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  • 51.
    Alverup, Josefin
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Clinical Microbiology, Biomedical Laboratory Science.
    Förekomst av bakterier i hudstrukturer med sjukdomen Hidradenitis suppurativa: propionibacterium acnes, Propionibacterium granulosum och Staphylococcus species detektion med immunofluorescens2013Independent thesis Basic level (professional degree), 10 credits / 15 HE creditsStudent thesis
  • 52. Amada, Takako
    et al.
    Yoshimatsu, Kumiko
    Koma, Takaaki
    Shimizu, Kenta
    Gamage, Chandika D.
    Shiokawa, Kanae
    Nishio, Sanae
    Ahlm, Clas
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Clinical Microbiology, Infectious Diseases.
    Arikawa, Jiro
    Development of an immunochromatography strip test based on truncated nucleocapsid antigens of three representative hantaviruses2014In: Virology Journal, ISSN 1743-422X, E-ISSN 1743-422X, Vol. 11, p. 87-Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: Hantaviruses are causative agents of hemorrhagic fever with renal syndrome (HFRS) and nephropathia epidemica (NE) in the Old World and hantavirus pulmonary syndrome (HPS) in the New World. There is a need for time-saving diagnostic methods. In the present study, recombinant N antigens were used as antigens in an immunochromatography strip (ICG) test to detect specific IgG antibodies. Methods: The N-terminal 103 amino acids (aa) of Hantaan virus (HTNV), Puumala virus (PUUV) and Andes virus (ANDV) nucleocapsid (N) protein were expressed in E. coli as representative antigens of three groups (HFRS, NE and HPS-causing viruses) of hantavirus. Five different types of ICG test strips, one antigen line on one strip for each of the three selected hantaviruses (HTNV, PUUV and ANDV), three antigen lines on one strip and a mixed antigen line on one strip, were developed and sensitivities were compared. Results: A total of 87 convalescent-phase patient sera, including sera from 35 HFRS patients, 36 NE patients and 16 HPS patients, and 25 sera from healthy seronegative people as negative controls were used to evaluate the ICG test. Sensitivities of the three-line strip and mixed-line strip were similar to those of the single antigen strip (97.2 to 100%). On the other hand, all of the ICG test strips showed high specificities to healthy donors. Conclusion: These results indicated that the ICG test with the three representative antigens is an effective serodiagnostic tool for screening and typing of hantavirus infection in humans.

  • 53. Andersen, G. Neumann
    et al.
    Andersen, M.
    Nagaeva, Olga
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Clinical Microbiology, Clinical Immunology.
    Wikberg, J. E. S.
    Mincheva-Nilsson, Lucia
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Clinical Microbiology, Clinical Immunology.
    Dermal Melanocortin Receptor Rebound in Diffuse Systemic Sclerosis after Anti-TGF ss 1 Antibody Therapy2012In: Scandinavian Journal of Immunology, ISSN 0300-9475, E-ISSN 1365-3083, Vol. 76, no 5, p. 478-482Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Disturbed transforming growth factor beta (TGF beta) signalling leads to enhanced synthesis of extracellular matrix (ECM), which is manifested as systemic sclerosis (SSc), but this may be attenuated by the melanocortin system. Here, we report of rebound reaction in the gene expression of melanocortin receptor (MCR) subtypes and of the precursor of these receptors ligands, the pro-opio-melanocortin protein (POMC), in the acute skin lesion of diffuse systemic sclerosis (dSSc) after treatment with a recombinant human anti-TGF beta 1 antibody. Biopsies, taken from the leading edge of the skin lesion, before and after treatment of a patient with recent onset dSSc, were examined. Before treatment, increased levels of TGF beta mRNA and suppressed levels of POMC mRNA and MCR subtypes MC1-3, 5R mRNAs were seen in the lesion, compared with healthy controls. After treatment, there was a rebound expression of POMC, MC2, 3, 5R mRNAs. As the melanocortin system regulates collagen and melanin production, our findings add a new understanding to the pathogenetic mechanisms involved in the acute skin lesion of dSSc, which is characterized by enhanced ECM formation and changes in skin pigmentation.

  • 54.
    Andersen, Grethe
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine, Rheumatology.
    Hägglund, M
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Clinical Microbiology, Clinical Immunology.
    Nagaeva, Olga
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Clinical Microbiology, Clinical Immunology.
    Frängsmyr, Lars
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Clinical Microbiology, Clinical Immunology.
    Petrovska, R
    Mincheva-Nilsson, Lucia
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Clinical Microbiology, Clinical Immunology.
    Wikberg, J E S
    Quantitative measurement of the levels of melanocortin receptor subtype 1, 2, 3 and 5 and pro-opio-melanocortin peptide gene expression in subsets of human peripheral blood leucocytes2005In: Scandinavian Journal of Immunology, ISSN 0300-9475, E-ISSN 1365-3083, Vol. 61, no 3, p. 279-284Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Levels of the melanocortin receptor (MCR) 1, 2, 3 and 5 subtypes and pro-opio-melanocortin (POMC) protein mRNA were measured by the real-time quantitative reverse transcriptase polymerase chain reaction method in CD4+ T helper (Th) cells, CD8+ T cytotoxic cells, CD19+ B cells, CD56+ natural killer (NK) cells, CD14+ monocytes and CD15+ granulocytes from healthy donors. We found high levels of all of the MC1, 2, 3 and 5R subtype mRNA in Th cells and moderate levels in NK cells, monocytes and granulocytes. POMC peptide mRNA was found in all examined leucocyte subsets, but only low levels were present in granulocytes. Our findings suggest a co-ordinating role for MCR subtypes and their naturally occurring ligands in the co-operation between innate and adaptive immunity. Moreover, our findings are compatible with earlier finding of MCR-mediated tolerance induction in Th cells.

  • 55. Andersen, Grethe N.
    et al.
    Nagaeva, Olga
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Clinical Microbiology.
    Mincheva-Nilsson, Lucia
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Clinical Microbiology.
    Wikberg, Jarl E. S.
    The Melanocortin System: A New and Important Actor on the Scene of Systemic Sclerosis2011In: Arthritis and Rheumatism, ISSN 0004-3591, E-ISSN 1529-0131, Vol. 63, no 10, p. S908-S908Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 56.
    Andersen, Grethe N.
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine, Reumatology.
    Nilsson, Kenneth
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine, Pulmonary Medicine.
    Nagaeva, O
    Rantapää-Dahlqvist, Solbritt
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine, Reumatology.
    Sandström, Thomas
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine, Pulmonary Medicine.
    Mincheva-Nilsson, Lucia
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Clinical Microbiology, Clinical Immunology.
    Cytokine mRNA profile of alveolar T lymphocytes and macrophages in patients with systemic sclerosis suggests a local Tr1 response2011In: Scandinavian Journal of Immunology, ISSN 0300-9475, E-ISSN 1365-3083, Vol. 74, no 3, p. 272-81Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The development of an autoimmune disease like systemic sclerosis (SSc) is suspected to be driven by an activated T lymphocyte subset, expressing a cytokine profile specific to the disease. To further characterize the type of immune reaction in SSc, we searched for a broad panel of cytokine messenger ribonucleic acids (mRNAs) in T lymphocytes and monocytes/macrophages from paired samples of bronchoalveolar lavage fluid and peripheral blood in 18 patients and 16 age- and sex-matched controls. RNA from CD3(+) T lymphocytes and CD14(+) monocytes/macrophages was examined by means of the reverse transcriptase polymerase chain reaction. SSc alveolar T lymphocytes expressed a cytokine profile suggestive of a mixed Th1/Th2 reaction, showing an increased frequency of mRNA for interleukin (IL)-10, IL-6 and interferon (IFN)γ, while IL-1β, IFNγ and tumour necrosis factor β were expressed in blood T lymphocytes in a higher percentage of patients with SSc than controls. SSc alveolar T cells expressed IL-10 mRNA more often than peripheral T cells, a phenomenon not found in controls and which may point at local IL-10 activation/response in SSc lung. Transforming growth factor β mRNA was present in all alveolar as well as peripheral blood T cell samples in patients and controls. The cytokine mRNA profile in SSc with interstitial lung disease (ILD) was similar to the profile found in SSc without ILD. Our findings point at a mixed Th1/Th2 reaction in SSc and may indicate regulatory T 1 cell activation/response in the lungs of patients with SSc.

  • 57.
    Andersen, Grethe Neumann
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine, Reumatology.
    Caidahl, Kenneth
    Sahlgrenska University Hospital, Göteborg, Sweden.
    Kazzam, Elsadig
    Petersson, Ann-Sofi
    Sahlgrenska University Hospital, Göteborg, Sweden.
    Waldenström, Anders
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine, Medicine.
    Mincheva-Nilsson, Lucia
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Clinical Microbiology, Clinical Immunology.
    Rantapää-Dahlqvist, Solbritt
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine, Reumatology.
    Correlation between increased nitric oxide production and markers of endothelial activation in systemic sclerosis: findings with the soluble adhesion molecules E-selectin, intercellular adhesion molecule 1, and vascular adhesion molecule 12000In: Arthritis and Rheumatism, ISSN 0004-3591, E-ISSN 1529-0131, Vol. 43, no 5, p. 1085-1093Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Objective To determine the relationship between vascular function and the inflammatory response in systemic sclerosis (SSc), and to investigate whether production of endothelial-derived nitric oxide (NO) is disturbed in this disease.

    Methods We measured plasma nitrate, urinary excretion of both nitrate and cGMP, and soluble adhesion molecules of endothelial origin in patients with SSc and in age- and sex-matched controls and compared these levels between groups. Additionally, we performed correlation analysis to determine how these variables were related to one another. Plasma nitrate and 24-hour-urinary excretion of nitrate in patients and controls were measured after a 72-hour nitrate-free-diet, using a gas chromatography/mass spectrometric method. Soluble adhesion molecules intercellular adhesion molecule 1 (sICAM-1), vascular cell adhesion molecule 1 (sVCAM-1), and E-selectin and cytokines were measured by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay. The expression of E-selectin was further investigated in skin biopsy specimens by immunoperoxidase staining, and the presence of inducible NO synthase by immunoblotting.

    Results Plasma nitrate and 24-hour-urinary-excretion of cGMP were significantly elevated in patients compared with controls, while 24-hour-urinary-excretion of nitrate tended to be elevated in SSc patients. Levels of sICAM-1, sVCAM-1, and sE-selectin were significantly elevated in the patients. Levels of plasma nitrate in the patients correlated significantly with levels of sVCAM-1 (P = 0.020) and sE-selectin (P = 0.018) and approached a significant correlation with sICAM-1 (P = 0.055), suggesting that activated endothelial cells may produce plasma nitrate.

    Conclusion NO synthesis is elevated in SSc patients, and the activated endothelial cell is a likely site of its production.

  • 58.
    Andersen, Grethe Neumann
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine, Reumatology.
    Mincheva-Nilsson, Lucia
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Clinical Microbiology, Clinical Immunology.
    Kazzam, Elsadig
    Mälar Hospital, Eskilstuna, Sweden.
    Nyberg, Gunnar
    Sahlgrenska University Hospital, Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Klintland, Natalia
    Sahlgrenska University Hospital, Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Petersson, Ann-Sofi
    Sahlgrenska University Hospital, Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Rantapää-Dahlqvist, Solbritt
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine, Reumatology.
    Waldenström, Anders
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine, Medicine.
    Caidahl, Kenneth
    Sahlgrenska University Hospital, Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Assessment of vascular function in systemic sclerosis: indications of the development of nitrate tolerance as a result of enhanced endothelial nitric oxide production2002In: Arthritis and Rheumatism, ISSN 0004-3591, E-ISSN 1529-0131, Vol. 46, no 5, p. 1324-1332Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    OBJECTIVE: To investigate the relationship between endothelium-dependent and endothelium-independent functions and the stiffness of conduit arteries as well as levels of endothelial activation markers in patients with systemic sclerosis (SSc).

    METHODS: Endothelium-dependent (i.e., flow-mediated) and endothelium-independent (i.e., nitroglycerin-induced) dilation of the brachial artery was measured as the percentage of change from baseline (FMD% and NTG%, respectively) in 24 SSc patients and 24 age- and sex-matched healthy controls by high-resolution ultrasound imaging. The maximum increase in systolic pressure per unit of time (dP/dt(max)), as a measure of arterial wall stiffness, was assessed in the radial artery by pulse applanation tonometry. Plasma nitrate, the most important metabolite of nitric oxide, and 24-hour urinary excretion of nitrate were measured by gas chromatography mass spectrometry. Soluble E-selectin and soluble vascular cell adhesion molecule 1 (sVCAM-1) were measured by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay.

    RESULTS: Brachial artery FMD% and NTG% did not differ between SSc patients and controls. Radial artery dP/dt(max) was significantly increased in the patients and correlated significantly with elevated levels of plasma nitrate and sVCAM-1. Twenty-four-hour urinary nitrate excretion tended to be elevated. Brachial artery NTG% was significantly inversely correlated with levels of plasma nitrate and soluble endothelial adhesion molecules.

    CONCLUSION: The ability of the brachial arteries to dilate in response to hyperemia and nitroglycerin challenge is preserved in SSc. Stiffness of the radial artery is increased, however. Endothelial activation seems to determine the extent of the brachial artery NTG% and the radial artery dP/dt(max). The data are compatible with the hypothesis that nitrate tolerance is present in the vascular smooth muscle cells of the brachial artery wall in SSc.

  • 59.
    Andersen, Grethe Neumann
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine, Reumatology.
    Nilsson, Kenneth
    Nagaeva, Olga
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Clinical Microbiology, Clinical Immunology.
    Rantapää-Dahlqvist, Solbritt
    Sandström, Thomas
    Mincheva-Nilsson, Lucia
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Clinical Microbiology, Clinical Immunology.
    Cytokine mRNA profile of alveolar T lymphocytes and macrophages in systemic sclerosis patients suggests Th1 and Th2 responseManuscript (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
  • 60.
    Andersen, Grethe Neumann
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine, Reumatology.
    Nilsson, Kenneth
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine, Pulmonary Medicine.
    Pourazar, Jamshid
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine, Pulmonary Medicine.
    Hackett, Tillie-Louise
    Kazzam, Elsadig
    Blomberg, Anders
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine, Pulmonary Medicine.
    Waldenström, Anders
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine.
    Warner, Jane
    Rantapää-Dahlqvist, Solbritt
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine, Reumatology.
    Mincheva-Nilsson, Lucia
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Clinical Microbiology, Clinical Immunology.
    Sandström, Thomas
    Bronchoalveolar matrix metalloproteinase 9 relates to restrictive lung function impairment in systemic sclerosis.2007In: Respiratory Medicine, ISSN 0954-6111, E-ISSN 1532-3064, Vol. 101, no 10, p. 2199-2206Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Systemic sclerosis (SSc) is frequently associated with interstitial lung disease (ILD) often leading to lung fibrosis. In this study we investigated whether matrix metalloproteinase 9 (MMP-9) and its natural inhibitor; the tissue inhibitor of matrix metalloproteinase 1 (TIMP-1), would be associated with remodelling in ILD in SSc. Levels of total MMP-9, pro-MMP-9 and TIMP-1 were measured in bronchoalveolar lavage (BAL) fluid from nine SSc patients with ILD, seven SSc patients without ILD and 16 age- and sex-matched healthy controls. Total MMP-9 and pro-MMP-9 levels were significantly elevated in SSc patients with ILD, compared to levels in SSc patients without ILD and healthy controls. In SSc patients with ILD calculated active MMP-9 levels were significantly higher than in SSc patients without ILD and tended to be higher than in healthy controls. TIMP-1 levels were elevated in both patient groups compared to healthy controls. Total-, pro- and active MMP-9 levels as well as pro-MMP-TIMP-1 and active MMP-9/TIMP-1 ratios were inversely associated with total lung capacity. The present study suggests that MMP-9 plays a pathophysiological role in the remodelling in ILD and lung fibrosis associated with SSc, and may represent a new therapeutic target in this condition.

  • 61. Andersen, M.
    et al.
    Nagaev, Ivan
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Clinical Microbiology, Clinical Immunology.
    Meyer, M. K.
    Nagaeva, Olga
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Clinical Microbiology, Clinical Immunology.
    Wikberg, J.
    Mincheva-Nilsson, Lucia
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Clinical Microbiology, Clinical Immunology.
    Andersen, G. N.
    Melanocortin 2, 3 and 4 Receptor Gene Expressions are Downregulated in CD8(+) T Cytotoxic Lymphocytes and CD19(+) B Lymphocytes in Rheumatoid Arthritis Responding to TNF- Inhibition2017In: Scandinavian Journal of Immunology, ISSN 0300-9475, E-ISSN 1365-3083, Vol. 86, no 1, p. 31-39Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Melanocortin signalling in leucocyte subsets elicits anti-inflammatory and immune tolerance inducing effects in animal experimental inflammation. In man, however, the effects of melanocortin signalling in inflammatory conditions have scarcely been examined. We explored the differential reactions of melanocortin 1-5 receptors (MC1-5R) gene expressions in pathogenetic leucocyte subsets in rheumatoid arthritis (RA) to treatment with TNF- inhibitor adalimumab. Seven patients with active RA donated blood at start and at 3-month treatment. CD4(+) T helper (h) lymphocytes (ly), CD8(+) T cytotoxic (c) ly, CD19(+) B ly and CD14(+) monocytes were isolated, using immunomagnetic beads, total RNA extracted and reverse transcription quantitative polymerase chain reaction (RT-qPCR) performed. Fold changes in MC1-5R, Th1-, inflammatory- and regulatory cytokine gene expressions were assessed for correlation. Six patients responded to adalimumab treatment, while one patient was non-responder. In all lymphocyte subtypes, MC1-5R gene expressions decreased in responders and increased in the non-responder. In responders, decrease in MC2R, MC3R and MC4R gene expressions in CD8(+) Tc and CD19(+) B ly was significant. Fold change in MC1-5R and IFN gene expressions correlated significantly in CD8(+) Tc ly, while fold change in MC1R, MC3R and MC5R and IL-1 gene expressions correlated significantly in CD4(+) Th ly. Our results show regulation of MC2R, MC3R and MC4R gene expressions in CD8(+) Tc ly and CD19(+) B ly. The correlations between fold change in different MCRs and disease driving cytokine gene expressions in CD8(+) Tc ly and CD4(+) Th ly point at a central immune modulating function of the melanocortin system in RA.

  • 62. Andersen, M.
    et al.
    Olesen, M. K.
    Nagaev, Ivan
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Clinical Microbiology, Clinical Immunology.
    Nagaeva, Olga
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Clinical Microbiology, Clinical Immunology.
    Wikberg, J.
    Mincheva-Nilsson, Lucia
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Clinical Microbiology, Clinical Immunology.
    Andersen, G. N.
    Vendsyssel Hosp, Clin Res Ctr, Rheumatol Unit, Hjorring, Denmark.
    Adalimumab (Humira (R)) normalizes melanocortin receptor subtype 2, 3, and 4 expression in CD8+, CD14+, and CD19+leucocyte subsets in rheumatoid arthritis2014In: Scandinavian Journal of Rheumatology, ISSN 0300-9742, E-ISSN 1502-7732, Vol. 43, no Suppl. 127, p. 25-26 Meeting Abstr. PP119Article in journal (Other academic)
  • 63. Andersen, Petter I.
    et al.
    Krpina, Klara
    Ianevski, Aleksandr
    Shtaida, Nastassia
    Jo, Eunji
    Yang, Jaewon
    Koit, Sandra
    Tenson, Tanel
    Hukkanen, Veijo
    Anthonsen, Marit W.
    Bjoras, Magnar
    Evander, Magnus
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Clinical Microbiology, Section of Virology.
    Windisch, Marc P.
    Zusinaite, Eva
    Kainov, Denis E.
    Novel Antiviral Activities of Obatoclax, Emetine, Niclosamide, Brequinar, and Homoharringtonine2019In: Viruses, ISSN 1999-4915, E-ISSN 1999-4915, Vol. 11, no 10, article id 964Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Viruses are the major causes of acute and chronic infectious diseases in the world. According to the World Health Organization, there is an urgent need for better control of viral diseases. Repurposing existing antiviral agents from one viral disease to another could play a pivotal role in this process. Here, we identified novel activities of obatoclax and emetine against herpes simplex virus type 2 (HSV-2), echovirus 1 (EV1), human metapneumovirus (HMPV) and Rift Valley fever virus (RVFV) in cell cultures. Moreover, we demonstrated novel activities of emetine against influenza A virus (FLUAV), niclosamide against HSV-2, brequinar against human immunodeficiency virus 1 (HIV-1), and homoharringtonine against EV1. Our findings may expand the spectrum of indications of these safe-in-man agents and reinforce the arsenal of available antiviral therapeutics pending the results of further in vitro and in vivo tests.

  • 64.
    Anderson, Filippa
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Clinical Microbiology, Biomedical Laboratory Science.
    Förändrat uttryck av Epidermal Growth Factor Receptors ligander i androgenoberoende prostata-cancer2012Independent thesis Basic level (degree of Bachelor), 10 credits / 15 HE creditsStudent thesis
  • 65.
    Andersson, Emma
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Clinical Microbiology, Virology.
    Human adenoviruses: new bioassays for antiviral screening and CD46 interaction2010Doctoral thesis, comprehensive summary (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Adenoviruses are common pathogens all over the world. The majority of the population has at some point been infected with an adenovirus. Although severe disease can occur in otherwise healthy individuals an adenovirus infection is most commonly self limited in these cases. For immunocompromised individuals however, adenoviruses can be life-threatening pathogens capable of causing disseminated disease and multiple organ failure. Still there is no approved drug specific for treatment of adenovirus infections. We have addressed this using a unique whole cell viral replication reporter gene assay to screen small organic molecules for anti-adenoviral effect. This RCAd11pGFP-vector based assay allowed screening without any preconceived idea of the mechanism for adenovirus inhibition. As a result of the screening campaign 2-[[2-(benzoylamino)benzoyl]amino]-benzoic acid turned out to be a potent inhibitor of adenoviral replication. To establish a structure-activity relationship a number of analogs were synthesized and evaluated for their anti-adenoviral effect. The carboxylic acid moiety of the molecule was important for efficient inhibition of adenovirus replication.

    There are 54 adenovirus types characterized today and these are divided into seven species, A-G. The receptors used by species B and other adenoviruses are not fully characterized. CD46 is a complement regulatory molecule suggested to be used by all species B types and some species D types but this is not established. We have designed a new bioassay for assessment of the interaction between adenoviruses and CD46 and investigated the CD46-binding capacity of adenovirus types indicated to interact with CD46. We concluded that Ad11p, Ad34, Ad35, and Ad50 clearly bind CD46 specifically, whereas Ad3p, Ad7p, Ad14, and Ad37 do not.

    CD46 is expressed on all human nucleated cells and serves as a receptor for a number of different bacteria and viruses. Downregulation of CD46 on the cell surface occurs upon binding by some of these pathogens. We show that early in infection Ad11p virions downregulate CD46 upon binding to a much higher extent than the complement regulatory molecules CD55 and CD59.

    These findings may lead to a better understanding of the pathogenesis of adenoviruses in general and species B adenoviruses in particular and hopefully we have discovered a molecule that can be the basis for development of new anti-adenoviral drugs.

  • 66.
    Andersson, Emma K
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Clinical Microbiology, Virology.
    Mei, Ya-Fang
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Clinical Microbiology, Virology.
    Wadell, Göran
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Umeå Centre for Microbial Research (UCMR). Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Clinical Microbiology, Virology.
    Adenovirus interactions with CD46 on transgenic mouse erythrocytes2010In: Virology, ISSN 0042-6822, E-ISSN 1096-0341, Vol. 402, no 1, p. 20-25Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Hemagglutination is an established method but has not been used previously to determine the efficacy of virus binding to a specific cellular receptor. Here we have utilized CD46-expressing erythrocytes from a transgenic mouse to establish whether and to what extent the species B adenoviruses (Ads) as well as Ad37 and Ad49 of species D can interact with CD46. A number of different agglutination patterns, and hence CD46 interactions, could be observed for the different adenovirus types. In this system Ad7p, Ad11a, and Ad14 did not agglutinate mouse erythrocytes at all. Hemagglutination of CD46 expressing erythrocytes with high efficiency was observed for the previously established CD46 users Ad11p and Ad35 as well as for the less investigated Ad34. Ad50 agglutinated with moderate efficiency. Ad16, Ad21 and Ad49 gave incomplete agglutination. Ad16 was the only adenovirus that could be eluted. No specific CD46 interaction could be observed for Ad3p or for Ad37.

  • 67.
    Andersson, Emma K
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Clinical Microbiology, Virology.
    Strand, Mårten
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Clinical Microbiology, Virology.
    Edlund, Karin
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Clinical Microbiology, Virology.
    Lindman, Kristina
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Clinical Microbiology, Virology.
    Enquist, Per-Anders
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Department of Chemistry.
    Spjut, Sara
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Department of Chemistry.
    Allard, Annika
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Clinical Microbiology, Virology.
    Elofsson, Mikael
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Department of Chemistry.
    Mei, Ya-Fang
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Clinical Microbiology, Virology.
    Wadell, Göran
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Clinical Microbiology, Virology.
    Small molecule screening using a whole cell viral replication reporter gene assay identifies 2-{[2-(benzoylamino)benzoyl]amino}-benzoic acid as a novel anti-adenoviral compound2010In: Antimicrobial Agents and Chemotherapy, ISSN 0066-4804, E-ISSN 1098-6596, Vol. 54, no 9, p. 3871-3877Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Adenovirus infections are widespread in society and are occasionally associated with severe, but rarely with life-threatening, disease in otherwise healthy individuals. In contrast, adenovirus infections present a real threat to immunocompromised individuals and can result in disseminated and fatal disease. The number of patients undergoing immunosuppressive therapy for solid organ or hematopoietic stem cell transplantation is steadily increasing, as is the number of AIDS patients, and this makes the problem of adenovirus infections even more urgent to solve. There is no formally approved treatment of adenovirus infections today, and existing antiviral agents evaluated for their anti-adenoviral effect give inconsistent results. We have developed a whole cell-based assay for high-throughput screening of potential anti-adenoviral compounds. The assay is unique in that it is based on a replication competent adenovirus type 11p GFP-expressing vector (RCAd11pGFP). This allows measurement of fluorescence changes as a direct result of RCAd11pGFP genome expression. Using this assay, we have screened 9,800 commercially available small organic compounds. Initially, we observed approximately 400 compounds that inhibited adenovirus expression in vitro by >/= 80% but only 24 were later confirmed as dose-dependent inhibitors of adenovirus. One compound in particular, 2-[[2-(benzoylamino)benzoyl]amino]-benzoic acid, turned out to be a potent inhibitor of adenovirus replication.

  • 68.
    Andersson, Henrik
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Clinical Microbiology.
    A microarray analysis of the host response to infection with Francisella tularensis2006Doctoral thesis, comprehensive summary (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Francisella tularensis is a gram-negative bacterium that is the cause of the serious and sometimes fatal disease, tularemia, in a wide range of animal species and in humans. The response of cells of the mouse macrophage cell line J774 to infection with Francisella tularensis LVS was analyzed by means of a DNA microarray. It was observed that the infection conferred an oxidative stress upon the target cells and many of the host defense mechanisms appeared to be intended to counteract this stress. The infection was characterized by a very modest inflammatory response.

    Tularemia caused by inhalation of F. tularensis subspecies tularensis is one of the most aggressive infectious diseases known. We used the mouse model to examine in detail the host immune response in the lung. After an aerosol challenge all mice developed clinical signs of severe disease, showed weight loss by day four of infection, and died the next day. Gene transcriptional changes in the mouse lung samples were examined on day one, two, and four of infection. Genes preferentially involved in host immune responses were activated extensively on day four but on day one and two, only marginally or not at all. Several genes upregulated on day four are known to depend on IFN-gamma or TNF-alpha for their regulation. In keeping with this finding, TNF-alpha and IFN-gamma levels were found to be increased significantly in bronchoalveolar lavage on day four.

    We undertook an analysis of the transcriptional response in peripheral blood during the course of ulceroglandular tularemia by use of Affymetrix microarrays. Samples were obtained from seven individuals at five occasions during two weeks after the first hospital visit and convalescent samples three months later. In total 265 genes were differentially expressed. The most prominent changes were noted in samples drawn on days 2-3 and a considerable proportion of the upregulated genes appeared to represent an IFN-gamma-induced response and also a pro-apoptotic response. Genes involved in the generation of innate and acquired immune responses were found to be downregulated, presumably a pathogen-induced event. A logistic regression analysis revealed that seven genes were good predictors of the early phase of tularemia.

    Recently, a large number of methods for the analysis of microarray data have been proposed but there are few comparisons of their relative performances. We undertook a study to evaluate established and novel methods for filtration, background adjustment, scanning, and censoring. For all analyses, the sensitivities at low false positive rates were observed together with a bias measurement. In general, there was a trade off between the analyses ability to identify differentially expressed genes and their ability to obtain unbiased estimators of the desired ratios. A commonly used standard analysis using background adjustment performed poorly. Interestingly, the constrained model combining data from several scans resulted in high sensitivities. For experiments where only low false discovery rates are acceptable, the use of the constrained model or the novel partial filtration method are likely to perform better than some commonly used standard analyses.

  • 69.
    Andersson, Henrik
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Clinical Microbiology, Clinical Bacteriology.
    Hartmanova (Andersson), Blanka
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Clinical Microbiology, Clinical Bacteriology.
    Landfors, Mattias
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Clinical Microbiology, Clinical Bacteriology.
    Ryden, Patrik
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Mathematics and Mathematical Statistics.
    Noppa, Laila
    FOI, Umeå (Swedish Defence Research Agency).
    Näslund, Linda
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Clinical Microbiology, Clinical Bacteriology.
    Näslund, A.
    T A microarray analysis of the murine macrophage response to infection with Francisella tularensis LVS2006In: Journal of Medical Microbiology, ISSN 0022-2615, E-ISSN 1473-5644, Vol. 55, no 8, p. 1023-1033Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 70.
    Andersson, Henrik
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Clinical Microbiology, Clinical Bacteriology.
    Hartmanova, Blanka
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Clinical Microbiology, Clinical Bacteriology.
    Bäck, Erik
    Universitetssjukhuset i Örebro.
    Eliasson, Henrik
    Universitetssjukhuset i Örebro.
    Landfors, Mattias
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Clinical Microbiology, Clinical Bacteriology.
    Näslund, Linda
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Clinical Microbiology, Clinical Bacteriology.
    Ryden, Patrik
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Clinical Microbiology, Clinical Bacteriology.
    Sjöstedt, Anders
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Clinical Microbiology, Clinical Bacteriology.
    Transcriptional profiling of the peripheral blood response during tularemia.2006In: Genes and Immunity, ISSN 1466-4879, E-ISSN 1476-5470, Vol. 7, no 6, p. 503-513Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 71.
    Andersson, Henrik
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Clinical Microbiology, Clinical Bacteriology.
    Hartmanova, Blanka
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Clinical Microbiology, Clinical Bacteriology.
    Kuolee, R.
    Ryden, Patrik
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Department of Mathematics and Mathematical Statistics.
    Conlan, Wayne
    NRC, Kanada.
    Chen, Wang
    Sjöstedt, Anders
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Clinical Microbiology, Clinical Bacteriology.
    Transcriptional profiling of the host responses in mouse lungs following aerosol2006In: Journal of Medical Microbiology, ISSN 0022-2615, E-ISSN 1473-5644, Vol. 55, no 3, p. 263-271Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 72.
    Andersson, Henrik
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Clinical Microbiology, Clinical Bacteriology.
    Hartmanová, Blanka
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Clinical Microbiology, Clinical Bacteriology.
    KuoLee, Rhonda
    Rydén, Patrik
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Clinical Microbiology, Clinical Bacteriology.
    Conlan, Wayne
    NRC, Kanada.
    Chen, Wangxue
    Sjöstedt, Anders
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Clinical Microbiology, Clinical Bacteriology.
    Transcriptional profiling of host responses in mouse lungs following aerosol infection with type A Francisella tularensis2006In: Journal of Medical Microbiology, ISSN 0022-2615, E-ISSN 1473-5644, Vol. 55, no 3, p. 263-271Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 73.
    Andersson, Henrik
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Clinical Microbiology, Clinical Bacteriology.
    Hartmanová, Blanka
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Clinical Microbiology, Clinical Bacteriology.
    Rydén, Patrik
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Clinical Microbiology, Clinical Bacteriology.
    Näslund, Linda
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Clinical Microbiology, Clinical Bacteriology.
    Noppa, Laila
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Clinical Microbiology, Clinical Bacteriology.
    Sjöstedt, Anders
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Clinical Microbiology, Clinical Bacteriology.
    A microarray analysis of the host response to intracellular infection with Francisella tularensis LVSManuscript (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
  • 74. Andersson, Ida
    et al.
    Simon, Melinda
    Lundkvist, Ake
    Nilsson, Mikael
    Holmström, Anna
    Swedish Defence Research Agency, Division of CBRN Defence and Security, SE-901 82 Umeå, Sweden.
    Elgh, Fredrik
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Biosciences, Pathology. Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Clinical Microbiology, Virology.
    Mirazimi, Ali
    Role of actin filaments in targeting of Crimean Congo hemorrhagic fever virus nucleocapsid protein to perinuclear regions of mammalian cells.2004In: J Med Virol, ISSN 0146-6615, Vol. 72, no 1, p. 83-93Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 75.
    Andersson, Paulina
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Clinical Microbiology, Biomedical Laboratory Science.
    Autolog adsorptionsteknik hos nytransfunderad patient med autoantikroppar – en experimentell metodutvärdering.2018Independent thesis Basic level (professional degree), 10 credits / 15 HE creditsStudent thesis
  • 76.
    Andersson, Simon
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Clinical Microbiology, Biomedical Laboratory Science.
    Binding of Norovirus-Like Particles to Integrin Expressing CHO Cells2017Independent thesis Basic level (professional degree), 10 credits / 15 HE creditsStudent thesis
  • 77.
    Andersson, Simon
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Clinical Microbiology, Virology.
    Binding of Norovirus-like particles to integrin expressing CHO cells2016Independent thesis Basic level (degree of Bachelor), 10 credits / 15 HE creditsStudent thesis
  • 78.
    Andersson, T
    et al.
    Department of Mathematics, Stockholm University, Sweden and Swedish Institute for National Food Agency (SLV), Sweden and Communicable Disease Control (SMI), Solna, Sweden.
    Bjelkmar, P
    Swedish Institute for Communicable Disease Control (SMI), Solna, Sweden, and Inera AB, Sweden.
    Hulth, A
    Swedish Institute for Communicable Disease Control (SMI), Solna, Sweden.
    Lindh, J
    Department of Microbiology, Tumour and Cell Biology, Karolinska Institutet, Sweden and Swedish Institute for Communicable Disease Control (SMI), Solna, Sweden.
    Stenmark, Stephan
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Clinical Microbiology, Infectious Diseases. County Medical Officer, Västerbotten, Sweden.
    Widerström, Micael
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Clinical Microbiology, Clinical Bacteriology. Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Clinical Microbiology, Infectious Diseases.
    Syndromic surveillance for local outbreak detection and awareness: evaluating outbreak signals of acute gastroenteritis in telephone triage, web-based queries and over-the-counter pharmacy sales2014In: Epidemiology and Infection, ISSN 0950-2688, E-ISSN 1469-4409, Vol. 142, no 2, p. 303-313Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    For the purpose of developing a national system for outbreak surveillance, local outbreak signals were compared in three sources of syndromic data - telephone triage of acute gastroenteritis, web queries about symptoms of gastrointestinal illness, and over-the-counter (OTC) pharmacy sales of antidiarrhoeal medication. The data sources were compared against nine known waterborne and foodborne outbreaks in Sweden in 2007-2011. Outbreak signals were identified for the four largest outbreaks in the telephone triage data and the two largest outbreaks in the data on OTC sales of antidiarrhoeal medication. No signals could be identified in the data on web queries. The signal magnitude for the fourth largest outbreak indicated a tenfold larger outbreak than officially reported, supporting the use of telephone triage data for situational awareness. For the two largest outbreaks, telephone triage data on adult diarrhoea provided outbreak signals at an early stage, weeks and months in advance, respectively, potentially serving the purpose of early event detection. In conclusion, telephone triage data provided the most promising source for surveillance of point-source outbreaks.

  • 79.
    Andersson, Viktor
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Clinical Microbiology, Biomedical Laboratory Science.
    Vänsterkammarfunktion hos cancerpatienter som erhållit hjärttoxisk behandling: Intraobservatörvariabilitet för systoliska funktionsmått utvärderad med ekokardiografi2018Independent thesis Basic level (professional degree), 10 credits / 15 HE creditsStudent thesis
  • 80.
    Andersson, Yvonne
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Clinical Sciences, Paediatrics.
    Hammarström, Marie-Louise
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Clinical Microbiology, Immunology/Immunchemistry.
    Lönnerdal, Bo
    Department of Nutrition, University of California, Davis, CA 95616.
    Graverholt, Gitte
    Arla Foods Ingredients, Aarhus, Denmark.
    Fält, Helen
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Clinical Sciences, Paediatrics.
    Hernell, Olle
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Clinical Sciences, Paediatrics.
    Formula feeding skews immune cell composition toward adaptive immunity compared to breastfeeding2009In: Journal of Immunology, ISSN 0022-1767, E-ISSN 1550-6606, Vol. 183, no 7, p. 4322-4328Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The ontogeny of the immune system and the effect thereon by type of infant feeding is incompletely understood. We analyzed frequencies and composition of immune cells in blood of breastfed (BF) and formula-fed (FF) infants at 1.5, 4, and 6 mo of age. Three formulas with the same protein concentration but with varying levels of alpha-lactalbumin and caseinoglycomacropeptide were compared. Twenty-nine exclusively BF infants served as reference, and 17 infants in each formula group completed the study. Whole blood and PBMCs were analyzed by flow cytometry and immunoflow cytometry, respectively. Leukocyte count of BF infants increased with time due to increased frequency of neutrophils. Lymphocyte count was high at 1.5 mo and was unchanged over time, as were the relative proportions of CD4+ alphabetaT cells, CD8+ alphabetaT cells, B cells, NK cells, and gammadeltaT cells. Most CD45R0+CD3+ cells were HLA-DR- and hence memory cells. Compared with breastfeeding, formula feeding resulted in a significant decrease in proportion of NK cells, but a significant increase in naive CD4+ alphabetaT cells and an elevated CD4-to-CD8 ratio, that is, 3.3 in the combined FF groups compared with 2.6 in the BF group. No significant differences were found between the three groups of FF infants. In conclusion, blood cells of lymphoid lineage did not change significantly in frequencies or composition from 1.5 to 6 mo of age in BF infants. In contrast, FF infants displayed an ongoing maturation of adaptive immunity cells and a delayed recruitment of innate immunity cells as compared with BF infants.

  • 81.
    Andersson-Evelönn, Emma
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Biosciences, Pathology.
    Vidman, Linda
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Department of Mathematics and Mathematical Statistics.
    Källberg, David
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Department of Mathematics and Mathematical Statistics. Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Umeå School of Business and Economics (USBE), Statistics.
    Landfors, Mattias
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Biosciences, Pathology.
    Liu, Xijia
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Department of Mathematics and Mathematical Statistics.
    Ljungberg, Börje
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Surgical and Perioperative Sciences, Urology and Andrology.
    Hultdin, Magnus
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Biosciences, Pathology.
    Degerman, Sofie
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Biosciences, Pathology. Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Clinical Microbiology.
    Rydén, Patrik
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Department of Mathematics and Mathematical Statistics.
    Combining epigenetic and clinicopathological variables improves prognostic prediction in clear cell Renal Cell CarcinomaManuscript (preprint) (Other academic)
  • 82. Andrii, Dudnyk
    et al.
    Matthew, Burman
    Ludmyla, Kulyk
    Olena, Rzhepishevska
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Department of Chemistry. Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Clinical Microbiology.
    M/XDR‐TB treatment perspective: how to avoid mountains of pills via digital technologies2018In: Respirology (Carlton South. Print), ISSN 1323-7799, E-ISSN 1440-1843, Vol. 23, no 6, p. 636-637Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 83.
    Angelin, Martin
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Clinical Microbiology, Infectious Diseases.
    Travel – a risk factor for disease and spread of antibiotic resistance2015Doctoral thesis, comprehensive summary (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    As international travel is rapidly increasing, more people are being exposed to potentially more antibiotic resistant bacteria, a changed infectious disease epidemiology, and an increased risk of accidents and crime. Research-based advice is needed to adequately inform travellers about these risks. We studied travellers who sought advice from the Travel Medicine Clinic at the Department of Infectious Diseases, Umeå University Hospital, as well as university students from Umeå, Stockholm, and Gothenburg travelling abroad for study, research, and clinical exchange programs.

    From retrospective data at the Travel Medicine Clinic, we found that pre-existing health problems were rare among travellers from Umeå seeking pre- travel health advice and vaccinations. In addition, we found that the travel destination and the sex of the traveller affected vaccination levels. Although hepatitis A is endemic to both Thailand and Turkey, compared to travellers to Thailand few travellers to Turkey visited the clinic for hepatitis A vaccination. The data also revealed that more women than men were vaccinated against Japanese encephalitis despite comparable trips.

    A prospective survey study showed that travellers felt that the pre-travel health advice they received was helpful. Two-thirds of the travellers followed the advice given although they still fell ill to the same extent as those who were not compliant with the advice. Factors outside the control of travellers likely affect the travel-related morbidity. Compared to older travellers, younger travellers were less compliant with advice, fell ill to a greater extent, and took greater risks during travel.

    In a prospective survey study, we found that healthcare students had higher illness rates and risk exposure when abroad compared to students from other disciplines. This difference was mainly due to the fact that healthcare students more often travelled to developing regions during their study period abroad. When abroad, half of all students increased their alcohol consumption and this was linked to an increased risk of theft and higher likelihood of meeting a new sex partner.

    The healthcare students participating in the survey study also submitted stool samples before and after travel. These samples were tested for the presence of antibiotic resistance, both by selective culturing for ESBL-PE (Extended-Spectrum Beta-Lactamase Producing Enterobacteriaceae) as well as by metagenomic sequencing. About one-third (35%) of the students became colonised by ESBL-PE following their study abroad. The strongest risk factor for colonisation was travel destination; for example, 70% of students who had travelled to India became colonised. Antibiotic treatment during travel was also a significant risk factor for colonisation.

    The stool samples from a subset of study subjects were analysed using metagenomic sequencing. From this we learned that although the majority of resistance genes in the gut microbiome remained unchanged following travel, several clinically important resistance genes increased, most prominently genes encoding resistance to sulphonamide, trimethoprim, and beta-lactams. Overall, taxonomic changes associated with travel were small but the proportion of Proteobacteria, which includes several clinically important bacteria (e.g., Enterobacteriaceae), increased in a majority of the study subjects.

    Clearly, there are risks associated with international travel and these risks include outside factors as well as the personal behaviour of travellers. We believe our results can be used to develop better pre-travel advice for tourists as well as university students studying abroad resulting in safer travel.

  • 84.
    Angelin, Martin
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Clinical Microbiology.
    Evengård, Birgitta
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Clinical Microbiology.
    Palmgren, Helena
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Clinical Microbiology.
    Illness and risk behaviour in health care students studying abroad2015In: Medical Education, ISSN 0308-0110, E-ISSN 1365-2923, Vol. 49, no 7, p. 684-691Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Context: The numbers of university students studying abroad increase every year. These students are not tourists as their studies require different types of travel that expose them to different risks. Moreover, health care students (HCSs) may be exposed to even greater risks according to their travel destinations and itineraries. Clearly, research-based pre-travel advice is needed.

    Methods: This study reports on a prospective survey conducted from April 2010 to January 2014 of health care and non-health care students from Swedish universities in Umeå, Stockholm and Gothenburg studying abroad.

    Results: Of the 393 students included in the study, 85% responded. Over half (55%) were HCSs. Pre-travel health information was received by 79% and information on personal safety by 49% of HCSs. The rate of illness during travel was 52%. Health care students more often travelled to developing regions and were at increased risk for travellers' diarrhoea. One in 10 experienced theft and 3% were involved in traffic accidents. One in five met a new sexual partner during travel and 65% of these practised safe sex. Half of all participants increased their alcohol consumption while abroad; high alcohol consumption was associated with increased risk for being a victim of theft, as well as for meeting a new sexual partner during travel.

    Conclusions: University authorities are responsible for the safety and well-being of students studying abroad. This study supplies organisers and students with epidemiological data that will help improve pre-travel preparation and increase student awareness of the potential risks associated with studying abroad.

  • 85.
    Angelin, Martin
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Clinical Microbiology, Infectious Diseases.
    Evengård, Birgitta
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Clinical Microbiology, Infectious Diseases.
    Palmgren, Helena
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Clinical Microbiology, Infectious Diseases.
    Travel and vaccination patterns: a report from a travel medicine clinic in northern Sweden2011In: Scandinavian Journal of Infectious Diseases, ISSN 0036-5548, E-ISSN 1651-1980, Vol. 43, no 9, p. 714-720Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    BACKGROUND: The Travel Medicine Clinic in Umeå is one of Sweden's largest public providers of vaccination and counselling prior to international travel. During the study period it was the only travel medicine clinic in Umeå. This study describes the demography of the visitors to the clinic and travel destinations and durations, as well as vaccinations administered. METHODS: This was a retrospective study for the period January 2005 to April 2008 based on pre-travel consultation questionnaires and on vaccine expenditure data. A 10% sample of 16,735 first visits prior to international travel was consecutively selected according to the chronology of the visits. RESULTS: Data on 1698 travellers were included in the study. Thailand was the most common destination among visitors, accounting for one third of all destinations. Medical problems affecting pre-travel health planning were rare. Four out of 5 visitors (79%) received only 1 vaccination, mainly for hepatitis A. Travellers to Thailand more often sought travel health advice compared to travellers to Turkey, despite the fact that the 2 destinations were almost equally distributed among travellers from Umeå. We found differences between men and women in money spent on vaccines and in particular in vaccination against Japanese encephalitis. CONCLUSIONS: To assess the optimal vaccination level at a travel medicine clinic is difficult. Decisions are affected by general recommendations and the risk perception of the travel medicine practitioner, as well as the risk perception of the traveller. The sex difference found in this study might be due to gender differences in risk perception and should be further investigated.

  • 86.
    Angelin, Martin
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Clinical Microbiology, Infectious Diseases.
    Evengård, Birgitta
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Clinical Microbiology, Infectious Diseases.
    Palmgren, Helena
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Clinical Microbiology, Infectious Diseases.
    Travel health advice: Benefits, compliance, and outcome2014In: Scandinavian Journal of Infectious Diseases, ISSN 0036-5548, E-ISSN 1651-1980, Vol. 46, no 6, p. 447-453Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: Travel health advice is an important and difficult part of a pre-travel consultation. The aim of this study was to determine whether the travel health advice given is followed by the traveller and whether it affects disease and injury experienced during travel. Methods: A prospective survey study was carried out from October 2009 to April 2012 at the Travel Medicine Clinic of the Department of Infectious Diseases, Umea University Hospital, Umea, Sweden. The Travel Medicine Clinic in Umea is the largest travel clinic in northern Sweden. Results: We included 1277 individuals in the study; 1059 (83%) responded to the post-travel questionnaire. Most visitors (88%) remembered having received travel health advice; among these, 95% found some of the health advice useful. Two-thirds (67%) claimed to have followed the advice, but fell ill during travel to the same extent as those who did not. Younger travellers (< 31 y) found our travel health advice less beneficial, were less compliant with the advice, took more risks during travel, and fell ill during travel to a greater extent than older travellers. Conclusions: Helping travellers stay healthy during travel is the main goal of travel medicine. Younger travellers are a risk group for illness during travel and there is a need to find new methods to help them avoid illness. Travellers find travel health advice useful, but it does not protect them from travel-related illness. Factors not easily influenced by the traveller play a role, but a comprehensive analysis of the benefits of travel health advice is needed.

  • 87.
    Angelin, Martin
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Clinical Microbiology, Infectious Diseases.
    Forsell, Joakim
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Clinical Microbiology, Clinical Bacteriology.
    Granlund, Margareta
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Clinical Microbiology, Clinical Bacteriology.
    Evengård, Birgitta
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Clinical Microbiology, Infectious Diseases.
    Palmgren, Helena
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Clinical Microbiology, Infectious Diseases.
    Johansson, Anders
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Clinical Microbiology, Clinical Bacteriology. Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Molecular Infection Medicine Sweden (MIMS).
    Risk factors for colonization with extended-spectrum beta-lactamase producing Enterobacteriaceae in healthcare students on clinical assignment abroad: A prospective study2015In: Travel Medicine and Infectious Disease, ISSN 1477-8939, E-ISSN 1873-0442, Vol. 13, no 3, p. 223-229Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: The increase of antibiotic resistance in clinically important bacteria is a worldwide threat, especially in healthcare environments. International travel is a risk factor for gut colonization with extended-spectrum beta-lactamase-producing Enterobacteriaceae (ESBL-PE). The risk for healthcare students of being colonized with ESBL-PE when participating in patient-related work abroad has not been previously investigated. Methods: Swedish healthcare students travelling for pre-clinical and clinical courses outside Scandinavia submitted faecal samples and survey data before and after travel. The faecal samples were screened for ESBL-PE and carbapenemase-producing Enterobacteriaceae (CPE). Screening results and survey data were analysed to identify risk factors for colonization. Results: In the 99 subjects who submitted a full set of samples, 35% were colonized with a new ESBL-PE strain during travel. No CPE was found. The most important risk factor for ESBL-PE colonization was travel destination, and the highest colonization rate was found in the South East Asia region. Antibiotic treatment during travel was an independent risk factor for ESBL-PE colonization but patient-related work was not significantly associated with an increased risk. Conclusions: Patient-related work abroad was not a risk factor for ESBL-PE suggesting that transmission from patients is uncommon. Pre-travel advice on avoiding unnecessary antibiotic treatment during travel is recommended.

  • 88.
    Antti, Henrik
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Department of Chemistry.
    Fahlgren, Anna
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Molecular Biology (Faculty of Medicine). Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Umeå Centre for Microbial Research (UCMR).
    Näsström, Elin
    Umeå University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Department of Chemistry.
    Kouremenos, Konstantinos
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Molecular Biology (Faculty of Medicine). Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Molecular Infection Medicine Sweden (MIMS). Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Umeå Centre for Microbial Research (UCMR).
    Sundén-Cullberg, Jonas
    Guo, Yongzhi
    Moritz, Thomas
    Wolf-Watz, Hans
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Molecular Biology (Faculty of Medicine). Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Molecular Infection Medicine Sweden (MIMS). Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Umeå Centre for Microbial Research (UCMR).
    Johansson, Anders
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Clinical Microbiology, Infectious Diseases.
    Fällman, Maria
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Molecular Biology (Faculty of Medicine). Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Molecular Infection Medicine Sweden (MIMS). Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Umeå Centre for Microbial Research (UCMR).
    Metabolic profiling for detection of staphylococcus aureus infection and antibiotic resistance2013In: PLoS ONE, ISSN 1932-6203, E-ISSN 1932-6203, Vol. 8, no 2, article id e56971Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Due to slow diagnostics, physicians must optimize antibiotic therapies based on clinical evaluation of patients without specific information on causative bacteria. We have investigated metabolomic analysis of blood for the detection of acute bacterial infection and early differentiation between ineffective and effective antibiotic treatment. A vital and timely therapeutic difficulty was thereby addressed: the ability to rapidly detect treatment failures because of antibiotic-resistant bacteria. Methicillin-resistant (MRSA) and methicillin-sensitive (MSSA) were used and for infecting mice, while natural MSSA infection was studied in humans. Samples of bacterial growth media, the blood of infected mice and of humans were analyzed with combined Gas Chromatography/Mass Spectrometry. Multivariate data analysis was used to reveal the metabolic profiles of infection and the responses to different antibiotic treatments. experiments resulted in the detection of 256 putative metabolites and mice infection experiments resulted in the detection of 474 putative metabolites. Importantly, ineffective and effective antibiotic treatments were differentiated already two hours after treatment start in both experimental systems. That is, the ineffective treatment of MRSA using cloxacillin and untreated controls produced one metabolic profile while all effective treatment combinations using cloxacillin or vancomycin for MSSA or MRSA produced another profile. For further evaluation of the concept, blood samples of humans admitted to intensive care with severe sepsis were analyzed. One hundred thirty-three putative metabolites differentiated severe MSSA sepsis (n = 6) from severe sepsis (n = 10) and identified treatment responses over time. Combined analysis of human, , and mice samples identified 25 metabolites indicative of effective treatment of sepsis. Taken together, this study provides a proof of concept of the utility of analyzing metabolite patterns in blood for early differentiation between ineffective and effective antibiotic treatment in acute infections.

  • 89. Aoki, Koki
    et al.
    Benkö, Mária
    Davison, Andrew J
    De Jong, Jan C
    Echavarria, Marcela
    Erdman, Dean D
    Harrach, Balázs
    Kajon, Adriana E
    Schnurr, David
    Wadell, Göran
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Clinical Microbiology, Virology.
    Towards an integrated human adenovirus designation system that utilizes molecular and serological data and serves both clinical and fundamental virology2011In: Journal of Virology, ISSN 0022-538X, E-ISSN 1098-5514, Vol. 85, no 11, p. 5703-5704Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 90. Aplander, Karolina
    et al.
    Marttila, Marko
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Clinical Microbiology, Virology.
    Manner, Sophie
    Arnberg, Niklas
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Clinical Microbiology, Virology.
    Sterner, Olov
    Ellervik, Ulf
    Molecular wipes: application to epidemic keratoconjuctivitis2011In: Journal of Medicinal Chemistry, ISSN 0022-2623, E-ISSN 1520-4804, Vol. 54, no 19, p. 6670-6675Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Epidemic keratoconjunctivitis (EKC) is a severe disease of the eye, caused by members of the Adenoviridae (Ad) family, with symptoms such as keratitis, conjunctivitis, pain, edema, and reduced vision that may last for months or years. There are no vaccines or antiviral drugs available to prevent or treat EKC. It was found previously that EKC-causing Ads use sialic acid as a cellular receptor and demonstrated that soluble, sialic acid-containing molecules can prevent infection. In this study, multivalent sialic acid constructs based on 10,12-pentacosadiynoic acid (PDA) have been synthesized, and these constructs are shown to be efficient inhibitors of Ad binding (IC(50) = 0.9 mu M) and Ad infectivity (IC(50) = 0.7 mu M). The mechanism of action is to aggregate virus particles and thereby prevent them from binding to ocular cells. Such formulations may be used for topical treatment of adenovirus-caused EKC.

  • 91.
    Arabi, Thyba
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Clinical Microbiology, Biomedical Laboratory Science. Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine, Medicine.
    Cajal cellernas roll i mag-tarm komplikationer hos patienter med transtyretin amyloidos2017Independent thesis Basic level (professional degree), 10 credits / 15 HE creditsStudent thesis
  • 92. Ariza-Miguel, Jaime
    et al.
    Johansson, Anders
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Clinical Microbiology, Infectious Diseases.
    Fernández-Natal, María Isabel
    Martínez-Nistal, Carmen
    Orduña, Antonio
    Rodríguez-Ferri, Elías F
    Hernández, Marta
    Rodríguez-Lázaro, David
    Molecular investigation of tularemia outbreaks, Spain, 1997-20082014In: Emerging Infectious Diseases, ISSN 1080-6040, E-ISSN 1080-6059, Vol. 20, no 5, p. 754-761Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Tularemia outbreaks occurred in northwestern Spain in 1997-1998 and 2007-2008 and affected >1,000 persons. We assessed isolates involved in these outbreaks by using pulsed-field gel electrophoresis with 2 restriction enzymes and multilocus variable number tandem repeat analysis of 16 genomic loci of Francisella tularensis, the cause of this disease. Isolates were divided into 3 pulsotypes by pulsed-field gel electrophoresis and 8 allelic profiles by multilocus variable number tandem repeat analysis. Isolates obtained from the second tularemia outbreak had the same genotypes as isolates obtained from the first outbreak. Both outbreaks were caused by genotypes of genetic subclade B.Br:FTNF002-00, which is widely distributed in countries in central and western Europe. Thus, reemergence of tularemia in Spain was not caused by the reintroduction of exotic strains, but probably by persistence of local reservoirs of infection.

  • 93.
    Arnberg, Niklas
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Clinical Microbiology, Virology.
    Adenovirus E3 protein modulates leukocyte functions2013In: Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences of the United States of America, ISSN 0027-8424, E-ISSN 1091-6490, Vol. 110, no 50, p. 19976-19977Article in journal (Other academic)
  • 94.
    Arnberg, Niklas
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Clinical Microbiology, Virology.
    Adenovirus receptors: implications for targeting of viral vectors2012In: TIPS - Trends in Pharmacological Sciences, ISSN 0165-6147, E-ISSN 1873-3735, Vol. 33, no 8, p. 442-448Article, review/survey (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Cancer, cardiovascular disease, and infectious diseases are all global health threats. To combat these diseases with gene therapies, adenovirus-based vectors have been developed. Although certain clinical trials appear successful, there is an obvious need to improve the efficacy of most adenovirus-based vectors. For the most commonly used vector (based on type 5; Ad5), a main problem is its accumulation in the liver, which can be attributed to interactions with specific host factors. The diverse tropism for types other than Ad5 implies that vectors based on alternative types could have advantages. The numerous interactions of different adenoviruses with host molecules - such as the recently identified desmoglein-2 receptor - may cause novel and unexpected obstacles, but also may provide possibilities for vectors based on alternative types. This review provides an update of new and previously known molecules that mediate cellular attachment of human adenoviruses and discusses how these may influence the targeting of adenovirus-based vectors.

  • 95.
    Arnberg, Niklas
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Clinical Microbiology, Virology.
    Adenovirus receptors: implications for tropism, treatment and targeting2009In: Reviews in Medical Virology, ISSN 1052-9276, E-ISSN 1099-1654, Vol. 19, no 3, p. 165-178Article, review/survey (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Adenoviruses (Ads) are the most frequently used viral vectors in gene therapy and cancer therapy. Obstacles to successful clinical application include accumulation of vector and transduction in liver cells, coupled with poor transduction of target cells and tissues such as tumours. Many host molecules, including coagulation factor X, have been identified and suggested to serve as mediators of Ad liver tropism. This review summarises current knowledge concerning these molecules and the mechanisms used by Ads to bind to target cells, and considers the prospects of designing vectors that have been detargeted from the liver and retargeted to cells and tissues of interest in the context of gene therapy and cancer therapy.

  • 96.
    Arnberg, Niklas
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Clinical Microbiology, Virology.
    Edlund, Karin
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Clinical Microbiology, Virology.
    Kidd, Alistair H
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Clinical Microbiology, Virology.
    Wadell, Göran
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Clinical Microbiology, Virology.
    Adenovirus type 37 uses sialic acid as a cellular receptor2000In: Journal of Virology, ISSN 0022-538X, E-ISSN 1098-5514, Vol. 74, no 1, p. 42-48Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Two cellular receptors for adenovirus, coxsackievirus-adenovirus receptor (CAR) and major histocompatibility complex class I (MHC-I) alpha2, have recently been identified. In the absence of CAR, MHC-I alpha2 has been suggested to serve as a cellular attachment protein for subgenus C adenoviruses, while members from all subgenera except subgenus B have been shown to interact with CAR. We have found that adenovirus type 37 (Ad37) attachment to CAR-expressing CHO cells was no better than that to CHO cells lacking CAR expression, suggesting that CAR is not used by Ad37 during attachment. Instead, we have identified sialic acid as a third adenovirus receptor moiety. First, Ad37 attachment to both CAR-expressing CHO cells and MHC-I alpha2-expressing Daudi cells was sensitive to neuraminidase treatment, which eliminates sialic acid on the cell surface. Second, Ad37 attachment to sialic acid-expressing Pro-5 cells was more than 10-fold stronger than that to the Pro-5 subline Lec2, which is deficient in sialic acid expression. Third, neuraminidase treatment of A549 cells caused a 60% decrease in Ad37 replication in a fluorescent-focus assay. Moreover, the receptor sialoconjugate is most probably a glycoprotein rather than a ganglioside, since Ad37 attachment to sialic acid-expressing Pro-5 cells was sensitive to protease treatment. Ad37 attachment to Pro-5 cells occurs via alpha(2-->3)-linked sialic acid saccharides rather than alpha(2-->6)-linked ones, since (i) alpha(2-->3)-specific but not alpha(2-->6)-specific lectins blocked Ad37 attachment to Pro-5 cells and (ii) pretreatment of Pro-5 cells with alpha(2-->3)-specific neuraminidase resulted in decreased Ad37 binding. Taken together, these results suggest that, unlike Ad5, Ad37 makes use of alpha(2-->3)-linked sialic acid saccharides on glycoproteins for entry instead of using CAR or MHC-I alpha2.

  • 97.
    Arnberg, Niklas
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Clinical Microbiology, Virology.
    Kidd, Alistair H
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Clinical Microbiology, Virology.
    Edlund, Karin
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Clinical Microbiology, Virology.
    Nilsson, Jonas
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Clinical Microbiology, Virology.
    Pring-Åkerblom, Patricia
    Wadell, Göran
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Clinical Microbiology, Virology.
    Adenovirus type 37 binds to cell surface sialic acid through a charge-dependent interaction2002In: Virology, ISSN 0042-6822, E-ISSN 1096-0341, Vol. 302, no 1, p. 33-43Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Most adenoviruses use the coxsackie-adenovirus receptor (CAR) as a major cellular receptor. We have shown recently that adenovirus types 8, 19a, and 37, which are the major causes of epidemic keratoconjunctivitis, use sialic acid rather than CAR as a major cellular receptor. The predicted isoelectric point of the receptor-interacting knob domain in the adenovirus fiber protein is unusually high (9.0-9.1) in type 8, 19a, and 37. The pKa of sialic acid is low, 2.6, implying a possible involvement of charge in fiber knob-sialic acid interactions. Here we show that (i) positively charged adenovirus knobs require sialic acid for efficient cell membrane interactions; (ii) viral and knob interactions with immobilized sialic acid or cell-surface sialic acid are sensitive to increased ionic strength; (iii) negatively charged molecules such as sulfated glycosaminoglycans inhibit the binding of virions to target cells in a nonspecific, charge-dependent manner; and that (iv) the ability of adenovirus knobs to interact with sialic acid correlates with the overall charge on the top surface of the respective knobs as predicted by homology modeling. Taken together, the results presented provide strong evidence for a charge mechanism during the interaction between the Ad37 fiber knob and sialic acid.

  • 98.
    Arnberg, Niklas
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Clinical Microbiology, Virology.
    Kidd, Alistair H
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Clinical Microbiology, Virology.
    Edlund, Karin
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Clinical Microbiology, Virology.
    Olfat, Farzad
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Clinical Microbiology, Virology.
    Wadell, Göran
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Clinical Microbiology, Virology.
    Initial interactions of subgenus D adenoviruses with A549 cellular receptors: sialic acid versus alpha(v) integrins2000In: Journal of Virology, ISSN 0022-538X, E-ISSN 1098-5514, Vol. 74, no 16, p. 7691-3Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Selected members of the adenovirus family have been shown to interact with the coxsackie adenovirus receptor, alpha(v) integrins, and sialic acid on target cells. Initial interactions of subgenus D adenoviruses with target cells have until now been poorly characterized. Here, we demonstrate that adenovirus type 8 (Ad8), Ad19a, and Ad37 use sialic acid as a functional cellular receptor, whereas the Ad9 and Ad19 prototypes do not.

  • 99.
    Arnberg, Niklas
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Clinical Microbiology, Virology.
    Mei, Ya Fang
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Clinical Microbiology, Virology.
    Wadell, Göran
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Clinical Microbiology, Virology.
    Fiber genes of adenoviruses with tropism for the eye and the genital tract1997In: Virology, ISSN 0042-6822, E-ISSN 1096-0341, Vol. 227, no 1, p. 239-244Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    We have characterized the fibergenes of adenovirus type 19p (Ad19p), Ad19a, and Ad37 by sequencing. The fiber genes of Ad19a and Ad37 are identical and only five amino acids differ comparing Ad19a/Ad37 with Ad19p. Based on the translated sequences we calculated the isoelectrical points (Ips) and found that the fiber knobs of Ad19p, Ad19a, and Ad37 together with Ad8 display the highest Ips of all so far characterized. Two regions within the fiber knob with unusually basic characteristics have been identified. Sequence alignments revealed that the corresponding regions in other fiber knobs are highly antigenic in pepscan analysis and of importance for hemagglutination. Only two positions differ in the knobs comparing Ad19a/Ad37 with Ad19p. Hence, either of these or both amino acid residues should be expected to be responsible for the observed differences in hemagglutination between Ad19p and Ad19a/Ad37. Moreover, we have found two amino acids (Ala227 and Lys252) that are unique in their respective position in Ad19p, Ad19a, Ad37, and Ad8. Three amino acids (Lys236, Lys240, and Asn251) are unique in their respective position in Ad19a and Ad37, that manifest a tropism for the genital tract. All five amino acids colocalize within one of the two basic regions.

  • 100.
    Arnberg, Niklas
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Clinical Microbiology, Virology.
    Pring-Akerblom, Patricia
    Wadell, Göran
    Umeå University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Clinical Microbiology, Virology.
    Adenovirus type 37 uses sialic acid as a cellular receptor on Chang C cells2002In: Journal of Virology, ISSN 0022-538X, E-ISSN 1098-5514, Vol. 76, no 17, p. 8834-8841Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Epidemic keratoconjunctivitis (EKC) is a severe eye infection caused mainly by adenovirus type 8 (Ad8), Ad19, and Ad37. We have shown that the EKC-causing adenoviruses use sialic acid as a cellular receptor on A549 cells instead of the coxsackie-adenovirus receptor, which is used by most adenoviruses. Recently, Wu et al. (Virology 279:78-89, 2001) proposed that Ad37 uses a 50-kDa protein as a receptor on Chang C conjunctival cells and that this interaction is independent of sialic acid. According to the American Type Culture Collection, this cell line carries HeLa cell markers and should be considered to be a genital cell line. This prompted us to investigate the function of sialic acid as a cellular receptor for Ad37 in Chang C cells. In this study, we demonstrate that enzymatic removal or lectin-mediated blocking of cell surface sialic acid inhibits the binding of Ad37 virions to Chang C cells, as does soluble, virion-interacting sialic acid-containing substances. The binding was Ca2+ or Mg2+ ion independent and mediated by the knob domain of the trimeric viral fiber polypeptide. Moreover, Ad37 virions infected Chang C cells and two other genital cell lines (HeLa and SiHa) as well as a corneal cell line in a strictly sialic acid-dependent manner. From these results, we conclude that Ad37 uses sialic acid as a major receptor in cell lines derived from both genital and corneal tissues.

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