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  • 51.
    Vikström, Lotta
    Umeå University, Faculty of Arts.
    Unga på glid: brott och straff i 1800-talets Sundsvall2013In: Usla, elända och arma: samhällets utsatta under sjuhundra år / [ed] Sofia Holmlund och Annika Sandén, Stockholm: Natur och kultur, 2013, 1, p. 185-208Chapter in book (Other academic)
  • 52.
    Vikström, Lotta
    Umeå University, Faculty of Arts, Department of historical, philosophical and religious studies.
    Using matched data analyses and developmental perspectives to illuminating the impact of incarceration: young offenders and their pathways in comparison to non-offenders in nineteenth-century northern Sweden2006Conference paper (Other academic)
  • 53.
    Vikström, Lotta
    Umeå University, Faculty of Arts, Historical Studies.
    Vi vågade oss också västerut!: Kisakvinnornas utvandring 1845-19152004In: Befolkningshistoriska perspektiv: Festskrift till Lars-Göran Tedebrand / [ed] Anders Brändström, Sören Edvinsson, Tom Ericsson, Peter Sköld, Umeå: Demografiska Databasen , 2004, p. 229-256Chapter in book (Other academic)
  • 54.
    Vikström, Lotta
    Umeå University, Faculty of Arts, Department of historical, philosophical and religious studies. Umeå University, Arctic Research Centre at Umeå University.
    Vulnerability among paupers: determinants of individuals receiving poor relief in nineteenth-century northern Sweden2006In: The History of the Family, ISSN 1081-602X, E-ISSN 1873-5398, Vol. 11, no 4, p. 223-239Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This study combines computerized parish registers with parish meeting records that account for individuals who received poor relief in the nineteenth-century Sundsvall region, Sweden. The combination of sources especially helps to explore the recipients who are overlooked in the literature or difficult to trace in historical data. Their demographic characteristics in relation to relief allocation and experiences prior to it are analyzed and show that they did not only share the occurrence of entitlement. Vast but insufficient family networks failed to give the recipients support to manage their distressed situation. Deaths and births of relatives jeopardized their capability to guarantee subsistence for them or their family, and so did also their gender and phase in the lifecycle. The multi-dimensional concept of vulnerability is employed to comprehend the dynamic determinants of poverty represented by individuals granted poor relief. It is argued that this concept has to be further developed but nevertheless helps to identify and stratify some of the vulnerabilities that characterized paupers in the past.

  • 55.
    Vikström, Lotta
    Umeå University, Faculty of Arts.
    What Were Women Workers Really Doing?: Quantitative and Qualitative Aspects on Women’s Work in Sundsvall, A Swedish Sawmill Town, During Industrialization2002Conference paper (Other academic)
  • 56.
    Vikström, Lotta
    Umeå University, Faculty of Arts.
    Winners or Victims?: Swedish Urban Migrants and Their Socio-Geographical Mobility. The Case of Sundsvall During the Second Part of the Nineteenth Century1998Conference paper (Other academic)
  • 57.
    Vikström, Lotta
    Umeå University, Faculty of Arts.
    Women in a Man’s Town: Aspects on Sources, Occupational Structure and Marital Mobility of Young Unmarried Women in Sundsvall, a Swedish Sawmill Town, During Industrialization2000Conference paper (Other academic)
  • 58.
    Vikström, Lotta
    Umeå University, Faculty of Arts, Historical Studies.
    Women Migrants in a Sawmill Town: The Socio-Spatial Path of Single Women Migrants Heading for Sundsvall in the 1870s2002In: Nordic Demographic Symposium in History and Present-Day Society / [ed] Peter Sköld & Lars-Göran Tedebrand, Umeå: Demographic Data Base , 2002, p. 367-384Chapter in book (Other academic)
  • 59.
    Vikström, Lotta
    Umeå University, Faculty of Arts, Department of historical, philosophical and religious studies.
    Women’s position between family and work: dissolving nineteenth-century women’s kin and occupations using different sources in Sweden2008Conference paper (Other academic)
  • 60.
    Vikström, Lotta
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Arts, Historical Studies.
    Engberg, Elisabeth
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Demographic Data Base.
    Bland pigor, utvandrare och vanliga dödliga i 1800-talets Sverige: historiska problem i digitala källor: ett arbets- och inspirationsmaterial för gymnasieskolan2006Book (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
  • 61.
    Vikström, Lotta
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Arts, Historical Studies. Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Centre for Population Studies (CPS).
    Engberg, Elisabeth
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Demographic Data Base. Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Centre for Population Studies (CPS).
    Kärlek, liv och död på webben: Befolkningshistoriska källor som resurs i historieundervisningen2007In: Aktuellt om historia, ISSN 0348-503X, no 1, p. 37-49Article in journal (Other academic)
  • 62.
    Vikström, Lotta
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Arts.
    Haage, Helena
    Umeå University, Faculty of Arts, Department of historical, philosophical and religious studies.
    Estimating death differentials to measure the labeling impact of disability: a case study of past populations in Sweden2013In: XXIVI IUSSP International Population Conference: Programme, IUSSP , 2013, p. 150-Conference paper (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    This study follows 555 disabled individuals over life to examine their survival chances in past society. The aim is to detect whether they were markedly stigmatized and thus faced difficulties in life, which we in accordance with the labeling theme of secondary deviance assume would be indicated by high levels of mortality. We make use of Sweden's 19th-century parish registers (digitized by the Demographic Data Base, Umeå University) to categorize the disability marks the ministers noted about their parishioners. Then we employ a six-fold disability categorization and run multivariate regression models. The statistical results suggest that the type of disability mattered but was not the only key to the individuals' mortality, because age, SES and gender determined the survival of disabled, too. Disability shaped women's life expectancy more evidently than the men's; women afflicted with multiple disabilities were least likely to survive. Our findings are rare in providing statistical evidence of disabled individuals' experiences beyond institutional life and because we seek to measure the level of labeling in their life. The death differentials demonstrate that the disabled constituted a heterogeneous collection of people whose demography and pathways must be further researched.

  • 63.
    Vikström, Lotta
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Arts, Department of historical, philosophical and religious studies.
    Haage, Helena
    Umeå University, Faculty of Arts, Department of historical, philosophical and religious studies.
    Ett kortare liv än andra? Dödsrisker, funktionsnedsättningar och attityder i 1800-talets samhälle.2015In: Kulturella perspektiv - Svensk etnologisk tidskrift, ISSN 1102-7908, Vol. 24, no 1, p. 31-41Article in journal (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    This study follows disabled individuals over their lifespan to examine their mortality risks in 19th century society, in comparison to non-disabled people. The aim is to detect whether people, due to their disability, had a higher probability of meeting a premature death. We use Sweden’s 19th-century parish registers to identify people the ministers defined as disabled, and employ theories on deviance and gender to grasp the statistical mortality findings. Disability significantly jeopardized the survival of individuals and particularly of men, probably because impairment limited their chances to match the breadwinner ideals associated with the male gender.

  • 64.
    Vikström, Lotta
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Centre for Demographic and Ageing Research (CEDAR). Umeå University, Faculty of Arts, Department of historical, philosophical and religious studies.
    Haage, Helena
    Umeå University, Faculty of Arts, Department of historical, philosophical and religious studies. Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Centre for Demographic and Ageing Research (CEDAR).
    Häggström Lundevaller, Erling
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Umeå School of Business and Economics (USBE), Statistics. Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Centre for Demographic and Ageing Research (CEDAR).
    Sequence analysis of how disability influenced life trajectories in a past population from the nineteenth-century Sundsvall region, Sweden2017In: Historical Life Course Studies, ISSN 1570-1522, E-ISSN 2352-6343, Vol. 4, p. 97-119Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 65.
    Vikström, Lotta
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Arts, Department of historical, philosophical and religious studies. Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Centre for Demographic and Ageing Research (CEDAR).
    Häggström Lundevaller, Erling
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Umeå School of Business and Economics (USBE), Statistics. Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Centre for Demographic and Ageing Research (CEDAR).
    Haage, Helena
    Umeå University, Faculty of Arts, Department of historical, philosophical and religious studies. Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Centre for Demographic and Ageing Research (CEDAR).
    First a job, and then a family?: Impacts of disabilities on young people's life courses in a nineteenth-century Swedish region2017In: Disability Studies Quarterly (DSQ), ISSN 1041-5718, E-ISSN 2159-8371, Vol. 37, no 4Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This study considers the life courses of young men and women with and without disabilities in the Sundsvall region of Sweden during the nineteenth century. It aims to ascertain how disability and gender shaped their involvement in work and their experience of family in order to assess the extent of their social inclusion. Through the use of Swedish parish registers digitized by the Demographic Data Base, Umeå University, we examine 8,874 individuals observed from 15 to 33 years of age to investigate whether obtaining a job, getting married and having children were less frequent events for people with disabilities. Our results reveal that this was the case and particularly for those with mental disabilities, even if having an impairment did not wholly prevent people from finding a job. However, their work did not represent the key to family formation and for the women it implied a higher rate of illegitimacy. We argue that the lower level of inclusion in work and family was not solely the outcome of the impairment itself, but differed in relation to the particular attitudes towards men and women with disabilities within the labour market and society more generally in this particular context.

  • 66.
    Vikström, Lotta (Marie-Christine)
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Centre for Population Studies (CPS). Umeå University, Faculty of Arts, Historical Studies.
    I skammens namn?: Kvinnors inflyttning och illegitimitet i det industrialiserade Sundsvall: Samband och konsekvenser2002In: Sekelskiftets utmaningar: Essäer om välfärd, utbildning och nationell identitet vid sekelskiftet 1900 / [ed] Ann-Katrin Hatje, Stockholm: Carlssons , 2002, p. 199-226Chapter in book (Other academic)
  • 67.
    Vikström, Lotta (Marie-Christine)
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Centre for Population Studies (CPS). Umeå University, Faculty of Arts, Historical Studies.
    Women Migrants in a Swedish Sawmill Town: The Socio-Spatial Paths of Single Women Migrants Heading for Sundsvall in the 1870s2001In: Nordic demography in history and present-day society / [ed] Lars-Göran Tedebrand and Peter Sköld, Umeå: Umeå universitet , 2001, p. 367-384Chapter in book (Other academic)
  • 68.
    Vikström, Lotta
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Arts, Department of historical, philosophical and religious studies. Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Centre for Demographic and Ageing Research (CEDAR).
    Marklund, Emil
    Umeå University, Faculty of Arts, Department of historical, philosophical and religious studies. Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Umeå Centre for Gender Studies (UCGS).
    Sandström, Glenn
    Umeå University, Faculty of Arts, Department of historical, philosophical and religious studies. Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Centre for Demographic and Ageing Research (CEDAR).
    Demographic outcomes during colonisation: Migration and mortality among indigenous and non-indigenous populations in nineteenth-century Sweden2016In: Journal of Migration History, ISSN 2351-9916, Vol. 2, no 1, p. 148-176Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Due to insufficient historical population data, there is limited knowledge about the demographic outcomes of colonisation. This study provides demographic evidence of the difficulties faced by the Sami – an indigenous population in Sweden – during nineteenth-century colonisation, as indicated by (1) high risks of migration and (2) low survival rates compared to non-Sami. The digitised parish registers of the Demographic Data Base (Umeå University) provide longitudinal, individual-level data on migration, mortality, and ethnic origin. Event history analysis reveals that the Sami were vulnerable, with a higher mortality rate than non-Sami, and that they were more prone to migrate from areas overcrowded due to an increased competition for land. However, regardless of ethnic origin, it was primarily the settlers who migrated, and who ran the lowest mortality risks. This result suggests a ‘healthy settler effect’, and diverse consequences of colonisation that did not always follow ethnic lines.

  • 69.
    Vikström, Lotta
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Arts, Department of historical, philosophical and religious studies.
    Poppel, van, Frans
    Netherlands Interdisciplinary Demographic Institute (NIDI), Hague, the Netherlands.
    Putte, Van de, Bart
    Bart.VandePutte@UGent.be.
    From past patterns of divorces to present: new light on the divorce transition2011In: Journal of Family History, ISSN 0363-1990, E-ISSN 1552-5473, Vol. 36, no 2, p. 107-117Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 70.
    Vikström, Lotta
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Arts.
    Sandström, Glenn
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Centre for Population Studies (CPS).
    Was there any gendered preferences for children during the fertility transition?: Results from Germany 1825-19002013In: XXVII IUSSP International Population Conference: Book of abstracts, 2013, p. 364-364Conference paper (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Demographers demonstrate an increasing interest for studying parental gender preferences in developing countries and more developed societies. They find an association between the sex-composition of living offspring and the probability of having an additional child. In history, parents’ gender preferences have proven difficult to verify. This study makes use of John Knodel’s German village genealogies to obtain knowledge on this issue during a period of fertility transition, 1825-1900. Couples at first marriage who gave birth to minimum four children are targeted. Event history analyses (Cox regression models) of couples’ duration and propensity to progress to fifth parity, helps us to test if the probability to have additional children was influenced by the sex-composition of surviving children at lower parities. It appears that sex preferences for son(s) did influence parents’ reproductive behavior, as those having only girls experienced the highest transition rates to fifth parity. However, couples who married from approximately 1870 onward started to exhibit a fertility behavior that consistent with the desire to have at least one surviving boy and girl. That the gendered preferences became more symmetrical already during the fertility decline we view as an surprisingly early move toward a modern European pattern.

  • 71.
    Vikström, Lotta
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Arts.
    Sandström, Glenn
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Centre for Population Studies (CPS).
    Marklund, Emil
    Umeå University, Faculty of Arts, Department of historical, philosophical and religious studies.
    Demographic responses to colonization among indigenous populations: Migration and mortality in 19th-century northernmost Sweden2013In: XXVII IUSSP International Population Conference: Book of abstracts, 2013, p. 221-221Conference paper (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Although history shows how colonization has exposed indigenous populations to vulnerability, there is a narrow quantitative knowledge of how they demographically responded to colonization. Swedish parish registers are unique in providing longitudinal demographic data on the indigenous populations in northernmost Sweden: the Sami. The Demographic Data Base, Umeå University, has digitized these registers, which allows this study to conduct event history analyses of the Sami’s colonial experiences during the 19th century. If colonization added to the Sami’s difficulties to maintain their traditional use of land and lifestyle, it would be indicated by (1) untimely death among them; (2) a desire to leave their space as it was increasingly colonized. However, the propensity to depart was significantly higher among the Non-Sami people, primarily settlers, probably because it was a tough task to establish a farm in these remote cold areas. Additionally, ‘lock-in’ mechanisms might have reduced the Sami’s inclination to relocate, if this meant giving up a lifestyle and occupation difficult to perform in other settings. Their survival chances were higher than those of the Non-Sami, especially among women. In all, the findings propose that the Non-Sami individuals suffered from an ‘unhealthy migrant effect’.

  • 72.
    Vikström, Lotta
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Arts, Department of historical, philosophical and religious studies.
    Sola, Angels
    Barcelona University, Spain.
    Women’s labor participation in the business sector of two towns in nineteenth-century Spain and Sweden: Barcelona and Sundsvall2010Conference paper (Other academic)
  • 73.
    Vikström, Lotta
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Arts, Historical Studies.
    Tedebrand, Lars-Göran
    Umeå University, Faculty of Arts, Historical Studies.
    Nilsson, Hans
    Centrum för lokalhistoria, Linköpings universitet.
    Marriage Patterns in Swedish Cities 1840-19902004In: Living in the City (14th-20th Centuries): Proceedings of the International Conference held by the International Commission for Historical Demography (ICHD) / [ed] Eugenio Sonnino, Rome: La Sapienza, University of Rome , 2004, p. 203-236Chapter in book (Other academic)
  • 74.
    Vikström, Lotta
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Arts, Department of historical, philosophical and religious studies.
    van Poppel, FransNetherlands Interdisciplinary Demographic Institute (NIDI), Netherlands.van de Putte, BartGhent, University, Belgium.
    From past patterns of divorces to present: new light on the divorce transition2011Collection (editor) (Refereed)
  • 75.
    Vikström, Lotta
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Arts, Department of historical, philosophical and religious studies. Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Centre for Population Studies (CPS).
    van Poppel, FransNetherlands Interdisciplinary Demographic Institute (NIDI), Netherlands.Van de Putte, BartGhent University, Belgium.
    From past patterns of divorces to present: new light on the divorce transition2011Conference proceedings (editor) (Refereed)
12 51 - 75 of 75
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