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  • 51.
    Eimermann, Marco
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Geography and Economic History, Economic and social geography. Umeå University, Arctic Research Centre at Umeå University.
    Kordel, Stefan
    Friedrich-Alexander University Erlangen-Nuremberg, Germany.
    International lifestyle migrant entrepreneurs in two New Immigration Destinations: Understanding their evolving mix of embeddedness2018In: Journal of Rural Studies, ISSN 0743-0167, E-ISSN 1873-1392, Vol. 64, p. 241-252Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This article focuses on consumption and production in lifestyle migration to New Immigration Destinations (NIDs). The aim is to understand how and why lifestyle migrants' structural and individual peculiarities affect socio-economic changes in NIDs. Data are drawn from biographical interviews with lifestyle migrants in rural Slovenia and Sweden, adding issues of production to the otherwise prevailing focus on consumption in lifestyle migration studies. We ask how the ongoing quest for a better life and the lifestyle migrants' embedding processes in various contexts affect each other. Studying lifestyle migrants’ strives for better lives implies both an implicit and an explicit focus on temporality, which can result in a complex mix of embeddedness. Although our participants desire social relations with local populations, they establish them to only a limited degree, deploying multiple local and social networks in various locations for business purposes. As such, this article contributes to discussions on the incorporation of novel populations in NIDs and how to evaluate their contributions to local rural development.

  • 52.
    Eimermann, Marco
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Geography and Economic History, Economic and social geography. Umeå University, Arctic Research Centre at Umeå University.
    Tillberg Mattsson, Karin
    Centre for Research and Development,Uppsala University/Region Gävleborg, Gävle,Sweden.
    Carson, Doris A.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Geography and Economic History. Umeå University, Arctic Research Centre at Umeå University.
    International tourism entrepreneurs in Swedish peripheries: compliance and collision with public tourism strategies2019In: Regional Science Policy & Practice, E-ISSN 1757-7802, Vol. 11, no 3, p. 479-492Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This paper examines the entrepreneurial strategies and development aspirations of immigrant tourism entrepreneurs in rural Sweden, and how they support or conflict with local and regional public sector tourism strategies. Our conceptual framework contrasts the immigrant entrepreneurs' business and lifestyle priorities with public sector responsibilities and development interests. Findings from three case studies suggest that immigrants both collaborate and compete with public sector stakeholders in different tourism destination systems. We identify mismatches in terms of economic, lifestyle and public interest goals, as well as institutional and cultural differences between immigrant entrepreneurs and public sector stakeholders that hinder effective public‐private collaboration.

  • 53.
    Eklund, Niklas
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Political Science.
    van der Watt, Lize-Marié
    Umeå University, Arctic Research Centre at Umeå University.
    Refracting (geo)political choices in the Arctic2017In: The Polar Journal, ISSN 2154-896X, E-ISSN 2154-8978, Vol. 7, no 1, p. 86-103Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Geopolitics as a field was originally intended as a theoretical modelling of the relationship between fixed geographical circumstances and political choice. Now, the field is largely dominated by critical studies. It is almost considered axiomatic to include geopolitics as a theme in descriptive and analytical studies of the Arctic in global, regional, national and local contexts. This essay aims to review the core tenets of geopolitical thought and trace the categories and distinctions between the classical and critical approaches as applied in Arctic scholarship. It draws on highlights from the Arctic policy texts of three states demonstrating how assumptions and political options in terms of Arctic geographies can be expressed in different geopolitical frameworks. It is argued that revisiting and reviewing the core categories of geopolitics and their application in Arctic affairs can contribute to a better-informed understanding of how developments in the Arctic may unfold, as well as provide insights into the different functionalities of geopolitics.

  • 54. Engeset, D.
    et al.
    Skeie, G.
    Olsen, A.
    Nilsson, Lena Maria
    Umeå University, Arctic Research Centre at Umeå University. Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine, Nutritional Research.
    Dietary patterns and whole grain in Scandinavia. The HELGA project2013In: Annals of Nutrition and Metabolism, ISSN 0250-6807, E-ISSN 1421-9697, Vol. 63, no Supplement 1, p. 341-341Article in journal (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Background and objectives: In the recent years a trendwithin nutrition epidemiology has been to assess overall dietaryquality, often by identifying dietary patterns. The HELGAstudy population is based on samples of existing cohorts fromthe three Scandinavian countries. All three cohorts are part ofthe EPIC study. The aim of this study is to find a typical wholegrain pattern in Scandinavia and see if the pattern is similar inthe three countries.Methods: The associations among the variables were investigatedby factor analysis.Results: Both Norway and Sweden had two breakfast patternsand one dinner pattern. Both the countries had a healthybreakfast pattern including food items commonly consideredhealthy, such as fruit, yoghurt and breakfast cereals. However,coarse bread was the main item in a more traditional pattern for Norway, while it was a part of the healthy pattern inSweden. The second breakfast pattern in Sweden included unhealthyitems like white bread, cakes, sweets, soft drinks andalcohol. The dinner pattern was almost equal in Sweden andNorway. Denmark differed from the other Scandinavian countriesconcerning dietary patterns. Only one breakfast patternwas found. This pattern had some similarities with the traditionalNorwegian pattern, but scored high on all whole grainitems while in Norway only wheat had a high score. Two dinnerpatterns are seen for Denmark, the healthier one includesfruit and vegetables, fish and poultry, the second includes meatand meat products, ice cream and alcohol.Conclusions: When comparing dietary patterns from thethree Scandinavian countries, we find both differences andsimilarities. The main whole grain item used in Norway andSweden seems to be wheat, while rye is more dominant in Denmark.

  • 55.
    Evengård, Birgitta
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Clinical Microbiology, Infectious Diseases. Umeå University, Arctic Research Centre at Umeå University.
    Nilsson, Lena Maria
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine, Nutritional Research. Umeå University, Arctic Research Centre at Umeå University.
    Destouni, Gia
    Stockholms universitet.
    Säker tillgång till mat och vatten prioriterad fråga för Arktis2013In: Läkartidningen, ISSN 0023-7205, E-ISSN 1652-7518, Vol. 110, no 05, p. CCF7-Article in journal (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
    Abstract [sv]

    Arktis befinner sig i förändring. Dessa förändringar beror på mänskliga aktiviteter i regionen och på den globala klimatförändringen, som märks först och mest i norr till exempel där den sibiriska tundran övergår i gräsbevuxen terräng. Djur och människor som bor i den här delen av världen är redan påverkade av förändringarna och kommer att förbli så under lång tid framöver. Ursprungsbefolkningar runt om i Arktis samlar sig i protester, nu senast i Kanada. De många ursprungsbefolkningarna i Arktis lever ofta nära naturen och är därför mer sårbara än andra, men även samhällen med god infrastruktur påverkas av miljöförändringar. I Sverige märkte vi nyligen detta, när närmare 100 000 personer i Östersund och Skellefteå med omgivningar vintern 2010–2011 fick koka sitt vatten under månader på grund av att en parasit (Cryptosporidium) kom in i vattnet. Olika slags system behöver kontrolleras regelbundet, så att säkra datatolkningar kan ges till beslutsfattare, för att vidta åtgärder i tid för ökad säkerhet.

  • 56.
    Gavazov, Konstantin
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Department of Ecology and Environmental Sciences. Umeå University, Arctic Research Centre at Umeå University.
    Ingrisch, Johannes
    Hasibeder, Roland
    Mills, Robert T E
    Buttler, Alexandre
    Gleixner, Gerd
    Pumpanen, Jukka
    Bahn, Michael
    Winter ecology of a subalpine grassland: Effects of snow removal on soil respiration, microbial structure and function2017In: Science of the Total Environment, ISSN 0048-9697, E-ISSN 1879-1026, Vol. 590-591, p. 316-324Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Seasonal snow cover provides essential insulation for mountain ecosystems, but expected changes in precipitation patterns and snow cover duration due to global warming can influence the activity of soil microbial communities. In turn, these changes have the potential to create new dynamics of soil organic matter cycling. To assess the effects of experimental snow removal and advanced spring conditions on soil carbon (C) and nitrogen (N) dynamics, and on the biomass and structure of soil microbial communities, we performed an in situ study in a subalpine grassland in the Austrian Alps, in conjunction with soil incubations under controlled conditions. We found substantial winter C-mineralisation and high accumulation of inorganic and organic N in the topsoil, peaking at snowmelt. Soil microbial biomass doubled under the snow, paralleled by a fivefold increase in its C:N ratio, but no apparent change in its bacteria-dominated community structure. Snow removal led to a series of mild freeze-thaw cycles, which had minor effects on in situ soil CO2 production and N mineralisation. Incubated soil under advanced spring conditions, however, revealed an impaired microbial metabolism shortly after snow removal, characterised by a limited capacity for C-mineralisation of both fresh plant-derived substrates and existing soil organic matter (SOM), leading to reduced priming effects. This effect was transient and the observed recovery in microbial respiration and SOM priming towards the end of the winter season indicated microbial resilience to short-lived freeze-thaw disturbance under field conditions. Bacteria showed a higher potential for uptake of plant-derived C substrates during this recovery phase. The observed temporary loss in microbial C-mineralisation capacity and the promotion of bacteria over fungi can likely impede winter SOM cycling in mountain grasslands under recurrent winter climate change events, with plausible implications for soil nutrient availability and plant-soil interactions.

  • 57. Gepharta, Jessica A.
    et al.
    Deutsch, Lisa
    Pacea, Michael L.
    Troell, Max
    Seekell, David
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Department of Ecology and Environmental Sciences. Umeå University, Arctic Research Centre at Umeå University.
    Shocks to fish production: Identification, trends, and consequences2017In: Global Environmental Change, ISSN 0959-3780, E-ISSN 1872-9495, Vol. 42, p. 24-32Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Sudden disruptions, or shocks, to food production can adversely impact access to and trade of food commodities. Seafood is the most traded food commodity and is globally important to human nutrition. The seafood production and trade system is exposed to a variety of disruptions including fishery collapses, natural disasters, oil spills, policy changes, and aquaculture disease outbreaks, aquafeed resource access and price spikes. The patterns and trends of these shocks to fisheries and aquaculture are poorly characterized and this limits the ability to generalize or predict responses to political, economic, and environmental changes. We applied a statistical shock detection approach to historic fisheries and aquaculture data to identify shocks over the period 1976–2011. A complementary case study approach was used to identify possible key social and political dynamics related to these shocks. The lack of a trend in the frequency or magnitude of the identified shocks and the range of identified causes suggest shocks are a common feature of these systems which occur due to a variety, and often multiple and simultaneous, causes. Shocks occurred most frequently in the Caribbean and Central America, the Middle East and North Africa, and South America, while the largest magnitude shocks occurred in Asia, Europe, and Africa. Shocks also occurred more frequently in aquaculture systems than in capture systems, particularly in recent years. In response to shocks, countries tend to increase imports and experience decreases in supply. The specific combination of changes in trade and supply are context specific, which is highlighted through four case studies. Historical examples of shocks considered in this study can inform policy for responding to shocks and identify potential risks and opportunities to build resilience in the global food system.

  • 58.
    Goicolea, Isabel
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine, Epidemiology and Global Health.
    Carson, Dean
    Umeå University, Arctic Research Centre at Umeå University. Demography and Growth Planning, Northern Institute, Charles Darwin University, Darwin, Australia; Centre for Rural Medicine, Storuman, Sweden.
    San Sebastian, Miguel
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine, Epidemiology and Global Health.
    Christianson, Monica
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Nursing.
    Wiklund, Maria
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Community Medicine and Rehabilitation, Physiotherapy.
    Hurtig, Anna-Karin
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine, Epidemiology and Global Health.
    Health care access for rural youth on equal terms?: A mixed methods study protocol in northern Sweden2018In: International Journal for Equity in Health, ISSN 1475-9276, E-ISSN 1475-9276, Vol. 17, article id 6Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    BACKGROUND: The purpose of this paper is to propose a protocol for researching the impact of rural youth health service strategies on health care access. There has been no published comprehensive assessment of the effectiveness of youth health strategies in rural areas, and there is no clearly articulated model of how such assessments might be conducted. The protocol described here aims to gather information to; i) Assess rural youth access to health care according to their needs, ii) Identify and understand the strategies developed in rural areas to promote youth access to health care, and iii) Propose actions for further improvement. The protocol is described with particular reference to research being undertaken in the four northernmost counties of Sweden, which contain a widely dispersed and diverse youth population.

    METHODS: The protocol proposes qualitative and quantitative methodologies sequentially in four phases. First, to map youth access to health care according to their health care needs, including assessing horizontal equity (equal use of health care for equivalent health needs,) and vertical equity (people with greater health needs should receive more health care than those with lesser needs). Second, a multiple case study design investigates strategies developed across the region (youth clinics, internet applications, public health programs) to improve youth access to health care. Third, qualitative comparative analysis of the 24 rural municipalities in the region identifies the best combination of conditions leading to high youth access to health care. Fourth, a concept mapping study involving rural stakeholders, care providers and youth provides recommended actions to improve rural youth access to health care.

    DISCUSSION: The implementation of this research protocol will contribute to 1) generating knowledge that could contribute to strengthening rural youth access to health care, as well as to 2) advancing the application of mixed methods to explore access to health care.

  • 59.
    Goodsite, Michael Evan
    et al.
    Department of Technology and InnovationUniversity of Southern Denmark.
    Bertelsen, Rasmus Gjedssø
    Tromsø University.
    Cassotta Pertoldi-Bianchi, Sandra
    rctic Research CentreAarhus University.
    Ren, Jingzhen
    Department of Technology and InnovationUniversity of Southern Denmark.
    van der Watt, Lize-Marié
    Umeå University, Arctic Research Centre at Umeå University.
    Johansson, Halldor
    Arctic Portal.
    The role of science diplomacy: a historical development and international legal framework of arctic research stations under conditions of climate change, post-cold war geopolitics and globalization/power transition2016In: Journal of Environmental Studies and Sciences, ISSN 2190-6483, E-ISSN 2190-6491, Vol. 6, no 4, p. 645-661Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The Arctic is undergoing transformation, where three important drivers are climate change, post-Cold War geopolitics and globalization/power transition from the rise of China. This transformation defines the nexus between science diplomacy, geopolitics, law and globalization under climate change, which is shaping the future of the Arctic and will bring considerable opportunity at national, regional and global levels. Research infrastructures (research stations both military and non-military, observation and monitoring networks) are opening access and data to new Arctic and non-Arctic players. Additional logistics hubs than those already existing are and should be established. Countries are sustaining and building new research as well as search and rescue bases/stations. Stations can be used as indicator of this transformation as well as their implications to improve cooperation, engage in multilateral rather than unilateral actions to protect the Arctic infrastructures and to improve military capabilities. These actions have started to attract also non-Arctic actors, such as China and the European Union (EU), which are developing new policies. Stations may not be developed and maintained only not only for the purpose of the scientific understanding of climatic and environmental impacts but also for function as entities that legitimize national or sovereign claims. At the nexus are the scientists that utilize the research bases and their international colleagues. Arctic/Northern bases are primarily military for historical reasons and for reasons of logistics and expertise, as historically indicated through the American presence in Alaska. This is not the same as saying that the bases are militarized—or part of some national militarization strategy in the Arctic. New steps to identify the role of stations at national, regional and global levels are needed. In this essay, we explore the implications and opportunities for these stations to act as pivots between scientific and geopolitical issues. We argue that where there is scientific collaboration, there is less risk of military conflict and that the Arctic is not “militarized” based on the international politics and science diplomacy of the Arctic.

  • 60.
    Gustafsson, Maria
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Community Medicine and Rehabilitation, Geriatric Medicine. Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Pharmacology and Clinical Neuroscience, Pharmacology.
    Isaksson, Ulf
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Nursing. Umeå University, Arctic Research Centre at Umeå University.
    Karlsson, Stig
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Nursing.
    Sandman, Per-Olof
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Nursing. Department of Neurobiology, Care Sciences and Society, Division of Nursing, Karolinska Institutet, 171 77 Stockholm, Sweden.
    Lövheim, Hugo
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Community Medicine and Rehabilitation, Geriatric Medicine.
    Behavioral and psychological symptoms and psychotropic drugs among people with cognitive impairment in nursing homes in 2007 and 20132016In: European Journal of Clinical Pharmacology, ISSN 0031-6970, E-ISSN 1432-1041, Vol. 72, no 8, p. 987-994Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    PURPOSE: The use of psychotropic drugs to treat behavioral and psychological symptoms among people with dementia has been widely questioned because of its limited efficacy and risk of harmful side-effects. The objectives of this study was to compare the prevalence of behavioral and psychological symptoms and the use of psychotropic drug treatments among old people with cognitive impairment living in geriatric care units in 2007 and 2013.

    METHODS: Two questionnaire surveys were performed in 2007 and 2013, comprising all those living in geriatric care units in the county of Västerbotten in northern Sweden. A comparison was made between 1971 people from 2007 and 1511 people from 2013. Data were collected concerning psychotropic and antidementia drug use, functioning in the activities of daily living (ADL), cognition, and behavioral and psychological symptoms, using the Multi-Dimensional Dementia Assessment Scale (MDDAS).

    RESULTS: Between 2007 and 2013, the use of antipsychotic drugs declined from 25.4 to 18.9 %, and of anxiolytic, hypnotic, and sedative drugs from 35.5 to 29.4 %. The prevalence of people prescribed antidepressant drugs remained unchanged while antidementia drug prescription increased from 17.9 to 21.5 %. When controlled for demographic changes, 36 out of 39 behavioral and psychological symptoms showed no difference in prevalence between the years.

    CONCLUSIONS: The use of antipsychotic, anxiolytic, hypnotic, and sedative drugs declined considerably between 2007 and 2013 among old people with cognitive impairment living in geriatric care units. Despite this reduction, the prevalences of behavioral and psychological symptoms remained largely unchanged.

  • 61.
    Gustafsson, Maria
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Pharmacology and Clinical Neuroscience.
    Lämås, Kristina
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Nursing.
    Isaksson, Ulf
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Nursing. Umeå University, Arctic Research Centre at Umeå University.
    Sandman, Per-Olof
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Nursing. Department of Neurobiology, Care Sciences and Society, Division of Nursing, Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Lövheim, Hugo
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Community Medicine and Rehabilitation, Geriatric Medicine.
    Constipation and laxative use among people living in nursing homes in 2007 and 20132019In: BMC Geriatrics, ISSN 1471-2318, E-ISSN 1471-2318, Vol. 19, article id 38Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: Constipation is a common condition among older people, particularly among people living in nursing homes, and the use of drugs such as opioids is one of many factors that contribute to its high prevalence. The aim of this study was to compare the prevalence of constipation and the use of laxatives between 2007 and 2013, to analyze constipation and laxative use among people who are prescribed opioids, and to identify factors associated with constipation. Methods: In 2007 and 2013, two surveys were performed in the county of Vasterbotten in Northern Sweden, comprising all those living in nursing homes. The Multi-Dimensional Dementia Assessment Scale was used to collect data regarding laxative, opioid and anticholinergic drug use, functioning in activities of daily living (ADL), cognition and symptoms of constipation. A comparison was made between 2820 people from 2007 and 1902 people from 2013. Results: The prevalence of symptoms of constipation among people living in nursing homes increased from 36% in 2007 to 40% in 2013. After controlling for age, sex, ADL, cognitive impairment and use of opioid and anticholinergic drugs, this difference was found to be statistically significant. When controlled for demographic changes, there was a statistically significant difference in the regular use of laxatives between the respective years, from 46% in 2007 to 59% in 2013. People prescribed opioids and anticholinergic drugs were at increased risk of constipation, while people with a higher ADL score were at decreased risk. Further, among people prescribed opioids and rated as constipated, 35% in 2007 and 20% in 2013 were not prescribed laxatives for regular use, a difference that was found to be statistically significant. Conclusions: The prevalence of symptoms of constipation increased between 2007 and 2013. Although there was a decrease between the years, there were still a number of people being prescribed with opioids and rated as constipated who were not treated with laxatives. This study therefore indicates that constipation remains a significant problem among people in nursing homes and also indicates that those prescribed opioids could benefit from an increased awareness of the risk of constipation and treatment, if required.

  • 62.
    Gustafsson, Maria
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Pharmacology and Clinical Neuroscience, Pharmacology. Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Community Medicine and Rehabilitation, Geriatric Medicine.
    Sandman, Per-Olof
    Department of Neurobiology, Care Sciences and Society, Division of Nursing, Karolinska Institutet, 171 77 Stockholm, Sweden.
    Karlsson, Stig
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Nursing.
    Isaksson, Ulf
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Nursing. Umeå University, Arctic Research Centre at Umeå University.
    Schneede, Jörn
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Pharmacology and Clinical Neuroscience, Pharmacology.
    Sjölander, Maria
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Pharmacology and Clinical Neuroscience, Pharmacology.
    Lövheim, Hugo
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Community Medicine and Rehabilitation, Geriatric Medicine.
    Reduction in the use of potentially inappropriate drugs among old people living in geriatric care units between 2007 and 20132015In: European Journal of Clinical Pharmacology, ISSN 0031-6970, E-ISSN 1432-1041, Vol. 71, no 4, p. 507-515Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    PURPOSE: The aims of this study were to investigate trends in the prevalence of potentially inappropriate drug use among old people living in geriatric care units in the county of Västerbotten between 2007 and 2013 using six national quality indicators and to assess the impact of medication reviews on those quality indicators.

    METHODS: Data were collected concerning potentially inappropriate drug use, function in the activities of daily living (ADL) and cognitive function, using the Multi-Dimensional Dementia Assessment Scale (MDDAS). A comparison was made between the years 2007 and 2013, comprising 2772 and 1902 people, respectively, living in geriatric care in the county of Västerbotten, Sweden. We conducted a parallel investigation of a separate corresponding population in Västerbotten County from 2012, where potentially inappropriate drug use was measured before and after 895 medication reviews which involved a clinical pharmacist.

    RESULTS: After controlling for age, sex, ADL and cognitive impairment, there was a significant improvement in five out of six quality indicators between 2007 and 2013. While 44 % of the people were exposed to one or more potentially inappropriate medications in 2007, this number had declined to 26 % by 2013. In the separate population from 2012, the frequency of potentially inappropriate drug use was significantly reduced amongst the people who had a medication review performed.

    CONCLUSION: The extent of potentially inappropriate drug use declined between 2007 and 2013 according to the quality indicators used. Medication reviews involving clinical pharmacists might be an important factor in reducing potentially inappropriate drug use and improving drug treatment among old people.

  • 63.
    Haglund, Anders
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Arts, Department of historical, philosophical and religious studies.
    Axelsson, Per
    Umeå University, Faculty of Arts, Department of historical, philosophical and religious studies. Umeå University, Faculty of Arts, Centre for Sami Research. Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Centre for Demographic and Ageing Research (CEDAR). Umeå University, Arctic Research Centre at Umeå University.
    The Invisible Sami Population: Regional Public Healthcare in Northern Sweden 1863–19502016In: Journal of Northern Studies, ISSN 1654-5915, Vol. 10, no 2, p. 123-145Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Medicine and public health provision have often been used as instruments of power that have shaped relations between the colonizer and the colonized. The county councils, established in 1862 as regional self-governing authorities, became (and have remained) the main architects of Swedish public healthcare services. In this paper, we investigate the political praxis in regional public healthcare development in the three northernmost counties of Sweden, during 1863–1950. Our study finds that the "Lapp shall remain Lapp" policy, which dominated Swedish Sami policy at the time, had little if any influence on regional public healthcare politics. During the focal period, there were no public healthcare facilities and virtually no specific policies or directives aimed at improving access to healthcare for the Sami population.

  • 64.
    Hansson, Heidi
    Umeå University, Faculty of Arts, Department of language studies. Umeå University, Arctic Research Centre at Umeå University.
    Arctopias: the Arctic as No Place and New Place in fiction2015In: The new Arctic / [ed] Birgitta Evengård, Joan Nymand Larsen and Øyvind Paasche, Cham: Springer, 2015, p. 69-77Chapter in book (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In fiction written from the outside, i. e., not by the indigenous population, an Arctic setting has long been used to emphasise the tough and heroic qualities of predominantly male main characters. The primary genres have been adventure stories and thrillers, with the region depicted as a natural rather than a social world. But there is also a counter-tradition where the Arctic is perceived as the route to or the place of an alternative world. Such utopian, or Arctopian works, appear in the nineteenth century when Arctic exploration maintained public interest and seem to reappear in the form of so-called cli-fi or climate fiction today. The works usually describe new forms of social organisation, and as a result, they contribute to changing persistent ideas about the Arctic as pristine nature. At the same time, genre characteristics rely on conventional ideas of the Arctic as empty space, which means that fantasies of the region continue to play a comparatively important role, despite increasing knowledge about actual conditions.

  • 65.
    Hansson, Heidi
    Umeå University, Faculty of Arts, Department of language studies. Umeå University, Arctic Research Centre at Umeå University.
    Book reviews; Gamle Norge and nineteenth-century British women travellers in Norway, by Kathryn Walchester, London and New York, Anthem Press, 2014, 223 pp., ISBN 978-1-7830-8365-7: This review is based on the e-book2015In: Journal of Tourism History, ISSN 1755-182X, E-ISSN 1755-1838, Vol. 7, no 1-2, p. 190-192Article, book review (Other academic)
  • 66.
    Hansson, Heidi
    Umeå University, Faculty of Arts, Department of language studies. Umeå University, Arctic Research Centre at Umeå University.
    Punch, Fun, Judy and the Polar Hero: Comedy, Gender and the British Arctic Expedition 1875-762012In: North and South: Essays on Gender, Race and Region / [ed] Christine DeVine and Mary Ann Wilson, Newcastle upon Tyne: Cambridge Scholars Publishing, 2012, p. 61-89Chapter in book (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Narratives about the polar expeditions in the nineteenth and early twentieth century usually convey the ideal of heroic masculinity, with the Arctic imagined as a testing ground for heroes. There are, however, also counter-narratives where both the Arctic as a demanding landscape and the image of the conquering hero are questioned. Towards the end of the nineteenth century, commentary in the form of cartoons, jokes and verses in the English periodicals Punch, Fun and Judy sometimes present an alternative Arctic discourse where the region emerges as a mirror of metropolitan Europe and the polar hero as a bumpkin who just happens to stumble across the North Pole. The article discusses popular English responses to the British Arctic Expedition in 1875-76, particularly in relation to late nineteenth-century gender ideals.

  • 67.
    Hansson, Heidi
    Umeå University, Faculty of Arts, Department of language studies. Umeå University, Arctic Research Centre at Umeå University.
    Staging the Arctic 1819-1909 and 20142015In: Nordlit, ISSN 0809-1668, E-ISSN 1503-2086, Vol. 35, p. 47-62Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Throughout the long nineteenth century and beyond, outside representations of the Arctic on stage have circulated a stereotypical image of the region. The two most long-standing emblems are ice and indigenous culture, and as commodity, the Arctic is identified as mystical, authentic, natural and pre-modern. These images are circulated in popular, cultural events like theatre performances, panoramic displays, music hall shows, and musical comedy but their presence in a popular cultural context also contributes to destabilise the signifiers. At the best, theatre productions about the Arctic may produce a kind of history from below, including a cautious critique of the colonial project and the ideal of heroic masculinity. Their radical potential should not be overstated, however, since the historical meanings of the stereotypes even when they are being debunked. At least on stage, conventional images of the Arctic continue to dominate.

  • 68.
    Hansson, Heidi
    Umeå University, Faculty of Arts, Department of language studies. Umeå University, Arctic Research Centre at Umeå University.
    The Arctic in literature and the popular imagination2018In: The Routledge handbook of the Polar Regions / [ed] Mark Nuttall, Torben R. Christensen, Martin J. Siegert, Abingdon and New York: Routledge, 2018, p. 45-56Chapter in book (Refereed)
  • 69.
    Heith, Anne
    Umeå University, Faculty of Arts, Department of culture and media studies. Umeå University, Faculty of Arts, Centre for Sami Research. Umeå University, Arctic Research Centre at Umeå University.
    Enacting Colonised Space: Katarina Pirak Sikku and Anders Sunna2015In: Nordisk Museologi, ISSN 1103-8152, no 2, p. 69-83Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    During 2014 the Swedish city of Umeå was a European Capital of Culture, with the signature Umeå2014. In Umeå’s application there was a strong focus upon the Sámi and the fact that Umeå is situated in Sápmi. Elements from Sámi culture were used in the programme and in the marketing of Umeå as a cultural capital. Bildmuseet, a museum for contemporary visual art and a part of Umeå University, was one of the institutions that contributed to the programme by commissioning works for solo exhibitions from eight artists from Sweden, Norway and Finland. The exhibitions were shown in a series called Eight Sami Artists. !e article explores the function and implication of Sámi elements in Umeå2014 with a specific focus on two of the exhibitions shown at Bildmuseet: Katarina Pirak Sikku’s Nammaláhpán and Anders Sunna’s Area Infected. The role of the museum for problematising colonising narratives, as well as the artists’ use of emotions in the production of Sámi counter narratives are themes explored.

  • 70.
    Heith, Anne
    Umeå University, Faculty of Arts, Department of culture and media studies. Umeå University, Faculty of Arts, Centre for Sami Research. Umeå University, Arctic Research Centre at Umeå University.
    Minorities and migrants: transforming Swedish literary fields2016In: The novel and Europe: imagining the continent in post-1945 fiction / [ed] Andrew Hammond, London: Palgrave Macmillan, 2016, 1, p. 211-226Chapter in book (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    European fiction is being increasingly influenced by postcolonialism, globalisation and transnationalism. Methodological nationalism based on the idea that a nation-state is a container, the contents of which need to be protected, has come under critical scrutiny by cultural mobilisers from regions seen as peripheral during the era of modern European nation-building. One novel that exemplifies the literary response to marginalisation is Populärmusik från Vittula (Popular Music, 2000) by the Swedish-Tornedalian writer Mikael Niemi. Set in the historical homeland of the Tornedalians in the northern borderlands between Sweden and Finland, the novel addresses the concerns—poverty, alienation, assimilation and the internalisation of majority discourse—which are more typically associated with postcolonial writing from the (former) European colonies.

  • 71.
    Hellström Ängerud, Karin
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Nursing. Umeå University, Arctic Research Centre at Umeå University.
    Boman, Kurt
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine, Medicine.
    Brännström, Margareta
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Nursing. Umeå University, Arctic Research Centre at Umeå University. Centre for Person-Centred Care (GPCC), University of Gothenburg, Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Areas for quality improvements in heart failure care: quality of care from the family members' perspective2018In: Scandinavian Journal of Caring Sciences, ISSN 0283-9318, E-ISSN 1471-6712, Vol. 32, no 1, p. 346-353Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    BACKGROUND: The complex needs of people with chronic heart failure (HF) place great demands on their family members, and it is important to ask family members about their perspectives on the quality of HF care.

    OBJECTIVE: To describe family members' perceptions of quality of HF care in an outpatient setting.

    METHODS: A cross-sectional study using a short form of the Quality from Patients' Perspective (QPP) questionnaire for data collection. The items in the questionnaire measure four dimensions of quality, and each item consists of both the perceived reality of the care and its subjective importance. The study included 57 family members of patients with severe HF in NYHA class III-IV.

    RESULTS: Family members reported areas for quality improvements in three out of four dimensions and in dimensionless items. The lowest level of perceived reality was reported for treatment for confusion and loss of appetite. Treatment for shortness of breath, access to the apparatus and access to equipment necessary for medical care were the items with the highest subjective importance for the family members.

    CONCLUSION: Family members identified important areas for quality improvement in the care for patients with HF in an outpatient setting. In particular, symptom alleviation, information to patients, patient participation and access to care were identified as areas for improvements. Thus, measuring quality from the family members' perspective with the QPP might be a useful additional perspective when it comes to the planning and implementation of changes in the organisation of HF care.

  • 72.
    Hellström Ängerud, Karin
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Nursing. Umeå University, Arctic Research Centre at Umeå University.
    Boman, Kurt
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine, Medicine.
    Ekman, Inger
    Brännström, Margareta
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Nursing. Umeå University, Arctic Research Centre at Umeå University. Centre for Person-Centred Care, University of Gothenburg (GPCC), Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Areas for quality improvements in heart failure care: quality of care from the patient's perspective2017In: Scandinavian Journal of Caring Sciences, ISSN 0283-9318, E-ISSN 1471-6712, Vol. 31, no 4, p. 830-838Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    BACKGROUND: Heart failure is a serious condition with high mortality and a high symptom burden. Most patients with heart failure will be taken care of in primary care but the knowledge of how the quality of care is perceived by patients with heart failure is limited.

    OBJECTIVE: The aim was to explore how patients with heart failure report quality of care, in an outpatient setting.

    METHODS: Seventy-one patients with a confirmed diagnosis of heart failure and who were cared for in an outpatient setting were included in this cross-sectional study. Quality of care was assessed with a short form of the Quality from the Patient's Perspective questionnaire. The items measured four dimensions, and each item consists of both perceived reality of the received care and its subjective importance.

    RESULTS: Inadequate quality was identified in three out of four dimensions and in items without dimension affiliation. In total, inadequate quality was identified in 19 out of 25 items. Patients reported the highest level of perceived reality in 'my family member was treated well' and the lowest perceived reality in 'effective treatment for loss of appetite'. Effective treatment for shortness of breath was of the highest subjective importance for the patients.

    CONCLUSION: Important areas for improvement in the quality of care for patients with heart failure in an outpatient setting were identified, such as symptom alleviation, information, participation and access to care.

  • 73.
    Hemmingsson, Eva-Stina
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Community Medicine and Rehabilitation, Geriatric Medicine.
    Gustavsson, Maria
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Pharmacology and Clinical Neuroscience.
    Isaksson, Ulf
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Nursing. Umeå University, Arctic Research Centre at Umeå University.
    Karlsson, Stig
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Nursing.
    Gustavsson, Yngve
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Community Medicine and Rehabilitation, Geriatric Medicine.
    Sandman, Per-Olof
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Nursing. Department of Neurobiology, Care Sciences and Society, Division of Nursing, Karolinska Institutet, Sweden; Department of Health Sciences, Luleå University of Technology, Sweden.
    Lövheim, Hugo
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Community Medicine and Rehabilitation, Geriatric Medicine.
    Prevalence of pain and pharmacological pain and treatment among old people in nursing homes in 2007 and 20132018In: European Journal of Clinical Pharmacology, ISSN 0031-6970, E-ISSN 1432-1041, Vol. 74, no 4, p. 483-488Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Purpose: Many elderly people living in nursing homes experience pain and take analgesic medication. The aim of this study was to analyze the prevalence of pain and pharmacological pain treatment among people living in nursing homes in Sweden, in two large, comparable, samples from 2007 to 2013.

    Methods: Cross-sectional surveys were performed in 2007 and 2013, including all residents in nursing homes in the county of Västerbotten, Sweden. A total of 4933 residents (2814 and 2119 respectively) with a mean age of 84.6 and 85.0 years participated. Of these, 71.1 and 72.4% respectively were cognitively impaired. The survey was completed by the staff members who knew the residents best.

    Results: The prescription of opioids became significantly more common while the use of tramadol decreased significantly. The staff reported that 63.4% in 2007 and 62.3% in 2013 had experienced pain. Of those in pain, 20.2% in 2007 and 16.8% in 2013 received no treatment and 73.4 and 75.0% respectively of those with pain, but no pharmacological treatment, were incorrectly described by the staff as being treated for pain.

    Conclusions: There has been a change in the pharmacological analgesic treatment between 2007 and 2013 with less prescribing of tramadol and a greater proportion taking opioids. Nevertheless, undertreatment of pain still occurs and in many cases, staff members believed that the residents were prescribed analgesic treatment when this was not the case.

  • 74. Hodge, Heidi
    et al.
    Carson, Doris
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Geography and Economic History. School of Natural and Built Environments, University of South Australia, Australia; The Northern Institute, Charles Darwin University, Australia.
    Carson, Dean
    Umeå University, Arctic Research Centre at Umeå University. Mid North Knowledge Partnership, Flinders Rural Health South Australia, Flinders University, Australia; The Northern Institute, Charles Darwin University, Australia.
    Newman, Lareen
    Garrett, Jaimee
    Using Internet technologies in rural communities to access services: the views of older people and service providers2017In: Journal of Rural Studies, ISSN 0743-0167, E-ISSN 1873-1392, Vol. 54, p. 469-478Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Older people in rural communities increasingly rely on the Internet to access essential health, finance, education, and other social services. However, their abilities to participate in the online service system are often undermined by a continuing 'digital divide'. This divide may be exacerbated by the strategies of service providers who fail to recognise and respond to the needs of older rural clients. This paper is based on a case study in Clare, a small rural town in South Australia, and examines the experiences of older residents and local service providers in trying to engage online for digital service delivery. Drawing on two sets of in-depth interviews, the study uses a mix of thematic content analysis and social network analysis to identify the nature and extent of digital interactions between older people and service providers, and the enablers and challenges for online service engagement. Older participants demonstrated considerable interest in learning how to use the Internet for accessing particular services, with social support networks and third party facilitators being crucial enablers. Service providers' ambitions to engage with older people online appeared more limited as a result of entrenched stereotypes of older non-users, a lack of internal digital skills, as well as organisational and funding constraints. The case study findings emphasise the importance of balancing the views of older people and service providers in the design of online engagement strategies. These insights are critical for improving online service delivery in rural communities affected by an increasing withdrawal of physical services.

  • 75.
    Häggström Lundevaller, Erling
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Centre for Demographic and Ageing Research (CEDAR). Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Umeå School of Business and Economics (USBE), Statistics.
    Vikström, Lotta
    Umeå University, Faculty of Arts, Department of historical, philosophical and religious studies. Umeå University, Arctic Research Centre at Umeå University. Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Centre for Demographic and Ageing Research (CEDAR).
    Haage, Helena
    Umeå University, Faculty of Arts, Department of historical, philosophical and religious studies.
    Modelling mortality using life trajectories of disabled and non-disabled individuals in nineteenth-century Sweden2018In: Sequence analysis and related approaches: innovative methods and applications / [ed] Gilbert Ritschard, Matthias Studer, Cham, Switzerland: Springer, 2018, p. 69-81Chapter in book (Refereed)
  • 76.
    Jacobsson, Lars
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Clinical Sciences, Psychiatry. Umeå University, Arctic Research Centre at Umeå University.
    Fagerström, Anna
    Centre for Rural Medicine, County Council of Västerbotten, Umeå University, Umeå , Sweden.
    Daerga, Laila
    Centre for Rural Medicine, County Council of Västerbotten, Umeå University, Umeå , Sweden.
    Edin-Liljegren, Anette
    Centre for Rural Medicine, County Council of Västerbotten, Umeå University, Umeå , Sweden.
    Experiences of Psychiatric Care among Young Sami in Northern Sweden2016In: International Journal of Circumpolar Health, ISSN 1239-9736, E-ISSN 2242-3982, Vol. 75, no 33200Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 77. Johnsen, Nina F.
    et al.
    Frederiksen, Kirsten
    Christensen, Jane
    Skeie, Guri
    Lund, Eiliv
    Landberg, Rikard
    Johansson, Ingegerd
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Odontology. Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine, Nutritional Research.
    Nilsson, Lena M.
    Umeå University, Arctic Research Centre at Umeå University. Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine, Nutritional Research.
    Halkjaer, Jytte
    Olsen, Anja
    Overvad, Kim
    Tjonneland, Anne
    Whole-grain products and whole-grain types are associated with lower all-cause and cause-specific mortality in the Scandinavian HELGA cohort2015In: British Journal of Nutrition, ISSN 0007-1145, E-ISSN 1475-2662, Vol. 114, no 4, p. 608-623Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    No study has yet investigated the intake of different types of whole grain (WG) in relation to all-cause and cause-specific mortality in a healthy population. The aim of the present study was to investigate the intake of WG products and WG types in relation to all-cause and cause-specific mortality in a large Scandinavian HELGA cohort that, in 1992-8, included 120 010 cohort members aged 30-64 years from the Norwegian Women and Cancer Study, the Northern Sweden Health and Disease Study, and the Danish Diet Cancer and Health Study. Participants filled in a FFQ from which data on the intake of WG products were extracted. The estimation of daily intake of WG cereal types was based on country-specific products and recipes. Mortality rate ratios (MRR) and 95% CI were estimated using the Cox proportional hazards model. A total of 3658 women and 4181 men died during the follow-up (end of follow-up was 15 April 2008 in the Danish sub-cohort, 15 December 2009 in the Norwegian sub-cohort and 15 February 2009 in the Swedish sub-cohort). In the analyses of continuous WG variables, we found lower all-cause mortality with higher intake of total WG products (women: MRR 0.89 (95% CI 0.86, 0.91); men: MRR 0.89 (95% CI 0.86, 0.91) for a doubling of intake). In particular, intake of breakfast cereals and non-white bread was associated with lower mortality. We also found lower all-cause mortality with total intake of different WG types (women: MRR 0.88 (95% CI 0.86, 0.92); men: MRR 0.88 (95% CI 0.86, 0.91) for a doubling of intake). In particular, WG oat, rye and wheat were associated with lower mortality. The associations were found in both women and men and for different causes of deaths. In the analyses of quartiles of WG intake in relation to all-cause mortality, we found lower mortality in the highest quartile compared with the lowest for breakfast cereals, non-white bread, total WG products, oat, rye (only men), wheat and total WG types. The MRR for highest v. lowest quartile of intake of total WG products was 0.68 (95% CI 0.62, 0.75, P-trend over quartiles, 0.0001) for women and 0.75 (95% CI 0.68, 0.81, P-trend over quartiles, 0.0001) for men. The MRR for highest v. lowest quartile of intake of total WG types was 0.74 (95% CI 0.67, 0.81, P-trend over quartiles, 0.0001) for women and 0.75 (95% CI 0.68, 0.82, P-trend (over quartiles), 0.0001) for men. Despite lower statistical power, the analyses of cause-specific mortality according to quartiles of WG intake supported these results. In conclusion, higher intake of WG products and WG types was associated with lower mortality among participants in the HELGA cohort. The study indicates that intake of WG is an important aspect of diet in preventing early death in Scandinavia.

  • 78. Jussila, Kirsi
    et al.
    Rissanen, Sirkka
    Aminoff, Anna
    Wahlström, Jens
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine, Occupational and Environmental Medicine. Umeå University, Arctic Research Centre at Umeå University.
    Vaktskjold, Arild
    Talykova, Ljudmila
    Remes, Jouko
    Mänttäri, Satu
    Rintamäki, Hannu
    Thermal comfort sustained by cold protective clothing in Arctic open-pit mining: a thermal manikin and questionnaire study2017In: Industrial Health, ISSN 0019-8366, E-ISSN 1880-8026, Vol. 55, no 6, p. 537-548Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Workers in the Arctic open-pit mines are exposed to harsh weather conditions. Employers are required to provide protective clothing for workers. This can be the outer layer, but sometimes also inner or middle layers are provided. This study aimed to determine how the Arctic open-pit miners protect themselves against cold and the sufficiency, and the selection criteria of the garments. Workers' cold experiences and the clothing in four Arctic open-pit mines in Finland, Sweden, Norway and Russia were evaluated by a questionnaire (n=1323). Basic thermal insulation (Icl) of the reported clothing was estimated (ISO 9920). The Icl of clothing from the mines were also measured by thermal manikin (standing/walking) in 0.3 and 4.0 m/s wind. The questionnaire showed that the Icl of the selected clothing was on average 1.2 and 1.5 clo in mild (-5 to +5°C) and dry cold (-20 to -10°C) conditions, respectively. The Icl of the clothing measured by thermal manikin was 1.9w2.3 clo. The results show that the Arctic open-pit miners' selected their clothing based on occupational (time outdoors), environmental (temperature, wind, moisture) and individual factors (cold sensitivity, general health). However, the selected clothing was not sufficient to prevent cooling completely at ambient temperatures below -10°C.

  • 79.
    Karlsson, Lena
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Centre for Demographic and Ageing Research (CEDAR). Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Sociology.
    Liliequist, Marianne
    Umeå University, Faculty of Arts, Department of culture and media studies. Umeå University, Arctic Research Centre at Umeå University.
    Fattigauktioner och samiska ålderdomshem: synen på äldre samer i samband med åldringsvården2016In: De historiska relationerna mellan Svenska kyrkan och samerna: en vetenskaplig antologi. Bd 2 / [ed] Daniel Lindmark, Olle Sundström, Skellefteå: Artos & Norma bokförlag, 2016, p. 885-912Chapter in book (Refereed)
  • 80.
    Karlsson, Lena
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Centre for Demographic and Ageing Research (CEDAR). Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Sociology.
    Liliequist, MarianneUmeå University, Faculty of Arts, Department of culture and media studies. Umeå University, Arctic Research Centre at Umeå University.Lundgren, Anna SofiaUmeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Centre for Demographic and Ageing Research (CEDAR). Umeå University, Faculty of Arts, Department of culture and media studies.Lövgren, KarinUmeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Centre for Demographic and Ageing Research (CEDAR).Sjöstedt Landén, AngelikaUmeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Centre for Demographic and Ageing Research (CEDAR).
    Ageing: culture & identity2015Collection (editor) (Refereed)
  • 81. Key, Timothy J.
    et al.
    Appleby, Paul N.
    Bradbury, Kathryn E.
    Sweeting, Michael
    Wood, Angela
    Johansson, Ingegerd
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Odontology.
    Kühn, Tilman
    Steur, Marinka
    Weiderpass, Elisabete
    Wennberg, Maria
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine, Nutritional Research.
    Würtz, Anne Mette Lund
    Agudo, Antonio
    Andersson, Jonas
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine. Research Unit Skellefteå, Umeå University.
    Arriola, Larraitz
    Boeing, Heiner
    Boer, Jolanda M. A.
    Bonnet, Fabrice
    Boutron-Ruault, Marie-Christine
    Cross, Amanda J.
    Ericson, Ulrika
    Fagherazzi, Guy
    Ferrari, Pietro
    Gunter, Marc
    Huerta, José María
    Katzke, Verena
    Khaw, Kay-Tee
    Krogh, Vittorio
    La Vecchia, Carlo
    Matullo, Giuseppe
    Moreno-Iribas, Conchi
    Naska, Androniki
    Nilsson, Lena Maria
    Umeå University, Arctic Research Centre at Umeå University.
    Olsen, Anja
    Overvad, Kim
    Palli, Domenico
    Panico, Salvatore
    Molina-Portillo, Elena
    Quirós, J. Ramón
    Skeie, Guri
    Sluijs, Ivonne
    Sonestedt, Emily
    Stepien, Magdalena
    Tjønneland, Anne
    Trichopoulou, Antonia
    Tumino, Rosario
    Tzoulaki, Ioanna
    van der Schouw, Yvonne T.
    Verschuren, W. M. Monique
    Di Angelantonio, Emanuele
    Langenberg, Claudia
    Forouhi, Nita
    Wareham, Nick
    Butterworth, Adam
    Riboli, Elio
    Danesh, John
    Consumption of Meat, Fish, Dairy Products, Eggs and Risk of Ischemic Heart Disease: A Prospective Study of 7198 Incident Cases Among 409,885 Participants in the Pan-European EPIC Cohort2019In: Circulation, ISSN 0009-7322, E-ISSN 1524-4539, Vol. 139, no 25, p. 2835-2845Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    BACKGROUND: There is uncertainty about the relevance of animal foods to the etiology of ischemic heart disease (IHD). We examined meat, fish, dairy products and eggs and risk for IHD in the pan-European EPIC cohort.

    METHODS: A prospective study of 409,885 men and women in nine European countries. Diet was assessed using validated questionnaires, calibrated using 24-hour recalls. Lipids and blood pressure were measured in a subsample. During 12.6 years mean follow up, 7198 participants had a myocardial infarction or died from IHD. The relationships of animal foods with risk were examined using Cox regression with adjustment for other animal foods and relevant covariates.

    RESULTS: The hazard ratio (HR) for IHD was 1.19 (95% CI 1.06-1.33) for a 100 g/d increment in intake of red and processed meat, and this remained significant after excluding the first 4 years of follow-up (HR 1.25 [1.09-1.42]). Risk was inversely associated with intakes of yogurt (HR 0.93 [0.89-0.98] per 100 g/d increment), cheese (HR 0.92 [0.86-0.98] per 30 g/d increment) and eggs (HR 0.93 [0.88-0.99] per 20 g/d increment); the associations with yogurt and eggs were attenuated and non-significant after excluding the first 4 years of follow-up. Risk was not significantly associated with intakes of poultry, fish or milk. In analyses modelling dietary substitutions, replacement of 100 kcal/d from red and processed meat with 100 kcal/d from fatty fish, yogurt, cheese or eggs was associated with approximately 20% lower risk of IHD. Consumption of red and processed meat was positively associated with serum non-HDL cholesterol concentration and systolic blood pressure, and consumption of cheese was inversely associated with serum non-HDL cholesterol.

    CONCLUSIONS: Risk for IHD was positively associated with consumption of red and processed meat, and inversely associated with consumption of yogurt, cheese and eggs, although the associations with yogurt and eggs may be influenced by reverse causation bias. It is not clear whether the associations with red and processed meat and cheese reflect causality, but they were consistent with the associations of these foods with plasma non-HDL cholesterol, and for red and processed meat with systolic blood pressure, which could mediate such effects.

  • 82. Kjellström, Sofia
    et al.
    Sjölander, Per
    Umeå University, Arctic Research Centre at Umeå University.
    Almers, Ellen
    Mccall, Mary E.
    Value systems among adolescents: Novel method for assessing level of ego-development2017In: Scandinavian Journal of Psychology, ISSN 0036-5564, E-ISSN 1467-9450, Vol. 58, no 2, p. 150-157Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Children's value systems develop through youth and influence attitudes and actions. But there is a lack of appropriate measures for children and adolescents. The objective of this study was to construct and validate a questionnaire that reveals distinct value systems among adolescents, and to evaluate the identified value systems' relationship to degree of ego-development and moral development. A quantitative study in a Swedish School with ages 12 through 16 (grades 6 to 9) was performed (N = 204). A set of pattern recognition statistical analyses has been used to identify different profiles of values systems and demonstrate that these systems can be arranged in a hierarchical order similar to other development. Results revealed three value systems in this sample. The identified value systems reflect different degrees of moral and ego-development among children in the study. Three distinct value systems were identified: the first (n = 9) and the second value systems (n = 35) correspond to pre-conventional stages, and the third value system (n = 155) corresponds to early conventional stages of ego development. Ego development scoring of test statements to assess stages. The value system was significantly related to moral development in the personal interest and the maintaining norms schemas of the Defining Issues Test (DIT). However, many students did not complete the entire DIT, so those results should be looked at with caution. It appears that this new test (Test for Adolescent Value Systems - TAVS) does relate to an established ego development rating scale.

  • 83.
    Knudsen, Markus Dines
    et al.
    Danish Cancer Society, Research Center, Copenhagen, Denmark.
    Kyrø, Cecilie
    Danish Cancer Society, Research Center, Copenhagen, Denmark.
    Olsen, Anja
    Danish Cancer Society, Research Center, Copenhagen, Denmark.
    Dragsted, Lars O
    Department of Nutrition, Exercise and Sports, University of Copenhagen, Copenhagen, Denmark.
    Skeie, Guri
    Department of Community Medicine, University of Tromsø, Tromsø, Norway.
    Lund, Eiliv
    Department ofCommunity Medicine, University of Tromsø, Tromsø, Norway.
    Åman, Per
    Department of food Science, Swedish University of Agriculture Science, Uppsala, Sweden.
    Nilsson, Lena Maria
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine, Nutritional Research. Umeå University, Arctic Research Centre at Umeå University.
    Bueno-de-Mesquita, H. B.
    National Institute for Public Health and the Environment, Bilthoven, The Netherlands.
    Tjønneland, Anne
    Danish Cancer Society, Research Center, Copenhagen, Denmark.
    Landberg, Rikard
    Department of Food Science, Swedish University of Agriculture Science, Uppsala, Sweden and Nutritional Epidemiology Unit, Institute for Environmental Medicine, Karolinska Institute, Stockholm.
    Self-Reported Whole-Grain Intake and Plasma Alkylresorcinol Concentrations in Combination in Relation to the Incidence of Colorectal Cancer2014In: American Journal of Epidemiology, ISSN 0002-9262, E-ISSN 1476-6256, Vol. 179, no 10, p. 1188-1196Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Self-reported food frequency questionnaires (FFQs) have occasionally been used to investigate the association between whole-grain intake and the incidence of colorectal cancer, but the results from those studies have been inconsistent. We investigated this association using intakes of whole grains and whole-grain products measured via FFQs and plasma alkylresorcinol concentrations, a biomarker of whole-grain wheat and rye intake, both separately and in combination (Howe's score with ranks). We conducted a nested case-control study in a cohort from a research project on Nordic health and whole-grain consumption (HELGA, 1992-1998). Incidence rate ratios and 95% confidence intervals were calculated using conditional logistic regression. Plasma alkylresorcinol concentrations alone and Howe's score with ranks were inversely associated with the incidence of distal colon cancer when the highest quartile was compared with the lowest (for alkylresorcinol concentrations, incidence rate ratio = 0.34, 95% confidence interval: 0.13, 0.92; for Howe's score with ranks, incidence rate ratio = 0.35, 95% confidence interval: 0.15, 0.86). No association was observed between whole-grain intake and any colorectal cancer (colon, proximal, distal or rectum cancer) when using an FFQ as the measure/exposure variable for whole-grain intake. The results suggest that assessing whole-grain intake using a combination of FFQs and biomarkers slightly increases the precision in estimating the risk of colon or rectal cancer by reducing the impact of misclassification, thereby increasing the statistical power of the study.

  • 84. Kotljarchuk, Andrej
    et al.
    Sundström, Olle
    Umeå University, Faculty of Arts, Department of historical, philosophical and religious studies. Umeå University, Arctic Research Centre at Umeå University.
    Introduction: the problem of ethnic and religious minorities in Stalin's Soviet Union2017In: Ethnic and Religious Minorties in Stalin's Soviet Union: New Dimensions of Research / [ed] Andrej Kotljarchuk & Olle Sundström, Huddinge: Södertörns högskola, 2017, p. 15-30Chapter in book (Refereed)
  • 85.
    Kotyrlo, Elena
    Umeå University, Arctic Research Centre at Umeå University. Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Demographic Data Base.
    Labour Market Outcomes of Migrant Women in Västerbotten and Norrbotten2014In: Arctic Yearbook, ISSN 2298–2418, p. 1-17Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 86.
    Kotyrlo, Elena
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Demographic Data Base. Umeå University, Arctic Research Centre at Umeå University.
    Northern Investment Risks in Human Capital Formation: Russian Experience2014In: Sociology and Anthropology, ISSN 2331-6179 (print), 2331-6187 (online), Vol. 2, no 3, p. 95-105Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Historically, the northern Russian regions have been an object of a special socio-economic policy, united by extreme climate conditions, geographical isolation and rich natural resources reserves. Northern investment risks in human capital formation are proposed in the paper, as an indicator of investment conditions, which can be employed to improve policy of human development in the northern regions of Russia. Northern investment risks encompass uncertainties associated with extreme northern climate conditions, historically determined allocation of resources in the Russian northern regions and restrictions on labour mobility caused by geographic isolation and administrative rules. Investment risks in human capital, its measurement, methods of estimation are considered. Empirical estimation illustrates higher investment risks in the northern regions. Method of estimation can be employed widely to compare investment conditions in imperfect economies. Policy of insurance of private investment risks and current restrictions on it’s implementation in the northern regions of Russia are discussed.

  • 87. Landais, Edwige
    et al.
    Moskal, Aurelie
    Mullee, Amy
    Nicolas, Genevieve
    Gunter, Marc J.
    Huybrechts, Inge
    Overvad, Kim
    Roswall, Nina
    Affret, Aurelie
    Fagherazzi, Guy
    Mahamat-Saleh, Yahya
    Katzke, Verena
    Kuehn, Tilman
    La Vecchia, Carlo
    Trichopoulou, Antonia
    Valanou, Elissavet
    Saieva, Calogero
    de Magistris, Maria Santucci
    Sieri, Sabina
    Braaten, Tonje
    Skeie, Guri
    Weiderpass, Elisabete
    Ardanaz, Eva
    Chirlaque, Maria-Dolores
    Garcia, Jose Ramon
    Jakszyn, Paula
    Rodriguez-Barranco, Miguel
    Brunkwall, Louise
    Huseinovic, Ena
    Nilsson, Lena
    Umeå University, Arctic Research Centre at Umeå University. Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine, Nutritional Research.
    Wallström, Peter
    Bueno-de-Mesquita, Bas
    Peeters, Petra H.
    Aune, Dagfinn
    Key, Tim
    Lentjes, Marleen
    Riboli, Elio
    Slimani, Nadia
    Freisling, Heinz
    Coffee and Tea Consumption and the Contribution of Their Added Ingredients to Total Energy and Nutrient Intakes in 10 European Countries: Benchmark Data from the Late 1990s2018In: Nutrients, ISSN 2072-6643, E-ISSN 2072-6643, Vol. 10, no 6, article id 725Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: Coffee and tea are among the most commonly consumed nonalcoholic beverages worldwide, but methodological differences in assessing intake often hamper comparisons across populations. We aimed to (i) describe coffee and tea intakes and (ii) assess their contribution to intakes of selected nutrients in adults across 10 European countries.

    Method: Between 1995 and 2000, a standardized 24-h dietary recall was conducted among 36,018 men and women from 27 European Prospective Investigation into Cancer and Nutrition (EPIC) study centres. Adjusted arithmetic means of intakes were estimated in grams (=volume) per day by sex and centre. Means of intake across centres were compared by sociodemographic characteristics and lifestyle factors.

    Results: In women, the mean daily intake of coffee ranged from 94 g/day (similar to 0.6 cups) in Greece to 781 g/day (similar to 4.4 cups) in Aarhus (Denmark), and tea from 14 g/day (similar to 0.1 cups) in Navarra (Spain) to 788 g/day (similar to 4.3 cups) in the UK general population. Similar geographical patterns for mean daily intakes of both coffee and tea were observed in men. Current smokers as compared with those who reported never smoking tended to drink on average up to 500 g/day more coffee and tea combined, but with substantial variation across centres. Other individuals' characteristics such as educational attainment or age were less predictive. In all centres, coffee and tea contributed to less than 10% of the energy intake. The greatest contribution to total sugar intakes was observed in Southern European centres (up to similar to 20%).

    Conclusion: Coffee and tea intake and their contribution to energy and sugar intake differed greatly among European adults. Variation in consumption was mostly driven by geographical region.

  • 88.
    Larsson, Lars
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Geography and Economic History, Economic and social geography. Umeå University, Arctic Research Centre at Umeå University.
    Wiberg, Ulf
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Geography and Economic History, Economic and social geography. Umeå University, Arctic Research Centre at Umeå University.
    Keskitalo, E Carina H
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Geography and Economic History, Economic and social geography. Umeå University, Arctic Research Centre at Umeå University.
    Contrasting territorial policy perspectives for Northern Sweden2015In: Barents Studies, ISSN 1651-0534, E-ISSN 2324-0652, Vol. 2, no 1, p. 11-33Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Northern Sweden is increasingly influenced by competing social interests striving for advantages and claiming territorial influence through "scalar politics". The strategic deployment of scalar conceptions is an integral part of policy making and implementation. Increasing use of varying scalar conceptions follows from "new spatial planning" practices. Set territorial delineations and administrative responsibilities are opened up to complex associational relationships with varying spatial claims. Focusing on territorial policies, this paper examines what orientations there are in territorial policy development in and for northern Sweden. The 29 municipalities embraced by the two northernmost counties Norrbotten and Västerbotten are the geographical delimitation of the study. As the analysis shows, the dominating scalar constructs relate to national and EU territorial policies rather than to competing constructs focused on Nordic, Barents and Arctic territorialization.

  • 89.
    Leu, Traian
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Geography and Economic History, Economic and social geography. Umeå University, Arctic Research Centre at Umeå University.
    Tourism as a livelihood diversification strategy among Sámi indigenous people in northern Sweden2019In: Acta Borealia, ISSN 0800-3831, E-ISSN 1503-111X, Vol. 36, no 1, p. 75-92Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Tourism entrepreneurship is frequently promoted as a livelihood strategy for Sámi indigenous people living in northern Sweden. At the same time, tourism’s ability to fully take over struggling primary sectors has been brought into question, due perhaps to a mismatch of skills or to tourism’s seasonality and low pay. In spite of that, the role of tourism development might relate less to financial autonomy but could best be characterized as being supplementary and complementary to other occupations. Additionally, the motivations behind tourism involvement among Sámi tourist entrepreneurs remain largely unknown. This interview-based study therefore aims to uncover why Sámi indigenous tourist entrepreneurs living in northern Sweden get involved in tourism and to what extent tourism is part of a livelihood diversification strategy. The findings show that a combination of factors such as lifestyle choices, existing touristic demand and readily available forms of capital lead people to become tourist entrepreneurs. At the same time, for some respondents, tourism is part of a livelihood diversification strategy where its development is not sought for replacing a struggling traditional occupation, namely reindeer herding, but for complementing it.

  • 90.
    Leu, Traian
    et al.
    Umeå University, Arctic Research Centre at Umeå University. Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Geography and Economic History.
    Eriksson, Madeleine
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Geography and Economic History. Umeå University, Arctic Research Centre at Umeå University.
    Müller, Dieter
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Geography and Economic History. Umeå University, Arctic Research Centre at Umeå University.
    More than just a job: exploring the meanings of tourism work among indigenous Sámi tourist entrepreneurs2018In: Journal of Sustainable Tourism, ISSN 0966-9582, E-ISSN 1747-7646, Vol. 26, no 8, p. 1468-1482Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In northern Sweden, the positive effects of tourism involvement by Sámi Indigenous people are mostly shown in terms of employment, yet at times have been shown to go beyond economic ones and include other equally important benefits. Only when all components are seen at the same time can we get a true understanding of tourism as a livelihood strategy. This paper uses a sustainable rural livelihoods approach to investigate the different roles and meanings of tourism among Sámi tourist entrepreneurs in northern Sweden. It does so using data from 13 semi-structured interviews with Sámi Indigenous tourist entrepreneurs. The results indicate that there are many goals and objectives tourism jobs serve among Sámi Indigenous people in the Swedish north. For example, the tourism business is at times seen as a more sustainable way of using reindeer. Tourism was also a way for Sámi to express themselves and keep certain traditions alive. Another leading conclusion relates to tourist entrepreneurs as cultural ambassadors for Sámi issues. By presenting factual information about Sámi people, challenging stereotypes and by making others aware of the many hardships reindeer herders face, Sámi tourist entrepreneurs attribute to their work meanings that are social, cultural and even political.

  • 91.
    Leu, Traian
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Geography and Economic History, Economic and social geography. Umeå University, Arctic Research Centre at Umeå University.
    Müller, Dieter
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Geography and Economic History, Economic and social geography. Umeå University, Arctic Research Centre at Umeå University.
    Maintaining inherited occupations in changing times: the role of tourism among reindeer herders in northern Sweden2016In: Polar Geography, ISSN 1088-937X, E-ISSN 1939-0513, Vol. 39, no 1, p. 40-57Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Tourism is often identified as able to provide opportunities for indigenous populations. In northern Sweden, correspondingly tourism has been proposed to create employment opportunities and help preserve Sámi indigenous culture. Although there are numerous studies on the topic, they are lacking in a time dimension and comprehensiveness. Often they are based on limited case studies and narratives of those members of the indigenous population who have engaged in new activities successfully. Therefore, this work aims to investigate on a national scale how widespread are tourism occupations among reindeer herders and what are some of the characteristics of those engaged in them. This paper uses detailed census and population register data containing personal and professional information on reindeer herders in Sweden and their families spanning 50 years. The findings suggest that involvement in tourism is more common among reindeer herders than farmers. Moreover, involvement in tourism is highly gendered with women being more likely to be engaged in it. Findings also show that the type of tourism professions people are engaged in is more a result of the available geographical resource than an inherent inclination among reindeer herders to work with specific fields such as nature-based attractions.

  • 92.
    Liliequist, Marianne
    Umeå University, Faculty of Arts, Department of culture and media studies. Umeå University, Arctic Research Centre at Umeå University.
    Strategies of decolonisation: portraits of elderly female pioneers in the Sami ethno-political movement2015In: Ageing: culture and identity / [ed] Lena Karlsson, Marianne Liliequist, Anna Sofia Lundgren, Karin Lövgren & Angelika Sjöstedt Landén, Umeå: Umeå University , 2015, p. 39-63Chapter in book (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This article is about elderly Sami women who are front figures in the ethno-political mobilisation movement, acting from artistic platforms or in traditional political arenas. The Sami culture has been described as male-dominated and Sami women as dually oppressed, belonging to a minority people while also being women, but there are many Sami women, especially the elderly, who in recent decades have emerged as prominent figures in the fight for the survival of Sami culture. How do these prominent figures describe their own position and status? What strategies do they use, as elderly Sami women, to enter the Sami and non-Sami public spheres? How do they tell their story, what is it that motivates them, what obstacles have they faced and what has helped them? This chapter conducts an intersectional analysis on an individual level of the strategic approaches of three women. I have looked at the way these strategies emerge in the women's life stories. Depending on special circumstances, either currently or earlier in their life, ethnicity, gender, age and class are emphasized to various degrees in the different narratives.

  • 93.
    Liliequist, Marianne
    et al.
    Umeå University, Arctic Research Centre at Umeå University. Umeå University, Faculty of Arts, Department of culture and media studies.
    Cocq, Coppélie
    Umeå University, Faculty of Arts, Humlab.
    Samisk kamp för kulturell överlevnad2014In: Kulturella perspektiv - Svensk etnologisk tidskrift, ISSN 1102-7908, ISSN 1102-7908, Vol. 23, no 1, p. 2-4Article, review/survey (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This special issue focuses on the Sami struggle for cultural survival. The articles deal with strategies and initiatives going on in Sápmi today during a time of threats and challenges - a time that is also marked by resistance and mobilization. During the fall of 2013, the Swedish government has been criticized both by the United Nations’ Committee on the Elimination of all Forms of Racial Discrimination, and by the Swedish Discrimination Ombudsman for its actions against the Sami population. The UN criticism was directed against a planned mine in Rönnbäcken, in the region of Västerbotten. Exploitation in Northern Sweden, not least the mining boom, is among of the biggest challenges in Sápmi today. Sami identity markers such as reindeer herding, land, language and oral traditions are examples of expressions that are highlighted in the battle to claim rights to land and water, to language, and to participation in decision making.

  • 94.
    Lindbo, Agnes
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Community Medicine and Rehabilitation, Geriatric Medicine.
    Gustafsson, Maria
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Pharmacology and Clinical Neuroscience, Pharmacology.
    Isaksson, Ulf
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Nursing. Umeå University, Arctic Research Centre at Umeå University.
    Sandman, Per-Olof
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Nursing. Department of Neurobiology, Care Sciences and Society, Division of Nursing, Karolinska Institutet, Sweden; Department of Health Sciences, Luleå University of Technology, Sweden.
    Lövheim, Hugo
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Community Medicine and Rehabilitation, Geriatric Medicine.
    Dysphoric symptoms in relation to other behavioral and psychological symptoms of dementia, among elderly in nursing homes2017In: BMC Geriatrics, ISSN 1471-2318, E-ISSN 1471-2318, Vol. 17, no 1, article id 206Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    BACKGROUND: Behavioral and psychological symptoms of dementia (BPSD) are common and varied in the elderly. The aim of the current study was to explore associations between BPSD and dysphoric symptoms at different levels of cognitive impairment.

    METHODS: Assessments of 4397 elderly individuals living in nursing homes in Sweden were performed. Data on cognitive function and BPSD were collected using the Multi-Dimensional Dementia Assessment Scale (MDDAS). The relationships between dysphoria and eight BPSD factors were plotted against cognitive function to investigate how dysphoria affects BPSD throughout the dementia disease.

    RESULTS: Overall, dysphoric symptoms were most prevalent in persons with moderate cognitive impairment. However, moderate to severe dysphoric symptoms showed no clear variation with cognitive impairment. Furthermore, aggressive behavior, verbally disruptive/attention-seeking behavior, hallucinatory symptoms and wandering behavior were more common with concurrent dysphoria regardless of cognitive function. In contrast, passiveness was more common with concurrent dysphoria in mild cognitive impairment but not in moderate to severe cognitive impairment.

    CONCLUSIONS: BPSD, including aggressive behavior and hallucinations, were more common with concurrent dysphoric symptoms, providing insight into behavioral and psychological symptoms among individuals with cognitive impairment. Apathy was more commonly associated with concurrent dysphoria at early stages of cognitive decline but not at later stages, indicating that apathy and dysphoria represent separate syndromes among elderly patients with moderate to severe cognitive impairment.

  • 95.
    Lundgren, Anna Sofia
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Arts, Department of culture and media studies. Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Centre for Demographic and Ageing Research (CEDAR).
    Karlsson, Lena
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Centre for Demographic and Ageing Research (CEDAR). Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Sociology.
    Liliequist, Marianne
    Umeå University, Faculty of Arts, Department of culture and media studies. Umeå University, Arctic Research Centre at Umeå University.
    Lövgren, Karin
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Centre for Demographic and Ageing Research (CEDAR).
    Sjöstedt Landén, Angelika
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Centre for Demographic and Ageing Research (CEDAR).
    Introduction2015In: Ageing: culture & identity / [ed] Karlsson, Lena; Liliequist, M; Lundgren, AS; Lövgren, K & Sjöstedt Landén, A, Umeå: Umeå universitet , 2015, p. 9-15Chapter in book (Other academic)
  • 96.
    Lwande, Olivia Wesula
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Clinical Microbiology, Section of Virology. Umeå University, Arctic Research Centre at Umeå University.
    Näslund, Jonas
    Lundmark, Eva
    Ahlm, Kristoffer
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Clinical Microbiology, Infectious Diseases.
    Ahlm, Clas
    Umeå University, Arctic Research Centre at Umeå University. Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Clinical Microbiology, Infectious Diseases.
    Bucht, Göran
    Evander, Magnus
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Clinical Microbiology, Section of Virology. Umeå University, Arctic Research Centre at Umeå University.
    Experimental Infection and Transmission Competence of Sindbis Virus in Culex torrentium and Culex pipiens Mosquitoes from Northern Sweden2019In: Vector Borne and Zoonotic Diseases, ISSN 1530-3667, E-ISSN 1557-7759, Vol. 19, no 2, p. 128-133Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Introduction: Sindbis virus (SINV) is a mosquito-borne Alphavirus known to infect birds and cause intermittent outbreaks among humans in Fenno-Scandia. In Sweden, the endemic area has mainly been in central Sweden. Recently, SINV infections have emerged to northern Sweden, but the vectorial efficiency for SINV of mosquito species in this northern region has not yet been ascertained.

    Objective: Mosquito larvae were sampled from the Umea region in northern Sweden and propagated in a laboratory to adult stage to investigate the infection, dissemination, and transmission efficiency of SINV in mosquitoes.

    Materials and Methods: The mosquito species were identified by DNA barcoding of the cytochrome oxidase I gene. Culex torrentium was the most abundant (82.2%) followed by Culex pipiens (14.4%), Aedes annulipes (1.1%), Anopheles claviger (1.1%), Culiseta bergrothi (1.1%), or other unidentified species (1.1%). Mosquitoes were fed with SINV-infected blood and monitored for 29 days to determine the viral extrinsic incubation period. Infection and dissemination were determined by RT-qPCR screening of dissected body parts of individual mosquitoes. Viral transmission was determined from saliva collected from individual mosquitoes at 7, 14, and 29 days. SINV was detected by cell culture using BHK-21 cells, RT-qPCR, and sequencing.

    Results: Cx. torrentium was the only mosquito species in our study that was able to transmit SINV. The overall transmission efficiency of SINV in Cx. torrentium was 6.8%. The rates of SINV infection, dissemination, and transmission in Cx. torrentium were 11%, 75%, and 83%, respectively.

    Conclusions: Cx. torrentium may be the key vector involved in SINV transmission in northern Sweden.

  • 97. Merritt, Melissa A.
    et al.
    Tzoulaki, Ioanna
    Tworoger, Shelley S.
    De Vivo, Immaculata
    Hankinson, Susan E.
    Fernandes, Judy
    Tsilidis, Konstantinos K.
    Weiderpass, Elisabete
    Tjonneland, Anne
    Petersen, Kristina E. N.
    Dahm, Christina C.
    Overvad, Kim
    Dossus, Laure
    Boutron-Ruault, Marie-Christine
    Fagherazzi, Guy
    Fortner, Renee T.
    Kaaks, Rudolf
    Aleksandrova, Krasimira
    Boeing, Heiner
    Trichopoulou, Antonia
    Bamia, Christina
    Trichopoulos, Dimitrios
    Palli, Domenico
    Grioni, Sara
    Tumino, Rosario
    Sacerdote, Carlotta
    Mattiello, Amalia
    Bueno-de-Mesquita, H. B. (as)
    Onland-Moret, N. Charlotte
    Peeters, Petra H.
    Gram, Inger T.
    Skeie, Guri
    Ramon Quiros, J.
    Duell, Eric J.
    Sanchez, Maria-Jose
    Salmeron, D.
    Barricarte, Aurelio
    Chamosa, Saioa
    Ericson, Ulrica
    Sonestedt, Emily
    Nilsson, Lena Maria
    Umeå University, Arctic Research Centre at Umeå University. Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine, Nutritional Research.
    Idahl, Annika
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Clinical Sciences, Obstetrics and Gynecology.
    Khaw, Kay-Tee
    Wareham, Nicholas
    Travis, Ruth C.
    Rinaldi, Sabina
    Romieu, Isabelle
    Patel, Chirag J.
    Riboli, Elio
    Gunter, Marc J.
    Investigation of Dietary Factors and Endometrial Cancer Risk Using a Nutrient-wide Association Study Approach in the EPIC and Nurses' Health Study (NHS) and NHSII2015In: Cancer Epidemiology, Biomarkers and Prevention, ISSN 1055-9965, E-ISSN 1538-7755, Vol. 24, no 2, p. 466-471Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Data on the role of dietary factors in endometrial cancer development are limited and inconsistent. We applied a "nutrient-wide association study" approach to systematically evaluate dietary risk associations for endometrial cancer while controlling for multiple hypothesis tests using the false discovery rate (FDR) and validating the results in an independent cohort. We evaluated endometrial cancer risk associations for dietary intake of 84 foods and nutrients based on dietary questionnaires in three prospective studies, the European Prospective Investigation into Cancer and Nutrition (EPIC; N = 1,303 cases) followed by validation of nine foods/nutrients (FDR <= 0.10) in the Nurses' Health Studies (NHS/NHSII; N = 1,531 cases). Cox regression models were used to estimate HRs and 95% confidence intervals (CI). In multivariate adjusted comparisons of the extreme categories of intake at baseline, coffee was inversely associated with endometrial cancer risk (EPIC, median intake 750 g/day vs. 8.6; HR, 0.81; 95% CI, 0.68-0.97, P-trend = 0.09; NHS/NHSII, median intake 1067 g/day vs. none; HR, 0.82; 95% CI, 0.70-0.96, P-trend = 0.04). Eight other dietary factors that were associated with endometrial cancer risk in the EPIC study (total fat, monounsaturated fat, carbohydrates, phosphorus, butter, yogurt, cheese, and potatoes) were not confirmed in the NHS/NHSII. Our findings suggest that coffee intake may be inversely associated with endometrial cancer risk. Further data are needed to confirm these findings and to examine the mechanisms linking coffee intake to endometrial cancer risk to develop improved prevention strategies. (C)2015 AACR.

  • 98. Moberg, Karen R.
    et al.
    Aall, Carlo
    Western Norway Research Institute, Sogndal, Norway.
    Dorner, Florian
    Institute of Public Health, Heidelberg University, Heidelberg, Germany.
    Reimerson, Elsa
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Political Science. Umeå University, Arctic Research Centre at Umeå University. Umeå University, Faculty of Arts, Centre for Sami Research.
    Ceron, Jean-Paul
    Centre International de Recherche sur l’Environnement et le Développement, Paris, France.
    Sköld, Bore
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine.
    Sovacool, Benjamin K.
    Science Policy Research Unit (SPRU), School of Business, Management and Economics, University of Sussex, Brighton, UK; Center for Energy Technologies, Department of Business Development and Technology, Aarhus University, Aarhus, Denmark.
    Piana, Valentino
    Economics Web Institute, Monterotondo, Italy.
    Mobility, food and housing: responsibility, individual consumption and demand-side policies in European deep decarbonisation pathways2019In: Energy Efficiency, ISSN 1570-646X, E-ISSN 1570-6478, Vol. 12, no 2, p. 497-519Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The Brundtland Commission report ‘Our Common Future’ highlighted that residents in high-income countries lead lifestyles incompatible with planetary boundaries. Three decades later, consumption-related greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions have continued to increase. To achieve ‘well below 2°C’ and 1.5 °C goals, consumption-related emissions must be substantially reduced in the coming decades. This paper provides insights on how to pursue 1.5 °C pathways through changes in household consumption. It draws on original data gathered in the project ‘HOusehold Preferences for reducing greenhouse gas Emissions in four European High Income Countries’ (HOPE) to analyse policies targeting and affecting direct and indirect GHG emissions in three household consumption categories (mobility, housing and food) in four countries (France, Germany, Norway and Sweden) and four medium-sized cities. This paper demonstrates discrepancies and similarities between current governmental policy approaches in the four countries and household perceptions of consumption changes with respect to policy mechanisms, responsibilities and space for acting on mitigation. Current demand-side policy strategies rely heavily on instruments of self-governance and nudging behaviour. Whilst some of our data suggests that households broadly accept this, it also suggests that governments could more actively lead and steer demand-side mitigation via adjusting and supplementing a comprehensive list of 20 climate policy measures currently in place in one or more of the case countries. The paper concludes by suggesting areas for more effective policy change and household-level climate change mitigation to feed the next update of climate pledges under the Paris Agreement.

  • 99.
    Müller, Dieter K
    Umeå University, Arctic Research Centre at Umeå University. Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Geography and Economic History, Economic and social geography.
    Issues in Arctic tourism2015In: The New Arctic / [ed] B. Evengård, J. Nymand Larsen & Ø. Paasche, Heidelberg: Springer Berlin/Heidelberg, 2015, p. 147-158Chapter in book (Refereed)
  • 100.
    Müller, Dieter K.
    Umeå University, Arctic Research Centre at Umeå University. Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Geography and Economic History, Economic and social geography.
    On the Location of Tourism: An Outlook from Europe’s Northern Periphery2016In: Naturtourismus: Chancen und Herausforderungen / [ed] Marius Mayer & Hubert Job, Mannheim: Meta GIS Systems , 2016, Vol. 12, p. 113-124Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Relatively little has been written on the geographical location of tourism since Walter Chistaller’s seminal work “Some considerations of tourism location in Europe: the peripheral regions‐underdeveloped countries‐recreation areas” in 1964. This neglect of location may come as surprise considering the great interest of communities in remote areas to develop tourism as response to decline in other industries. This paper focuses on geographical explanations of tourism success and failure. Not least inspired by the work of Jan Lundgren, the article claims that accessibility is a major factor for success that often is underrated in discourses of destination development. Moreover, other industrial development justifying the provision of accessibility entailed important steps for the development of northern tourism destinations. Hence, it is argued that extractive industries often considered a threat to nature-based tourism in the far North, create vital preconditions for the development of tourism. This is done by reviewing the literature on location and tourism and secondary data sources on tourism development in northern Sweden.

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