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  • 51. Johansson, Maria
    et al.
    Sandström, Camilla
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Political Science.
    Pedersen, Eja
    Ericsson, Göran
    Factors governing human fear of wolves: moderating effects of geographical location and standpoint on protected nature2016In: European Journal of Wildlife Research, ISSN 1612-4642, E-ISSN 1439-0574, Vol. 62, no 6, p. 749-760Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This study analyses psychological antecedents of feelings of fear of wolves in a proportional sample of the Swedish population (national sample, n = 545) and in a sample of people in counties with wolf presence (regional sample, n = 1,892). Structural equation modelling of survey data suggests a dual pathway to self-reported fear. One path encompasses the appraisal of the environmental context operationalised as a potential wolf encounter. The second path concerns the appraisal of the social context assessed as social trust in managing authorities. The relative importance of the paths differs between the national and the regional sample, and between people in the administrative centre of the region and the regional periphery. We show that the public's fear of wolves should be addressed both at an individual level, focusing on situations with potential encounters, and at a collective level, by strengthening the trust between the public and authorities, and regional variation should be considered.

  • 52.
    Keskitalo, E. Carina H.
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Social and Economic Geography.
    Sandström, Camilla
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Political Science.
    Tysiachniouk, Maria
    Centre for Independent Social Research, St. Petersburg, Russia.
    Johansson, Johanna
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Political Science.
    Local consequences of applying international norms: differences in the application of forest certification in northern Sweden, northern Finland, and northwest Russia2009In: Ecology and Society, ISSN 1708-3087, Vol. 14, no 2Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Forest certification, developed in the early 1990s, is a process in which independent assessors grant use of the certification label to producers who meet certain environmental and social criteria set for their forest products. This label was quickly seen to offer a market advantage and to signal corporate social and environmental responsibility. This paper focuses on international norms pertaining to environmental and indigenous rights, as manifested in cases of Forest Stewardship Council (FSC)- and Programme for the Endorsement of Forest Certification (PEFC)-compatible certification, and how these norms have been applied domestically and perceived locally in different states. Case studies are drawn from northern Sweden, northern Finland, and three regions in northwest Russia. The studies illustrate that the choice and implementation of certification type depend considerably on national infrastructure and market characteristics and result in substantial differences in the impact that international norms have at the local level.

  • 53. Krange, Olve
    et al.
    Sandström, Camilla
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Political Science.
    Tangeland, Torvald
    Ericsson, Göran
    Approval of Wolves in Scandinavia: A Comparison Between Norway and Sweden2017In: Society & Natural Resources, ISSN 0894-1920, E-ISSN 1521-0723, Vol. 30, no 9, p. 1127-1140Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Based on Norwegian and Swedish representative national samples, and samples from areas with large mammalian carnivores present, we investigated whether well-known predictors for approval of wolves may explain between-country differences. Swedes were in general more positive than Norwegians were, while respondents in large carnivore areas, regardless of nationality, were less positive. The profile of those who approved wolf presence was the same in all samples. The difference between the samples was greater in Sweden, indicating that the relationship between urbanized and rural areas is more polarized in Sweden compared to Norway. We suggest this to be an effect of the fact that Norway's large carnivore and agriculture policies favor the rural population, and of a higher degree of urbanization in Sweden. We recommend future studies to look into the different power relations between people living in urban and rural areas, comparing countries with different degree of urbanization.

  • 54.
    Krange, Olve
    et al.
    Norsk institutt for naturforskning .
    Tangeland, Torvald
    Norsk institutt for naturforskning .
    Sandström, Camilla
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Political Science.
    Ericsson, Göran
    Holdinger til store rovdyr i Norge og Sverige: En komparativ studie av holdinger til rovdyr og rovviltforvaltning2012Report (Refereed)
  • 55.
    Lidskog, Rolf
    et al.
    Örebro universitet, Institutionen för humaniora, utbildnings- och samhällsvetenskap.
    Bishop, Kevin
    Department of Aquatic Sciences and Assessment, The Swedish University of Agricultural Sciences, Uppsala, Sweden.
    Eklöf, Karin
    Department of Aquatic Sciences and Assessment, The Swedish University of Agricultural Sciences, Uppsala, Sweden.
    Ring, Eva
    The Forestry Research Institute of Sweden (Skogforsk), Uppsala Science Park, Uppsala, Sweden.
    Åkerblom, Staffan
    Department of Aquatic Sciences and Assessment, The Swedish University of Agricultural Sciences, Uppsala, Sweden.
    Sandström, Camilla
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Political Science.
    From wicked problem to governable entity?: The effects of forestry on mercury in aquatic ecosystems2018In: Forest Policy and Economics, ISSN 1389-9341, E-ISSN 1872-7050, Vol. 90, p. 90-96Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In all Swedish lakes, the concentration of mercury (Hg) in fish exceeds the European Union threshold limit. While the ultimate source of Hg is primarily airborne emissions from fossil energy, forestry plays a small but important role because some forestry operations help mobilize and transform Hg, increasing Hg loads in downstream aquatic ecosystems. Simultaneously, climate change is placing additional demands on forests to provide biomass as a substitute for fossil fuel. Thus, decision-makers are facing a complex situation, a “wicked problem,” when it comes to how to handle the problem of forestry’s effects on Hg in aquatic ecosystems while at the same time securing other ecosystem services. In order to explore forestry’s degree of responsibility as well as possible solutions to this problem in Sweden, a transdisciplinary method has been used consisting of a structured dialogue with actors from relevant governmental agencies, forest companies, and forest associations. The analysis shows that while the issue can be addressed constructively, the complex character of the problem requires consideration of not only management practices for forestry but also current regulatory goals and environmental objectives. The Hg problem represents a class of difficult issues for forestry where stand- or property-based production has an impact on a greater spatial scale. This means that regulating the more direct impacts of forestry needs to be weighed against the implications this regulation may have on the overall issue of ecosystem services.

  • 56. Lindahl, Karin Beland
    et al.
    Sandström, Camilla
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Political Science.
    Stens, Anna
    Umeå University, Faculty of Arts, Department of historical, philosophical and religious studies.
    Alternative pathways to sustainability?: Comparing forest governance models2017In: Forest Policy and Economics, ISSN 1389-9341, E-ISSN 1872-7050, Vol. 77, p. 69-78Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 57.
    Lindkvist, Anna
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Arts, Department of historical, philosophical and religious studies.
    Mineur, Eva
    The Swedish Research Council, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Nordlund, Annika
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Psychology.
    Nordlund, Christer
    Umeå University, Faculty of Arts, Department of historical, philosophical and religious studies.
    Olsson, Olof
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Geography and Economic History.
    Sandström, Camilla
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Geography and Economic History.
    Westin, Kerstin
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Social and Economic Geography.
    Keskitalo, Carina
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Social and Economic Geography.
    Attitudes on intensive forestry: an investigation into perceptions of increased production requirements in Swedish forestry2012In: Scandinavian Journal of Forest Research, ISSN 0282-7581, E-ISSN 1651-1891, Vol. 27, no 5, p. 438-448Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In 2008, the Swedish government launched an inquiry into the possibilities, benefits and requirements for conducting intensive forestry in part of the Swedish countryside, including fertilization, genetically improved plant material and fastgrowing species beyond what is currently allowed in Swedish legislation. Drawing upon part of that governmental investigation, this paper analyzes attitudes toward intensive forestry over time. The study draws upon studies of points of conflict written in the 1970s and 1980s, attitudes among different stakeholder groups, and interviews with forest owners and stakeholder groups potentially affected by intensive forestry. The study concludes that the diverging opinions as to what constitutes acceptable forest use have remained largely the same over the years. Radical landscape change is generally not seen as desirable, but views diverge over the use of novel tree species and the use of fertilization.

  • 58.
    Lindkvist, Anna
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Arts, Department of historical, philosophical and religious studies.
    Nordlund, Christer
    Umeå University, Faculty of Arts, Department of historical, philosophical and religious studies.
    Olsson, Olof
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Social and Economic Geography.
    Westin, Kerstin
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Social and Economic Geography.
    Nordlund, Annika
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Psychology.
    Mineur, Eva
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Political Science.
    Sandström, Camilla
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Political Science.
    Konflikt och konsensus i skogen: intensivodling av skog ur ett humanistiskt och samhällsvetenskapligt perspektiv. Faktaunderlag till utredning om Möjligheter till intensivodling av skog2009Report (Other academic)
    Abstract [sv]

    Den första delstudien, ”Skogslandskapet som arena”, syftar till att ge en bakgrund till dagens skogsbruk i Sverige och att sätta in skogspolitiken i ett idé- och miljöhistoriskt sammanhang. Sammantaget handlar undersökningen om hur skogen har brukats och hur detta brukande har motiverats, institutionaliserats, reglerats och ifrågasatts under de senaste århundradena. Den består av två delar. Den första delen inleds med en historik som tar upp maktförhållandena i skogen och hur skogen har nyttjats genom tiderna. Därefter följer en redogörelse över skogsbrukets och skogsvårdslagens förändring över tid fram till att miljörörelsen, rennäringen, kulturminnesvården och andra ”allmänna intressen” som värnar om skogen tar plats i skogsvårdslagen. I den andra delen diskuteras ett urval konflikter som uppkommit i anslutning till skogen och skogsbruket, främst med tyngdpunkt på 1970- och 1980-talen: debatten om plantering av skog i öppna landskap, kalhyggesdebatten, reaktionerna vid inplantering av främmande trädslag, debatten om bruket av bekämpningsmedel samt visionen om att utveckla och nyttja genmodifierade träd. Flera av dessa konflikter kan rimligen åter aktualiseras vid ett intensifierat skogsbruk av det slag som utredningen behandlar.Den andra delstudien, ”Attityder och värderingar”, undersöker privatpersoners och skogsägares inställningar till den svenska skogen i allmänhet och till intensivodling av skog i synnerhet. Privatpersoner betraktar vanligen skogen som en rekreationsresurs, medan skogsägare håller skogens traditionella, ekonomiska värden närmare hjärtat. När attityder mot skogen väl förändras beror det ofta på generationsväxlingar, ökat miljömedvetande och urbaniseringstrender. Sveriges stora demografiska och kulturella skillnader har även bidragit till att skogen idag uppfattas olika i olika delar av landet. Samtidigt som vi bor längre bort från skogen än tidigare ökar vår efterfrågan på dess sociala värden, vilket innebär att ungefär hälften av våra skogsbesök numera sker i tätortsnära skog, som främst är förknippad med rekreation och vila. Skogens ekonomiska värden är emellertid fortfarande viktiga, inte minst när det gäller skogens roll som framtida energikälla. Intervjuade skogsägare har visat sig vara förhållandevis positiva till intensivodling av skog, samtidigt som det av miljömässiga och ekonomiska skäl finns ett starkt motstånd mot att öka användningen av gödsel. Privatpersoner som intervjuats anser i regel att intensivodlade områden begränsar naturupplevelsen, skadar miljön och missgynnar mångfalden. Fördelar som ökad möjlighet att utvinna alternativa energibränslen och ökade exportmöjligheter för svensk industri har emellertid också nämnts.Den tredje delstudien, ”Potentiella synergier och målkonflikter”, relaterar intensivodling av skog dels till de av riksdagen fastställda miljömålen dels till eventuella intressemotsättningar som kan uppstå till följd av ett förändrat nyttjande av jordbruksmark. De målkonflikter som identifieras, främst mellan miljömålen ’Begränsad klimatpåverkan’ och ’Ett rikt växt- och djurliv’, kan inte enbart lösas på teknisk väg utan kräver någon form av politisk avvägning. För att ansvariga myndigheter ska kunna göra en sådan avvägning krävs dock att det utarbetas någon form av politisk prioriteringsordning som kan vägleda myndigheterna i det arbetet. När det gäller eventuella intressemotsättningar som kan uppstå till följd av intensivodling framgår det av intervjuer med olika intresseorganisationer att många konflikter sannolikt kan undvikas om synpunkter från olika intressen beaktas i samband med planering av förändrat marknyttjande.

  • 59.
    Lindqvist, Sara
    et al.
    SLU.
    Camilla, Sandström
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Political Science.
    Bjärstig, Therese
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Political Science.
    Kvastegård, Emma
    SLU.
    The changing role of hunting in Sweden: From subsistence to ecosystem stewardship?2014In: Alces, ISSN 0835-5851, Vol. 50, p. 35-51Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Although hunting served traditionally to supply game meat, and that is still important in Sweden, recreation is the most common reason for hunting moose (Alces alces) today. Hunting also serves an important management purpose in regulating moose populations to control crop and forest damage. This study used semi-structured interviews with key stakeholders and officials involved in the recently implemented ecosystem-based, adaptive local moose management system where hunters and landowners become environmental stewards responsible for managing moose in context with forest damage, vehicular collisions, large carnivores, and biodiversity. Our study found that participation and collaboration in reaching management objectives was perceived as positive by stakeholders, although their stewardship is jeopardized if specific management responsibilities are not clarified regarding monitoring. Further, it is important to find long-term funding solutions for monitoring activities that are critical for adequate data collection and to support the stakeholder role as steward. The importance of monitoring must be communicated to individual hunters and landowners to achieve an ecosystem-based moose management system that effectively incorporates both social and ecological values.

  • 60.
    Lindroos, Ola
    et al.
    Sveriges Lantbruksuniversitet .
    Sandström, Camilla
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Political Science.
    Odling av träd eller nyttjande av natur?: tankar kring skogsbrukets ställning inom markanvändningen2014In: Thule: Kungl. Skytteanska samfundets årsbok. 2014, [årg. 27] / [ed] Roger Jacobsson, Umeå: Kungl. Skytteanska Samfundet , 2014, p. 85-95Chapter in book (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
  • 61.
    Lundmark, Linda
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Geography and Economic History, Economic and social geography.
    Sandström, CamillaUmeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Political Science.
    Natural resources and regional development theory2013Collection (editor) (Other academic)
  • 62.
    Löf, Annette
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Political Science.
    Sandström, Per
    Sveriges Lantbruksuniversitet.
    Baer, Karin
    Vilhelmina norra sameby.
    Stinnerbom, Marita
    Vilhelmina norra sameby.
    Sandström, Camilla
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Political Science.
    Renskötsel och klimatförändring: Risker, sårbarhet och anpassningsmöjligheter i Vilhelmina norra sameby2012Report (Other academic)
  • 63.
    Mårald, Erland
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Arts, Department of historical, philosophical and religious studies.
    Sandström, Camilla
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Political Science.
    Annika, Nordin
    Sveriges lantbruksuniversitet, SLU.
    Sténs, Anna (Contributor)
    Umeå University, Faculty of Arts, Department of historical, philosophical and religious studies.
    Beland Lindahl, Karin (Contributor)
    Luleå tekniska universitet.
    Carlsson-Kanyama, Annika (Contributor)
    Kungl. Tekniska Högskolan, KTH.
    Johansson, Johanna (Contributor)
    Södertörns högskola.
    Keskitalo, E. Carina H. (Contributor)
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Geography and Economic History.
    Laudon, Hjalmar (Contributor)
    Sveriges lantbruksuniversitet, SLU.
    Lidskog, Rolf (Contributor)
    Örebro universitet.
    Lämås, Tomas (Contributor)
    Sveriges lantbruksuniversitet, SLU.
    Lundmark, Tomas (Contributor)
    Swedish University of Agricultural Sciences (SLU).
    Nilsson, Urban (Contributor)
    Sveriges lantbruksuniversitet, SLU.
    Nordström, Eva-Maria (Contributor)
    Swedish University of Agricultural Sciences.
    Roberge, Jean-Michel (Contributor)
    Sveriges lantbruksuniversitet, SLU.
    Sonesson, Johan (Contributor)
    Skogforsk.
    Forest governance and management across time: developing a new forest social contract2017Book (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The influence of the past, and of the future on current-time tradeoffs in the forest arena are particularly relevant given the long-term successions in forest landscapes and the hundred years' rotations in forestry. Historically established path dependencies and conflicts determine our present situation and delimit what is possible to achieve. Similarly, future trends and desires have a large influence on decision making. Nevertheless, decisions about forest governance and management are always made in the present – in the present-time appraisal of the developed situation, future alternatives and in negotiation between different perspectives, interests, and actors.

    This book explores historic and future outlooks as well as current tradeoffs and methods in forest governance and management. It emphasizes the generality and complexity with empirical data from Sweden and internationally. It first investigates, from a historical perspective, how previous forest policies and discourses have influenced current forest governance and management. Second, it considers methods to explore alternative forest futures and how the results from such investigations may influence the present. Third, it examines current methods of balancing tradeoffs in decision-making among ecosystem services. Based on the findings the authors develop an integrated approach – Reflexive Forestry – to support exchange of knowledge and understandings to enable capacity building and the establishment of common ground. Such societal agreements, or what the authors elaborate as forest social contracts, are sets of relational commitment between involved actors that may generate mutual action and a common directionality to meet contemporary challenges.

  • 64.
    Mårald, Erland
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Arts, Department of historical, philosophical and religious studies.
    Sandström, Camilla
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Political Science.
    Rist, Lucy
    Rosvall, Ola
    Samuelsson, Lars
    Umeå University, Faculty of Arts, Department of historical, philosophical and religious studies.
    Idenfors, Annika
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Political Science.
    Exploring the use of a dialogue process to tackle a complex and controversial issue in forest management2015In: Scandinavian Journal of Forest Research, ISSN 0282-7581, E-ISSN 1651-1891, Vol. 30, no 8, p. 749-756Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This article explores the use of a dialogue process to approach complex issues related to forest management. Aninterdisciplinary research team set up an experimental dialogue process concerning the use of introduced tree speciesin Southern Sweden for the purposes of climate change adaptation. The process involved stakeholders at a regionallevel, including those with divergent opinions regarding introduced tree species and their use in forestry. Through aprocess of repeated meetings and exchanges with researchers, the participant’s knowledge was deepened and grouprelationships developed such that the group was able to jointly formulate a set of policy recommendations. Theinvestigation revealed that dialogue processes may improve decision-making by identifying priorities for action orfurther research. However, when a collaborative process targets complex environmental issues on larger geographicaland temporal scales, as matters about forests typically do, a collaborative process must be integrated with externalactors and institutions in order to attain tangible outcomes. Consequently, to fully access the benefits of usingcollaborative processes to handle complex challenges in forest policy and management, the connections betweenpolitical sphere, the private sector, authorities and research institutions must be concretely established.

  • 65. Neumann, Wiebke
    et al.
    Sandström, Camilla
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Political Science.
    Holmgren, Lina
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Political Science. Department of Wildlife, Fish and Environmental Studies, Swedish University of Agricultural Science, Umeå, Sweden.
    Ericsson, Göran
    Defining a mountain landscape characterized by grazing using actor perception, governmental strategy, and environmental monitoring data2019In: Journal of Mountain Science, ISSN 1672-6316, E-ISSN 1993-0321, Vol. 16, no 7, p. 1691-1701Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In multi-functional mountainous landscapes worldwide, conservation of natural values is a major task. Here, pro-active policies can be a way forward. National Environmental Quality Objectives (EQO) to solve environmental problems for future generations, however, often wrestle with being too visionary and lacking specificity, which complicates their implementation. The EQO A Magnificent Mountain Landscape that has been adopted by the Swedish Parliament in 1999 to preserve the pristine mountain environment in Sweden, experiences all these flaws. To aid its implementation, we studied the conditions and processes needed to define, to evaluate, and to preserve its goals across the Swedish mountain chain, using one of its milestone targets (a landscape characterized by grazing) as a study system. Applying qualitative and quantitative methods, we analyzed three types of data: 1) referral responses to the governmental strategy document, 2) interviews with relevant actors, and 3) environmental monitoring data (reindeer position data). Nationally, our results suggest a need for geographical differentiation to match regional/local conditions. Regionally, difference in both perception and definition of the milestone target among the actors hinders the formulation, monitoring, and evaluation of a common goal. Next to a culture-nature divide, we found that a within as a user and from the outside as an observer perspective influenced suggested definitions. Moreover, we found a need for better defining whether the goal is maintaining current conditions or restoring previous ones. Our result supports the use of animal position data as a decision support tool to monitor and to aid evaluation of the target. Given the number of actors involved and conflicts of interests present, we suggest the application of a structured decision process to accomplish agreements on a common goal. Here, environmental monitoring data can aid a landscape assessment step as a natural part in the decision process to target landscape management actions resourcefully and effectively.

  • 66. Nordin, Annika
    et al.
    Sandström, Camilla
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Political Science.
    Interdisciplinary science for future governance and management of forests2016In: Ambio, ISSN 0044-7447, E-ISSN 1654-7209, Vol. 45, p. S69-S73Article in journal (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    The sustainable use of forests constitutes one of the great challenges for the future due to forests' large spatial coverage, long-term planning horizons and inclusion of many ecosystem services. The mission of the Future Forests programme is to provide a scientifically robust knowledge base for sustainable governance and management of forests preparing for a future characterized by globalization and climate change. In this introduction to the Special Issue, we describe the interdisciplinary science approach developed in close collaboration with actors in the Future Forests programme, and discuss the potential impacts of this science on society. In addition, we introduce the 13 scientific articles and present results produced by the programme.

  • 67. Olschewski, Roland
    et al.
    Sandström, Camilla
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Political Science.
    Kasymov, Ulan
    Johansson, Johanna
    Fürst, Christine
    Ring, Irene
    Policy Forum: Challenges and opportunities in developing new forest governance systems: insights from the IPBES assessment for Europe and Central Asia2018In: Forest Policy and Economics, ISSN 1389-9341, E-ISSN 1872-7050, Vol. 97, p. 175-179Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 68. Overvåg, Kjell
    et al.
    Skjeggedal, Terje
    Sandström, Camilla
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Political Science.
    Management of mountain areas in Norway and the persistence of local-national conflicts2016In: Journal of Environmental Planning and Management, ISSN 0964-0568, E-ISSN 1360-0559, Vol. 59, no 7, p. 1186-1204Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    We have investigated why conflicts linked to the distribution of power between governments and actors at the national and local levels concerning environmental management of mountain areas in Norway persist despite political intentions to strengthen local powers. We seek to explain this by analysing changes in policies, institutional frameworks, and regional contexts, and the local perceptions of these changes. Paradoxically, the national government's power has apparently been strengthened by new sectoral regulations and more stringent enforcement of the existing ones, increases in the number and extent of protected areas, and failures to act on intentions to devolve power. An additional factor spurring conflicts is the increased importance of tourism to mountain communities. To become more relevant to policies and development in mountain areas, future studies on multilevel governance must address multilevel politics, entire mountain areas, and the context of their development, rather than focusing on minor projects and protected areas.

  • 69.
    Overvåg, Kjell
    et al.
    Østlandsforskning.
    Skjeggedal, Terje
    Østlandsforskning.
    Sandström, Camilla
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Political Science.
    Nasjonalparkforvaltning i Norge i lys av europeiske modeller2016In: Fjellbygd eller feriefjell? / [ed] Terje Skjeggedal og Kjell Overvåg, Bergen: Fagbokforlaget, 2016, 1, p. 203-224Chapter in book (Refereed)
  • 70. Overvåg, Kjell
    et al.
    Skjeggedal, Terje
    Sandström, Camilla
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Political Science.
    Statlig styrning versus lokal autonomi i forvaltning av fjellområdene2015In: Fjellbygd eller feriefjell? / [ed] Terje Skjeggedal og Kjell Overvåg, Bergen: Fagbokforlaget, 2015, p. 181-200Chapter in book (Refereed)
  • 71. Pekor, Adam
    et al.
    Jansson, Ingela
    Ole Seki, William
    Rentsch, Dennis
    Spong, Göran
    Sandström, Camilla
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Political Science.
    In search of new modes of governance: the potential of conservation incentive payment policies to promote human-wildlife co-existence2020In: Governing renewable natural resources: theories and frameworks / [ed] Fiona Nunan, Routledge, 2020, p. 204-225Chapter in book (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Over the past two decades, conservation incentive payments (CIPs), innovative incentive-based policy instruments, have gained appeal as a way to promote human–wildlife coexistence by linking the economic interests of local people with conservation goals. In theory, specific features of CIP programs enable them to improve outcomes for both people and wildlife. In practice, outcomes depend on the interplay between the three key constituent elements of governance: polity, politics, and policy. While many studies in natural resources governance focus on one or two of these elements, this chapter analyzes the nexus between the three elements and demonstrates that changes along the policy dimension, in particular, can help transform the others. To illustrate our argument, we use Tanzania’s Ngorongoro Conservation Area (NCA) as a case study. In the NCA, intense human–lion conflict over the past several decades has threatened the livelihoods of local people and led to a dramatic decline in the local lion population. We show how the introduction of a new policy instrument in the NCA—a CIP program—has the potential to promote human–lion coexistence while at the same time helping to shift the local mode of governance from top-down to participatory and interactive.

  • 72.
    Pellikka, Jani
    et al.
    University of Eastern Finland.
    Sandström, Camilla
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Political Science.
    The role of large carnivore committees in legitimising large carnivore management in Finland and Sweden: Environmental management2011In: Environmental Management, ISSN 0364-152X, E-ISSN 1432-1009, Vol. 48, no 1, p. 212-228Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Many countries, including Sweden and Finland, are decentralizing the management of large carnivore species within their borders and emphasizing the role of stakeholder participation in legitimizing formal policy. Regional large carnivore committees (RLCCs), including representatives of authorities and non-governmental organizations, are essential to these endeavors. These committees are formally constituted in Sweden, whereas in Finland, they are informally developed from the bottom-up. In both countries, the declared roles of these committees are consultative. A comparative study based on survey data is described here, which address the question of how procedural legitimacy is shaped and maintained in institutional settings with different origins, such as top-down or bottom-up. The results indicate no clear difference in the representatives’ general satisfaction with the country-specific arrangements. Notable differences were found in specific perceptions of the clarity and purposes of the RLCCs. In both countries, the perceived rationale for the establishment of RLCCs emphasized the knowledge and expertise of the represented interest groups and authorities. Between the countries, similarities were also found in the strong links between overall satisfaction and personally perceived success and progress in communication and information exchange, i.e., deliberative processes. The capacity of the RLCCs to improve trust and acceptability with regard to different opinions was viewed as a key element underlying satisfactory RLCC activities, irrespective of the institutional settings.

  • 73.
    Persson, Jens
    et al.
    Inst. för skoglig zooekologi, SLU Umeå.
    Zachrisson, Anna
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Political Science.
    Sandström, Camilla
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Political Science.
    Ericsson, Göran
    Inst. för skoglig zooekologi, SLU Umeå.
    Lokal förvaltning av stora rovdjur: en kunskapssammanställning2004Report (Other academic)
    Abstract [sv]

    Hur våra gemensamma resurser bäst kan och ska förvaltas är både en komplicerad och ofta konfliktfylld fråga. Det framgår inte minst av debatten kring hur och på vilken nivå våra storarovdjur ska förvaltas. Eftersom rovdjuren vanligtvis lever i glesa populationer, spridda över mycket stora områden, men också är förknippade med såväl ekonomiska som sociala konflikter harden centrala nivån ansetts bäst lämpad att förvalta rovdjuren.Det har bland annat medfört att de som lever nära rovdjuren och riskerar att drabbas av rovdjuren upplever att de har småmöjligheter att påverka politikens och förvaltningens utformning.Det har i sin tur skapat konflikter kring hur och på vilketsätt rovdjuren bäst förvaltas (SOU 1999:146).

    I en strävan att öka förtroendet för den svenska rovdjurspolitikenoch överbrygga den klyfta mellan centralmakt och lokalnivå eller mellan stad och land som uppstått har riksdagenbeslutat att lokala aktörer på olika sätt ska involveras i förvaltningen.Inom ramen för en sammanhållen rovdjurspolitik harbland annat regionala rovdjursgrupper, sammansatta av olikaberörda intressen, bildats. Den svenska decentraliseringen avrovdjurspolitiken, följer den av FN fastslagna andra Malawi-principensom slår fast att förvaltning av ekosystem ska decentraliserastill lägsta ändamålsenliga nivå (UNEP/CBD/COP/4/inf.9).

    Att decentralisera förvaltningen av gemensamma resurser,i det här fallet stora rovdjur, är förknippat med en rad specifikaproblem. Förutom att det krävs biologisk kunskap om rovdjuren,är det nödvändigt att reda ut vilka sociala, ekonomiska och kulturellaaspekter som bör beaktas vid förvaltningen. Det är ocksånödvändigt att finna en acceptabel balans mellan decentraliseringoch centralisering av beslutsprocessen. Lokal förvaltningav rovdjur är relativt nytt även internationellt sett. Det är fortfarandetill stora delar okänt vad som egentligen krävs för attlokal förvaltning av rovdjur ska fungera. Det är emellertid möjligtatt vi kan lära något av de försök som redan genomförts. Syfte med den här rapporten är därför dels att sammanställakunskap om lokal eller decentraliserad förvaltning av stora rovdjur, främst utifrån biologiska, socioekonomiska och förvaltningspolitiskaförutsättningar, dels att skapa ett underlag för fortsattforskning inom ramen för forskningsprogrammet FjällMistra.

  • 74. Randall, Deborah
    et al.
    Fisher, Anke
    Nelson, Alastair
    Msuha, Maurus
    Lowassa, Asanterabi
    Sandström, Camilla
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Political Science.
    Multiple functions and institutions: management complexity in the serengeti ecosystem2015In: Serengeti IV: sustaining biodiversity in a coupled human-natural system / [ed] Anthony R. E. Sinclair, Kristine L. Metzger, Simon A. R. Mduma and John M. Fryxell, Chicago: The University of Chicago Press , 2015, 1, p. 701-735Chapter in book (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The multifunctionality of the Serengeti ecosystem is evident in the range of ecological, economic and socio-cultural goods and services across the landscape and the many institutions designed to manage these functions. Navigating the institutional complexity with respect to wildlife, land and local community rights in Tanzania remains a huge challenge. Most of the relevant policies recognize the linkages between functions and institutions, but they are still, for the most part, sector oriented with no clearly defined mechanisms for collaboration with other sectors or stakeholders. As a result the existing institutions tend to guard the ecosystem’s functions only partially or selectively. In some cases, local institutions - both formal (e.g. police, judiciary, rural development authorities) and informal (e.g. social norms and customs) - exist but are not being used effectively and, in the case of local informal rules, may be eroding over time. This institutional interplay is increasingly giving rise to conflicts between actors and the functions they seek to enhance. The continued enhancement of adaptive co-management can not only help reconcile the multifunctionality of the Serengeti ecosystem but also improve its resilience to environmental and social change and, ultimately, help ensure sustainability.

  • 75. Redpath, Steve M.
    et al.
    Linnell, John D. C.
    Festa-Bianchet, Marco
    Boitani, Luigi
    Bunnefeld, Nils
    Dickman, Amy
    Gutiérrez, R. J.
    Irvine, R. J.
    Johansson, Maria
    Majić, Aleksandra
    McMahon, Barry J.
    Pooley, Simon
    Sandström, Camilla
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Political Science.
    Sjölander-Lindqvist, Annelie
    Skogen, Ketil
    Swenson, Jon E.
    Trouwborst, Arie
    Young, Juliette
    Milner-Gulland, E. J.
    Don't forget to look down – collaborative approaches to predator conservation2017In: Biological Reviews, ISSN 1464-7931, E-ISSN 1469-185X, Vol. 92, no 4, p. 2157-2163Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Finding effective ways of conserving large carnivores is widely recognised as a priority in conservation. However, there is disagreement about the most effective way to do this, with some favouring top-down ‘command and control’ approaches and others favouring collaboration. Arguments for coercive top-down approaches have been presented elsewhere; here we present arguments for collaboration. In many parts of the developed world, flexibility of approach is built into the legislation, so that conservation objectives are balanced with other legitimate goals. In the developing world, limited resources, poverty and weak governance mean that collaborative approaches are likely to play a particularly important part in carnivore conservation. In general, coercive policies may lead to the deterioration of political legitimacy and potentially to non-compliance issues such as illegal killing, whereas collaborative approaches may lead to psychological ownership, enhanced trust, learning, and better social outcomes. Sustainable hunting/trapping plays a crucial part in the conservation and management of many large carnivores. There are many different models for how to conserve carnivores effectively across the world, research is now required to reduce uncertainty and examine the effectiveness of these approaches in different contexts.

  • 76.
    Riley, Shawn, J.
    et al.
    Michigan State University .
    Sandström, Camilla
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Political Science.
    Human dimension insights for reintroductions of fish and wildlife species2016In: Reintroduction of fish and wildlife populations / [ed] David S. Jachowski, Joshua J. Millspaugh, Paul L. Angermeier, and Rob Slotow, Oakland: University of California Press, 2016, 1, p. 55-77Chapter in book (Refereed)
  • 77. Ring, Eva
    et al.
    Johansson, Johanna
    Sandström, Camilla
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Political Science.
    Bjarnadóttir, Brynhildur
    Finér, Leena
    Lībiete, Zane
    Lode, Elve
    Stupak, Inge
    Sætersdal, Magne
    Mapping policies for surface water protection zones on forest land in the Nordic–Baltic region: large differences in prescriptiveness and zone width2017In: Ambio, ISSN 0044-7447, E-ISSN 1654-7209, Vol. 46, no 8, p. 878-893Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The forest landscape across the Nordic and Baltic regions hosts numerous lakes and watercourses, which must be included in forest management. In this study, national policy designs regarding protection zones for surface waters on forest land were reviewed and compared for the Nordic countries, Estonia and Latvia. The focus was how each country regulates protection zones, whether they are voluntary or mandatory, and the rationale behind adopting a low or high degree of prescriptiveness. Iceland and Denmark had a low degree of policy prescriptiveness, whereas Norway, Estonia and Latvia had a high degree of prescriptiveness. Sweden and Finland relied to a large extent on voluntary commitments. The prescribed zone widths within the region ranged from 1 m to 5 km. The results indicated that land-use distribution, forest ownership structure and historical and political legacies have influenced the varying degrees of prescriptiveness in the region.

  • 78. Ring, Irene
    et al.
    Sandström, Camilla
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Political Science.
    Acar, Sevil
    Adeishvili, Malkhaz
    Albert, Christian
    Allard, Christina
    Anker, Yaakov
    Arlettaz, Raphaël
    Bela, Györgyi
    ten Brink, Ben
    Coscieme, Luca
    Fischer, Anke
    Fürst, Christine
    Bela, Galil
    Hynes, Stephen
    Kasymov, Ulan
    Marta-Pedroso, Cristine
    Mendes, Ana
    Molau, Ulf
    Olschewski, Roland
    Pergl, Jan
    Simoncini, Riccardo
    Options for governance and decision-making across scales and sectors2018In: The IPBES regional assessment report on biodiversity and ecosystem services for Europe and Central Asia / [ed] Mark Rounsevell, Markus Fischer, Amor Torre-Marin Rando and André Mader, Bonn: Intergovernmental Science-Policy Platform on Biodiversity and Ecosystem Services (IPBES) , 2018, p. 661-802Chapter in book (Refereed)
  • 79.
    Rist, Lucy
    et al.
    SLU.
    Felton, Adam
    SLU.
    Samuelsson, Lars
    Umeå University, Faculty of Arts, Department of historical, philosophical and religious studies.
    Sandström, Camilla
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Political Science.
    Rosvall, Ola
    A new paradigm for adaptive management2013In: Ecology & society, ISSN 1708-3087, E-ISSN 1708-3087, Vol. 18, no 4, p. 63-Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Uncertainty is a pervasive feature in natural resource management. Adaptive management, an approach that focuses on identifying critical uncertainties to be reduced via diagnostic management experiments, is one favored approach for tackling this reality. While adaptive management is identified as a key method in the environmental management toolbox, there remains a lack of clarity over when its use is appropriate or feasible. Its implementation is often viewed as suitable only in a limited set of circumstances. Here we restructure some of the ideas supporting this view, and show why much of the pessimism around AM may be unwarranted. We present a new framework for deciding when AM is appropriate, feasible, and subsequently successful. We thus present a new paradigm for adaptive management that shows that there are no categorical limitations to its appropriate use, the boundaries of application being defined by problem conception and the resources available to managers. In doing so we also separate adaptive management as a management tool, from the burden of failures that result from the complex policy, social, and institutional environment within which management occurs.

  • 80.
    Roberge, Jean-Michel
    et al.
    Sveriges lantbruksuniversitet, SLU.
    Laudon, Hjalmar
    Sveriges lantbruksuniversitet, SLU.
    Björkman, Christer
    Sveriges lantbruksuniversitet, SLU.
    Ranius, Thomas
    Sveriges lantbruksuniversitet, SLU.
    Sandström, Camilla
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Political Science.
    Felton, Adam
    Swedish Univ Agr Sci SLU, Southern Swedish Forest Res Ctr, Rorsjovagen 1,Box 49, S-23053 Alnarp, Sweden.
    Sténs, Anna
    Umeå University, Faculty of Arts, Department of historical, philosophical and religious studies.
    Nordin, Annika
    Sveriges lantbruksuniversitet, SLU.
    Granström, Anders
    Sveriges lantbruksuniversitet, SLU.
    Widemo, Fredrik
    Swedish University of Agricultural Sciences (SLU).
    Bergh, Johan
    Linnéuniversitetet.
    Sonesson, Johan
    Skogforsk.
    Stenlid, Jan
    Swedish University of Agricultural Sciences (SLU).
    Lundmark, Tomas
    Swedish University of Agricultural Sciences (SLU).
    Socio-ecological implications of modifying rotation lengths in forestry2016In: Ambio, ISSN 0044-7447, E-ISSN 1654-7209, Vol. 45, p. 109-123Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The rotation length is a key component of even-aged forest management systems. Using Fennoscandian forestry as a case, we review the socioecological implications of modifying rotation lengths relative to current practice by evaluating effects on a range of ecosystem services and on biodiversity conservation. The effects of shortening rotations on provisioning services are expected to be mostly negative to neutral (e.g. production of wood, bilberries, reindeer forage), while those of extending rotations would be more varied. Shortening rotations may help limit damage by some of today's major damaging agents (e.g. root rot, cambium-feeding insects), but may also increase other damage types (e.g. regeneration pests) and impede climate mitigation. Supporting (water, soil nutrients) and cultural (aesthetics, cultural heritage) ecosystem services would generally be affected negatively by shortened rotations and positively by extended rotations, as would most biodiversity indicators. Several effect modifiers, such as changes to thinning regimes, could alter these patterns.

  • 81.
    Sandstrom, Camilla
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Political Science.
    Johansson, Maria
    Sjolander-Lindqvist-, Annelie
    The management of large carnivores in Sweden: challenges and opportunities2015In: Wildlife Biology, ISSN 0909-6396, E-ISSN 1903-220X, Vol. 21, no 3, p. 120-121Article in journal (Other academic)
  • 82.
    Sandström, Camilla
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Political Science.
    Co-management as a new approach to use common forest resources2004In: Inauguration of Vilhelmina Model Forest, 2004Conference paper (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
  • 83.
    Sandström, Camilla
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Political Science.
    Co-management of Natural Resources in the Swedish Mountains, Promises and Limitations2005In: 12th International Symposium on Society and Resource Management. Östersund, 16-19 juni, 2005Conference paper (Other academic)
  • 84.
    Sandström, Camilla
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Political Science.
    European Liberal, Democrat and Reform Party: from co-operation to integration2004In: Europarties, Organisation and Influence, Editions de l’Universite de Bruxelles, Bryssel , 2004Chapter in book (Refereed)
  • 85.
    Sandström, Camilla
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Political Science.
    Förekomsten av jakt och fisketurism i fjällsamebyarna2004Report (Other academic)
  • 86.
    Sandström, Camilla
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Political Science.
    Förutsättningar för decentraliserad förvaltning av rovdjur2005In: Fjällen i fokus, 2005Conference paper (Other academic)
  • 87.
    Sandström, Camilla
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Political Science.
    Förutsättningar för förvaltning av Stora rovdjur2003In: FjällMistras Nätverkskonferens, 2003Conference paper (Other academic)
  • 88.
    Sandström, Camilla
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Political Science.
    Institutional Dimensions of Comanagement: Participation, Power, and Process2009In: Society & Natural Resources, ISSN 0894-1920, Vol. 22, no 3, p. 230-244Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 89.
    Sandström, Camilla
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Political Science.
    Internationella erfarenheter av samförvaltning av naturresurser2005In: Svenska samernas riksförbunds landsmöte Tänndalen, 2005Conference paper (Other academic)
  • 90.
    Sandström, Camilla
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Political Science.
    Liberalt partisamarbete i Europa: ELDR en ny typ av parti?2003Doctoral thesis, monograph (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    The purpose of this thesis is to map and assess the organisational and ideological development of the European Liberal Democrat and Reform party, the ELDR. More specifically, it seeks to analyse the degree of integration between the members of the ELDR over time, to identify factors that may or may not generate integration, to relate the development of the ELDR to earlier research about European parties, and finally to contribute to the ongoing debate about whether or not the traditional national party families are about to establish parties at the European level.

    The thesis is based on the assumption that parties adapt to their environment, in this case, the system of multi-level governance that characterises the European Union. As the European parties are composed of national parties, they are also dependent on the member parties' opportunities and motives for cooperation. If there is integration, we can, however, not only expect the European parties to adapt to their environment. As they become independent actors, they may also influence their environment. In other words, we can anticipate interaction between the European and national levels that leads to mutual adaptation, or Europeanisation. To be able to capture the interaction between the two levels, theories from international relations and comparative politics are combined.

    Based on interviews, participant observation, documentary research and content analysis of European election manifestos, the analyses shows that the members of the ELDR have over time reached a rather advanced level of integration, both organisationally and ideologically. Although it is possible to identify constraining factors to this development, the ELDR has, at least from what is known from literature, reached about the same level of development as the two other European parties, the Christian democratic EPP and the Social democratic PES. The internal integration of the ELDR is the outcome of a successive transfer of power from the member parties to the ELDR. By now, the ELDR can therefore be defined as a rather independent actor and as a type of party at the European level. This type of party is, however, not comparable to national parties. It is instead adapted to the institutional structure of the European Union, with, at least partly, a different organisation and different functions from those of national parties.

  • 91.
    Sandström, Camilla
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Political Science.
    Managing Large Ungulates in Europe: The Need to Address Institutional Challenges of Wildlife Management2012In: Human Dimensions of Wildlife, ISSN 1087-1209, E-ISSN 1533-158X, Vol. 17, no 5, p. 320-332Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    To address the problems associated with the management of increasing numbers of large ungulates in many European countries, more holistic approaches, such as ecosystem or landscape management, are called on to replace, for example, sectoral and single-species management. The implementation of holistic approaches, however, requires changes in societal institutions, which have proven to be both complicated and conflicting. The purpose of this article is to examine the institutional obstacles and incentives associated with the implementation of two holistic approaches to wildlife management, the Convention on Biological Diversity (CBD) and the European Landscape Convention (ELC). Examination of the operational guidelines of the two approaches identified a number of challenges associated with multilevel and multiparty decision-making procedures. These institutional challenges need to be addressed in a systematic way in order to increase the adaptive capacity of the management of wildlife in Europe.

  • 92.
    Sandström, Camilla
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Political Science.
    Samförvaltning – hur når vi dit?: Framgångsfaktorer och fallgropar2006In: ÄlgMittskandia. Hemavan 29-30 november, 2006Conference paper (Other academic)
  • 93.
    Sandström, Camilla
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Political Science.
    Samförvaltning av rovdjur i ett flernivåsystem: problem och möjligheter2006In: Förvaltning av omstridda naturresurser. Nordiska trender och nya utmaningar, Workshop, 2006Conference paper (Other academic)
  • 94.
    Sandström, Camilla
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Political Science.
    Samråd mellan rennäring och skogsbruk – ett exempel på samförvaltning?2005In: Fjällen i Fokus, 2005Conference paper (Other academic)
  • 95.
    Sandström, Camilla
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Political Science.
    Samråd mellan rennäring och skogsbruk: ett exempel på samförvaltning av gemensamma resurser2004Report (Other academic)
  • 96.
    Sandström, Camilla
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Political Science.
    Samråd mellan rennäring och skogsbruk: ett exempel på samförvaltning av gemensamma resurser2004In: Skogsstyrelsen och Holmen skog, Jalga, 2004Conference paper (Other academic)
  • 97.
    Sandström, Camilla
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Political Science.
    Ökar stödet för rovdjuren med en decentraliserad förvaltning?2006In: Fjällen i fokus. Vilhelmina 22 november, 2006Conference paper (Other academic)
  • 98.
    Sandström, Camilla
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Political Science.
    Beland Lindahl, Karin
    Sténs, Anna
    Umeå University, Faculty of Arts, Department of historical, philosophical and religious studies.
    Comparing forest governance models2017In: Forest Policy and Economics, ISSN 1389-9341, E-ISSN 1872-7050, Vol. 77, p. 1-5Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 99.
    Sandström, Camilla
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Political Science.
    Blomgren, Magnus
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Political Science.
    Europaparlamentet2005In: EU och Sverige: ett sammanlänkat statsskick / [ed] Magnus Blomgren, Torbjörn Bergman, Stockholm: Liber , 2005, p. 126-149Chapter in book (Refereed)
  • 100.
    Sandström, Camilla
    et al.
    Umeå University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Political Science.
    Carlsson-Kanyama, Annika
    Beland Lindahl, Karin
    Mossberg Sonnek, Karin
    Mossing, Annika
    Nordin, Annika
    Nordstrom, Eva-Maria
    Räty, Riitta
    Understanding consistencies and gaps between desired forest futures: An analysis of visions from stakeholder groups in Sweden2016In: Ambio, ISSN 0044-7447, E-ISSN 1654-7209, Vol. 45, p. S100-S108Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Conflicting perspectives on forests has for a long time challenged forest policy development in Sweden. Disagreements about forest futures create intractable deadlocks when stakeholders talk past each other. The purpose of this study is to move beyond this situation through the application of participatory backcasting. By comparing visions of the future forest among stakeholder groups, we highlight contemporary trajectories and identify changes that were conceived as desirable. We worked with four groups: the Biomass and Bioenergy group, the Conservation group, the Sami Livelihood group and the Recreation and Rural Development group; in total representatives from 40 organizations participated in workshops articulating the groups' visions. Our results show well-known tensions such as intrinsic versus instrumental values but also new ones concerning forests' social values. Identified synergies include prioritization of rural development, new valued-added forest products and diversified forest management. The results may feed directly into forest policy processes facilitating the process and break current deadlocks.

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