2012In: Nature Communications, ISSN 2041-1723, E-ISSN 2041-1723, Vol. 3, p. 1002-Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The grand vision of manufacturing large-area emissive devices with low-cost roll-to-roll coating methods, akin to how newspapers are produced, appeared with the emergence of the organic light-emitting diode about 20 years ago. Today, small organic light-emitting diode displays are commercially available in smartphones, but the promise of a continuous ambient fabrication has unfortunately not materialized yet, as organic light-emitting diodes invariably depend on the use of one or more time-and energy-consuming process steps under vacuum. Here we report an all-solution-based fabrication of an alternative emissive device, a light-emitting electrochemical cell, using a slot-die roll-coating apparatus. The fabricated flexible sheets exhibit bidirectional and uniform light emission, and feature a fault-tolerant >1-mu m-thick active material that is doped in situ during operation. It is notable that the initial preparation of inks, the subsequent coating of the constituent layers and the final device operation all could be executed under ambient air.

  • 55. Sayou, Camille
    et al.
    Nanao, Max H.
    Jamin, Marc
    Pose, David
    Thevenon, Emmanuel
    Gregoire, Laura
    Tichtinsky, Gabrielle
    Denay, Gregoire
    Ott, Felix
    Llobet, Marta Peirats
    Schmid, Markus
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Umeå Plant Science Centre (UPSC). Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Department of Plant Physiology.
    Dumas, Renaud
    Parcy, Francois
    A SAM oligomerization domain shapes the genomic binding landscape of the LEAFY transcription factor2016In: Nature Communications, ISSN 2041-1723, E-ISSN 2041-1723, Vol. 7, article id 11222Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Deciphering the mechanisms directing transcription factors (TFs) to specific genome regions is essential to understand and predict transcriptional regulation. TFs recognize short DNA motifs primarily through their DNA-binding domain. Some TFs also possess an oligomerization domain suspected to potentiate DNA binding but for which the genome-wide influence remains poorly understood. Here we focus on the LEAFY transcription factor, a master regulator of flower development in angiosperms. We have determined the crystal structure of its conserved amino-terminal domain, revealing an unanticipated Sterile Alpha Motif oligomerization domain. We show that this domain is essential to LEAFY floral function. Moreover, combined biochemical and genome-wide assays suggest that oligomerization is required for LEAFY to access regions with low-affinity binding sites or closed chromatin. This finding shows that domains that do not directly contact DNA can nevertheless have a profound impact on the DNA binding landscape of a TF.

  • 56. Scelo, Ghislaine
    et al.
    Purdue, Mark P.
    Brown, Kevin M.
    Johansson, Mattias
    Wang, Zhaoming
    Eckel-Passow, Jeanette E.
    Ye, Yuanqing
    Hofmann, Jonathan N.
    Choi, Jiyeon
    Foll, Matthieu
    Gaborieau, Valerie
    Machiela, Mitchell J.
    Colli, Leandro M.
    Li, Peng
    Sampson, Joshua N.
    Abedi-Ardekani, Behnoush
    Besse, Celine
    Blanche, Helene
    Boland, Anne
    Burdette, Laurie
    Chabrier, Amelie
    Durand, Geoffroy
    Le Calvez-Kelm, Florence
    Prokhortchouk, Egor
    Robinot, Nivonirina
    Skryabin, Konstantin G.
    Wozniak, Magdalena B.
    Yeager, Meredith
    Basta-Jovanovic, Gordana
    Dzamic, Zoran
    Foretova, Lenka
    Holcatova, Ivana
    Janout, Vladimir
    Mates, Dana
    Mukeriya, Anush
    Rascu, Stefan
    Zaridze, David
    Bencko, Vladimir
    Cybulski, Cezary
    Fabianova, Eleonora
    Jinga, Viorel
    Lissowska, Jolanta
    Lubinski, Jan
    Navratilova, Marie
    Rudnai, Peter
    Szeszenia-Dabrowska, Neonila
    Benhamou, Simone
    Cancel-Tassin, Geraldine
    Cussenot, Olivier
    Baglietto, Laura
    Boeing, Heiner
    Khaw, Kay-Tee
    Weiderpass, Elisabete
    Ljungberg, Börje
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Surgical and Perioperative Sciences, Urology and Andrology.
    Sitaram, Raviprakash T.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Surgical and Perioperative Sciences, Urology and Andrology.
    Bruinsma, Fiona
    Jordan, Susan J.
    Severi, Gianluca
    Winship, Ingrid
    Hveem, Kristian
    Vatten, Lars J.
    Fletcher, Tony
    Koppova, Kvetoslava
    Larsson, Susanna C.
    Wolk, Alicja
    Banks, Rosamonde E.
    Selby, Peter J.
    Easton, Douglas F.
    Pharoah, Paul
    Andreotti, Gabriella
    Freeman, Laura E. Beane
    Koutros, Stella
    Albanes, Demetrius
    Mannisto, Satu
    Weinstein, Stephanie
    Clark, Peter E.
    Edwards, Todd L.
    Lipworth, Loren
    Gapstur, Susan M.
    Stevens, Victoria L.
    Carol, Hallie
    Freedman, Matthew L.
    Pomerantz, Mark M.
    Cho, Eunyoung
    Kraft, Peter
    Preston, Mark A.
    Wilson, Kathryn M.
    Gaziano, J. Michael
    Sesso, Howard D.
    Black, Amanda
    Freedman, Neal D.
    Huang, Wen-Yi
    Anema, John G.
    Kahnoski, Richard J.
    Lane, Brian R.
    Noyes, Sabrina L.
    Petillo, David
    Teh, Bin Tean
    Peters, Ulrike
    White, Emily
    Anderson, Garnet L.
    Johnson, Lisa
    Luo, Juhua
    Buring, Julie
    Lee, I-Min
    Chow, Wong-Ho
    Moore, Lee E.
    Wood, Christopher
    Eisen, Timothy
    Henrion, Marc
    Larkin, James
    Barman, Poulami
    Leibovich, Bradley C.
    Choueiri, Toni K.
    Lathrop, G. Mark
    Rothman, Nathaniel
    Deleuze, Jean-Francois
    Mckay, James D.
    Parker, Alexander S.
    Wu, Xifeng
    Houlston, Richard S.
    Brennan, Paul
    Chanock, Stephen J.
    Genome-wide association study identifies multiple risk loci for renal cell carcinoma2017In: Nature Communications, ISSN 2041-1723, E-ISSN 2041-1723, Vol. 8, article id 15724Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Previous genome-wide association studies (GWAS) have identified six risk loci for renal cell carcinoma (RCC). We conducted a meta-analysis of two new scans of 5,198 cases and 7,331 controls together with four existing scans, totalling 10,784 cases and 20,406 controls of European ancestry. Twenty-four loci were tested in an additional 3,182 cases and 6,301 controls. We confirm the six known RCC risk loci and identify seven new loci at 1p32.3 (rs4381241, P = 3.1 x 10(-10)), 3p22.1 (rs67311347, P = 2.5 x 10(-8)), 3q26.2 (rs10936602, P = 8.8 x 10(-9)), 8p21.3 (rs2241261, P = 5.8 x 10(-9)), 10q24.33-q25.1 (rs11813268, P = 3.9 x 10(-8)), 11q22.3 (rs74911261, P = 2.1 x 10(-10)) and 14q24.2 (rs4903064, P = 2.2 x 10(-24)). Expression quantitative trait analyses suggest plausible candidate genes at these regions that may contribute to RCC susceptibility.

  • 57. Schlaepfer, Daniel R.
    et al.
    Bradford, John B.
    Lauenroth, William K.
    Munson, Seth M.
    Tietjen, Britta
    Hall, Sonia A.
    Wilson, Scott D.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Department of Ecology and Environmental Sciences. Department of Biology, University of Regina, Regina, Saskatchewan, Canada.
    Duniway, Michael C.
    Jia, Gensuo
    Pyke, David A.
    Lkhagva, Ariuntsetseg
    Jamiyansharav, Khishigbayar
    Climate change reduces extent of temperate drylands and intensifies drought in deep soils2017In: Nature Communications, ISSN 2041-1723, E-ISSN 2041-1723, Vol. 8, article id 14196Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Drylands cover 40% of the global terrestrial surface and provide important ecosystem services. While drylands as a whole are expected to increase in extent and aridity in coming decades, temperature and precipitation forecasts vary by latitude and geographic region suggesting different trajectories for tropical, subtropical, and temperate drylands. Uncertainty in the future of tropical and subtropical drylands is well constrained, whereas soil moisture and ecological droughts, which drive vegetation productivity and composition, remain poorly understood in temperate drylands. Here we show that, over the twenty first century, temperate drylands may contract by a third, primarily converting to subtropical drylands, and that deep soil layers could be increasingly dry during the growing season. These changes imply major shifts in vegetation and ecosystem service delivery. Our results illustrate the importance of appropriate drought measures and, as a global study that focuses on temperate drylands, highlight a distinct fate for these highly populated areas.

  • 58. Segura, Javier H.
    et al.
    Nilsson, Mats B.
    Haei, Mahsa
    Sparrman, Tobias
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Department of Chemistry.
    Mikkola, Jyri-Pekka
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Department of Chemistry. Industrial Chemistry & Reaction Engineering, Process Chemistry Centre, Åbo.
    Gräsvik, John
    Schleucher, Jürgen
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Biochemistry and Biophysics.
    Öquist, Mats G.
    Microbial mineralization of cellulose in frozen soils2017In: Nature Communications, ISSN 2041-1723, E-ISSN 2041-1723, Vol. 8, no 1, article id 1154Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    High-latitude soils store ~40% of the global soil carbon and experience winters of up to 6 months or more. The winter soil CO2 efflux importantly contributes to the annual CO2 budget. Microorganisms can metabolize short chain carbon compounds in frozen soils. However, soil organic matter (SOM) is dominated by biopolymers, requiring exoenzymatic hydrolysis prior to mineralization. For winter SOM decomposition to have a substantial influence on soil carbon balances it is crucial whether or not biopolymers can be metabolized in frozen soils. We added 13C-labeled cellulose to frozen (−4 °C) mesocosms of boreal forest soil and followed its decomposition. Here we show that cellulose biopolymers are hydrolyzed under frozen conditions sustaining both CO2 production and microbial growth contributing to slow, but persistent, SOM mineralization. Given the long periods with frozen soils at high latitudes these findings are essential for understanding the contribution from winter to the global carbon balance.

  • 59.
    Serikova, Svetlana
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Department of Ecology and Environmental Sciences. Climate Impacts Research Centre (CIRC), Umeå University, Umeå, Sweden.
    Pokrovsky, O. S.
    Laudon, H.
    Krickov, I. , V
    Lim, A. G.
    Manasypov, R. M.
    Karlsson, J.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Department of Ecology and Environmental Sciences.
    High carbon emissions from thermokarst lakes of Western Siberia2019In: Nature Communications, ISSN 2041-1723, E-ISSN 2041-1723, Vol. 10, article id 1552Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The Western Siberia Lowland (WSL), the world's largest permafrost peatland, is of importance for understanding the high-latitude carbon (C) cycle and its response to climate change. Warming temperatures increase permafrost thaw and production of greenhouse gases. Also, permafrost thaw leads to the formation of lakes which are hotspots for atmospheric C emissions. Although lakes occupy similar to 6% of WSL, lake C emissions from WSL remain poorly quantified. Here we show high C emissions from lakes across all permafrost zones of WSL. The C emissions were especially high in shoulder seasons and in colder permafrost-rich regions. The total C emission from permafrost-affected lakes of WSL equals similar to 12 +/- 2.6 Tg C yr(-1) and is 2-times greater than region's C export to the Arctic coast. The results show that C emission from WSL lakes is a significant component in the high-latitude C cycle, but also suggest that C emission may decrease with warming.

  • 60.
    Sharifi, Tiva
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Department of Physics.
    Gracia-Espino, Eduardo
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Department of Physics. Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Department of Chemistry.
    Barzegar, Hamid Reza
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Department of Physics.
    Jia, Xueen
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Department of Physics.
    Nitze, Florian
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Department of Physics.
    Hu, Guangzhi
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Department of Physics.
    Nordblad, Per
    Department of Engineering Sciences, Uppsala University, Box 534, 751 21 Uppsala, Sweden.
    Tai, Cheuk-Wai
    Department of Materials and Environmental Chemistry, Arrhenius Laboratory, Stockholm University, S-106 91 Stockholm, Sweden.
    Wågberg, Thomas
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Department of Physics.
    Formation of nitrogen-doped graphene nanoscrolls by adsorption of magnetic gamma-Fe2O3 nanoparticles2013In: Nature Communications, ISSN 2041-1723, E-ISSN 2041-1723, Vol. 4, p. 2319-Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Graphene nanoscrolls are Archimedean-type spirals formed by rolling single-layer graphene sheets. Their unique structure makes them conceptually interesting and understanding their formation gives important information on the manipulation and characteristics of various carbon nanostructures. Here we report a 100% efficient process to transform nitrogen-doped reduced graphene oxide sheets into homogeneous nanoscrolls by decoration with magnetic gamma-Fe2O3 nanoparticles. Through a large number of control experiments, magnetic characterization of the decorated nanoparticles, and ab initio calculations, we conclude that the rolling is initiated by the strong adsorption of maghemite nanoparticles at nitrogen defects in the graphene lattice and their mutual magnetic interaction. The nanoscroll formation is fully reversible and upon removal of the maghemite nanoparticles, the nanoscrolls return to open sheets. Besides supplying information on the rolling mechanism of graphene nanoscrolls, our results also provide important information on the stabilization of iron oxide nanoparticles.

  • 61.
    Shungin, Dmitry
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Odontology. Broad Institute of MIT and Harvard, Cambridge, MA 02142, USA; .
    Hawort, Simon
    Divaris, Kimon
    Agler, Cary S.
    Kamatani, Yoichiro
    Lee, Myoung Keun
    Grinde, Kelsey
    Hindy, George
    Alaraudanjoki, Viivi
    Pesonen, Paula
    Teumer, Alexander
    Holtfreter, Birte
    Sakaue, Saori
    Hirata, Jun
    Yu, Yau-Hua
    Ridker, Paul M.
    Giulianini, Franco
    Chasman, Daniel, I
    Magnusson, Patrik K. E.
    Sudo, Takeaki
    Okada, Yukinori
    Voelker, Uwe
    Kocher, Thomas
    Anttonen, Vuokko
    Laitala, Marja-Liisa
    Orho-Melander, Marju
    Sofer, Tamar
    Shaffer, John R.
    Vieira, Alexandre
    Marazita, Mary L.
    Kubo, Michiaki
    Furuichi, Yasushi
    North, Kari E.
    Offenbacher, Steve
    Ingelsson, Erik
    Franks, Paul W.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine. Department of Clinical Sciences, Genetic and Molecular Epidemiology Unit, Lund University, Malmö SE-214 28, Sweden; Department of Nutrition, Harvard T. H. Chan School of Public Health, Boston, MA 02115, USA.
    Timpson, Nicholas J.
    Johansson, Ingegerd
    Genome-wide analysis of dental caries and periodontitis combining clinical and self-reported data2019In: Nature Communications, ISSN 2041-1723, E-ISSN 2041-1723, Vol. 10, article id 2773Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Dental caries and periodontitis account for a vast burden of morbidity and healthcare spending, yet their genetic basis remains largely uncharacterized. Here, we identify self-reported dental disease proxies which have similar underlying genetic contributions to clinical disease measures and then combine these in a genome-wide association study meta-analysis, identifying 47 novel and conditionally-independent risk loci for dental caries. We show that the heritability of dental caries is enriched for conserved genomic regions and partially overlapping with a range of complex traits including smoking, education, personality traits and metabolic measures. Using cardio-metabolic traits as an example in Mendelian randomization analysis, we estimate causal relationships and provide evidence suggesting that the processes contributing to dental caries may have undesirable downstream effects on health.

  • 62.
    Tang, Shi
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Department of Physics. LunaLEC AB.
    Sandström, Andreas
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Department of Physics. LunaLEC AB.
    Lundberg, Petter
    Lanz, Thomas
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Department of Physics.
    Larsen, Christian
    LunaLEC AB.
    van Reenen, Stephan
    Kemerink, Martijn
    Edman, Ludvig
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Department of Physics. LunaLEC AB.
    Design rules for light-emitting electrochemical cells delivering bright luminance at 27.5 percent external quantum efficiency2017In: Nature Communications, ISSN 2041-1723, E-ISSN 2041-1723, Vol. 8, article id 1190Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The light-emitting electrochemical cell promises cost-efficient, large-area emissive applications, as its characteristic in-situ doping enables use of air-stabile electrodes and a solution-processed single-layer active material. However, mutual exclusion of high efficiency and high brightness has proven a seemingly fundamental problem. Here we present a generic approach that overcomes this critical issue, and report on devices equipped with air-stabile electrodes and outcoupling structure that deliver a record-high efficiency of 99.2 cd A(-1) at a bright luminance of 1910 cd m(-2). This device significantly outperforms the corresponding optimized organic light-emitting diode despite the latter employing calcium as the cathode. The key to this achievement is the design of the host-guest active material, in which tailored traps suppress exciton diffusion and quenching in the central recombination zone, allowing efficient triplet emission. Simultaneously, the traps do not significantly hamper electron and hole transport, as essentially all traps in the transport regions are filled by doping.

  • 63. Tao, Liang
    et al.
    Peng, Lisheng
    Berntsson, Ronnie P. -A.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Biochemistry and Biophysics. Department of Biochemistry and Biophysics, Stockholm University, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Liu, Sai Man
    Park, SunHyun
    Yu, Feifan
    Boone, Christopher
    Palan, Shilpa
    Beard, Matthew
    Chabrier, Pierre-Etienne
    Stenmark, Pål
    Krupp, Johannes
    Dong, Min
    Engineered botulinum neurotoxin B with improved efficacy for targeting human receptors2017In: Nature Communications, ISSN 2041-1723, E-ISSN 2041-1723, Vol. 8, article id 53Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Botulinum neurotoxin B is a Food and Drug Administration-approved therapeutic toxin. However, it has lower binding affinity toward the human version of its major receptor, synaptotagmin II (h-Syt II), compared to mouse Syt II, because of a residue difference. Increasing the binding affinity to h-Syt II may improve botulinum neurotoxin B's therapeutic efficacy and reduce adverse effects. Here we utilized the bacterial adenylate cyclase two-hybrid method and carried out a saturation mutagenesis screen in the Syt II-binding pocket of botulinum neurotoxin B. The screen identifies E1191 as a key residue: replacing it with M/C/V/Q enhances botulinum neurotoxin B binding to human synaptotagmin II. Adding S1199Y/W or W1178Q as a secondary mutation further increases binding affinity. Mutant botulinum neurotoxin B containing E1191M/S1199Y exhibits similar to 11-fold higher efficacy in blocking neurotransmission than wild-type botulinum neurotoxin B in neurons expressing human synaptotagmin II, demonstrating that enhancing receptor binding increases the overall efficacy at functional levels. The engineered botulinum neurotoxin B provides a platform to develop therapeutic toxins with improved efficacy.

  • 64. Valleix, Sophie
    et al.
    Verona, Guglielmo
    Jourde-Chiche, Noémie
    Nédelec, Brigitte
    Mangione, P. Patrizia
    Bridoux, Frank
    Mangé, Alain
    Dogan, Ahmet
    Goujon, Jean-Michel
    Lhomme, Marie
    Dauteuille, Carolane
    Chabert, Michèle
    Porcari, Riccardo
    Waudby, Christopher A.
    Relini, Annalisa
    Talmud, Philippa J.
    Kovrov, Oleg
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Biosciences.
    Olivecrona, Gunilla
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Biosciences.
    Stoppini, Monica
    Christodoulou, John
    Hawkins, Philip N.
    Grateau, Gilles
    Delpech, Marc
    Kontush, Anatol
    Gillmore, Julian D.
    Kalopissis, Athina D.
    Bellotti, Vittorio
    D25V apolipoprotein C-III variant causes dominant hereditary systemic amyloidosis and confers cardiovascular protective lipoprotein profile2016In: Nature Communications, ISSN 2041-1723, E-ISSN 2041-1723, Vol. 7, article id 10353Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Apolipoprotein C-III deficiency provides cardiovascular protection, but apolipoprotein C-III is not known to be associated with human amyloidosis. Here we report a form of amyloidosis characterized by renal insufficiency caused by a new apolipoprotein C-III variant, D25V. Despite their uremic state, the D25V-carriers exhibit low triglyceride (TG) and apolipoprotein C-III levels, and low very-low-density lipoprotein (VLDL)/high high-density lipoprotein (HDL) profile. Amyloid fibrils comprise the D25V-variant only, showing that wild-type apolipoprotein C-III does not contribute to amyloid deposition in vivo. The mutation profoundly impacts helical structure stability of D25V-variant, which is remarkably fibrillogenic under physiological conditions in vitro producing typical amyloid fibrils in its lipid-free form. D25V apolipoprotein C-III is a new human amyloidogenic protein and the first conferring cardioprotection even in the unfavourable context of renal failure, extending the evidence for an important cardiovascular protective role of apolipoprotein C-III deficiency. Thus, fibrate therapy, which reduces hepatic APOC3 transcription, may delay amyloid deposition in affected patients.

  • 65. van Teeseling, Muriel C. F.
    et al.
    Mesman, Rob J.
    Kuru, Erkin
    Espaillat, Akbar
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Molecular Biology (Faculty of Medicine). Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Molecular Infection Medicine Sweden (MIMS).
    Cava, Felipe
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Molecular Biology (Faculty of Medicine). Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Molecular Infection Medicine Sweden (MIMS).
    Brun, Yves V.
    VanNieuwenhze, Michael S.
    Kartal, Boran
    van Niftrik, Laura
    Anammox Planctomycetes have a peptidoglycan cell wall2015In: Nature Communications, ISSN 2041-1723, E-ISSN 2041-1723, Vol. 6, article id 6878Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Planctomycetes are intriguing microorganisms that apparently lack peptidoglycan, a structure that controls the shape and integrity of almost all bacterial cells. Therefore, the planctomycetal cell envelope is considered exceptional and their cell plan uniquely compartmentalized. Anaerobic ammonium-oxidizing (anammox) Planctomycetes play a key role in the global nitrogen cycle by releasing fixed nitrogen back to the atmosphere as N-2. Here using a complementary array of state-of-the-art techniques including continuous culturing, cryo-transmission electron microscopy, peptidoglycan-specific probes and muropeptide analysis, we show that the anammox bacterium Kuenenia stuttgartiensis contains peptidoglycan. On the basis of the thickness, composition and location of peptidoglycan in K. stuttgartiensis, we propose to redefine Planctomycetes as Gram-negative bacteria. Our results demonstrate that Planctomycetes are not an exception to the universal presence of peptidoglycan in bacteria.

  • 66. Wessel, Jennifer
    et al.
    Chu, Audrey Y.
    Willems, Sara M.
    Wang, Shuai
    Yaghootkar, Hanieh
    Brody, Jennifer A.
    Dauriz, Marco
    Hivert, Marie-France
    Raghavan, Sridharan
    Lipovich, Leonard
    Hidalgo, Bertha
    Fox, Keolu
    Huffman, Jennifer E.
    An, Ping
    Lu, Yingchang
    Rasmussen-Torvik, Laura J.
    Grarup, Niels
    Ehm, Margaret G.
    Li, Li
    Baldridge, Abigail S.
    Stancakova, Alena
    Abrol, Ravinder
    Besse, Celine
    Boland, Anne
    Bork-Jensen, Jette
    Fornage, Myriam
    Freitag, Daniel F.
    Garcia, Melissa E.
    Guo, Xiuqing
    Hara, Kazuo
    Isaacs, Aaron
    Jakobsdottir, Johanna
    Lange, Leslie A.
    Layton, Jill C.
    Li, Man
    Zhao, Jing Hua
    Meidtner, Karina
    Morrison, Alanna C.
    Nalls, Mike A.
    Peters, Marjolein J.
    Sabater-Lleal, Maria
    Schurmann, Claudia
    Silveira, Angela
    Smith, Albert V.
    Southam, Lorraine
    Stoiber, Marcus H.
    Strawbridge, Rona J.
    Taylor, Kent D.
    Varga, Tibor V.
    Allin, Kristine H.
    Amin, Najaf
    Aponte, Jennifer L.
    Aung, Tin
    Barbieri, Caterina
    Bihlmeyer, Nathan A.
    Boehnke, Michael
    Bombieri, Cristina
    Bowden, Donald W.
    Burns, Sean M.
    Chen, Yuning
    Chen, Yii-Deri
    Cheng, Ching-Yu
    Correa, Adolfo
    Czajkowski, Jacek
    Dehghan, Abbas
    Ehret, Georg B.
    Eiriksdottir, Gudny
    Andersson Escher, Stefan
    Farmaki, Aliki-Eleni
    Franberg, Mattias
    Gambaro, Giovanni
    Giulianini, Franco
    Goddard, William A., III
    Goel, Anuj
    Gottesman, Omri
    Grove, Megan L.
    Gustafsson, Stefan
    Hai, Yang
    Hallmans, Goeran
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine, Nutritional Research. Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Biobank Research.
    Heo, Jiyoung
    Hoffmann, Per
    Ikram, Mohammad K.
    Jensen, Richard A.
    Jorgensen, Marit E.
    Jorgensen, Torben
    Karaleftheri, Maria
    Khor, Chiea C.
    Kirkpatrick, Andrea
    Kraja, Aldi T.
    Kuusisto, Johanna
    Lange, Ethan M.
    Lee, I. T.
    Lee, Wen-Jane
    Leong, Aaron
    Liao, Jiemin
    Liu, Chunyu
    Liu, Yongmei
    Lindgren, Cecilia M.
    Linneberg, Allan
    Malerba, Giovanni
    Mamakou, Vasiliki
    Marouli, Eirini
    Maruthur, Nisa M.
    Matchan, Angela
    McKean-Cowdin, Roberta
    McLeod, Olga
    Metcalf, Ginger A.
    Mohlke, Karen L.
    Muzny, Donna M.
    Ntalla, Ioanna
    Palmer, Nicholette D.
    Pasko, Dorota
    Peter, Andreas
    Rayner, Nigel W.
    Renstroem, Frida
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Biobank Research.
    Rice, Ken
    Sala, Cinzia F.
    Sennblad, Bengt
    Serafetinidis, Ioannis
    Smith, Jennifer A.
    Soranzo, Nicole
    Speliotes, Elizabeth K.
    Stahl, Eli A.
    Stirrups, Kathleen
    Tentolouris, Nikos
    Thanopoulou, Anastasia
    Torres, Mina
    Traglia, Michela
    Tsafantakis, Emmanouil
    Javad, Sundas
    Yanek, Lisa R.
    Zengini, Eleni
    Becker, Diane M.
    Bis, Joshua C.
    Brown, James B.
    Cupples, L. Adrienne
    Hansen, Torben
    Ingelsson, Erik
    Karter, Andrew J.
    Lorenzo, Carlos
    Mathias, Rasika A.
    Norris, Jill M.
    Peloso, Gina M.
    Sheu, Wayne H. -H.
    Toniolo, Daniela
    Vaidya, Dhananjay
    Varma, Rohit
    Wagenknecht, Lynne E.
    Boeing, Heiner
    Bottinger, Erwin P.
    Dedoussis, George
    Deloukas, Panos
    Ferrannini, Ele
    Franco, Oscar H.
    Franks, Paul W.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine, Medicine.
    Gibbs, Richard A.
    Gudnason, Vilmundur
    Hamsten, Anders
    Harris, Tamara B.
    Hattersley, Andrew T.
    Hayward, Caroline
    Hofman, Albert
    Jansson, Jan-Håkan
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine, Medicine.
    Langenberg, Claudia
    Launer, Lenore J.
    Levy, Daniel
    Oostra, Ben A.
    O'Donnell, Christopher J.
    O'Rahilly, Stephen
    Padmanabhan, Sandosh
    Pankow, James S.
    Polasek, Ozren
    Province, Michael A.
    Rich, Stephen S.
    Ridker, Paul M.
    Rudan, Igor
    Schulze, Matthias B.
    Smith, Blair H.
    Uitterlinden, Andre G.
    Walker, Mark
    Watkins, Hugh
    Wong, Tien Y.
    Zeggini, Eleftheria
    Laakso, Markku
    Borecki, Ingrid B.
    Chasman, Daniel I.
    Pedersen, Oluf
    Psaty, Bruce M.
    Tai, E. Shyong
    van Duijn, Cornelia M.
    Wareham, Nicholas J.
    Waterworth, Dawn M.
    Boerwinkle, Eric
    Kao, W. H. Linda
    Florez, Jose C.
    Loos, Ruth J. F.
    Wilson, James G.
    Frayling, Timothy M.
    Siscovick, David S.
    Dupuis, Josee
    Rotter, Jerome I.
    Meigs, James B.
    Scott, Robert A.
    Goodarzi, Mark O.
    Sharp, Stephen J.
    Forouhi, Nita G.
    Kerrison, Nicola D.
    Lucarelli, Debora M. E.
    Sims, Matt
    Barroso, Ines
    McCarthy, Mark I.
    Arriola, Larraitz
    Balkau, Beverley
    Barricarte, Aurelio
    Gonzalez, Carlos
    Grioni, Sara
    Kaaks, Rudolf
    Key, Timothy J.
    Navarro, Carmen
    Nilsson, Peter M.
    Overvad, Kim
    Palli, Domenico
    Panico, Salvatore
    Quiros, J. Ramon
    Rolandsson, Olov
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Biobank Research.
    Sacerdote, Carlotta
    Sanchez, Maria-Jose
    Slimani, Nadia
    Tjonneland, Anne
    Tumino, Rosario
    van der A, Daphne L.
    van der Schouw, Yvonne T.
    Riboli, Elio
    Low-frequency and rare exome chip variants associate with fasting glucose and type 2 diabetes susceptibility2015In: Nature Communications, ISSN 2041-1723, E-ISSN 2041-1723, Vol. 6, article id 5897Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Fasting glucose and insulin are intermediate traits for type 2 diabetes. Here we explore the role of coding variation on these traits by analysis of variants on the HumanExome BeadChip in 60,564 non-diabetic individuals and in 16,491 T2D cases and 81,877 controls. We identify a novel association of a low-frequency nonsynonymous SNV in GLP1R (A316T; rs10305492; MAF = 1.4%) with lower FG (beta = -0.09 +/- 0.01 mmol l(-1), P = 3.4 x 10(-12)), T2D risk (OR[95% CI] = 0.86[0.76-0.96], P = 0.010), early insulin secretion (beta = -0.07 +/- 0.035 pmol(insulin) mmol(glucose)(-1), P = 0.048), but higher 2-h glucose (beta = 0.16 +/- 0.05 mmol l(-1), P = 4.3 x 10(-4)). We identify a gene-based association with FG at G6PC2 (p(SKAT) = 6.8 x 10(-6)) driven by four rare protein-coding SNVs (H177Y, Y207S, R283X and S324P). We identify rs651007 (MAF = 20%) in the first intron of ABO at the putative promoter of an antisense lncRNA, associating with higher FG (beta = 0.02 +/- 0.004 mmol l(-1), P = 1.3 x 10(-8)). Our approach identifies novel coding variant associations and extends the allelic spectrum of variation underlying diabetes-related quantitative traits and T2D susceptibility.

  • 67. Willems, Sara M.
    et al.
    Wright, Daniel J.
    Day, Felix R.
    Trajanoska, Katerina
    Joshi, Peter K.
    Morris, John A.
    Matteini, Amy M.
    Garton, Fleur C.
    Grarup, Niels
    Oskolkov, Nikolay
    Thalamuthu, Anbupalam
    Mangino, Massimo
    Liu, Jun
    Demirkan, Ayse
    Lek, Monkol
    Xu, Liwen
    Wang, Guan
    Oldmeadow, Christopher
    Gaulton, Kyle J.
    Lotta, Luca A.
    Miyamoto-Mikami, Eri
    Rivas, Manuel A.
    White, Tom
    Loh, Po-Ru
    Aadahl, Mette
    Amin, Najaf
    Attia, John R.
    Austin, Krista
    Benyamin, Beben
    Brage, Soren
    Cheng, Yu-Ching
    Cieszczyk, Pawel
    Derave, Wim
    Eriksson, Karl-Fredrik
    Eynon, Nir
    Linneberg, Allan
    Lucia, Alejandro
    Massidda, Myosotis
    Mitchell, Braxton D.
    Miyachi, Motohiko
    Murakami, Haruka
    Padmanabhan, Sandosh
    Pandey, Ashutosh
    Papadimitriou, Loannis
    Rajpal, Deepak K.
    Sale, Craig
    Schnurr, Theresia M.
    Sessa, Francesco
    Shrine, Nick
    Tobin, Martin D.
    Varley, Ian
    Wain, Louise V.
    Wray, Naomi R.
    Lindgren, Cecilia M.
    MacArthur, Daniel G.
    Waterworth, Dawn M.
    McCarthy, Mark I.
    Pedersen, Oluf
    Khaw, Kay-Tee
    Kie, Douglas P.
    Pitsiladis, Yannis
    Fuku, Noriyuki
    Franks, Paul W.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine, Medicine. Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Biobank Research. Genetic and Molecular Epidemiology Unit, Department of Clinical Sciences, Lund University, Skånes University Hospital, 222 41 Lund, Sweden.
    North, Kathryn N.
    van Duijn, Cornelia M.
    Mather, Karen A.
    Hansen, Torben
    Hansson, Ola
    Spector, Tim
    Murabito, Joanne M.
    Richards, J. Brent
    Rivadeneira, Fernando
    Langenberg, Claudia
    Perry, John R. B.
    Wareham, Nick J.
    Scott, Robert A.
    Large-scale GWAS identifies multiple loci for hand grip strength providing biological insights into muscular fitness2017In: Nature Communications, ISSN 2041-1723, E-ISSN 2041-1723, Vol. 8, article id 16015Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Hand grip strength is a widely used proxy of muscular fitness, a marker of frailty, and predictor of a range of morbidities and all-cause mortality. To investigate the genetic determinants of variation in grip strength, we perform a large-scale genetic discovery analysis in a combined sample of 195,180 individuals and identify 16 loci associated with grip strength (P<5 x 10(-8)) in combined analyses. A number of these loci contain genes implicated in structure and function of skeletal muscle fibres (ACTG1), neuronal maintenance and signal transduction (PEX14, TGFA, SYT1), or monogenic syndromes with involvement of psychomotor impairment (PEX14, LRPPRC and KANSL1). Mendelian randomization analyses are consistent with a causal effect of higher genetically predicted grip strength on lower fracture risk. In conclusion, our findings provide new biological insight into the mechanistic underpinnings of grip strength and the causal role of muscular strength in age-related morbidities and mortality.

  • 68. Xing, Xuanxuan
    et al.
    Kane, Daniel P.
    Bulock, Chelsea R.
    Moore, Elizabeth A.
    Sharma, Sushma
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Biochemistry and Biophysics.
    Chabes, Andrei
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Biochemistry and Biophysics. Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Molecular Infection Medicine Sweden (MIMS).
    Shcherbakova, Polina V.
    A recurrent cancer-associated substitution in DNA polymerase ε produces a hyperactive enzyme2019In: Nature Communications, ISSN 2041-1723, E-ISSN 2041-1723, Vol. 10, article id 374Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Alterations in the exonuclease domain of DNA polymerase ε (Polε) cause ultramutated tumors. Severe mutator effects of the most common variant, Polε-P286R, modeled in yeast suggested that its pathogenicity involves yet unknown mechanisms beyond simple proofreading deficiency. We show that, despite producing a catastrophic amount of replication errors in vivo, the yeast Polε-P286R analog retains partial exonuclease activity and is more accurate than exonuclease-dead Polε. The major consequence of the arginine substitution is a dramatically increased DNA polymerase activity. This is manifested as a superior ability to copy synthetic and natural templates, extend mismatched primer termini, and bypass secondary DNA structures. We discuss a model wherein the cancer-associated substitution limits access of the 3'-terminus to the exonuclease site and promotes binding at the polymerase site, thus stimulating polymerization. We propose that the ultramutator effect results from increased polymerase activity amplifying the contribution of Polε errors to the genomic mutation rate.

  • 69. You, Yuan
    et al.
    Sawikowska, Aneta
    Neumann, Manuela
    Pose, David
    Capovilla, Giovanna
    Langenecker, Tobias
    Neher, Richard A.
    Krajewski, Pawel
    Schmid, Markus
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Umeå Plant Science Centre (UPSC). Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Department of Plant Physiology. Department of Molecular Biology, Max Planck Institute for Developmental Biology, Spemannstrasse 35, 72076 Tübingen, Germany.
    Temporal dynamics of gene expression and histone marks at the Arabidopsis shoot meristem during flowering2017In: Nature Communications, ISSN 2041-1723, E-ISSN 2041-1723, Vol. 8, article id 15120Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Plants can produce organs throughout their entire life from pluripotent stem cells located at their growing tip, the shoot apical meristem (SAM). At the time of flowering, the SAM of Arabidopsis thaliana switches fate and starts producing flowers instead of leaves. Correct timing of flowering in part determines reproductive success, and is therefore under environmental and endogenous control. How epigenetic regulation contributes to the floral transition has eluded analysis so far, mostly because of the poor accessibility of the SAM. Here we report the temporal dynamics of the chromatin modifications H3K4me3 and H3K27me3 and their correlation with transcriptional changes at the SAM in response to photoperiod-induced flowering. Emphasizing the importance of tissue-specific epigenomic analyses we detect enrichments of chromatin states in the SAM that were not apparent in whole seedlings. Furthermore, our results suggest that regulation of translation might be involved in adjusting meristem function during the induction of flowering.

  • 70. Zhang, Sicai
    et al.
    Berntsson, Ronnie P. A.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Biochemistry and Biophysics. Stockholm Univ, Dept Biochem & Biophys, SE-10691 Stockholm, Sweden.
    Tepp, William H.
    Tao, Liang
    Johnson, Eric A.
    Stenmark, Pal
    Dong, Min
    Structural basis for the unique ganglioside and cell membrane recognition mechanism of botulinum neurotoxin DC2017In: Nature Communications, ISSN 2041-1723, E-ISSN 2041-1723, Vol. 8, article id 1637Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Botulinum neurotoxins (BoNTs), the most potent toxins known, are potential bioterrorism agents. It is well established that all seven serotypes of BoNTs (BoNT/A-G) require complex gangliosides as co-receptors. Here, we report that BoNT/DC, a presumed mosaic toxin between BoNT/D and BoNT/C1, binds and enters efficiently into neurons lacking complex gangliosides and shows no reduction in toxicity in mice deficient in complex gangliosides. The co-crystal structure of BoNT/DC with sialyl-Thomsen-Friedenreich antigen (Sialyl-T) suggests that BoNT/DC recognizes only the sialic acid, but not other moieties in gangliosides. Using liposome flotation assays, we demonstrate that an extended loop in BoNT/DC directly interacts with lipid membranes, and the co-occurring sialic acid binding and loop-membrane interactions mediate the recognition of gangliosides in membranes by BoNT/DC. These findings reveal a unique mechanism for cell membrane recognition and demonstrate that BoNT/DC can use a broad range of sialic acid-containing moieties as co-receptors.

12 51 - 70 of 70
CiteExportLink to result list
Permanent link
Cite
Citation style
  • apa
  • ieee
  • modern-language-association-8th-edition
  • vancouver
  • Other style
More styles
Language
  • de-DE
  • en-GB
  • en-US
  • fi-FI
  • nn-NO
  • nn-NB
  • sv-SE
  • Other locale
More languages
Output format
  • html
  • text
  • asciidoc
  • rtf